2010-11 Scheduling Handbook - Gilmanton High School by pengxiang

VIEWS: 19 PAGES: 42

									Gilmanton High School
            2010-11 Scheduling Handbook


           COURSE REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

• The registration process will involve the students, parents,
  counselor, and principal.

• All students carry a class minimum load of 3.5 credits each
  semester. Students are required to have 26 credits to
  graduate.

• Students may have only one study hall per semester. (Not
  including the 30-minute period following lunch.) Two study
  halls may be permitted under unique circumstances and with
  permission from the principal or counselor.

• 9th and 10th grade students are limited in their choice of classes
  to help insure that a solid base is established in all core
  curriculum areas.

• 11th and 12th grade students have more flexibility to select
  courses as they continue to prepare for careers and education
  after high school. Courses are selected that will enable
  students to enter the workforce, technical college or college,
  and be prepared to meet the challenges they will confront.

• Students are also required to enroll in classes outside of the
  core curriculum. Taking these classes exposes students to a
  wider variety of experiences and contributes to a balanced
  educational background.


•   Work experience is limited to two credits total for high school
    career.



                                                                      1
                           DEFINITION OF TERMS

ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Advanced Placement courses allow high school students to earn University credit while still in
high school. Advanced Placement courses at Gilmanton High School are on-line courses that are
available to those students who meet the appropriate criteria for the specific course. These
courses are administered during study hall time. See the Guidance Counselor for more
information on Advanced Placement Courses.

CLASS RANK
This is the order of all cumulative grade point averages (GPA) within one grade level, listed from
the highest numerical value to the lowest. It is also used for college admittance, scholarship
assignments, and the seventh semester Wisconsin Higher Education Academic Excellence
Scholarship for the senior class.

COURSE CREDIT INFORMATION

                             Block      Traditional
                           (86 min.)     (43 min.)
Quarter Classes            1/2 credit       N/A
Semester Classes            1 credit     1/2 credit
Chorus (2 semesters)       1/2 credit    1/2 credit
Band (2 semesters)         1/2 credit    1/2 credit

Course credit is assigned as follows:
1. All class credits earned (except Chorus 1/2 credit per year) will be based on 1/2 credit per one
semester course and 1 credit per two-semester. One semester may vary due to how the class is
being offered in a semester. One semester may be a traditional class that will meet every day the
entire semester and another may meet in the block format for a nine-week period.

2. No partial credit will be granted for quarter classes. Exceptions may be made with mutual
agreement of the teacher, guidance counselor, and the high school principal.

3. Credit may be granted for college courses successfully completed when prior approval is given
by the high school counselor or principal (see YOUTH OPTIONS).

4. Various PASS/correspondence/ youth options courses will count towards the graduation credit
requirement, but will not count towards the student grade point average (GPA).

CORRESPONDENCE COURSE CREDIT (This is NOT Youth Options)
If the School District of Gilmanton agrees to pay for any college, technical college, or
correspondence course, a letter grade of C or better must be earned. Any grade less than a C or
withdrawal from the course will result in the said student paying for the course.

Correspondence study must be completed and the final grade must be received by May 1 if the
student wishes to participate in the graduation ceremony.

CREDIT/NO-CREDIT POLICY
Gilmanton High School recognizes that alternative grading may be in the best interest of the
student.

Under alternative grading, the student would receive either a “credit (Pass)” or “no-credit (Fail)”
grade, rather than a traditional letter grade, Students would have to earn 65% to earn a “credit”
grade (special education students see IEP).
                                          Eligibility Guidelines:
1. Grades in work-study by student choice.


                                                                                                      2
2. Grades in regular classes earned by special education students who have been determined
   to be in need of alternative grading and who have had such included on the IEP.

Students with more than two credits of credit/no-credit grades are not eligible for the class rank
based Wisconsin tuition remission award.

DISTANCE LEARNING COURSES
Distance Learning Courses are two-way video & audio courses, with live interaction between
students and teachers. These courses allow students to enroll in a class that is not currently
offered at their school or to enroll in a college level course.

    •   High School to High School – Transmitted between two high schools, taught by a
        certified high school teacher.
    •   Technical College & University Credit Courses – Transmitted between post-
        secondary institution and a high school, taught by certified instructors, using post-
        secondary books and materials. Students receive regular technical college/university
        credit upon completion of the course. Upon successful completion of the course, students
        will receive an official transcript with grade and credits recorded at the technical
        college/university. Students enrolled in technical college/university courses will also
        receive high school credit (dual credit).

DROP/ADD SCHEDULE CHANGES
After the students indicate their course preference the school completes the students’ program,
develops the master schedule, makes teacher assignments, and balances student loads;
therefore it will be difficult to obtain a schedule change. If you are in the wrong class because an
error has been made, see your counselor within three days after the quarter begins.

A student wishing to request a change should follow these steps:
                1. Discuss the change with parents and teachers involved.
                2. Obtain a drop/add slip from the counselor.
                3. Turn your completed drop/add slip in to the counselor or office. You may
                    change classes on this day.
                4. Final decisions on schedule changes will be influenced by:
                        a) student's past academic record
                        b) reason for requesting change
                        c) teacher's recommendation
                        d) effect on class size
                        e) effect on student
                        f) student's obligation

EARLY GRADUATION POLICY
Students may graduate at the end of the semester in which they successfully complete the
required amount of credits (26). Students who plan to undertake early graduation must meet with
the guidance counselor and establish a program and timetable leading to this goal. A request to
complete the requirements of early graduation must be made, in writing, to the guidance
counselor or principal. A conference with the student’s parent/guardian and the guidance
counselor or principal will be held. The request must be submitted to the principal for approval.
Early graduation will only be approved after all parties are agreed that this is the appropriate
program for the student. Early graduates will not be eligible to participate in WIAA sponsored
activities or extra curricular activities such as clubs, music, etc. Early graduates are eligible to
participate in all scholarship programs. It is the early graduate’s responsibility to keep informed of
available scholarships and their deadlines. Students are encouraged to participate in the spring
graduation ceremonies. They must notify the principal by April 1 of their intention to do so.

ELECTIVE COURSE
Elective courses are those selected to be supplemental to the list of required courses. Students
should select elective classes on the basis of personal interests and career goals.



                                                                                                     3
FINAL GRADES
The semester grade is considered the final grade and is recorded on the student's permanent
record.

FULL TIME STUDENT
All students at GHS are required to have a minimum class load of 3.5 credits per semester.

Exceptions to the above include: a) a modified schedule approved by the principal; b) students
taking post-secondary enrollment credits (YOUTH OPTIONS) where scheduled class times
conflict with GHS scheduled classes.

