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					UNIT FS 31

SUPERVISE AND MAINTAIN BEVERAGE STORAGE

LEARNER GUIDE

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Supervise and Maintain Beverage storage Learner Information
Details Name of learner Name of manager Work Unit Facilitator Date started Date of completion Date of Assessment Please Complete details

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Table of Contents
KEYS TO ICONS .................................................................................................................... 5 Supervise and Maintain Beverage Service............................................................................ 6 Specific Outcomes and Range of Learning ........................................................................... 7 1. Storage and Security Procedures .................................................................................... 10 1.1 Storage of Stocks - Cellar ........................................................................................... 10
1.2. Cellar Conditions.................................................................................................................................................. 11 1.3. Stock Rotation ...................................................................................................................................................... 11 1.4. Handling of Wines and Drinks............................................................................................................................. 12 1.5. Storage of Stock – Dispense Bar ......................................................................................................................... 12 1.6. Drinks Preparation Equipment ............................................................................................................................. 14 1.7 Security.................................................................................................................................................................. 15 1.8. Improving Security............................................................................................................................................... 16

2. Maintenance........................................................................................................................... 18
2.1. Cleaning Procedures for Cellar ............................................................................................................................ 18 2.2. Inspecting Cellar .................................................................................................................................................. 20 2.3. Identify, Report and Solve Problems ................................................................................................................... 21

3. Stock Control ........................................................................................................................ 24
3.1. Importance of Stock control................................................................................................................................. 25 3.2. Organisational Procedures ................................................................................................................................... 25 3.3 Par Stock Levels .................................................................................................................................................... 27 3.4 Calculating Stock Levels....................................................................................................................................... 28 3.5. Methods of Stock Taking ..................................................................................................................................... 30 3.6. Time Frame for Stock Taking and Inspections.................................................................................................... 32 3.7. Improving Sales of Slow Moving Stock .............................................................................................................. 32 3.8. Stock Catering for Functions ............................................................................................................................... 33 3.9 Accurate Record Keeping ..................................................................................................................................... 33

4. Unexpected Situations ....................................................................................................... 35
4.1. Dealing with Unexpected Problems..................................................................................................................... 35 4.2. Performance in Foreign Countries ....................................................................................................................... 38 4.3. Prioritise, Delegate and Organise Work in the Cellar and Storage Areas Efficiently......................................... 40

Signatures required on successful completion of this module ...................................... 43

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KEYS TO ICONS
The following icons are used throughout the study guide to indicate specific functions:
FOLDER ENCLOSURES This includes all examples, handouts, checklists, etc.

DON'T FORGET/NOTE This icon indicates information of particular importance. EXERCISES Practical activities to do , either individual or in syndicate groups during the training process BOOKS Additional resource information for further reading and reference.

SELF TEST QUESTIONS. Self evaluation for learners to test understanding of the learning material

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Supervise and Maintain Beverage Service Introduction
Purpose

The purpose of this training programme is to provide you with the applied competence according to the unit standard. In order to achieve the credits and qualify for this appropriate registered standard, determined by the Sector of Education Training Authority, you are expected to have demonstrated specific learning outcomes

Specific Outcomes

Specific outcomes describe what the learner has to be able to do successfully at the end of this learning experience.

Assessment Criteria

The only way to establish whether a learner is competent and has accomplished the specific outcomes, is through the assessment process. Assessment involves collecting and interpreting evidence about the learners’ ability to perform a task. This module may include assessments in the form of self-test, group exercises, quizzes, projects and a practical training programme whereby you are required to perform tasks on the job and collect as portfolio of evidence, proof signed by your supervisor that you have successfully performed these tasks

To qualify

To qualify and receive credits towards your qualification a registered Assessor will conduct an evaluation and assessment of your portfolio of evidence and competency. This describes the situation and circumstance in which competence must be demonstrated and the parameters in which the learner operates. The responsibility of learning rest with you, so . . .  Be proactive and ask questions.  Seek assistance and help from your coach, if required.

