Docstoc

Regional Tax Forum Background - ROB OAKESHOTT MP

Document Sample
Regional Tax Forum Background - ROB OAKESHOTT MP Powered By Docstoc
					Regional Tax Forum 
Thursday September 8th 2011                                       

Walcha Community Centre at Walcha Central School 

        09:30am         Registration 

        10:00am         Forum begins 

        12:30pm         Lunch (served on premises) 

        03:30pm         Forum concludes 

The Regional Tax Forum is open to all individuals, businesses and organisations from the federal 
electorates of New England and Lyne. New South Wales and national organisations with an interest 
in the reform of the tax and welfare systems will also be invited.  

Each participant is asked to pay $25 to cover catering, which includes morning tea, lunch, and all‐day 
tea or coffee. 

Reserve your place  

Make a submission  

 

Purpose 
The Regional Tax Forum is an opportunity for the community to discuss recommendations made by 
the Henry Tax Review on the reform of Australia’s tax and welfare system. Issues discussed at the 
Regional Tax Forum will be taken by the Independent Member for New England Tony Windsor and 
the Independent Member for Lyne Rob Oakeshott for discussion at the Treasurer’s Tax Forum in 
Canberra on October 4th and 5th.  

Reforming Australia’s tax and welfare system has the potential to raise living standards across the 
nation by boosting productivity and creating new economic growth. In fact, the Henry Tax Review 
estimates tax reform could increase national output by two to three per cent each year. There’s also 
much to be gained by strengthening superannuation savings, making welfare payments fairer, 
simplifying the system overall and slashing red tape.  

Although the government has already adopted some of the recommendations made by the Henry 
Tax Review, Mr Windsor and Mr Oakeshott believe there’s scope to go much further. That’s why 
they both made a national Tax Forum a condition as they negotiated which party would form 
government after the last election.  

While the proposed reforms are wide‐reaching, some have specific implications and possible 
benefits for country people. That’s why local people are being invited to communicate their ideas on 
national reform ahead of the Treasurer’s Tax Forum. Walcha was chosen as the location for the 
Regional Tax Forum because it’s midway between the Lyne and New England electorates. 

 
Format 
Discussion of reform proposals will be based around broad topics. Issues raised in each session will 
be taken to the Treasurer’s Tax Forum.  

Participants are invited to make submissions by September 2nd.  These will spark discussion and help 
us structure the format of the event. 

Topics to be discussed: (make the following points link to further detail provided further below) 

            1) Personal Income Tax and Superannuation  
               
            2) Transfer (welfare) system 
         
            3) Business Income and Rent on Resources and Land 
               
            4) Private Consumption Tax and State Taxes 
         
            5) Extra Targeted Taxes 
         
            6) Making the Tax System more responsive 
         
            7) Other tax issues 

 

The Henry Tax Review 
The Henry Tax Review (or Australia’s Future Tax System as it’s known officially) was headed by then 
Treasury Secretary Dr. Ken Henry. It was commissioned in 2008, completed in 2009, and released by 
the government in 2010. The federal government is implementing some of its recommendations in 
part.  

The Review considered how Australia could restructure its tax system to make it simpler and more 
user‐friendly, boost economic growth and our standard of living, support the less fortunate while 
also encouraging greater workforce participation, and face the challenges of the future (such as 
climate change and an ageing population) with confidence. 