GRADING SCALE
The following grading scale is in effect at Gilmanton High School:

                               98-100%             A+
                               95-97%              A
                               94-92%              A-
                               89-91%              B+
                               86-88%              B
                               83-85%              B-
                               80-82%              C+
                               77-79%              C
                               74-76%              C-
                               71-73%              D+
                               68-70%              D
                               65-67%              D-
                               Below 65%           F


I=      Incomplete (must be completed within two weeks of the end of the quarter, however, the
        principal may, under unusual circumstances, grant additional time for work to be
        completed.)
M=      Medical excuse (credit towards graduation but not towards GPA or rank)
W=      Withdrew (no credit given)

The following classes may use alternative grading: tutoring/teachers assistant, work study,
special education (if in IEP).
P=       Pass * (credit towards graduation but not towards GPA or rank)
F=       Fail* (no credit)

*See Credit/No-Credit Policy


GRADE POINT AVERAGE and CLASS RANK
A 4.0 grading scale will be used to determine grade point average at GHS in the following
manner:
                Regular Courses          Honors Courses
        A+      4.3333                   4.8333
        A       4.0                      4.5
        A-      3.6667                   4.1667
        B+      3.3333                   3.8333
        B       3.0                      3.5
        B-      2.6667                   3.1667
        C+      2.3333                   2.8333
        C       2.0                      2.5
        C-      1.6667                   2.1667



                                                                                                 4
        D+       1.3333                  1.8333
        D        1.0                     1.5
        D-       0.6667                  1.1667
        F        0                       0
                                                                                       st
For seniors only, class rank/grade point average will be determined at the end of the 1 semester
of grade 12 for purposes of selecting honor graduates, including valedictorian and salutatorian.
The top student in the senior class will be designated valedictorian and the second ranked
                                                                                                 th
student in the senior class will be designated as salutatorian. Any graduates with a cumulative 7
semester grade point average of 3.6667 or above will be designated as honor students and will
wear gold cords at graduation. (Foreign exchange students will not be eligible for scholarships or
included in class rank).

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS


       Department                 Cred Rq 10-11                     Classes Required
Language Arts (English)                 4           1.0 credit per year (see English course
                                                    description)
Social Studies                           3          U.S. History, World History, Civics, 1/2 Credit
                                                    Elective
Science                                  3          Physical Science, Biology, 1 Credit Elective
Mathematics                              2          Track 1: Algebra I-A & Algebra I-B
                                                    Track 2: Algebra I & Geometry
Physical Education                     1.5          Grades 9, 10, 11
Computer Education                      .5          Computer Applications
Health                                  .5          Health
Business                                .5          Personal Finance
Art                                     .5          Choose One
Tech Ed                                 .5          Choose One
Elective Classes                       10.0

TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED                    26
FOR GRADUATION


HONOR COURSES
The following classes are designated as honor classes and students will receive honor credit
values for them: Research & Term, Chemistry, Physics, Advanced Biology, Advanced Science,
Advanced Math I & II. See GRADE POINT AVERAGE for credit values.



HONOR ROLL
The honor roll will be named using the quarter grades at each grading period. The following
grade point averages will be used in determining honor roll:
                High Honors              3.75 and up
                Honors                   3.5 - 3.7499
                Honorable Mention        3.25 - 3.4999



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
The National Honor Society, established nationally in 1921 is the nation's premier organization
established to recognize outstanding high school students. More than just an honor roll, NHS
serves to honor those students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of Scholarship,




                                                                                                  5
Leadership, Service, and Character. These characteristics have been associated with
membership in the organization since its beginnings in 1921.

Today, it is estimated that more than one million students participate in activities of the NHS and
NJHS. NHS and NJHS chapters are found in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico,
many U.S. Territories, and Canada. Chapter membership not only recognizes students for their
accomplishments, but challenges them to develop further through active involvement in school
activities and community service.

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY AT GILMANTON HIGH SCHOOL
Students who are seniors, juniors, or second semester sophomores and who have a 3.5
accumulative grade point average are eligible to apply for membership in the Gilmanton High
School Chapter of the National Honor Society. Other criteria for membership include: wholesome
character, outstanding leadership, and exemplary service. Applications are made available in
March. A majority vote of the 5 member Faculty Council appointed by the principal makes the
final decision on membership. New members are inducted in March or April.

Once students are members, they are required to attend monthly meetings and to participate in
the various service activities sponsored by NHS, as well as uphold the standards in place when
they were selected.



PARTIAL CREDIT
A withdrawal from a course after the designated drop/add timeline will result in a "W" on the
student’s transcript. No partial credit will be given, unless approval is made by the principal or
counselor.


PREREQUISITE
A prerequisite is a course which must be completed before certain other courses may be taken.
Prerequisites, if any, are listed in each course description.




PROGRESS REPORTS
Progress reports are completed at the mid-way point of each quarter.




REPORT CARDS
Grades are recorded for each quarter. Report cards will be mailed home approximately ten days
after the conclusion of each quarter or handed out at parent-teacher conferences.




REQUIRED COURSE
Required courses are courses, which must be completed in order to earn a diploma from
Gilmanton.



TUTORING/TEACHERS ASSISTANT
Students can tutor in elementary, junior or senior high based on teacher's needs and individual
student needs. Students in the tutoring program contract for the grade they wish to receive



                                                                                                      6
according to specific requirements. The grade counts toward their grade point average. Students
must provide their own transportation between school district buildings if necessary.


WORK EXPERIENCE (School supervised on the job work experience during school hours)
Work Experience can be taken as a quarter, semester, or full year. Students must have a job and
approval of the principal and guidance counselor to assure student will meet required graduation
credits. The student's employer must be willing to enter into an agreement with the school to be a
participating work site. Students will take the required academic classes at the time they are
offered – no independent study is permitted for required classes. No schedule adjustments for
work study time. No more than 2 credits per high school career can be earned.

Students who choose to take Work Experience need to meet all of the criteria spelled out by the
instructor. A grade is given according to the criteria and the grade counts toward the student's
grade point average (up to ½ credit per semester, 1 credit per year).

YOUTH OPTIONS
                                                  th     th
The Youth Options program entitles qualified 11 or 12 grade pupils enrolled in a public school
to attend a Wisconsin post-secondary institution for the purpose of taking one or more
nonsectarian courses.

School districts pay and grant credit for eligible post-secondary coursework unless they already
offer a course having comparable (80% match) content. All university post-secondary
institutions, including the UW-colleges, participate in the program. All campuses of the Wisconsin
Technical College System participate in the program. By March 1 for the fall semester, and by
October 1 for the spring semester, pupils must notify the school board of their intention to
participate in the program. Form PI-8700A was designed to facilitate the
notification/approval/application process. The participating pupil must be enrolled in a public
                                                                     th
school. While a pupil may apply for the program while in the 10 grade, he or she must be in the
   th      th
11 or 12 grade to be eligible for the Youth Options program. Pupils must apply to the post-
secondary institution they wish to attend during the school semester prior to enrollment. They
must meet admission standards and application deadlines established by the post secondary
institution for participating in this program. In IHE's (institutes of higher learning), pupils will be
admitted only if space is available. At technical colleges, pupils will be admitted to any regular
occupational/technical and /or general education course or courses for which they meet the
requirements and prerequisites and that satisfy requirements of an associate degree or
vocational diploma program. Involvement in coursework under Youth Options should not
necessarily be construed as admission to the post secondary institution (or any specific program
in the college), after high school graduation.




                                                                                                     7
                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

10     ART DEPARTMENT

1010 ART                                                           1/2 credit
• Elective – (1/2 credit required grade)

The classes offered in Art provide students with a variety of experiences in many artistic
techniques and media. Using the elements of art and the principles of design, students
will develop creative problem solving skills.

Students may select one area of study each semester for ½ credit. For those with little or
no experience, it is suggested to begin with Drawing I. In any given area, level I must be
completed (or competency demonstrated) before a student enrolls in level II.

       American Indian Art I
       This course will explore and study the culture, history, and arts of North American
       Indian tribes. Project studies may include mandelas and medicine wheels, sand
       painting, weaving, beadwork, sculpture basketry, dream catchers, jewelry, and
       pottery.

       American Indian Art II
       This course will expand upon the study of the culture, history, and arts of North
       American Indian tribes. Project studies will be extended from American Indian Art
       I and will include an independent, in depth, study of the student's choice.

       Ceramics I
       Basic hand-built techniques are used to create a wide variety of functional and
       nonfunctional pottery. Various decorating and glazing techniques are also
       developed.