Range of Learning

Responsibility

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Specific Outcomes and Range of Learning

Demonstrated KNOWLEDGE and UNDERSTANDING:

1. Describe the maintenance and cleaning procedures for cellar equipment. 2. Explain the importance of security and describe steps to be taken when breaches in security are discovered. 3. Explain the importance of stock rotation, cellar inspections and maintaining environmental conditions 4. Identify wines that should be laid down and explain the ways wine should be stored to avoid damage to label and bottle. 5. Explain organisational procedures for recording and maintaining par stock levels in the cellar and dispense bar. 6. Describe ways to identify damaged corks and explain the importance of this. 7. Describe ways to identify wines that contain sediment and explain the correct storage procedures to avoid this. 8. Describe procedures and methods for stocktaking and explain the importance of carrying out these stock takes as per organisational procedures and specified time periods.

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Demonstrated 9. Handle and store wine and drinks and monitor standards on ability to make an ongoing basis. DECISIONS about 10. Carry out inspections regularly to ensure that cellar and practice and to drink storage procedures, including temperature control, ACT accordingly:

are maintained by staff and explain the importance of doing this. (Range of drinks: keg beers, bottled/pre-packed goods, including beers/spirits/beers. Bottled/pre-packed goods, including beers/spirits/liqueurs and soft drinks and wines) 11. Encourage staff to identify and report problems and suggest possible solutions. 12. Rotate stock and explain the importance of this. 13. Handle wine correctly to minimise damage to the bottle and contents. 14. Carry out stocktaking exercise. 15. Identify slow moving stock and suggest ways to improve sales. 16. Set stock levels according to the number of functions held. 17. Keep accurate and up to dare records and explain the importance of doing this. 18. Describe decisions made and reasons for action taken in response to an unexpected situation. (Range of unexpected situations: power failures, equipment failure, staffing problems, product failure, human errors,(including equipment not turned on), industrial action, expired stock) 19. Prioritise, delegate and organise work in the cellar and storage areas efficiently.

Demonstrated ability to learn from our actions and to ADAPT PERFORMANCE:

20. Describe how performance would be adapted when working in a cellar in a European Country. 21. Make suggestions on ways to improve security in the cellar and store areas. 22. Develop an action plan and maintain the quality of wine in the event of a poser failure

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Credits of this Module
Credits

The Unit Standard FS 31 – Supervise and Maintain Beverage Storage has a total credit value of 6.

Learner Support
Resources Books/ Articles

N/A

Videos

The following videos are recommended as further training tool and are available from learner resources. N/A

Folder Enclosures

1. 2. 3. 4.

Operations Standards Manual OHASA (Occupational Health and Safety Act) Ullage Book Inspection List

Purpose of Module
Overall Outcome

On completion of this unit, the learner will know the principles of receiving food deliveries and safe storage of such deliveries. The learner will be able to identify potential food hygiene hazards and react in the appropriate way to remedy such situations.

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1. Storage and Security Procedures 1.1 Storage of Stocks - Cellar
Procedures

Storage practices are guided by the Occupational Health and Safety Act and by the Company Operating Standards Manual. (Refer to the Folder Enclosure). In order to successfully maintain and conduct efficient storage practice follow the procedure below:

Step 1 2

3 4

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Action Ensure cleanliness of ceiling, light fittings, walls, shelves and floor. (there should be no dust dirt, spills or insect debris) Ensure appropriate temperatures are maintained for storage areas as follows:  Fridge’s and cold room – no higher than 7˙C  Cellars – no higher than 15˙C  Dispensing bow – no higher than 18˙C Store beverages in the order according to that on the stock sheet for ease of counting. Ensure that the various beverages are stored accordingly:  Beers and drinks to be stored in their crates or pallets  Spirits and liqueurs standing uprights on shelves or in their boxes on pellets.  Wine bottles and ports are to be stored on their sides in dry conditions, off the floor in appropriate racks, as damp conditions will damage the label.  Wines that contain sediment namely:  Vintage ports usually have a white splash on the bottle. These should be laid on its side with the white splash uppermost. This ensures that the crust settles in the other side of the bottle.  Older red wines should also be stored in their sides and not moved. Ensure that the FIFO principle (First In, First Out) of stock rotation is applied in the storage of all beverages. Carry out regular inspections to ensure compliance to organisational procedures and standards. 10

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1.2. Cellar Conditions
Importance

It is important to ensure that cellar conditions are maintained to avoid wine spoilage and maintain quality. There should always be a thermometer in the cellar which is regularly checked to ensure that the temperature is maintained or no higher than 15˙C. It is recommended that the cellar also be airconditioned to minimize dampness and humidity. The cellar should be on the current, controlled by the back up generator to ensure that power failures do not have a negative influence on the quality of wine. Lighting should be good, but should be switched off when the airconditioner is not in use.

