Around the World with Recipes

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					                     Around the World with Recipes
                                   FAMILY EDITION
Developed by:   Emily Schell, California Geographic Alliance & SDSU
Grades:         2-3
Standards:      Chronological and Spatial Thinking:
                4. Students use map skills to determine absolute locations of places.
                5. Students judge the significance of the relative location of a place and
                analyze how relative advantages and disadvantages can change over time.
                Grade 2 Social Studies:
                2.4.1 Describe food production.
                2.4.2 Understand the interdependence of buyers and sellers of goods and
                services.
                Grade 3 Social Studies:
                3.5.2 Understand that some goods are made locally, somewhere else in the
                U.S., and some abroad.
                3.5.3 Understand that individual economic choices involve trade-offs and the
                evaluation of benefits and costs.
Book Title:     How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World (Marjorie Priceman)
Other                Information Sheet about Food Origins
Contents:            World Map
                     Post-it notes
                     Recipes
                     Travel Journal
Directions:     1) Read together How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World.
                2) Discuss what you liked and learned from the story.
                3) Ask each other, “What would it be like if we had to travel to
                    faraway places to get the ingredients we needed for recipes?”
                4) Unfold the large world map. Compare and contrast this map with
                    the maps found in the storybook.
                5) Find the places on the large map that the girl in the book traveled to
                    in order to make her apple pie.
                6) Find a recipe (some are included in the bag or you may use your
                    own from a recipe box, book, magazine, or on the Internet.) Explain
                    how and why you use recipes.
                7) Select a favorite recipe. Look at the ingredients for this recipe.
                    Imagine where you might travel around the world to find these
                    ingredients (besides the grocery store). See the “Food Origins”
                    information sheet. Use Post-it notes to write the name (or draw a
                    picture) of each ingredient. Stick each Post-it note on the world
                    map in the correct place. Leave your notes on the map.
                8) Discuss the trip that you would take to go gather those ingredients
                    for your recipe. Write a story about your adventures in the travel
                    journal. Be sure to include:
                    what you are made (lemon cake, pork tamales, spring rolls, etc.)
                    what ingredients you needed
                    where you are gathered each ingredient
                    how you got from place to place
                    what you thought of your adventures
                9) If you can, try to do some cooking together and enjoy the results!
                10) Return the book bag with the map completed (with Post-it notes)
                    and your story in the travel journal.
                           Food Origins
                          Information Sheet
       New World Foods                           Old World Foods
Beans: Central America                  Beets: Europe, Africa, Near East
Cacao: South America                    Broccoli: Europe
Corn: Americas                          Carrots: Central Asia and Near East
Gourds: Americas                        Eggplant: India and China
Peanuts: South America                  Lettuce: Europe
Peppers: Mexico and Central             Okra: Africa
America
Pineapples: South America               Onions: Asia
Potatoes: Andes Mountains               Peas: Europe and Asia
Pumpkins: tropical America              Radishes: Asia
Squash: South America                   Wheat: Asia and Europe
Strawberries: America                   Yams: Africa
Sunflowers: North America
Tomatoes: Central America


                     Old World Herbs & Spices
                  Basil: Africa and Asia
                  Cinnamon: Asia
                  Cloves: Asia
                  Coriander: Rome
                  Dill: Egypt and Greece
                  Ginger: Asia
                  Mint: Rome and Greece
                  Oregano: Egypt
                  Parsley: Greece
                  Pepper: Asia
                  Thyme: Greece and Rome