       Ceramics II
       Advanced hand building and basic wheel throwing techniques are used to
       continue the study of ceramic design.

       Commercial Design
       Art-related careers are explored through the study of commercial art, cartooning,
       lettering, illustration, fashion and/or automotive design.

       Drawing I
       Basic drawing techniques, and the student's individual styles are developed
       through the use of lead, pen and ink, scratch board and assorted colored media.

       Drawing II
       An advanced study of colored and black & white media which continues skill and
       style development. Media explored includes charcoal, pastel, colored ink,
       prismacolor pencil, colored scratch board, mixed media, and/or computer
       graphics.


                                                                                        8
      Fibers
      On and off loom weaving techniques, textile surface design, stichery, and/or soft
      sculpture are explored through the use of natural and man-made fibers.

      Graphics I
      A printmaking class which includes the basic stencil, block printing, and solar
      printing processes.

      Graphics II
      Advanced block printing techniques and the basic silk-screening process, as well
      as computer graphics will be used to reproduce the student's designs on
      assorted surfaces.

      Painting I
      Involves the development of color theory and assorted brush application
      techniques as well as the exploration of different painting styles. Media used is
      acrylic and fabric paints.

      Painting II
      A continued study of painting styles and techniques using watercolor, acrylic,
      fabric paint, glass stain, and computer graphics.


      Sculpture I
      Three-dimensional art is explored through the use of additive and subtractive
      sculpting techniques. Materials used may include wood, metal, plaster, wire,
      paper, synthetic jewelry materials, and found objects.

      Sculpture II
      Advanced sculpting techniques are to construct larger, more complicated pieces,
      which include the student's choice of materials, soft sculpture, and/or inflatable
      sculpture.

      Independent Art
      Prerequisite: junior or senior with 3 or more quarters of high school art
      experience. Students design their own projects from a list of media and ideas
      supplied by the instructor. Can be repeated 2-3 times with permission by
      instructor.


Advanced Placement Art
      See the Guidance Counselor for more information on Advanced Placement
Courses.




                                                                                      9
11       BUSINESS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

1119 PERSONAL FINANCE                                            1 Semester, 1/2 credit
• Required – grade 10

Students need financial knowledge to ensure they make the best financial decisions.
Whether it is completing transactions for daily use or analyzing investments for their
future, students must understand how to use resources to develop economic growth.
Topics will include banking activities, investments, budgeting, credit, taxes, consumer
rights, and insurance.


1110 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                    1 Semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to all grade 9-12 students.

To be a productive citizen in today's society, students must understand the role and
function of business in the world's economy. This introductory course will give students
basic knowledge both FOR and ABOUT business. They will learn about the main facets
of business and will gain a solid foundation for further business courses. Through a
variety of activities, students will become better prepared to deal with and become part
of the business world. Topics include: free enterprise system, international business,
entrepreneurship, management, marketing, and business etiquette.


1112 BUSINESS AND PERSONAL LAW                                   1 Semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to all 9 - 12th grade students.

This course will explore our legal system and how it relates to business, civil, and
criminal law. Students will learn how the law affects their lives on a more personal basis.
Students will study real-life court cases to help understand an individual's rights and
remedies. Areas of study include: criminal law, torts, the court system, and contracts.
Students will be involved in a mock trial and will participate in a field trip to a circuit court.


1118     MULTIMEDIA                                      1 Semester, ½ credit

     •   Elective
     •   Open to grades 10-12

Students will apply writing and desktop publishing skills to produce the monthly school
district newsletter. Students will also be responsible for producing a weekly news show.
They will rotate through jobs such as anchor, writer, reporter and producer. Students will
gain experience using Windows Moviemaker, audio software, teleprompter software,
and desktop publishing software.




                                                                                               10
1116 BUSINESS SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS                         1 Semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Pre-requisite: Computer Applications
• Open to grades 10-12.

Business Software Applications is designed for students who have an interest in the
business technology field. This class will give students the chance to apply and integrate
computer skills as they participate in various common office tasks that use word
processing, spreadsheet, presentation, desktop publishing and database software.


1113 DESKTOP PUBLISHING I & II                              1 Semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 10-12.

Desktop Publishing will acquaint students with graphic techniques, principles of page
design, and desktop publishing applications. Students will use In-Design to create a
variety of documents. Scanning software and digital cameras will be used. Students will
also be responsible, under the supervision of a student editor and co-editor, for
producing the high school yearbook.


1114   ACCOUNTING I                                         Full Year Class, 1 credit
   •   Elective
   •   Open to all 10-12th grade students.

This elective course will provide an understanding of the basic elements and concepts of
double-entry accounting systems, including the following: the accounting equation, the
accounting cycle, entering transactions in journals, posting to ledgers, end-of-period
statements and reports, payroll systems, banking activities, taxes, uncollectible
accounts, depreciation, calculating payroll, preparation of balance sheets, income
statements, journal entries, and income tax forms.




                                                                                        11
12     CAREER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Career education is integrated across the curriculum.




                                                        12
13     COMPUTER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

1310 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS                              1 Semester, 1/2 credit
• Required grade 9

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of Windows-based
computers. We will explore the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, Access, and Power
Point).




                                                                                  13
14     ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT



1411   WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT                                 1 Semester, 1/2 credit
   •   Elective
   •   Open to grades 9-12
   •   Offered 2010-11 (every other year opposite Electricity I/II

This course will study game management and a variety of land and water animals.
Taxidermy practices will be discussed and practiced on fish and squirrels.

Note: taking this class does not satisfy the Tech Ed graduation requirement.




                                                                                    14
16     FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT

1611 SPANISH I                                           Full Year Course
• Distance Learning Course                               1 credit
• Offered to grades 11-12.

This course is offered via Distance Learning. The course is designed to give students a
basic understanding of the Spanish language, culture and people. The mechanics of
language and vocabulary are studied through thematic units. Cultural activities may
include exposure to films, newspapers, food and songs. Recommended for those
students who plan on attending a four-year college after graduation.


1612 SPANISH II                                        Full Year Course-1 credit
• Distance Learning Course
• Prerequisite: "C" average in Spanish I is recommended

This course is offered via Distance Learning. The student continues to build his/her
vocabulary in order to be able to communicate in a greater variety of situations.
Intermediate grammar concepts of language structure are introduced and developed.
Culture is taught through the language learning process itself. There is major emphasis
on all aspects of communication - listening, speaking, reading and writing. Much of the
class is conducted in Spanish. Recommended for those students who plan on attending
a four-year college after graduation.



ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH – See the Guidance Counselor for more
information on Advanced Placement Courses.




                                                                                    15
17     HEALTH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

1710   HEALTH                                            1/2 credit
   •   Required prior to graduation

A very comprehensive health class consisting of various aspects necessary for healthful
emotional, social, and personal development. Topics covered are mental/emotional
health, personal health, community health, environmental and consumer health,
prevention and control of disease (including HIV education), nutrition, accident and
safety prevention, and substance use and abuse.




                                                                                    16
18         LANGUAGE ARTS DEPARTMENT

NOTE: Students must take English 9, after which they must take one English
class per semester unless exception is granted from teacher. Students are
required to take two literature courses and two writing courses. Students will
then be able to choose between any remaining literature or writing courses to
complete their 4.0 English credits.

Each English class is limited to 18 students per course at one time.