The Review proposed abolishing numerous inefficient and narrowly‐based taxes (including stamp 
duty and payroll tax) and instead focused on four main revenue streams: 

    •   Personal Income tax 
    •   Business Income tax 
    •   Personal consumption tax  
    •   Rent on Resources and Land  

The Review also proposed a few taxes aimed at achieving specific goals: 

    •   Environmental tax (e.g. the Carbon Tax) to encourage sustainable development 
    •   Aged Care tax (if required to fund the burden of an ageing population) 
    •   Road Congestion tax (to reduce the loss of productivity caused by traffic congestion) 
To see a full list of the recommendations made by the Henry Tax Review go to: 

http://taxreview.treasury.gov.au/content/FinalReport.aspx?doc=html/publications/papers/Final_Re
port_Part_1/chapter_12.htm 

To see the complete Henry Tax Review go to: 

http://taxreview.treasury.gov.au/content/Content.aspx?doc=html/pubs_reports.htm 

 

The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper 
The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper has been released to foster discussion ahead of the Treasurer’s Tax 
Forum, to be held on October 4th and 5th in Canberra. 

The Treasurer intends to use the Tax Forum to identify further reforms to make the most of the 
opportunities and challenges for Australia, such as the shift in global economic weight from West to 
East, the ageing of the population and the transition to a clean‐energy future. 

The Treasurer identifies the following priorities for the government: 

    •   Making our economy stronger, by boosting participation and productivity, and providing 
        better incentives to work, save and invest; 
    •   Making our tax system fairer, by ensuring concessions are appropriately targeted and tax 
        rules achieve their original policy intent; and 
    •   Making our tax system simpler, by removing unnecessary complexity 

The Treasurer has stated that the government won’t consider any reforms that put pressure on their 
goal of returning the budget to surplus.  

To see a full version of The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper: 

        http://www.futuretax.gov.au/content/Content.aspx?doc=TaxForum/Discussion_Paper.htm 

 
Issues to be raised: by topic 
 1) Personal Income Tax and Superannuation 
The Henry Tax Review suggests: 

    •   Make tax returns simpler and more transparent and reduce churn with the welfare system 
        by: simplifying marginal tax rates to just two brackets, establishing standard deductions, 
        including super contributions and fringe benefits in taxable income, raising the tax‐free 
        threshold to $25,000, making transfer payments tax‐free. 
    •   Move to a more neutral treatment of returns on assets to encourage savings and prevent 
        market distortions by: offering a standard 40% tax discount across all interest, net 
        residential rents and capital gains (only to be undertaken when housing supply issues have 
        been addressed). This would end the current system’s encouragement of negative gearing.  
    •   Improve the simplicity of super and boost savings by: abolishing tax on super contributions 
        in fund, assessing employer super contributions as taxable income but paying tax offset to 
        contributors, taxing fund income and gains at 7.5%, making the $50,000 transitional cap for 
        those aged over 50 permanent, including super balances in the means test for the aged 
        pension. 
    •   Care services to be delivered independent of accommodation choices and based on a means 
        test, government to encourage and possibly offer longevity insurance policies. 

The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper is particularly concerned with: 

    •    The distortion of effective marginal tax rates by the tapered withdrawal of tax offsets (like 
        the Low Income Tax Offset and the Medicare Levy), and the resulting creation of 
        disincentives to work.  
    •   Differing treatment of the various fringe benefits. 

These recommendations need to be considered in light of already‐announced government reforms: 

    •   Lifting the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,200 in 2012‐13 and $19,400 in 2015‐16, 
        and correspondingly reducing the Low Income Tax Offset and lifting marginal tax rates (as 
        part of the carbon tax package); 

    •    Simplifying personal taxes by providing an optional standard tax deduction of $500 from 
        1 July 2012, increasing to $1,000 from 1 July 2013; 

    •   Reducing adverse incentives, by phasing out the Dependent Spouse Tax Offset for people 
        aged under 40 on 1 July 2011 and reforming the Fringe Benefits Tax treatment of cars to 
        remove the tax incentive to drive longer distances; 

    •   Improving the treatment of interest savings with a 50 per cent discount on up to $500 of 
        interest income from 1 July 2012, increasing to $1,000 from 1 July 2013; 

    •   Boosting superannuation savings through an increase in the Superannuation Guarantee to 
        12 per cent by 1 July 2019; and 

    •   Making superannuation concessions fairer, through a new $500 government contribution for 
        low‐income earners and maintaining the $50,000 superannuation contributions cap beyond 
        2012 for over 50s with balances below $500,000. 
 2) Transfer System 
The Henry Tax Review suggests this should be targeted to provide effective support for those who 
need it, but also designed to provide clear incentives to work for those who are able. 