1.3. Stock Rotation
Stock Rotation

Stock rotation is particularly important with white wines, dealcoholised and alcohol-free products, which do not last as red wines do. By following stock rotation procedures you are able to ensure that older stock is used before newer stock, thus making sure that the wine does not spoil from having been laid down for too long. The following types of wines should be laid down:  Only the best white wines - with good acidity, and enough fruit to carry the acidity should be laid down. Only sweeter white wines can be laid down for longer than 3 years.  Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Sauvignon blends benefit from laying down, as does Pinotage, Shiraz, and Pinot Noir.  Vintage Port should be laid down for a few weeks to allow the sediment to settle. It must be decanted off the sediment (crust) before being served. 11

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1.4. Handling of Wines and Drinks
Importance

Observing the manner in which cases and individual bottles of drink stock is handled is important to prevent and minimise damage to:  The bottle / or can which hold result in wastage  The cork or seal indicating leakage and possible hygienic concerns. For wines in particular careful and gentle handling of such stock is important so as not to disturb the content which would adversely affect the quality of the wines.

1.5. Storage of Stock – Dispense Bar
Procedure

Below find the range of products kept at the dispense bar and the appropriate storage procedures. Storage Procedure Beers should be stored in the refrigerator. The order in which beers are stored should follow that on the stock sheet for ease of counting; Quantities of each beer should be according to par or replenishments should be on order. A few bottles of Guinness should be kept at room temperature for the few guests who prefer them that way. Storage Procedure White, rosé and sparkling wines should be stored in the refrigerator, as could light and nouveau-style red wines, white port and pale dry sherry. Should be stored in the refrigerator, as could white port and pale dry sherry. Should be stored in the refrigerator. 12

Range of Product Beers

Range of Product
White, Rose Sparkling Wine Nouveau-style red wine White port and pale dry sherry

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Spirits

Spirits and liqueurs are generally stored at room temperature. Unopened bottles should be stored in the cupboards or on shelves, and only the bottles that are in use should be in speed racks, at the service stations or on display. The following products should be stored in the refrigerator:  Tequila  Polish and Russian Vodka  Schnapps The order in which spirits and liqueurs are stored should follow that on the stock sheet for ease of counting; Quantities of each spirit and liqueur should be according to par or replenishments should be on order.

Range of Product
Drink Accompaniments

Storage Procedure Fresh ice must be in the ice buckets / ice wells, and jugs of fresh iced water must be set out as required. Freshly sliced lemons must be at the service stations, with back-up stock in the fridge, along with other fruit garnishes (e.g. pineapples, apples, cucumber, oranges, maraschino cherries). Sugar syrup should be set out at one of the service stations (which is fully equipped for the preparation of cocktails) and cocktail creams (e.g. coconut cream and fresh cream) should be in the nearest refrigerator. A par stock of canned minerals must be stored in the refrigerator in the same order as they appear on the stock sheet.

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1.6. Drinks Preparation Equipment
Procedures

Check that all of the following drinks preparation equipment is clean, in good condition and correctly laid out ready for use during service: Step 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Action Clean bar cloths are laid on the counters (if applicable) and glassware is set out according to the required standard. Ice buckets are prepared with fresh ice and water, and stands are ready Ice tongs are placed in the ice wells and / or ice buckets as required Service stations are equipped with tot measures and clean drip trays, as well as corkscrews, swizzle sticks and straws. The cocktail service station is equipped with a blender, shaker(s), strainer, cocktail spoon, ice crusher, knife and chopping board. There is also fresh, hot coffee available on the appropriate hot place. If you have vintage wines or crusting ports on the wine list, ensure that appropriate decanters are available.