1820      English Language Arts 9           Full year course
                                            ½ writing credit and ½ literature credit
     •   Required - grade 9
Students will review and practice the Six Traits of Writing and Writing Process to
create personal, creative, and academic pieces of writing. They will explore oral and
electronic communication through speeches, podcasts, and web pages. Possible
activities could also include, but is not limited to: debates, newsletter writing, or
blogs. Plagiarism and how to avoid it, in addition to effective study skills,
researching skills, note-taking skills, and reading strategies, will be reviewed.


1821   Words in Conflict:
War and Other Conflict Literature           1 semester, ½ literature credit
     •   Elective

     •   Open to grades 10-12

     •   Offered 2010-2011 (every other year, opposite History’s Words)
In this class, students will read literature written about infamous wars and world
conflicts, with an extended unit on World War II and the Holocaust. Other possible
wars or conflicts include, but are not limited to, the Revolutionary War, Native
American conflicts, the Civil Rights Movement, and conflicts without U.S.
involvement.

1818      Reading for Enjoyment            1 semester, ½ credit
     •   Elective

     •   Open to grades 9-12

     •   Does not count as a required Literature class.

     •   Held as an Independent Study class

This course, unlike the other literature courses offered, is an independent study
elective course that allows much in-class time for reading books of the student’s
choice. Students will meet once per week with the instructor at a scheduled time.




                                                                                     17
Two 200+ page books are required to be read each quarter with the completion of
reading logs and reading journals. Students will also be introduced to new reading
strategies.

1823     World Voices                         1 semester, ½ literature credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 10-11
This class will allow students to read literature from all over the world, allowing
students to explore the cultures, beliefs, and traditions of the world near and far.
Students will read fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, and complete a cultural research
project.


1822     Literature of the Unknown            1 semester, ½ literature credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 10-12
 Myths, legends, folktales, and fables play prominent roles in peoples’ beliefs; this
class will explore those genres of literature. Students will be reading the Bram
Stoker classic, Dracula, various Greek myths, and other literature about the
“Unknown.”


1833     Exploring Literature         1 semester, ½ literature credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 11-12

   •   Grade of “C” or better in previous English classes or teacher’s consent
       required

Exploring Literature will do just that – this class will explore different authors who are
part of the literary canon. Possible texts include, but are not limited to: Beowulf,
Macbeth, Hamlet, Black Boy, Animal Farm, The Great Gatsby and The Curious
Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime.


1826     History’s Words: Non-Fiction Literature               1 semester,
                                                               ½ literature credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 10-12

   •   Offered 2011-2012 (every other year, opposite Words In Conflict)


In this class, students will read non-fiction literature that will give them insight into the
lives of people in many different places, situations, and cultures, including an
extended unit on slavery and the Civil War. Other possible non-fiction works could


                                                                                          18
include, but are not limited to, the Great Depression, the Women’s Rights
Movement, autobiographies, and world cultures and travel.

1827     Film as Literature        1 semester, ½ literature credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grade 12

   •   Does not count as a required Literature class.

   •   Requires parental consent form (see below)
 Students will learn about all the different aspects of film-making that goes into a film
and watch films from many different eras and categories to analyze those aspects of
it. Possible films could include Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove, Stephen
Spielberg’s ET, and William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives. Also, students will
use spoken communication to share their opinions on films; methods may include,
but are not limited to debates or speeches. Requires a parental consent form to
watch films that may include adult language or content; all students, including those
who are 18 years or older, are required to have this signed consent form on file.

 WRITING COURSES—
Students are required to take at least two writing courses. Writing courses
may be taken in any order – they do not have to be taken in sequence. Some
courses may have a $3.00 fee for a writing journal.


1829     Writing II: Advanced Personal and Academic Writing
                                                1 semester, ½ writing credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 10-12

In this class, students will use reflective journaling to find personal writing topics and
write for different purposes. An autobiographical writing project, research paper, and
literature analysis will be focuses of this writing course.

1830     Writing III: Advanced Creative Writing           1 semester, ½ writing credit
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 10-12.

Students will develop their creative writing skills; reflective journaling will be used to
help students find writing topics. Poetry, short stories, and dramas, among other
types of creative writing, may be written in this class.



1831     Writing IV: Career Writing and Popular Media            1 semester,
                                                                 ½ writing credit



                                                                                         19
   •   Elective

   •   Open to grades 11-12.
This course will cover career writing, including resumes and cover letters, and it will
also introduce many aspects of life after graduation (budgeting, moving out,
insurance, etc.). Also in this class will be an exploration of popular media—
electronic and print media—and its role in our society.

1832     Research and Term                         1 semester, ½ writing credit
                                                   (Honors)
   •   Elective

   •   Must have had “C” or better in Writing II, or teacher consent

   •   Open to grade 12.
This class is for college-bound students who want to learn how to write a research
paper. We will explore the methods of research, types of sources, and writing skills
and strategies to produce at least three well-written and organized research papers.
This class is recommended for all college bound students.

1834 Advanced Placement English                    Full Year, 1 credit (Honors)
   • Open to grade 12.
   • Literature/Writing Credit

This is a new course for 2010-2011. The description is still being developed. Until
then, please consult with the English Department for more information.




                                                                                      20
19     MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT


1924 ALGEBRA I-A                                              Full year-1 Credit
• Required (track 1)

This class covers the key topics found in the first semester of a typical Algebra I class.
The slower pace allows students to spend more time on each section with more
reinforcement and review. Topics include equation solving, graphing, basic operations
with numbers and variables, and related applied problems.          Extra application and
practice problems provide students with an understanding of algebraic concepts that
may be missed in the faster-paced class. This course can serve as a precursor to
Algebra I-B and/or Algebra I.

* Successful completion of both Algebra I-A and Algebra I-B fulfills the Algebra I
requirement for graduation or the continuation on to Geometry.




1931 ALGEBRA I-B                                              Full year-1 credit
• Required (track 1)
• Offered to grades 10 -12

This class is a continuation of Algebra I-A and covers the topics of a traditional second
semester Algebra I class. Topics include systems of equations, square roots, functions,
quadratic equations, and some use of the graphing calculator.

This is not a college-prep class, but the successful completion of this class will fulfill the
Algebra I requirement for graduation. It will also prepare the student for Geometry and
Algebra II in track 2.

* Successful completion of both Algebra I-A and Algebra I-B fulfills the Algebra I
requirement for graduation or the continuation on to Geometry.




1911 ALGEBRA I                                                Full year-1 credit
• Required (track 2)

The first step toward advanced mathematics. Students work with basic operations of
real numbers, solving equations and inequalities with emphasis on story problems. This
class builds skills in problem solving and critical thinking, while introducing mathematical
terminology and processes. Other specific topics are factorization, identifying and
defining functions and relations, basic coordinate geometry, and solving equations with
two variables.




                                                                                           21
1922 GEOMETRY                                              Full year-1 credit
• Prerequisite: Algebra I
• Required (track 2)

Emphasis on proofs using deduction and logic; proofs with triangles and circles.
Working with perimeter, area, surface area and volume of solids; also performing
constructions, working with coordinate geometry and transformations.


1912 ALGEBRA II                                      Full year-1 credit
• Elective
• Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry with C- or higher grade average in both
   classes; or special permission by Math Department

An elective class recommended for all juniors planning on attending college and many
technical college programs. Properties of rational and irrational numbers, functions and
polynomials are covered. Other topics include complex numbers, analytic geometry;
logarithms and probability.