                         For more information, go to:
               Seeds of Change Garden (Smithsonian Institute) at
                        www.mnh.si.edu/archives/garden
                      Around the World With Food
                        CLASSROOM CENTERS EDITION
Developed by:   Katie Pedersen, Cabrillo Elementary, San Diego Unified
Grade Levels:   2/3
Standards:      K-5 Historical and Social Science Analysis Skills
                Chronological and Spatial Thinking
                4. Students use map and globe skills to determine the absolute locations of
                places and interpret information available through a map’s or globe’s
                legend, scale, and symbolic representations.
                5. Students judge the significance of the relative location of a place and
                analyze how relative advantages or disadvantages can change over time.
                Grade 2 Social Studies:
                2.4.1 Describe food production and consumption long ago and today,
                including the roles of farmers, processors, distributors, weather, and land
                and water resources.
                2.4.2 Understand the role and interdependence of buyers (consumers) and
                sellers (producers) of goods and services.
                Grade 3 Social Studies:
                3.5.2 Understand that some goods are made locally, some elsewhere in the
                U.S., and some abroad.
                3.5.3 Understand that individual economic choices involve trade-offs and
                the evaluation of benefits and costs.
Book Titles:    Too Many Tamales (Gary Soto)
                Supermarket (Kathleen Krull)
                How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World
                Bread, Bread, Bread (Ann Morris)
                Jalapeno Bagels (Natasha Wing)
                Cook-a-doodle-do (Janet Stevens)
                Tops and Bottoms (Janet Stevens)
                How Do You Raise a Raisin? (Pam Munoz Ryan)
Other                Kid-friendly recipes (in plastic sleeves)
Contents:            Junior Atlas (Rand McNally)
                     Task Card
                     Post-it Notes
                     Globe
Directions:         1) At a learning center, place a selection of books that feature
                       information about food around the world. Provide a variety of
                       texts at different reading levels for students to read
                       independently or with a buddy.

                    2) Allow 30-40 minutes of free reading.

                    3) Task cards are simple, laminated cards with focus questions
                       for students to think about while reading.

                    4) Allow 10-20 minutes for students to complete a task card
                       (using Post-it notes to write information answering their focus
                       question) and prepare to have buddy talk.
Name:______________________________ Date: ______________________________



              Around the World With Food
 Read a story in the learning center and then use Post-it notes to complete each section.
                   When you are finished, share with a reading buddy.

          Where foods come from                            Special foods from my culture
Use the globe or atlas and locate the country where   What special foods do you eat that represent your
     you think the story takes place. Draw it.                            culture?




Things I learned about food and cooking                    Things I want to learn to cook
List several new things you learned while reading       List several recipes you might want to cook.
               about cooking food.
                                 Change Over Time
                         CLASSROOM CENTERS EDITION
Developed by:   Katie Pedersen, Cabrillo Elementary, San Diego Unified
Grades:         2/3
Standards:      K-5 Historical and Social Science Analysis Skills
                Chronological and Spatial Thinking
                1. Students place key events and people of the historical era they are studying
                in a chronological sequence and within a spatial context; they interpret time
                lines.
                2. Students correctly apply terms related to time, including part, present,
                future, decade, century, and generation.
                Historical Interpretation
                3. Students identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical
                events.
                Grade 2 Social Studies:
                2.5 Students understand the importance of individual action and character and
                explain how [people] from long ago and the recent past have made a
                difference in others’ lives.
                Grade 3 Social Studies:
                3.1.1 Identify geographical features in their local region.
                3.1.2 Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local
                region and modified the physical environment.
                3.2.2 Discuss the ways in which physical geography, including climate,
                influenced how the local Indian nations adapted to their natural environment.
Book Titles:    In My Own Backyard (J. Kurjian)
                A River Ran Wild (L. Cherry)
                River (D. Atwell)
                The House on Maple Street (B. Pryor)
Other                tub for books
Contents:            U.S. Political Map
                     Sentence strips for timeline
                     Post-it notes
Directions:         1) Place a variety of “over time” books in the book tub.
                    2) Students read independently or with a buddy (30-40 minutes).
                    3) Provide students with a U.S. map indicating where the story
                       takes place.
                    4) After reading, create a timeline using the sentence strip to
                       sequence the events in the story. Write each major event on a
                       Post-it note and then place the notes in chronological order to
                       create a timeline.
                    5) Students may use the timeline to retell the story to a partner or
                       other students.
                    6) * Students should compare and contrast the various stories from
                       the book tub.