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1.7 Security
Procedures

Implement security procedures as follows by ensuring that: Step 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Action Cellars and Cold Room The storage area is not left unlocked and unattended at any time. Keys are not handed to unauthorised persons at any time. The storage area is properly locked after hours and the keys handed in as required. That there is a security procedure in place and ensure that it is adequate. The key log for the signing in and out of keys is checked regularly to ascertain who has had access to the area and for what purposes. Appropriate disciplinary action is taken if unauthorised persons have had access to the keys. The issue and receipt log is accurate. If you find inaccuracies, have them corrected. Another stock-take is done in the case of the previous one being inaccurate. It is determined where the security breach lies and appropriate disciplinary action is taken according to disciplinary procedures. Dispense Bar No unauthorised persons have access to the bar The bar is not left unattended during operating hours All stock is locked away after hours The fridge’s, cupboards and bar entrance are securely locked after hours Deliveries are handled promptly

6. 7. 8. 9.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

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1.8. Improving Security
Importance Check that all required security procedures are being followed:      Ensure that the storage area is not left unlocked and unattended at any time; Keys are not handed to unauthorised persons at any time; The storage area is properly locked after hours and the keys handed in as required. Check that there is a security procedure in place and ensure that it is adequate. Check the key log for the signing and signing out of keys to ensure that the required procedures have been followed, and to ascertain who has had access to the area. Take appropriate disciplinary action if you establish that unauthorised persons have had access to the keys, ensuring that the correct disciplinary procedures are followed. Check the issue and receipt log to ensure that it is accurate. If you find inaccuracies, have them corrected. Carry out another stock take in case the previous one was inaccurate Once you are certain that the stock take is correct, determine where the security breach lies and take appropriate disciplinary action, ensuring that the correct disciplinary procedures are followed.

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Self Assessment 01
Instructions

In the following test you will be required to answer all questions.  You are required to obtain 100% to pass.  If you do not obtain the pass mark, revise all the learning material and redo the test.
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Question 1
What are the appropriate temperatures for the following:  Fridge’s and cold room  Cellars  Dispensing bow

Question 2
What are the security measures for cellars and cold rooms?

Question 3
What is the storage procedure for beer?

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2. Maintenance 2.1. Cleaning Procedures for Cellar
Procedures

It is very important to remember that spillage that is not cleaned up may attract vermin such as mice, rats, ants, flies and other insects that may be the transmitters of illness or disease. This is unacceptable in any establishment and would not contribute to customer satisfaction if the guests were to be made aware of this through adverse publicity. Cleaning of the cellars is of utmost importance and the supervisor must ensure that this procedure is carried out on a regular basis: Step 1. 2. Action Ceilings and walls These must be kept free from dirt and mould In cellars, beer and other drinks are often sprayed onto walls and ceilings due to leaks or accidental spillages. These must be cleaned up immediately, but walls and ceilings must also be cleaned regularly to make sure they are completely clean When trying to reach surfaces, always use steps or a ladder. Do not stand on casks, kegs, shelves or other equipment, as these may collapse or topple over, causing injury to yourself or damage to the item you have stood on Due to humidity and moisture in cellars and storerooms, mould often grows on ceilings and walls. This can be avoided through regular cleaning Always clean the ceilings and walls before the floors

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19 Step 6. 7. Action Floors These must be kept free from dirt, refuse, spillage and mould Any rubbish or refuse must be disposed of immediately to avoid someone tripping or falling over the item. A rubbish bin in the cellar is a useful item Any dust or dirt should be swept up immediately When cleaning, do it in a logical order: the ceilings and walls first, the floors last. Always work from the inside out to avoid making the clean floor dirty again If spillage occurs, they should be mopped or wiped up immediately to avoid slipping. When mopping a floor, use a pull-push action to avoid injury from over-stretching. Mop small areas at a time, so as not to strain your back If you are mopping a floor, you should close off the area, or place warning signs to avoid accidents Use correct cleaning agents according to organisational requirements. Follow manufacturer’s instructions. Always rinse with clean water after washing floors Always rinse with clean water after washing floors Move kegs and other heavy objects out of the way with the help of a colleague. Around and under these objects are often areas for mould growth. As there is always moisture and liquids in the cellar, the possibility of mould is quite high. It is therefore important to keep the area dry to avoid this happening Be aware of where any electrical outlets are and avoid splashing with water – if necessary, tape up the outlets to ensure no contact with water will be made

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2.2. Inspecting Cellar
procedure