1917 ADVANCED MATH                                       Full year-1 credit (Honors)
• Elective
• Prerequisite: Algebra I, II and Geometry with C- or higher grade average in all three
   classes; or special permission by Math Department
• Open to grade 12

An elective class recommended for students planning on attending college and many
technical college programs. Students work with advanced algebra, applications of
trigonometry, functions and inverses, sequences, and concepts of probability. When
time permits, a study of elementary calculus topics such as derivatives, rates of change,
and integrals.



Advanced Placement Calculus
Advanced Placement Statistics – See the Guidance Counselor for more information
on Advanced Placement Courses.




                                                                                      22
20     MISCELLANEOUS COURSES


2012 TUTORING/TEACHER’S ASSISTANT                           1/2 credit per semester
• Elective
• Open to grades 11 - 12

The numbers allowed into this course will be based on need of the high school and
elementary staff. The student works closely with a teacher and tutors high school, junior
high, or elementary children in a variety of areas. Students must have the approval of
the guidance counselor and principal to take this course.

Students in the tutoring program "contract" for the grade they want to receive and must
meet the requirements of the program to receive that grade.


2010 WORK EXPERIENCE                                        1/2 credit per semester
• Elective                                                  (2.0 credits maximum)
• Open to grades 11 - 12

Work Experience can be taken as a quarter, semester, or full year. Students must have
a job and approval of the principal and guidance counselor to assure student will meet
required graduation credits. The student's employer must be willing to enter into an
agreement with the school to be a participating work site. Students will take the required
academic classes at the time they are offered – no independent study is permitted for
required classes. No schedule adjustments for work study time. No more than 2 credits
per high school career can be earned.

Students who choose to take Work Experience need to meet all of the criteria spelled
out by the instructor. A grade is given according to the criteria and the grade counts
toward the student's grade point average (up to ½ credit per semester, 1 credit per year).


2014 INDEPENDENT PROJECTS                                   1/2 credit per semester
• Elective
• Prerequisite: Approval by instructor

An independent study opportunity is available for the student who wishes to add a
course to his/her schedule that is otherwise not available in the curricula or schedule,
usually for credit.
The purpose of the independent study is providing flexibility in the scheduling process for
the student: to provide career exploration: or to provide advanced placement
opportunities for the student who is identified as gifted. The course content and course
requirements vary with the individual student and course selection. All independent
study courses carry course requirements that are developed by the supervising teacher,
the independent study coordinator and the student.




                                                                                        23
SUMMER DRIVER'S EDUCATION                               No Credit Given
This course is held during the summer and consists of 30 hours of classroom training
going over rules of the road, safety, and various techniques involving procedures of
driving and maneuvering. Also 6 hours of behind-the-wheel training and 6 hours of
observation in the car are required.




                                                                                  24
21     MUSIC DEPARTMENT

2112 BAND                                                 1 credit
• Elective

Students must be able to play the Bb concert scale in one octave from memory.
Arrangements must be made to obtain an instrument to perform with. Band is a
performance organization, which learns about and rehearses music from all music
periods, from the Middle Ages to contemporary rock, pop, country, etc. The band
performs at several concerts, and provides music for sporting events. The band is
required to perform at the graduation ceremony.



2114 CHOIR                                                ½ credit
• Elective

Students will audition and must be able to correctly match pitches in a one-octave scale
in their range. Choir is a performance organization, which rehearses a wide variety of
music from various time periods. The choir performs at two to three concerts each year.
Students will be required to perform at the graduation ceremony.



ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC – See the Guidance Counselor for more information
on Advanced Placement Courses.




                                                                                     25
22     PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

2210   PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                     1/2 credit
   •   Required for grades 9 – 11
   •   Elective for grade 12

Physical activity is a vital part of every person's life. Students are offered the opportunity
to learn and to develop skills in many aspects of team activity as well as the life long
individual and dual sports. Self-control, self-discipline, and cooperation are also vital
elements to be learned in physical education.



2215   FITNESS                                                ½ credit
   •   Elective for grades 11-12

This course will offer the opportunity to improve the student’s overall fitness and acquire
the knowledge for a lifetime of healthy living. The content of the class includes weight
training, aerobic activity, and basic understanding of the muscular system.




                                                                                           26
23     SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

2310 PHYSICAL SCIENCE                                        1 credit
• Required for grade 9

This is an introductory course that covers various types of physical sciences for
freshmen. Subjects covered include introductory chemistry and physics. Emphasis is
placed on understanding the atom and atomic structure, defining the different types of
matter, describing motion and energy, and understanding machines. This course also
concentrates on developing skills in critical thinking through the scientific method, skills
in observations and basic laboratory procedures.


2320 BIOLOGY                                                 1 credit
• Required for grade 10

Biology is the study of living things. Some of the areas studied in this course include: the
basic characteristics of all living organisms; plant and animal systems; ecology; and
genetics. Lab work, lecture, writing assignments and projects will be emphasized.


2318 EARTH SCIENCE                                     1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to 9-12th grade students
• Offered 2011-12 (every other year opposite Environmental Science)

This class will focus on the solid structure of the earth and the forces that create
changes. Rocks, minerals, erosion, earthquakes and volcanoes will be some of the
topics discussed. Environmental issues will also be explored. Projects, lecture and labs
will be required.


2322 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE                             1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to all 9-12 grade students.
• Offered 2010-11 (every other year opposite Earth Science)

Environmental Science is the study of the natural environment. Living and non-living
aspects of nature will be explored as well as the interactions that occur between them.
Topics include: water, air and soil quality; endangered species and natural resources.
Environmental concerns globally, nationally and locally will be explored and discussed.
Class will include lecture/discussions, labs (both indoor and outdoor) and research
projects.

2319 BOTANY                                                  1/2 credit
• Prerequisite – 1st Semester Biology
• Elective
• Open to 10th - 12th grade students




                                                                                         27
Botany is the study of plants. This course will explore the physiology, taxonomy, and
propagation of plants. We will also look at the economic importance of plants, conduct a
biome study, and explore plant-breeding programs. Class will include lecture, lab work,
greenhouse work, outdoor labs, and writing projects.



2321 CHEMISTRY                                        1 credit (Honors)
• Elective
• Open to all 10th - 12th grade students who have successfully completed Physical
   Science
• Recommended: Algebra II or currently enrolled
• Offered 2010-11 (every other year opposite Physics)

Chemistry is the study of matter. Topics will include the composition of matter, the
periodic table, naming chemical compounds, chemical reactions, gases, solutions, and
organic chemistry. The class will consist primarily of lab work, lecture, and problem
solving exercises. All students pursuing technical studies or college level studies in a
science related field should take this course.



2328   OCEANOGRAPHY, METEOROLOGY, AND ASTRONOMY                              ½ credit
•      Elective
•      Open to 10th – 12th grade students
•      Not currently offered

This class will focus on the earth’s oceans, the atmosphere and the field of astronomy.
Topics discussed will include the ecosystems that are found in the oceans, weather
patterns and climate, as well as our solar system and other objects found in space will
be explored. Projects, lectures and labs will be required.



2330   ZOOLOGY                                                       1 semester, ½ credit
   •   Elective
   •   Open to all 10 -12th grade students
   •   Prerequisite: 1st Semester of Biology

Zoology is the study of the diversity of the animal kingdom. Specifically we will explore
the different types (phyla) including sponges, cnidarians (jellyfish, etc.), mollusks (clams,
octopus, etc.), worms, arthropods, reptiles, birds, fishes and mammals. Topics such as
living environments, eating habits, anatomy and reproduction will be explored. Class will
include lecture/discussion, lab (emphasis on dissections) and research projects.


2312 ADVANCED BIOLOGY                                                1 credit (Honors)
• Elective
• Open to all 11 - 12th grade students
• Not currently offered.