                * Note that some stories might start today and go back in time while others
                begin with events long ago and move forward in time.
                                  On the Move!
                        CLASSROOM CENTERS EDITION
Developed by:   Katie Pedersen, Cabrillo Elementary, San Diego Unified
Grade Levels:   2/3
Standards:      K-5 Historical and Social Science Analysis Skills
                Chronological and Spatial Thinking
                3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying
                both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things
                change over time and some things stay the same.
                4. Students use map and globe skills to determine the absolute locations of
                places and interpret information available through a map’s or globe’s
                legend, scale, and symbolic representations.
                Grade 2 Social Studies:
                2.1.3 Place important events in their lives in the order in which they
                occurred.
                Grade 3 Social Studies:
                3.1.2 Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local
                region and modified the physical environment.
Book Titles:    Alice Ramsey’s Grand Adventure (D. Brown)
                Don’t Forget Winona (J. Whitehouse Peterson)
                Amelia’s Road (L. Altman)
                Going Home (E. Bunting)
Other                tub to hold books
Contents:            U.S. Political Map (color)
                     task card
                     Post-it notes
Directions:         1) Place a variety of books on movement and new homes in a tub.

                    2) Allow 30-40 minutes for independent or partner reading.

                    3) Task cards are simple, laminated cards with generic
                       preprinted focus questions for students. Responses are put on
                       Post-it notes for the share-out.

                    4) Allow 10-20 minutes for students to complete the task card
                       and then share out with partner or other students their “work”
                       for the day.
                          On the Move!
                              Task Card

Read a story in the tub and then use Post-it notes to complete each
section below.

Where does the story begin?          Where do they travel to?




What places do they pass through?    Name at least two unforgettable
                                     events.
       Where in the World is She From? Cinderella Stories
                        CLASSROOM CENTERS EDITION
Developed by:   Katie Pedersen, Cabrillo Elementary, San Diego Unified
Grade Levels:   2/3
Standards:      K-5 Historical and Social Science Analysis Skills
                Chronological and Spatial Thinking
                4. Students use map and globe skills to determine the absolute locations of
                places and interpret information available through a map’s or globe’s
                legend, scale, and symbolic representations.
                Grade 2 Social Studies:
                2.1.2 Compare and contrast their daily lives with those of their parents,
                grandparents and/or guardians.
                2.2.3 Locate places on a map.
                Grade 3 Social Studies:
                3.1.1 Identify geographical features in their local region.
                3.1.2 Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local
                region and modified the physical environment.
                3.2.1 Describe national identities, religious beliefs, customs, and various
                folklore traditions.
Book Titles:    Any Cinderella stories that might represent the student population in
                your class. For example:
                Domilita (Mexico)
                Adelita (Mexico)
                Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter (Africa)
                Sootface (American Indian)
                Yeh Shen (China)
                Egyptian Cinderella (Egypt)
                Irish Cinderlad (Ireland)
                The Way Meat Loves Salt (Jewish)
Other                World Map
Contents:            Venn Diagrams
                     “Where Am I From?” Bag Project Parent Letter
                     Globe
Directions:         1) Send home parent letter “Where Am I From?” to launch unit.

                    2) Review map and globe skills.

                    3) Have students share “Where Am I From?” Bag Projects and
                       make small flags to pin up on the world map.

                    4) Read Cinderella stories from around the world and add flags
                       to the world map as each story is read.

                    5) Create class Venn Diagrams comparing and contrasting two
                       Cinderella stories at a time.
                           Where We Live
                        CLASSROOM EDITION
Developed by:     Stephanie Buttell-Maxin
                  Kimball School, National School District
Grade Level:      3
Standard:                       Grade 3 Social Studies
                  3.1 Students describe the physical and human geography and
                  use maps, tables, graphs, photographs, and charts to organize
                  information about people, places and environments in a spatial
                  context.

