Docstoc

MVA Safety and Principles of Extrication - McLane Black Lake Training.ppt

Document Sample
MVA Safety and Principles of Extrication - McLane Black Lake Training.ppt Powered By Docstoc
					  MVA Safety and
   Principles of
   Extrication

McLANE/BLACK LAKE FIRE DEPT
 Presented by: Captain Casey Sobol
        DRILL OUTLINE
l Preparation
l Response
l Assessment
l Hazard Control
l Support Operations
l Gaining Access
l Emergency Care
l   Disentanglement
l   Remove and Transfer
l   Termination

Training Objective:
The student will demonstrate a basic understanding
  of passenger vehicle extrication and the
  associated tools and techniques through
  participation in class discussion and practical
  activities.
           PREPARATION
l Proper  Training
l Proper Equipment for the conditions and
  situation
      RESPONSE TO THE
          SCENE
l Follow  all Dept. response policies
l Remember, this is NOT your emergency.
  You have been called to assist someone else.
l If we can’t arrive safely, we are no help.
l Be preparing mentally enroute to the call.
SCENE ASSESSMENT
  AND HIGHWAY
     SAFETY
l Warning      on-coming traffic
  – Set-up appropriate warning devices such as
    flares, strobes, traffic cones well ahead of
    accident scene
     l   At least 400’ before the accident
     l   Don’t use flares in cold, foggy conditions!!
  – Request additional units if necessary
l Protecting     the Scene
  – Park apparatus in a “defensive position”
  – Your engine is the best road block
DON’T BECOME A VICTIM
l Dozens  of Firefighters and EMT’s die every
  year across the U.S.A. while operating at
  MVA’s.
l Never turn your back to on-coming traffic
l Always remain in radio contact with person
  doing traffic control
l Always leave yourself a way out.
          Scene Hazards
l A 360 must be completed prior to any
 other activities being performed.
  – Downed Power Lines
  – Unstable Structures and vehicles
  – Hazardous Materials
  – Other?
      OTHER ASSESSMENT
l   Victims outside vehicles (ejection)
l   Hot and Cold zones around accident
l   Size-up before beginning activity
l   “READ THE WRECK”
l   Additional Resources?
l   Full protective equipment a must!!
l   Set-up Tool Staging Area (Engine Operator or per
    dept. SOP’s)
l   Supplemental Safety Systems
      HAZARD CONTROL
l Stabilize vehicles – Create a safe platform
  for extrication work. Cribbing, struts, etc.
  ~Practical Activity~
l Fire prevention and control – pull and
  maintain charged, manned hoseline.
l Traffic Control – Traffic control must
  always maintain radio contact with
  command or those working at scene.
    Supplemental Restraint
          Systems
l   Air Bags – Deployed or not? Location?
    – Front Impact Bags – Do Not put yourself between
      undeployed bag and patient.
    – Side Impact Bags – Normally curtain type from ceiling
      or side of seat mounted. Cylinder for systems normally
      in A, B, or C post. Avoid!! Pull off trim to expose and
      identify location before cutting.
    – Rear seat bags – Newer high end cars.
    – NO universal marking system. Most, however use
      SRS, HPS, IC, SIPS, or “Airbag”.
l StaticElectricity can cause air bags to
  deploy.
l Remember the 5-10-20 Rule:
  – 5” away from side air bags
  – 10” away from steering wheel air bags
  – 20” away from front passenger air bags
l Air Bag Deactivation Times – Cutting the
  battery cables doesn’t always work! The
  system can still hold a charge! Vary
  depending upon make, model of vehicle.
  Some older vehicles can hold a charge for
  up to 20-30 minutes.
l Battery locations – Vary based upon make,
  model. Batteries can now be found under
  hood, in the trunk, in the wheel well, and
  behind the rear seat.
          Hybrid Vehicles
l Avoid   ORANGE wires – They are part of
  the high voltage system!
l Turn off ignition and remove key to render
  car safe.
l Remember, the SILENT CAR. It may be
  running and can move even if you don’t
  hear it!
l High voltage systems are very safe.
 Seat Belt Pre Tensioning
l Seat Belt Pre-Tensioner systems – Designed
  to pull back seatbelt upon impact in
  coordination with airbag system. A part of
  the total SRS system.
l Normally found mid-height or near the floor
  in the door post. Contains an explosive
  charge similar to shotgun shell. Avoid
  cutting into this as it may go off.
 SUPPORT OPERATIONS
l Lighting
  – Scene
  – Extrication Area
  – Patient Assessment
l Helicopter LZ – Review LZ set-up and
 video (optional)
      GAINING ACCESS
l Hand  Tools – Types of hand tools
l Power Tools - Types of Power tools
l Normal Means – Unlocked or open doors
  and windows, “Try before you pry”
l Alternate Means – Front and rear windows,
  locked doors and windows
     EMERGENCY CARE
l Patient Assessment – 90 second survey.
  Determine ALS vs. BLS and Rapid
  extrication vs. routine.
  – Upgrade early, upgrade fast.
  – MOI??
l Coordinationwith extrication personnel
l Patient Immobilization
    DISENTANGLEMENT
l Coordinate  with EMS personnel regarding
  route of removal.
l STOP, LOOK, THINK, PLAN OF
  ACTION, ACT
l Disentanglement   techniques
  – Door Removal
  – Roof opening and removal
  – Seat Displacement
  – Steering Wheel Cutting
  – Steering Wheel Displacement
  – Pedal Displacement
  – Dash Roll-up
        Remember,
     when performing
extrication operations on
a vehicle, for every action,
    there is a Reaction.
 REMOVAL & TRANSFER
l Assisting   with Victim Removal
  – Coordinated
  – Be Prepared
  – Good Communications
  – Transfer of pt. Care
  – Proper documentation and pictures (if possible)
      TERMINATION OF
         INCIDENT
l Scene Clean-up
  – Inventory equipment
  – Check equipment function
  – Place apparatus back in service
  – Decon all equipment as necessary per
    department SOP’s

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:1/22/2014
language:English
pages:37