    •   Encourage workforce participation by: establishing different payment rates for those able to 
        work and those needing support (aged, carers, disabled), base payments on means tests 
        which taper at different rates to give a clear incentive to work for those who can, abolish 
        public housing rent concessions (which are linked to income) and replace them with Rent 
        Assistance, encourage the provision of quality child care. 
    •   Increase equity for those in need by: lifting the maximum rate of Rent Assistance and linking 
        it to market rents, giving high‐needs tenants extra assistance, index transfer payments once 
        they’ve reached an adequacy benchmark, extend relativity between couples and singles 
        across all payments, abolish the assets test in favour of a means test, family assistance to be 
        paid through a single program based around the cost of raising children. 

The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper is particularly concerned with: 

    •   The interaction of the personal tax and transfer systems, which creates zones of high 
        effective tax at certain income points. These can act as a disincentive to work.  
    •   Child care was found to have greater workforce participation benefits than other family 
        payments, but the cost of the rebate to the government is expected to escalate. 
    •   Setting public housing rents as a proportion of income could be a disincentive to work. 

These recommendations should be considered in light of already‐announced government reforms: 

    •   Lifting the tax free threshold from $6,000 to $18,200 in 2012‐13 and to $19,400 in 2015‐16 
        and correspondingly reducing the Low Income Tax Offset and lifting marginal tax rates (as 
        part of the carbon tax package); 

    •   Changes to payment income tests will reward participation, including the pension Work 
        Bonus, a cut of up to 20 per cent in the withdrawal rate facing single parents with school 
        aged children, and an increase in the amount of income that young people can earn before 
        their Youth Allowance is reduced.  

    •   New Disability Support Pension assessment processes and payment obligations are designed 
        to ensure that people with a disability who can perform some work are encouraged, and in 
        some cases required, to seek part‐time work. 

    •   Changes to the family payments system to better reflect the costs associated with teenagers 
        as they grow older, and improve the interactions between the Family Tax Benefit and the 
        Youth Allowance. 
 3) Business Income and Rent on Resources and Land 
The Henry Tax Review suggests Australia should reduce business taxes in favour of taxing immobile 
resources such as resources and land. In a small open economy with strong global ties, reducing 
business taxes can stimulate much greater investment, encourage entrepreneurial activity and 
reduce incentives to shift business profits offshore. Along with measures to increase workforce 
participation, the Review says this could increase national output by 2 – 3%.  

    •   Reduce company tax to 25%.  
    •   Encourage entrepreneurs by: improving treatment of business losses, including one year 
        carry‐back of company losses. 
    •   Encourage investment in productive assets by: streamlining and enhancing capital allowance 
        arrangements, allowing low‐value assets to be written off, establishing a high threshold for 
        small business, streamlining small business capital gains tax rules. 
    •   Impose a Resource Rent Tax at 40%, replacing state mining royalties.  
    •   Establish a Land Tax to apply uniformly across all land, with different rates based on value 
        per square metre, most agricultural land to be exempt, most residential land could be 
        subject to a tax of about 1%, revenue eventually to replace stamp duties on land transfers. 

These recommendations should be considered in light of already‐announced government reforms: 

    •   Lowering the company tax rate to 29 per cent from 2013‐14, with small companies 
        benefiting from an early start from 2012‐13. 

    •   The federal government’s proposed Mineral Resources Rent Tax has been set at 30% but has 
        a lower effective rate. The Treasurer says it’s not negotiable. 