                                                                                          28
Further study in Biology by looking at genetics, biotechnology, comparative anatomy and
plant physiology. Recommended for those individuals pursuing a technical or college
science-related degree.


2315 ADVANCED SCIENCE                                     1/2 credit (Honors)
• Elective
• Open to 11th - 12th grade students
• Not currently offered.

This course will cover advanced topics not addressed in other classes such as
microbiology and genetics. Area of focus will vary according to student interest.


2316 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY                               1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to 10th - 12th grade students
• Prerequisite: 1st semester biology

Anatomy is the study of the structure of living things. This course will emphasize human
anatomy and physiology. The various systems of the body will be explored. This course
is especially recommended for all those interested in health and physical education and
for all students pursuing a technical or college science related degree.


2314 PHYSICS                                            1 credit (Honors)
• Elective
• Open to all 11th - 12th grade students who have successfully completed Physical
   Science
• Prerequisite: minimum of B average* in Geometry and C average* in Algebra
• Offered 2011-12 (every other year opposite Chemistry)

Physics is the study of the interaction between energy and matter. This course is
intended to appeal to a wide range of students. This course will cover many of the major
topics in physics including: mechanics, force, sound and light, and electricity and
magnetism. Lab work, lecture, problem solving, and projects will be emphasized.
Physics is a preparatory step for students who intend furthering studies in science and
technology. All engineering and college science majors should take this course.

* Exceptions to prerequisite upon approval by Science and Math instructors.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY
ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS – See the Guidance Counselor for more
information on Advance Placement Courses.




                                                                                     29
24      SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

2410    U.S. HISTORY                                                 Full year-1 credit

•    Required for grade 9

This course covers the European arrival, settlement, Revolutionary War, Westward
expansion, Civil War, and Reconstruction Era through modern times. The major themes
covered are: the continuing development of the Constitution (court decisions and
amendments), Progressive Era, Labor Movement, migration and settlement of the West,
Industrial Revolution, World War I, The Great Depression, World War II, Cold War Era,
Civil Rights Movement, and recent events. The students should develop an appreciation
for the American people and their ability to cope with crisis, and by understanding the
past be better able to cope with or avoid future crisis.



2411 WORLD HISTORY                                           Full year-1 credit
• Required for grade 10

World History is a survey course with emphasis placed on the following areas: 1) ancient
civilizations, specifically the Middle East, Greek, and Roman; 2) Eastern civilization,
including Japan, China, and India; 3) European history involving age of enlightenment,
exploration, revolution, and industrialization; 4) the modern changing world and the
problems related to peaceful co-existence and the struggle for economic prosperity.



2412    CIVICS                                               1 semester, ½ credit
   •    Required for grade 11

Civics deals primarily with the structure and the functions of the national and state
governments of the United States. This class includes the study of the following:
systems of government; the Constitution and its development; how political parties,
interest groups, and the electoral process affect political life; the legislative branch; the
executive branch; the judicial branch; and how the state legislative, executive and
judicial branches of government work with and without the national system of
government. Local government organization will also be covered. This understanding of
the political process will enable the student to understand and work within the framework
of the American democratic system of government.



2420 HISTORY OF WISCONSIN                               1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 11 and 12; grade 10 with permission from instructor

This course will cover the political, economic and social development of the State of
Wisconsin.




                                                                                          30
2418 MODERN WORLD ISSUES                               1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 11 – 12; grade 10 with permission from instructor

Study of current events and issues that have been in the news in the past 5 years.
Major issues will be based on current world events. Students will be able to have
choices in the topics of the curriculum in many parts of this course. Course will be very
hands-on and high energy.


2414   U.S. MILITARY HISTORY                             1 semester, ½ credit
   •   Elective
   •   Open to grades 11-12; grade 10 with permission from instructor

Students will have an interactive survey of the different military conflicts that the United
States has been involved in since 1776. This course will allow students to interact with
history in a number of different ways. The course will begin with the Revolutionary War
and end with the War in Iraq “Operation Iraqi Freedom”.



2415 SOCIOLOGY                                                1 semester, ½ credit
• Elective for grade 12

Sociology is about people; how they act, react, and interact both in their everyday lives
and under extraordinary circumstances. Sociology also explores the social contexts;
groups, neighborhoods, cities, even whole societies, in which thoughts, feelings, and
ideas are formed.




ADVANCED PLACEMENT ECONOMICS
ADVANCED PLACEMENT GEOGRAPHY OR HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT & POLITICS
ADVANCED PLACEMENT HISTORY
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY – See the Guidance Counselor for more
information on Advance Placement Courses.




                                                                                           31
25     TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT


2523 AG TECH CONSTRUCTION I                                1 quarter, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9 - 12

This course introduces an awareness and skills in the area of agriculture. Topics
covered in this class include nutrient categories in digestive systems, energy sources,
how cows make milk, mastitis, and cattle breeds. Plus, students get hands-on
experience restoring farm equipment.



2529   AG TECH CONSTRUCTION II                             1 quarter, ½ credit
   •   Elective
   •   Open to grades 10-12

This course is a continuation of the Ag Tech Construction I course.




2519 BASIC CONSTRUCTION I                                  1 quarter, ½ credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9-12

This course provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with carpentry tools.
This course will cover measurement, basic construction and building individual projects.
Students are required to purchase lumber to build an individual project.



2520 BASIC CONSTRUCTION II                                 1 quarter, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 10 - 12

This course expands on processes learned in Basic Construction I. The course will
cover home construction topics. Students are required to purchase lumber to build an
individual project.



2521 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION I                               1 quarter, 1/2credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9 - 12

This course provides hands-on opportunities building framed walls and building projects
in the community.



                                                                                      32
2522   BUILDING CONSTRUCTION II                            1 quarter, 1/2 credit
       • Elective
       • Open to Grades 10-12

This course continues to provide hands-on opportunities building framed walls and
building projects in the community.

2510 COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS I                               1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9-12

Communication Systems is a course that is designed to give students a clear overview
of communication techniques and devices important to technology. Students rotate
through stations which include: photography, power point software, a radio station
show, computer aided design, digital manipulation of pictures on a computer, screen
printing and an introduction to creating web pages.

2511 COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS II                              1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Prerequisite - Communication Systems I

Communications II extends activities in digital manipulation of pictures. The course also
includes creating web pages, digital video production, and extends exercises in
photography.

2517 COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING & DESIGN (CAD I) 1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9 - 12

This course is designed to expose students to the fundamentals of mechanical and
architectural drafting using manual and computer-aided techniques.


2518 COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING & DESIGN II (CAD II) 1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Prerequisite - CAD I
• Open to grades 10 - 12

This course will extend the knowledge gained in CAD I. Students will work with
multiview drawings, 3-D drawings, and draw a variety of gears, pulleys and
miscellaneous items.


2525 ENERGY AND POWER                                     1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9 – 12
• Offered 2010-11 (every other year opposite Transportation)

This course includes units of energy conservation and transmission, fossil fuels, solar
power, and alternative energy sources. Activities include fluid power systems, building


                                                                                      33
solar collectors and working on small engines. Student will bring in their own engines
and perform maintenance and repairs.

2512 MANUFACTURING                                          1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9-12

This course is designed to provide understanding of how manufacturing systems work.
Students will learn basic welding and torch procedures, while designing and building a
project they will market and sell.



2524 TRANSPORTATION                                    1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 9 – 12
• Offered 2011-12 (every other year opposite Energy & Power)

Transportation is a course that studies various modes we use to move people and goods
through different environments using land, water, air and space transportation. Selected
content will cover the past, present, and future perspective of transportation. Plus, there
is discussion of how 2-cycle and 4-cycle engines work.