Inspections of storage areas is a critical function of importance to ensure compliance to Health and Safety Regulation and implementation of storage procedures. Carry out the inspection according to the following guidelines: Action Always carry out inspections with storeman and staff member responsible for maintaining storage areas and dispensing bar. Start at one side of work around ending at the other side of the door. Work from top to bottom and check cleanliness of ceilings, fittings, walls, shelves and floor. Check condition and state of repair of lights, fittings, shelves, doors, and locks. Check maintenance of temperatures, i.e:  cold rooms not higher than 7˙C  cellars not higher than 15˙C  dispensing bar not higher than 18˙C Check that seals on the fridge’s and cold room door are in good conditions Check for:  dampness  pest infestation  insect droppings…etc  clear marks  storage smells Check the manner in which drinks are stored, i.e:  beer and drinks on crates or pallets  wine on their side  spirits and liqueurs standing upright on shelves in their boxes Check that nothing is stored on the floor for ease of cleaning. Check bottles at random for signs of damage or leakage. Remove such bottles and place to one side. Check that stock rotation procedures have been complied with, i.e. older stock moved forward; never store older stock at the back. 20

Step 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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21 12. 13. Observe the manner in which cases and individual bottle are handled. This should be done gently and carefully. Check whether there is any sense of vibration – strong vibrations disturb the wine and will negatively affect the quality over a period of time. Report any maintenance issues / repairs / faults to the maintenance department for corrective action and follow up

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2.3. Identify, Report and Solve Problems
Procedure

Identifying and reporting problems immediately to the person in charge is imperative in rectifying the problem with minimum cost to the company. Appropriate Action Report equipment problems to the Maintenance Department so that repairs can be carried out. Ensure that equipment is maintained correctly by implementing Preventative Maintenance procedures Power failures may occur from time to time, resulting in fluctuations in cellar temperature. This is bad for the wine, so it is important to ensure that the wines are protected from this as far as possible. Ensure that the cellar is not left open or that it is opened and closed too often during power failures as this raises the cellar temperature. If you are in a hot climate, the cellar should be on the back-up generator circuit so that the temperature can be maintained in the event of power failures.

Situation Equipment Failure

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Power Failures

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22 Situation Product Failure,  Damage, Deterioration and Stock Losses  Appropriate Action Any damaged bottles or leaking bottles that suggest deterioration of the product or product loss should be set aside and recorded in the Ullage Book so that they can be included in the next stock take. Check that other bottles of the same product are not also damaged. If they are, action must be taken with the supplier and the stock must be replaced. If stock losses became apparent during the last stocktake, use this opportunity to check if the storage conditions may have contributed In the course of your inspections, you may come across mistakes made by the Stores staff, including failure to turn equipment on as required. As soon as you notice this, bring it to the attention of the Storeman. If it is a persistent problem that you have brought to the attention of the Storeman several times, you may consider it appropriate to take disciplinary action. If you observe products being mishandled, check if this has resulted in damage to the product. If damage has resulted, try to return the product to the supplier. If they will not accept it, you will have to write it off according to the appropriate accounting procedures. It is important to investigate the matter and possibly take disciplinary action in such an instance. If industrial action is threatening or is underway, ensure that the storage areas are properly secured, and supervised by a responsible person. If deliveries are affected by industrial action at suppliers, inform the Bartenders of the stock that will be affected. If it is basic stock (such as beer or cold drinks) try to obtain stock from another source

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Human Errors

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Mishandled Products

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Industrial Action

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Self-Assessment 02
Instructions

In the following test you will be required to answer all questions.  You are required to obtain 100% to pass.  If you do not obtain the pass mark, revise all the learning material and redo the test.
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Question 1
What is the procedure for cleaning floors, ceilings and walls in the cellar?

Question 2
In what manner should drinks be stored?

Question 3
Identify 6 problems that are likely to occur in the cellar.

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3. Stock Control

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3. Stock Control 3.1. Importance of Stock control
Importance

A constant stock of drinks must be maintained:

Importance

Time: Bartenders must be able to work quickly and efficiently, which means that everything that might be required for service must be immediately to hand. For this reason, it is important that ordering be done accurately and in advance of the commencement of service. Cost: Overstocking of cellars and bars ties profits up in stocks, rather than having it in the bank where it should be. Par stocks ensure that stocks are never higher than they should be, but that they are also adequate for service. Failure to stock the bar adequately results in guest dissatisfaction, which can mean that guests are lost to competitors. Guest satisfaction: Guests expect that their requirements will be met in our bars. This means that we must ensure that we have the stock required to meet these needs in order to ensure their satisfaction.