Book Title(s):    Where I Live (Frances Wolfe)

Other Contents:   • North America map
                  • chart paper
                  • drawing and lined paper (cut to the same
                    size)
                  • astrobright (light weight card stock) paper (square cut – twice
                  the size of the drawing/lined paper and also keeps a margin)
                  • crayons
                  • glue
                  • sentence strips with sentence frame
                  • parent letter (optional)
Directions:       1. Read together the book Where I Live.
                  2. Share the map of North America to compare the location of
                  Nova Scotia, Canada, to San Diego, California.
                  3. Discuss what you liked about the story. Discuss what you
                  learned from the story.
                  4. Compare and contrast the characteristics from the story that
                  are the same and different from the place where you live.
                  5. While you are soliciting these features, list those which
                  relate to your community on the chart paper. List additional
                  items once you are finished comparing to the book.
                  6. Introduce sentence frame to group. Use some of the
                  descriptions to create some sample sentences.
                  7. Divide students into pairs to create sentences of their own.
                  Once they are done, edit/revise their work and write on square
                  lined paper.
                  8. Students then create detailed illustrations for their sentence
                  on square drawing paper.
                  9. Mount illustrations and sentences onto folded astrobright
                  paper. (Instructions for folding attached.)
                  10. Assemble and glue pages in an order that is agreed upon by
                  class.
Dear Parents/Guardians,

Tonight, I hope you enjoy reading Where I Live by Frances Wolfe
with your child. It is a wonderful story about the childhood
memories of Nova Scotia, Canada, where the author grew up.
After you have read and shared what you learned from the book,
please take the time to talk about how it is the same and different
from what you know about the neighborhood and community
where you live.

When you have finished making your comparison, please use the
enclosed sentence frame with your child to tell us about what you
think is important about your neighborhood and/or the community
of _________.

Here are a couple of examples to help you along:

     “Thinking readers choose good books at the city library and
     families ride bicycles in Kimball Park where we live.”

     “Bright red trolleys take many people to work and gray navy
     ships sail along the coast where we live.”

Then, create an illustration that shows exactly what your sentence
means with the included art paper.

Once all students’ work has been collected, the sentences and
illustrations will be organized and published into our own “Where
We Live” book.

As always, thank you for making your best effort!
Estimados Padres de familia/Tutores:

Esta noche, espero que Usted y su hijo disfruten leyendo el libro,
Donde yo vivo por Frances Wolfe. Es la historia maravillosa de la
niñez de la autora en Nueva Escosia en Canadá. Después de leer y
compartir lo que han aprendido del libro, favor de tomar el tiempo
para hacer una comparación de como es igual y diferente el barrio
y la comunidad donde ustedes viven.

Cuando terminen con la comparación, favor de usar el patrón de
oración incluido con su hijo(a) para decirnos algo importante
sobre su barrio o la comunidad de _______.

Aquí hay unos ejemplos para ayudarles:

     “Buenos lectores escogen libros interesantes de la
     biblioteca y unas familias montan en bicicletas en Kimball
     Park donde vivimos nosotros.”

     “Trolleys pintados de rojo brillante llevan mucha gente a
     trabajar y barcos navales grises navegan por la costa
     donde vivimos nosotros.”

Entonces, hagan un dibujo en el papel incluido que muestre
precisamente lo que describe su oración.

Cuando reciba el trabajo de todos los estudiantes, las oraciones y
las ilustraciones seran organizadas y publicadas en nuestro propio
libro de “Donde nosotros vivimos.”

 Como siempre, ¡gracias por su ayuda y por darnos su mejor
                         esfuerzo!
                         From Sea to Shining Sea
                              CLASSROOM EDITION

Developed by:   Maureen Blackhall, Penn Elementary, San Diego Unified
Grade Level:    3
Standards:      Grade 3 Social Studies:
                3.3.1 Organizing information about people who visited, settled and
                continue to come to this region, including their cultural and religious
                traditions and contributions.

Book Titles:    Stringbean’s Trip to the Shining Sea (Vera Williams)
                Tulip’s Trip Across America (Cynthia Rylant)

Other                 Maps, atlases, brochures, travel guides and other sources of
Contents:              information about places that students might pretend to visit
                      Magazines to cut out pictures or postcards
                      Notebooks for travel journals

Directions:        1) As you read, remember information from Stringbean’s Trip to
                      the Shining Sea. Review the postcards and pictures from the
                      book.

