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Spinal Cord Spinocerebellar tracts Alan Moelleken MD Cottage Hospital.pdf

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					Cottage	
  Health	
  System	
  Dr	
  Alan	
  Moelleken	
  MD	
  Spine	
  Orthopedics	
  Center	
  Santa	
  
Barbara.	
  	
  Doctor	
  Moelleken	
  study	
  expert	
  lawsuit	
  anti-­‐trust	
  witness	
  case	
  law	
  terms	
  	
  
Cottage	
  Hospital	
  400	
  West	
  Pueblo	
  Street,	
  Santa	
  Barbara,	
  California	
  93105	
  
Dr	
  Alan	
  Moelleken	
  MD,	
  Cottage	
  Hospital	
  Santa	
  Barbara,	
  California	
  
Dr	
  Alan	
  Moelleken	
  MD	
  educational	
  medical	
  legal	
  law	
  case	
  terms	
  worldwide	
  for	
  
Planet	
  Generation	
  
	
  
Spinal Cord Spinocerebellar tracts

Proprioceptive information in the body travels up the spinal cord via three tracts. Below L2, the proprioceptive
information travels up the spinal cord in the ventral spinocerebellar tract. Also known as the anterior
spinocerebellar tract, sensory receptors take in the information and travel into the spinal cord. The cell bodies of
these primary neurons are located in the dorsal root ganglia. In the spinal cord, the axons synapse and the
secondary neuronal axons decussates and then travel up to the superior cerebellar peduncle where they
decussate again. From here, the information is brought to deep nuclei of the cerebellum including
the fastigial and interposed nuclei.
From the levels of L2 to T1, proprioceptive information enters the spinal cord and ascends ipsilaterally, where it
synapses in Clarke's nucleus. The secondary neuronal axons continue to ascend ipsilaterally and then pass into
the cerebellum via the inferior cerebellar peduncle. This tract is known as the dorsal spinocerebellar tract.
From above T1, proprioceptive primary axons enter the spinal cord and ascend ipsilaterally until reaching
the accessory cuneate nucleus, where they synapse. The secondary axons pass into the cerebellum via the
inferior cerebellar peduncle where again, these axons synapse on cerebellar deep nuclei. This tract is known as
the cuneocerebellar tract.
Motor information travels from the brain down the spinal cord via descending spinal cord tracts. Descending tracts
involve two neurons: the upper motor neuron (UMN) and lower motor neuron (LMN).[4] A nerve signal travels down
the upper motor neuron until it synapses with the lower motor neuron in the spinal cord. Then, the lower motor
neuron conducts the nerve signal to the spinal root where efferent nerve fibers carry the motor signal toward the
target muscle. The descending tracts are composed of white matter. There are several descending tracts serving
different functions. The corticospinal tracts (lateral and anterior) are responsible for coordinated limb movements.[4]
	
  




Cottage	
  Health	
  System	
  Dr	
  Alan	
  Moelleken	
  MD	
  Spine	
  Orthopedics	
  Center	
  Santa	
  
Barbara.	
  	
  Doctor	
  Moelleken	
  study	
  expert	
  lawsuit	
  anti-­‐trust	
  witness	
  case	
  law	
  terms	
  	
  

Cottage	
  Hospital	
  400	
  West	
  Pueblo	
  Street,	
  Santa	
  Barbara,	
  California	
  93105	
  
Dr	
  Alan	
  Moelleken	
  MD,	
  Cottage	
  Hospital	
  Santa	
  Barbara,	
  California	
  
Dr	
  Alan	
  Moelleken	
  MD	
  educational	
  medical	
  legal	
  law	
  case	
  terms	
  worldwide	
  for	
  
Planet	
  Generation	
  	
  
	
  
	
  

				
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Description: Dr Alan Moelleken MD, Moelleken, Expert witness, anti-trust, lawsuits, cottage hospital, spine, orthopedic, various medical terms for educational inquiry purposes only. Not a final determination of medical or legal terms.
About Board Certified and Fellowship Trained Orthopedic Surgeon Specializing in Surgeries of the Spine Dr. Moelleken attended SUNY Albany as an undergraduate student. He graduated number one in his class with a Double Honors’ Degree and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa as a junior. He subsequently enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he received his medical training and graduated with an M. D. degree in 1983. He then preformed a year of orthopedic surgery research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He was then accepted into a prestigious orthopedic residency program at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). After completion of his residency, he attended New York University (NYU), New York, for special fellowship training in neurosurgery and orthopedic spine surgery. His mentors included some of the most famous neurosurgeons, spine surgeons, and experts in scoliosis. While at NYU, he served as an assistant professor and an attending physician teaching neurosurgery and orthopedic residents at Bellevue Hospital Medical Center in New York and at the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center in New York (affiliated with NYU Medical Center). Dr. Moelleken is a member of a variety of academic and scientific organizations, such as the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), the North American Spine Society (NASS), and the American Medical Association (AMA). He has authored numerous scientific publications and presentations. For the past nine years, he has been the chairman of the monthly Tri-County Spine Conference. He maintains his cutting-edge knowledge and expertise as a spine surgeon by regularly attending national and international spine conferences and by constantly familiarizing himself with the latest research in the fields of orthopedic surgery and neurosurgery, especially as it pertains to disorders of the spine.