3.2. Organisational Procedures
Procedure

Proceed as follows: Step 1. Action Inspect Receiving Procedures Monitor the receiving procedures by personal observation to ensure that the receiving procedures described in Unit XX28 are fully complied with.

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26 2. If you observe problems in the receiving procedures, investigate the causes of the problems by consulting with the staff involved. Encourage them to recommend improvements Make recommendations for improvements to these procedures to your Manager. Damage, Deterioration and Wine Stock Losses Any damaged bottles or leaking bottles that suggest deterioration of the wine should be set aside and recorded in the Ullage Book so that they can be included in the next stock take. Check that other bottles in the same are not also damaged. If they are, action must be taken with the supplier and the stock must be replaced. If stock losses become apparent during the last stock take, use this opportunity to check if the storage conditions may have contributed. Stock Records The Ullage Book must be kept up-to-date, and must be made available to the Food and Beverage Controller at every stock take The Order Book must be correctly completed, and copies of the relevant pages attached to Delivery notes when stock is delivered. These must then be made available to the Food and Beverage Controller at the stipulated times.

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3.3 Par Stock Levels
Definition

This refers to the minimum and maximum stock-on-hand levels. The Par-Stock system is a financially effective tool to maintain sufficient stock levels. Factors that impact on stock levels when using the par-stock system include the following:   Rate of demand (consumption levels)- the rate at which stock is consumed. Storage or shelf life of the various products. The shelf life of a product determines the quantity of product to be ordered. Use-by-dates indicate when to expect expiry. Frequency of product usage, indicates frequency of product replenishment. If it is a product with a high turnover or a high deterioration rate it will need to be ordered on a more regular basis. Storage conditions Maintenance Standards within these areas include temperature, humidity, ventilation control and pest control. These affect life-span and quality of stock. Seasonal demands e.g. ice-cream is more popular in summer. Minimum delivery quantities These are stipulated to ensure that a substantial order is placed and the company is charged a delivery fee if orders are below the required minimum quantity. This can become fairly expensive if orders are placed daily in no organised manner.

Considerations

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Dispense Bar

Information to consider in anticipating shortfalls in dispense bar stocks:  The par stock is based on average expected business. By ordering stock to bring supplies back up to par, you are anticipating and preventing shortfalls.  In addition, if restaurant reservations are far more than usual, this is also an indicator that additional stock should be ordered. Only move wines from the cellar to the dispense bar as follows:  Wines should only be moved from the cellar to the dispense bar as they are required in terms of the maintenance of par stock levels.  Old red wines should be moved early in the day to allow them to settle.  Wines should only be moved to the dispense bar if they can go directly into the correct storage conditions - e.g. only move white wines when there is space in the fridge.

3.4 Calculating Stock Levels
Procedure

Proceed as follows: Step 1. 2. 3. Action Establish consumption levels over a set period of time (e.g. 5 days) by monitoring daily usage by conducting stock takes Determine lead times for deliveries e.g. 10 days Example beers castle beers consumed at an average of 20 per day x 5 days = 100 per week. Therefore minimum stock required for the month to meet demands would equal 400 beers. Considering lee time factor of 10 days, increase minimum stock order by 200 beers (average consumption of 20/day x lead time of 10 days). This will give a total stock level of 600 beers for the month, which is sufficient to meet the demand and accommodate a small buffer stock in the event of an unexpected situation where the delivery time is not met.

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From the case examples provided by the Facilitator, calculate Par Stock Levels accordingly. Show your workings out.