2514 ELECTRICITY I                                      1 quarter, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 10 – 12
• Offered 2011-12 (every other year opposite Wildlife Management)

This course is designed to allow students to diagnose and solve problems, and make
various measurements with test equipment in electronics through practical applications.
The course concentrates on DC circuits, Ohm's Law, and the application of basic
electronic components. Students will learn basic residential wiring of switches, outlets
and lights.


2515 ELECTRICITY II                                     1 quarter, 1/2credit
• Elective
• Prerequisite - Electricity I
• Open to grades 10 – 12
• Offered 2010-11 (every other year opposite Wildlife Management)

This course consists of the continuation and application of Ohm's Law, working with AC
circuits. Lab activities utilizing analog and digital measuring devices. Students will
continue their study of electrical wiring to include breaker boxes.


2528   INDEPENDENT TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS                      1 semester, ½ credit
   •   Elective
   •   Open to grades 10-12




                                                                                        34
This course allows students to work independently in one concentration of the following
four areas in Technology Education: woods, metals, computer-aided design (CAD), or
engineering. Students will sign a contract, declare an area of concentration, and work
on in-depth projects.



2516 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING                       1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 10 – 12
• Offered 2010-11 (every other year opposite Research & Design)

Introduction to engineering is an introductory study into the different fields of
engineering. Intro to engineering will build on basic problem solving skills. Activities
include designing a building and the building’s site plan, bridge design, and system
design problems.


2513 RESEARCH AND DESIGN                                 1 semester, 1/2 credit
• Elective
• Open to grades 10 – 12
• Offered 2011-12 (every other year opposite Introduction to Engineering)

The content of the course will cover the process of research and development. R & D is
a key component of modern industry. The class projects will develop a student’s ability
to systematically identify problems, collect information, and propose and test solutions
for design problems.


   The School District of Gilmanton does not discriminate against pupils on the basis of
 sex, race, national origin, religion, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status,
    sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability or handicap
                            in its education programs or activities.




                                                                                             35
2010-2011 CADENC Course Descriptions
            HIGH SCHOOL-TO-HIGH SCHOOL COURSES
AP Statistics
The purpose of the AP course in Statistics is to introduce students to the major
concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.
Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:
1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns
2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study
3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and
simulation
4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses
Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit,
advanced placement, or both for one-semester introductory college statistics
course. This does not necessarily imply that the high school course should be
one semester long. Statistics could be effectively studied in a one-year course.
Credits: High School
Length: 2 Semesters (full year)
Host School: Greenwood

Business Law (Credit: 0.5, Semester)
Prerequisite: Business Management
Grade level: 10-12
Subjects covered will be business laws and their ethical foundation, court
systems, criminal law as related to business, business contracts, consumer
protection, business ownership and leasing of business real estate, employment
law, legal forms of business organization, business cyberlaws, E-commerce, and
the history of business law cases. We will have mock trials to apply the concepts
learned.
Credits: High School (0.5)
Length: 1 Semester
Host School: Abbotsford

French I
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: This course is designed for college bound students who will receive
a basic knowledge of French language and culture. Students will use the
Learning Management System Moodle and a CD ROM textbook with audio and
therefore be expected to use a computer on a daily basis.
Credits: High School.
Length: 2 Semesters (full year) or one section will be offered in the fall as a
block section.

French II
Prerequisite(s): French I.




                                                                               36
Description: French II is a course designed to follow and be a continuation of
the learning begun in French I. Students continue to approach the language from
its four aspects: hearing/understanding, speaking, writing and reading. French II
is one involving much grammar study. Students will use the Learning
Management System Moodle and a CD ROM textbook with audio and therefore
be expected to use a computer on a daily basis.
Credits: High School.
Length: 2 Semesters (full year) or one section will be offered in the spring as a
block section.

French III
Prerequisite(s): French II or the equivalent in basic grammar and permission
from the instructor.
Description: This is an intermediate course in French language. Curriculum will
include advanced grammar concepts, literature and conversation. This is a hybrid
online/ITV course. Students will use the Learning Management System Moodle
and a CD ROM textbook with audio. Students will be expected to use a computer
on a daily basis to receive class media and submit both written and spoken work.
A conversation component will be scheduled using distance learning rooms.
Credits: High School
Length: 2 Semesters (full year)

German I
Prerequisite(s): Students must maintain at least a B average in their English
class.
Description: In this course the students will: engage in conversation in German,
provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange
opinions. Students will demonstrate understanding of the relationship between
the practices and perspectives of the German culture. Students will also
demonstrate their understanding of the nature of language through comparisons
between German and English languages.
Credits: High School
Length: 2 Semesters (full year).
Host School/Instructor: Arcadia/Olga Dedkova-Hasan.

Microbiology
Prerequisite: “C” or better average in biology
Grade level: 11-12
Description: Students will gain an understanding of the field of microbiology.
Microorganisms studied will include bacteria and protozoan. Coursework will
include labs, lectures, projects, and tests. Microbiology is a required course for
every area of biology in college. This course will provide the student with a solid
background in microbiology, thus better preparing them for college coursework in
the field of biology, nursing, pre-med, etc. Access to a compound light
microscope is recommended.
Credit: High School
Length: 1 semester




                                                                                 37
Spanish I
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of
the Spanish language, culture, and people. The mechanics of language and
vocabulary are studied through thematic units. Cultural activities may include
exposure to films,newspapers, food, and songs.
Credits: High School.
Length: 2 Semesters (full year)

Spanish II
Prerequisites(s): Spanish I.
Description: The student continues to build his/her vocabulary in order to be
able to communicate in a greater variety of situations. Intermediate grammar
concepts of language structure are introduced and developed. Culture is taught
through the language learning process itself. There is major emphasis on all
aspects of communication - listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Much of the
class is conducted in Spanish.
Credits: High School.
Length: 2 Semesters (full year)

Survey of Limnology and Oceanography
Prerequisite: Biology with a “C” or better
Grade Level: 11-12
Survey of Limnology and Oceanography is designed to be an upper level elective
for students who wish to study the biology, chemistry, geology, and physics of
aquatic environments. This course offers an opportunity for field and laboratory
investigations, including dissections. Students learn to make informed decisions
using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Furthermore, this course
provides a college preparatory delivery, as well as college level textbooks and
publications. Required school day and/or weekend field trips may be offered. A
composition-style notebook and scientific calculator are needed.
Credit: High School
Length: 2 Semesters (full year)
Host School: Thorp

TECHNICAL COLLEGE COURSES
These courses are taught by certified instructors at CVTC (Chippewa Valley
Technical College), using technical college books and materials. Students
receive regular technical college credit upon completion of the course(s). Upon
successful completion of the course, students will receive an official transcript
with grade and credit(s) recorded at the technical college. Students enrolled in
technical college courses will also receive high school credit (dual credit).
These courses are of college level integrity and rigor. Courses will be taught on
the technical college calendar as stated in the course syllabus. Absences due to
conflicting high school activities must be prearranged with the instructor, and
students will be responsible for any missed work.



                                                                                 38
All high school student registrations must be submitted on the "High School
Registration Form" with appropriate signatures and recommended form where
applicable.

**Are you wondering how your Technical College course might transfer into one
of the UW-System campuses? You can look up specific courses and campuses
at this website: www.uwsa.edu/tis/. The Transfer Information System (TIS) is
managed by the University of Wisconsin System and developed in conjunction
with the Wisconsin Technical College System.