                   2) Read Tulip’s Trip Across America with a partner.

                   3) Imagine taking a trip on your own and visiting at least 5
                      different places, like the characters in the stories.

                   4) Then create your own travel journal by making your own
                      postcards or pictures and pasting them into a special travel
                      journal. Write an entry telling something special about each
                      place that you pretend to visit. Use maps, atlases, travel
                      guides, books, the Internet and other sources of information to
                      learn more about these places that you are “visiting.”

                   5) Present your “trip” to these five places to the class. Use the
                      travel journal with the postcards and pictures that you added
                      to tell your story about your adventures.

                   6) Discuss what travels might have been like for people who
                      traveled to the region in which you live.
               Look What Comes From the United States!
                             CLASSROOM EDITION
Developed by:    Maureen Blackhall, Penn Elementary, San Diego Unified
Grade Level:     3
Standards:       Grade 3 Social Studies:
                 3.5.2 Students understand that some goods are made locally, some
                 elsewhere in the United States, and some abroad.
                 3.1 Students describe the physical and human geography and use maps,
                 tables, graphs, photographs, and charts to organize information about
                 people, places, and environments in a spatial context.

Book Titles:     Postcards From (China) Series (Zoe Dawson)
                 Look What Came From the United States (Kevin Davis)
                 And any other books from this Look What Came From… series
Other                U.S. Map
Contents:            World Map
                     Blank postcards (2 per student)
                     Blank outline map of the U.S.
                     Made in the U.S.A. Journal (blank book for lists; divided into
                        sections for Transportation, Inventions, Food, etc.)
Directions:         1) Read Look What Came from the United States together. Use
                        the table of contents, index and glossary to find your interests.

                    2) Use the map of the United States on page 5 as a model and
                       create a map with five things that you found interesting from
                       the book.

                    3) Create a list on the Made in the U.S.A. Journal of the five
                       things that you drew on your map.

                    4) After reading the book Postcards From (China, France, etc.),
                       create a postcard to send to the class about your favorite
                       things you found.

                    5) Add your cards to the postcard collection/mail box.

                    6) Present your findings to the class.

                    7) If additional books are available, choose to explore what
                       came from other countries! Then create a postcard sharing the
                       ideas, items, foods, etc., that came from that country.
                    Celebrations Around the World!
                           FAMILY/CLASSROOM EDITION

Developed by:   Karyn Thielen, Del Rio Elementary, Oceanside

Grade Levels:   3, 4, 5

Book Title:     Celebrations (UNICEF, Kindersley)

Other                    World Atlas
Contents:                World Map

Directions:         1) Scan Celebrations and read the sections that you find
                       interesting.

                    2) Select 3 celebrations from the book to read about carefully.

                    3) Write a summary about one of those three celebrations.
                       Include what the celebration is, and where and when the
                       celebration occurs.

                    4) Imagine that you could travel to another place in the world to
                       participate in a celebration that you have learned about from
                       the book. Find that place on the map and in the atlas.

                    5) Draw a picture of yourself participating in one of the
                       celebrations in the book. Label the different things that you
                       are wearing, holding, and doing as part of that celebration.
                             All Around the World
                           FAMILY/CLASSROOM EDITION

Developed by:   Karyn Thielen, Del Rio Elementary, Oceanside

Grade Levels:   3, 4, 5

Standards:      Social Studies:
                Diversity of California and the United States

Book Title:     My Picture Atlas (Roger Priddy)

Other                    Laminated world map
Contents:                World atlas
                         Outline map of the world
                         Blank post cards (cardstock)
                         Examples of post cards
                         Paper for letter writing
                         Blank travel brochures
                         Examples of travel brochures
                         Notebook (spiral)

Directions:         1) Look through My Picture Atlas.

                    2) Select 1-3 countries that you want to learn more about. Read
                       about those countries in the book and go to other sources
                       (atlas, Internet, encyclopedia, etc.) for more information.