Exercise

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3.5. Methods of Stock Taking
Procedure

Follow the procedures below to ensure successful stocktaking: Step 1. Action Liase with the Bartender:  To ensure that the wines listed on the wine list are in stock. In the case of Banqueting, this should be discussed a week before the function.  Where wines are out of stock, make a note so that you can inform service staff at the briefing immediately before service. Where stocks of wines are low (e.g. there are only 1 or 2 bottles of a particular wine left) make a note of this so that service staff can be informed.  Find out when stocks of these wines are expected. If the Bartender has been waiting for stocks, contact the Storeman or the Purchasing Department to find out when deliveries are expected.  Check the conditions under which wine is stored.  Ensure that the storage area is hygienically clean and tidy and that stock is stored according to the required standards (see 3G4). Before stock taking refer to the following stock records and documents to update on stock movements:  Stock & Order book  Purchase analysis sheet  Claims procedure  Transfers procedure  Conduct an accurate stock take by doing a stock take every week  Weighing / counting and recording accurately.

2.

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3.5. Methods of Stock Taking,
Description Weight or Quantity

continued Cost Price Total

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3.6. Time Frame for Stock Taking and Inspections
Time Frame

Stock take should occur at regular intervals:  Daily (for fast moving items)  Weekly  Monthly The Dispense bar should be inspected at least once a week, preferably at random as should the cellar and storage areas. An inspection should take approximately 20 - 30 minutes.

3.7. Improving Sales of Slow Moving Stock
Guidelines

It is suggested that the supervisor establish why a particular level of stock is not moving out of the storage areas and thereafter plan a method of improving the sales. Follow the guidelines below:

Important

Slow moving stock can be identified during stock taking procedures when a surplus is recognised. When there is a lack of request for more stock, it can be determined that this is slow moving stock. Slow moving stock can occur for a number of reasons, e.g. too expensive etc.

Procedure

Sales can be improved in the following ways:  Promotionals  Price reduction  Including it amongst specials  Using it for courteousy drinks

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3.8. Stock Catering for Functions
Importance

It is suggested that the supervisor establish the total number of guests that will be attending the function, the preferred beverages required and then only order stock so that, wastage is minimised and appropriate stock levels to meet function demands are maintained. This needs to be achieved according to the following standards:  Accurate counting and record keeping  Stock adjustments recorded as soon as they take place

3.9 Accurate Record Keeping
Importance

It is imperative that an accurate record of stock is maintained at all times for effective control purposes. Follow the procedures below: Step 1. Action Check that Ullage Records are kept up to date and made available to the Food and Beverage Controller when stocktaking is done. Ensure that all duplicate orders, etc. are also made available to the Food and Beverage Controller. Keep records of maintenance reports so that effective followup can take place.

2. 3.

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Self Assessment 03
Instructions

In the following test you will be required to answer all questions.  You are required to obtain 100% to pass.  If you do not obtain the pass mark, revise all the learning material and redo the test.


Question 1
What are the factors that influence stock levels?

Question 2
What are the actions that need to be taken when following organisational procedure for recording and maintaining par stock levels?

Question 3
What documentation and records should be referred to before stock taking?

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4. Unexpected Situations 4.1. Dealing with Unexpected Problems
Procedures

The following procedures must be complied with in dealing with unexpected problems and situations. Appropriate Action Report equipment problems to the Maintenance Department so that repairs can be carried out. Dispensing Bar:  Report equipment problems to the Maintenance Department so that repairs can be carried out.  Refrigerated cabinets operate in much the same way as an airconditioned cupboard. This means that they cool and dehumidify the air in the cabinet. Faults are clearly apparent if the cabinet is not holding a temperature of around 7°C, or if water is collecting in the bottom - indicating that the cabinet is not draining properly Power failures may occur from time to time, resulting in fluctuations in cellar temperature. This is bad for the wine, so it is important to ensure that the wines are protected from this as far as possible. Ensure that the cellar is not left open or that it is opened and closed too often during power failures as this raises the cellar temperature. If you are in a hot climate, the cellar should be on the back-up generator circuit so that the temperature can be maintained in the event of power failures. Dispensing Bar:  Ensure that the fridges are not left open or that they are not opened and closed too often during power failures as this raises the temperature temperature.  If possible, put ice and water into large bins or baths and place stock that must be chilled into these. 35