College Success (890-161)
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: This course is designed to help students increase their success in
college in order to reach their educational objectives. This course focuses on
developing practical study skills and covers topics such as the college
environment, study skills, personal resources, relationships, time management,
memory skills, test taking, reading, note taking, diversity, health, and goal setting
(Minimum score of 62 on COMPASS-Reading test or minimum score of 14 on
the ACT Reading pre-entry assessment test). This course will be taught as a
hybrid class – two days per week will be in the video classroom and the rest of
the week’s class will be taught online using Blackboard.
Credits: CVTC Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester (TBD).

Manual Communications (533-125) (Sign Language)
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: This is a course stressing manual communications to prepare
individuals to communicate with a deaf person.
Credits: WWTC Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester (2nd Semester).

Medical Terminology (501-101)
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: This course focuses on the component parts of medical terms:
prefixes, suffixes, and word roots. Students practice formation, analysis, and
reconstruction of terms. Emphasis on spelling, definition, and pronunciation.
Introduction to operative, diagnostic, therapeutic, and symptomatic terminology of
all body systems, as well as systemic and surgical terminology. This class will be
taught as a hybrid class – two days per week will be in the video classroom and
the rest of the week will be online using Blackboard.
Credits: CVTC Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester.

Psychology, Introduction to (809-198)
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: This introductory course in psychology is a survey of the multiple
aspects of human behavior. It involves a survey of the theoretical foundations of
human functioning in such areas as learning, motivation, emotions, personality,



                                                                                   39
deviance and pathology, physiological factors, and social influences. Additional
topics include research methods, biological and environmental impacts,
development, sensation and perception, consciousness, intelligence and stress.
This course directs the student to an insightful understanding of the complexities
of human relationships in personal, social, and vocational settings. Instructors
may require students to use Blackboard, an online learning tool, to access some
instructional resources.
Credits: CVTC Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester.

Sociology, Introduction to (809-196)
Prerequisite(s): None.
Description: Basic study of the role of society, culture and socialization in
shaping individual behavior and societal institutions. Emphasis is placed upon
applying sociological principles to both students' job settings and to their
interpersonal relationships. Instructors may require students to use Blackboard,
an online learning tool,to access some instructional resources.
Credits: CVTC Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES
Advanced Placement courses allow high school students to earn University credit
while still in high school in an intellectually stimulating and rewarding
environment. These courses are offered in over 10,000 American high schools
and in 64 foreign countries.

Calculus (AP)
Prerequisite(s): Pre-Calculus.
Description: This course is equivalent to a college course in calculus with
college credit available to students who pass the advanced placement test in
May. It will include work with functions, limits, derivatives and differential
calculus, integration and integral calculus, exponentials, logarithms, and
trigonometric functions.
Credits: High School.
Length: 2 Semesters (full year).

US History (AP)
Prerequisite(s): US History “B” Average and senior standing.
Description: This intensive reading and writing course will concentrate on the
scope of our U.S. History from colonial history to the present. This course is
designed to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Exam in U.S.
History the following spring. Students will refine their writing skills, expand their
knowledge of U.S. History, and practice taking the AP Exam. All students should
take the exam the following spring at their own expense (approximate cost
$80.00). If the test is successfully completed, advanced placement and/or college
credit will be granted.
Credits: High School.
Length: 2 Semesters (full year).


                                                                                   40
UNIVERSITY CREDIT COURSES
College Writing, Intro to (ENGL 110)
Admission Requirements: Students must submit a Youth Options application
with an attached official high school transcript for each semester that they plan to
enroll in Youth Options classes. The Youth Options application must include
signatures from both a parent or guardian and the school district administrator,
approving the student’s participation in the course. High school juniors or seniors
who wish to enroll may apply in one of the following two ways:

1. Open Enrollment. Admissions criteria:
    Must be juniors or seniors in the top 25% of their class;
OR
    Must be juniors or seniors in the top 50% of their class with an ACT
composite of 24 or greater (SAT V+M of 1110 or greater).

2. Exception Enrollment. If the student does not meet the above criteria, he or
she will need to apply as an Exception Enrollment Student. Admissions criteria:
must be a high school junior or senior who can provide substantial and
convincing letters of recommendation and/or data demonstrating high ability in a
specific area of University study. Attach the documentation to the application. For
more information, contact the UW-Eau Claire Admissions Office.

Course Prerequisites: To enroll in English 110, a student must have achieved
one of the following: 1) a UWENGL standard score of 375 or higher; 2) a UWEPT
standard score of 490 or higher; 3) an ACT English score of 18 or higher; 4) an
SAT I verbal score of 430 or higher; 5) a grade of C or above in ENGL 099; 6) a
grade of B or above in ESL 305; or 7) a score of 600 or higher on the TOEFL.
Continuing Education offers UWENGL testing at high school sites in the spring
and fall of each year. The Academic Testing office on campus offers UWENGL
testing throughout the year, either scheduled or by appointment.

Description: In this introductory college English class, students develop basic
skills in reading, writing and discussion. Students practice gathering and
expressing ideas by drafting and revising a series of writing assignments. Other
activities may include group projects, writing workshops, speaking or reading with
special attention to language fundamentals.

Credits: UW-Eau Claire Credit (5.0 cr).
Length: Students can take the course in one OR two semesters. The one
semester course meets for 50 minutes daily during the spring semester. The two
semester course meets two days weekly and alternate Fridays for 50 minutes per
class period throughout the academic year.

Composition II (ENG 102)
Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENG 101 or exemption based on
placement test score. Requires completion of online special student application
and submission of transcripts.


                                                                                  41
Description: A rhetoric course that focuses on writing which presents
information, ideas, and arguments, with attention to the essay and techniques of
documentation. Emphasis will be on academic writing, which is applicable across
the curriculum.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester (1st Semester).

Literature, Introduction to (ENG 250)
Prerequisite(s): Exception from 101 based on placement test score or ENG 101
or consent of instructor. Requires completion of online special student application
and submission of transcripts.
Description: Intensive analysis of literature, including poetry, drama and fiction,
using representative types from several periods of literature. Not open to
students with credit in ENG 251, ENG 253 or ENG 255.
Credits: UW System Credit (3.0).
Length: 1 Semester (2nd Semester).

Psychology, General (PSYCH 100)
Admission Requirements: Students must submit a Youth Options application
with an attached official high school transcript for each semester that they plan to
enroll in Youth Options classes. The Youth Options application must include
signatures from both a parent or guardian and the school district administrator,
approving the student’s participation in the course. High school juniors or seniors
who wish to enroll may apply in one of the following two ways:

1. Open Enrollment. Admissions criteria:
    Must be juniors or seniors in the top 25% of their class;
OR
    Must be juniors or seniors in the top 50% of their class with an ACT
composite of 24 or greater (SAT V+M of 1110 or greater).

2. Exception Enrollment. If the student does not meet the above criteria, he or
she will need to apply as an Exception Enrollment Student. Admissions criteria:
must be a high school junior or senior who can provide substantial and
convincing letters of recommendation and/or data demonstrating high ability in a
specific area of University study. Attach the documentation to the application. For
more information, contact the UW-Eau Claire Admissions Office.

Course Prerequisites: None.
Description: This introductory Psychology course introduces students to the
basic
concepts of human behavior, learning, thinking, motivation, perception, emotion,
behavior disorders, personality, psychological tests, social behavior and selected
applications of psychology.
Credits: UW-Eau Claire Credit (3.0 cr).
Length: 1 Semester (2nd Semester).




                                                                                  42

								
To top