    •   Replacing the Entrepreneurs’ Tax Offset with simpler and more generous depreciation 
        arrangements that allow small businesses to immediately write off assets valued at under 
        $5,000, and the first $5,000 of a motor vehicle. As part of the carbon tax package, this 
        instant asset write‐off will be lifted to $6,500. 

    •   Allowing designated infrastructure projects to carry forward losses with an uplift factor to 
        maintain their value.  

 4) Private Consumption Tax and State Taxes 
The GST wasn’t part of the scope of the Review, but nonetheless the authors note the 10% rate is 
low compared to other countries, and the tax is narrowly based.  

The Henry Tax Review suggests: 

    •   Abolishing the states’ narrow and inefficient consumption taxes (including those on payroll, 
        luxury cars and insurance) in favour of a low‐rate, broad‐based cash flow tax. Business 
        exports would be excluded but imports would be liable. It would also cover returns from 
        labour (in place of payroll tax). Collection could be automated through the computer 
        systems many businesses are adopting. 
    •    Replacing the current input taxation of financial services in favour of a new tax on the 
        consumption of financial services, to be designed in consultation with the industry. 

The federal government has ruled out changes to the GST. The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper notes 
that a review of the distribution of GST revenue to the states is underway, and due to report in 2012. 
The Paper raises the prospect of using GST distribution to encourage the states to shift towards 
more efficient taxes. 
 5) Extra Targeted Taxes 
The Henry Tax Review suggests the only taxes to be implemented outside of the four major revenue 
streams should be imposed with specific objectives in mind. Care should be taken to ensure these 
objectives aren’t undermined by the unintended consequences of other taxes. 

   •   Environmental Taxes to ensure development is sustainable. Existing carbon abatement 
       programs to be rationalised once a broad carbon price is introduced. 
   •   Aged Care tax to be considered as the population ages. To be applied across all taxpayers. 
   •   Road Congestion tax to reduce productivity losses caused by traffic. This could replace taxes 
       on fuel and registration, so could potentially benefit country drivers. 

   The Treasurer has already ruled out imposing a congestion tax, identifying it as an issue for state 
   governments.  

   The Treasurer’s Discussion Paper has advocated: 

   •    Discussion of a volumetric alcohol tax or a floor alcohol price, along with the possibility of 
       further raising tobacco excise. 

These recommendations should be considered in light of already‐announced government reforms: 

   •   Carbon tax to begin on July 1st 2012, morphing to an emissions trading scheme in 2015. 

   •   Considering heavy vehicle road user charging issues through COAG processes. 

   •   Implementing changes to the taxation of fuels, to bring LPG, LNG and CNG into the tax 
       system over time, but with a 50 per cent discount that recognises the special characteristics 
       of these fuels. 

   •   Reforming the Fringe Benefits Tax treatment of cars, to remove the incentive to drive 
       further just to increase a tax concession. 

   •   As part of the Government’s National Health and Hospital Network package, the 
       Government increased the excise on tobacco products by 25 per cent from 30 April 2010. 

 6) Making the tax system more responsive 
The Henry Tax Review suggests: 

   •   Citizens should have better access to information on their tax treatment so they are better 
       able to see how the choices they make affect their situation. 
   •   Establish a board to enhance oversight of the ATO, empower the Board of Taxation to 
       conduct reviews of the operation of the tax system. 
   •   Governments should publish more information on the tax and transfer system to increase 
       transparency and foster public debate about its performance. 

These recommendations should be considered in light of already‐announced government reforms: 

   •   Making ongoing improvements to the electronic lodgement of tax returns, including 
       expanding the pre‐filling of tax returns; 
   •   Making it easier for businesses to meet their obligations to governments through 
       standardised business reporting; and 
   •   Providing an optional standard tax deduction of $500 from 1 July 2012, increasing to $1,000 
       from 1 July 2013.  
 7) Other tax issues 
This is the opportunity for participants to raise issues and make proposals that don’t fit within the 
       preceding discussion topics. 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:1/8/2014
language:Latin
pages:8