Situation Equipment Failure

Power Failures

36 Situation Staffing Problems Appropriate Action Prevent staff problems by ensuring that service staff know the following about wines:  How to pronounce the names  What types of wines they are  What foods they compliment  The prices  The availability Use the pre-service briefing as an opportunity to test the wine knowledge of the service staff, and to provide them with necessary information. If you notice that a staff member is not performing, bring this to the person’s attention, and make it possible for him / her to resolve the problem. Provide support to staff as required. Check that they are coping with their work. If they are not coping to the extent that it is negatively impacting on service, take appropriate steps to obtain assistance. This may include:  Informing your Manager of the problem;  Requesting assistance from other staff;  Borrowing additional service staff from another department Any damaged bottles or leaking bottles that suggest deterioration of the product or product loss should be set aside and recorded in the Ullage Book so that they can be included in the next stock take. Check that other bottles of the same product are not also damaged. If they are, action must be taken with the supplier and the stock must be replaced. If stock losses became apparent during the last stocktake, use this opportunity to check if the storage conditions may have contributed.

Product Failure

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37 Situation
Human Errors

Appropriate Action In the course of your inspections, you may come across mistakes made by the Stores staff, including failure to turn equipment on as required. As soon as you notice this, bring it to the attention of the Storeman. If it is a persistent problem that you have brought to the attention of the Storeman several times, you may consider it appropriate to take disciplinary action. If industrial action is threatened or is underway, ensure that the storage areas are properly secured, and supervised by a responsible person. If deliveries are affected by industrial action at suppliers, inform the Bartenders of the stock that will be affected. If it is basic stock (such as beer or cold drinks) try to obtain stock from another source. Separate this stock from the rest of the stock, and do a stock count of each product. In the case of wines, it may be appropriate to draw up a list of “end of range” wines to sell in the restaurant. In the case of spirits, it may be appropriate to encourage the Bartenders to propose a range of cocktails that could be offered until the stock is finished. Alternatively, it may be necessary to return the stock to the supplier or arrange to sell it off in some way.

Industrial Action

Expired Stock

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38 Situation
Availability and Quality of Wine

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Appropriate Action If certain wines are out of stock and you are awaiting delivery, ensure that the Bartenders and aware of this so that they can keep Service Staff informed. If you consistently have problems with the delivery of certain wines, bring this to the attention of the Food and Beverage Manager so that this can be taken into account the next time the wine list is revised. Problems with batches (cases or specific types of wine) must be brought to the attention of the supplier so that they can be replaced.

4.2. Performance in Foreign Countries
Importance

In European countries, performance standards need to be adapted, when working in a cellar. There a number of considerations to take into account when considering these standards:]  Temperatures  Type of Stock  Availability of Stock  Security  Popularity of alcoholic beverages  Consumption

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Describe how performance would be adapted when working in a European country.

Exercise

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4.3. Prioritise, Delegate and Organise Work in the Cellar and Storage Areas Efficiently
Considerations

Plan the work schedule well, and ensure that your plan is in writing. Have back-up equipment or technicians on standby in case they are required. Make sure that your service staff are well trained, and update their skills constantly. Brief your staff well so that they know exactly what is expected of them, and give them regular positive and corrective feedback when appropriate. Maintain open lines of communication with your service staff and encourage them to discuss their concerns with you in order to prevent problems. Maintain a good relationship with the staff, and keep them informed of what is happening. Work with your team and be observant so that problems can be anticipated and prevented.

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Self Assessment 04
Instructions

In the following test you will be required to answer all questions.  You are required to obtain 100% to pass.  If you do not obtain the pass mark, revise all the learning material and redo the test.
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Question 1
What is the appropriate action for dealing with unexpected problems like the following: 1. Human Error 2. Industrial Action 3. Product Failure

Question 2
Give 2 considerations that need to be taken into account when adapting performance to foreign countries.

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Practical exercise
Practical Exercise Task No. 1 Task Type Date Completed Comments by Supervisor

Task No. 2

Task No. 3

Carry out an inspection to ensure storage procedures are correctly carried out in terms of:  Maintenance  Temperature control  Security  Hygiene Carry out a stock take: Set stock levels according to establishment requirements in terms of consumption and the number of functions held. Investigate stock rotation and determine slow moving stock.

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Signatures required on successful completion of this module

Comments & Review by coach

General comments from learner

I …………………………………………… have (Supervisor / Coach) hereby certified that I have examined the learners’ workbook and that the learner has successfully completed this section of the practical training programme.

_______________________ SIGNATURE SUPERVISOR

_________________________ SIGNATURE LEARNER

DATE: ___________________ _____________________

DATE:

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