                    3) Look at the postcards from places around the world.

                    4) Design your own postcard and write about one of the
                       countries you selected and learned more about.

                    5) Look at the travel brochures.

                    6) Design a travel brochure for at least one of the countries that
                       you selected and read more about.

                    7) Share the travel brochure and post card with your family. Be
                       prepared to share these with the class.

                    8) Find at least one country in the book that tells about a country
                       that your family is from. Create a simple “fact sheet” about
                       this country in the notebook.
                            Geography From A to Z
                                  CLASSROOM EDITION
Developed by:     LeAnn Leyden (Hearst Elementary, SDCS)
Grade Level(s):   Grades 2, 3, 4
Standard(s):      2.2.1 Identify geographical features in their neighborhood
                  3.1.1 Identify geographical features in their local area.
                  4.1.3 Identify physical regions of California
Book Title(s):    Geography from A to Z: A Picture Glossary
                  California Student Atlas
Other                  Postcards
Contents:              California map
                       Tourist brochures
                       Tag board
                       Glue stick
                       Scissors
Directions:       1. Students will read the book and then create two foldables about
                  one known and one unknown geographical element. For example,
                  “mountain” and “atoll”.
                  2. Select a geographic feature from the book that you have visited
                  and one that is new to you.
                      a. Fold a sheet of paper diagonally into a taco.fold.
                      b. Open the folded paper and refold it like a taco in the opposite
                          direction to create an x-fold pattern.
                      c. Trim the extra strip from the edge to make a square.
                      d. Cut one of the creases to the center of the x and stop. This
                          will form two triangular-shaped flaps. You will leave one
                          triangle blank.
                  3. Make Foldable 1: In the first triangle write the geographic word
                  that you have seen in person and explain what it means. In the
                  second triangle draw a picture illustrating the geographical term. In
                  the third triangle cut out and glue a picture from a postcard,
                  brochure, magazine or Internet. Write a sentence telling about this
                  geographical feature that you have visited.
                  4. Make Foldable 2: Create a foldable triangle about a geographical
                  feature that is unfamiliar to you. In the first triangle write the word
                  and what it means. In the second triangle draw a picture of this
                  feature. In the third triangle find a picture of this feature from a
                  magazine, brochure or the Internet. Write a sentence that explains
                  how your picture has the elements of the geographic feature.
                  5. Glue the blank triangle to the back of the other triangle to create a
                  pyramid.
                  6. Turn in both foldables to add to the class geography mobile.
                   You Can Make a Change, Too!

                    CLASSROOM/FAMILY EDITION
Developed by:     Katie Pedersen (Cabrillo Elementary, SDCS) and
                  LeAnn Leyden (Hearst Elementary, SDCS)

Grade Level(s):   2/3

Standard(s):      2.5 Importance taking action; heroes
                  3.4 Identify civic leadership

Book Title(s):    Thank You, Sarah: The Woman Who Saved Thanksgiving
                  (Laurie Halse Anderson)

Other Contents:            Stationery and envelopes
                           Paper for creating a timeline

Directions:       The student will read the story and think about the ways Sarah
                  Hale helped to make Thanksgiving a national holiday. Choose
                  one of the activities below to further the student’s
                  understandings of the book.

                        1. Create a timeline that chronologically illustrates Sarah’s
                           attempts to have Thanksgiving designated as a national
                           holiday. Your timeline can be created using pictures or
                           words. Write a summary on the back of the timeline
                           explaining how Sarah’s ideas moved over the land to
                           influence many people.

                        2. Write a letter to Sarah sharing your thoughts about her
                           perseverance and letter writing campaign. Share an idea
                           that you have to improve the land, community, nation, or
                           world – an idea you wish more people would adopt.

                        3. Write a letter to our current president asking him to make
                           a recent event (for example, the tragedy of 9/11) into a
                           national holiday. Be persuasive in your attempt and
                           explain what this holiday would do to improve our nation
                           and its people.

				
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