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Hydraulic Leaks and Risk.pptx

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									Hydraulic Leaks and Risk




  Every Drop Counts in Safety
   Are you really trained

Many occupational Standards and 
regulations explicitly require the employer 
to train employees in the safety and 
health aspects of their jobs. OH&S 
standards make it the employer’s legal 
responsibility to limit certain tasks to 
employees who are “certified”, 
“competent” or “qualified” – meaning that 
they have had special previous training to 
perform specific duties and are made 
aware of related hazards. Training must be 
part of every employer’s safety and health 
program for protecting workers from 
injuries and illnesses. Research concludes 
that those who are new on the job have a 
higher rate of incidents and injuries 
compared to more experienced workers.
          DO WE OR I :
A). Use hydraulics in our facility for 
plant processes.
B). Have mobile or construction 
equipment.
C). Have personnel that maintain 
equipment that utilizes hydraulics.
D). Have employees who work within 
1 meter of a hydraulic system or 
component.
E). Have personnel who operate 
equipment that utilizes hydraulics, in 
public areas.
F). Operate hydraulic equipment in 
fragile ecosystems.
Once the employees training needs 
have been identified; the employee 
should enrolled in the best suited 
level of training.
    Ok where are all the 
      Hydraulic Hoses?
    How are you Exposed
• Now apply our risk matrix?
          In your walk around's
You want to look for: 
•            hydraulic leaks, leaks are component failure which can
become catastrophic
•            hydraulic hoses that have wear from abrasion
•            hydraulic hoses that have bubbles forming on the
outer covering
•            cylinder gland nut unthreading
•            cylinder pins bushings and retainers are in place and in
proper condition
•            Fluid containment and absorbents are available
and identified
•            Fire suppression or extinguishers are available
•            Low pressure adapters in a high pressure system
•            hose pressure ratings; do the hoses have a safe working
pressure identified on them?
•            Are accumulators identified with hazard labels and have
components integrated for discharging stored energy?
Visual inspections should also include assessing risk
behaviour such as:
•            how workers interact with equipment when performing
their own inspection
•            how workers perform lockout and control hydraulic
energy for maintenance tasks
•            is there a comprehensive lockout procedure for venting
residual energy?
•            Are they supporting loads normally supported by
hydraulic cylinders?
•            is the safe work procedures task based?
     Control Bleeding Should 
        Never be allowed
In large industrial systems lockable isolation devices are common, 
such as ball valves. 
Isolating in an area of a circuit to perform maintenance also requires 
specific procedures for  isolation, lockout, monitoring, bleeding, and 
reintroduction of hydraulic energy. Each written  procedure should 
include details of each of these items. Redundancy of isolation 
devices and  monitoring is very important when energy exists 
beyond isolation devices. 
Hose burst protection system as described is known as a counter 
balance valve. The valve is   designed to prevent the free fall of the 
boom (load) in the event of a connecting hose failure. 
The valve is also designed to control descending (runaway) loads 
including overpressure  relieving capabilities. To be most effective in 
protection of hose failure, the valve must be  mounted having 
reduced failure points. This is commonly achieved by mounting the 
valve  directly to the cylinder port. In some cases it is welded 
directly or has a connection which is of  rigid pipe or tube or steel 
adapter. The most common are bolted pad mounted valves, which  
the two surfaces are sealed with and elastomeric seal (oring). 
The fluid between the actuator 
(cylinder piston in this case) and the counter balance valve is 
isolated and will not pass the  counter balance valve until pilot 
pressure from the directional control valve pilots the valve to open. 
Without pilot pressure or over pressure the fluid remains isolated. It 
is this isolated  volume under pressure which must be identified and 
controlled safely. 
      For each piece of 
     equipment at work
Write a safe work procedure specific 
to each task to include details on; 
• -Supporting components to prevent 
  movement when fluid is vented 
• -Instruction for safe use of 
  integrated monitoring and venting 
  devices 
• -Monitoring of energy hazards 
  throughout the duration of the task 
• -How to perform a hazard 
  assessment specific to the task 
• -PPE requirements 
 If you become 
injured/infected
   Thermal Expansion in 
         Tanks
When adding hydraulic fluid to a 
reservoir, NEVER FILL TO THE TOP! 
Oil expanding under working 
temperatures will overflow the 
reservoir
I think there is a leak
A severe NEAR MISS
Lets Talk Risk in a big way!
Is your Worker
WITHIN CLOSE 
  PROXIMITY
Clean up Spills 
IMMEDIATELY
$5. to $5000. in Seconds
LOOK for Blisters
Don’t Johnny Rig Leaks
Think Confined Energy
Hydraulic Fluid Is Very 
    FLAMMABLE
Change this Out Now
    Seems Tiny
But a HUGE Hazard
  Simple Don’t 
Inspect by Hand
Burns and Hot Surfaces
  ARE EVERYWHERE
    150-F or 65-C
High  Pressure Bullets
 Lock out Tag Out
Verify Zero Energy
 Don’t Mix Adapter
Know the Difference
      Always THINK 
Environmental Protection
  Got a spill? 
Control it NOW!

								
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