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					   Broken Promises:
   The Children Left Behind in Silicon Valley Schools

                                  Second Edition
                                  With new 2013 Student Achievement Data
                                  Including English Language Learners and
                                  Low-Income Students


                              An Innovate Public Schools Publication
                              Written by Joanne Jacobs
December 2013                 With Matt Hammer and Dr. Linda Murray
Endorsers of the
Second Edition

Mayor Chuck Reed,   Mayor Alicia Aguirre,
City of San Jose    City of Redwood City
                          Foreword to the
                          Second Edition &
                          Acknowledgements



                          Innovate Public Schools is dedicated to the mission of giving every child in the
                          greater Silicon Valley region the chance to attend a great public school. Our
                          organization grows out of the sense of urgency that parents feel when their
                          children are stuck in low-performing schools with low expectations.

                          This is the second edition of the report "Broken Promises: The Children Left Behind
                          In Silicon Valley Schools," focused on student achievement in Santa Clara and San
                          Mateo counties. This report presents clear data about how public schools are doing
                          preparing children for success in college, based on a few of the measures available
                          to the public through the California Department of Education.

                          Given the persistent achievement gap between ethnic and socio-economic groups,
                          we focus on some of the most underserved groups, particularly Latino and African-
                          American children. The data paints an alarming picture about the future for so
                          many of these children who are denied access to a high-quality school. That’s the
                          promise that we, as a community, have broken.

                          In this new edition, we have updated the data using the most recent available
                          results from the 2013 California Standards Test. We have also added many
                          new graphs that disaggregate the data by two other large and underserved
                          subgroups of students: English Language Learners and low-income children.

                          With 54 school districts across the two counties, it is particularly challenging for
                          parents and the general public to know how their schools and districts are actually
                          doing. Where are the most successful schools? Where are the biggest problems?
                          How does my district and my child’s school stack up against the others?

                          A critical mission of our public school system is to prepare every student for
                          success in college and good careers. The reality now is that our children will be
                          entering a job market that is increasingly global and highly competitive. Our
                          public school system is nowhere near delivering the quality of education called
                          for by that reality.




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                          1
“The good jobs that require        But we can make it so. The good news is that there is an ever-growing number of
 only a high school education      great public schools here in the Valley that are bucking the trends. Those schools
 are gone and will not be          are proving what is possible. The question now is whether we have the political will
                                   to replicate and grow what is working. If we can create 20 great public schools in
 coming back."
                                   this Valley, then why not 200?
   – Anthony Carnevale,
     Georgetown Center on          We dedicate this report to the hundreds of parent leaders involved with PACT,
     Education and the Workforce   who have worked tirelessly in their free time for the past 13 years to create, grow,
                                   and support many of the best schools in this report. That deep love for the children
                                   inspires people to make miracles happen, to create places of hope where there
                                   was once despair. May that continue.

                                   Finally, I need to acknowledge a few organizations and individuals who helped
                                   make this report possible. First, we are so grateful to the Walton Family Foundation
                                   for providing the seed funding to launch this new organization, as well as to the
                                   Silicon Valley Community Foundation, for its generous support. We appreciate also
                                   the generosity of the Charles and Helen Schwab Foundation, the Noyce Foun-
                                   dation, the Sobrato Family Foundation, Reed Hastings, and Infonetics Research.
                                   Thanks also to Ann Bowers, Lisa Sonsini, and Ken Schroeder for supporting our
                                   work.

                                   Special thanks to Tom Zazueta and his brilliant team at Coakley Heagerty, who
                                   are the artistic, marketing, and technical juice behind this report and our website,
                                   all provided pro bono. Thanks also to Susan Hanson, one of our thought partners
                                   and editors.

                                   We hope this report inspires dialogue, provokes hard discussions, and leads
                                   to more urgent improvement in the quality of public education that we offer our
                                   children.

                                   Matt Hammer, Executive Director
                                   Innovate Public Schools




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                   2
                          Key Findings
                          We make a promise to our kids – to everyone’s kids. Go to school, work hard and you’ll
                          have a bright future. Anyone can go to college, we say, from the daughter of a Mexican
                          gardener with a fifth-grade education to the son of an engineer with a Stanford PhD.
                          Education is the golden road to opportunity.

                          For many students in Silicon Valley – especially English Language Learners, low-income
                          students, Latinos, African-Americans and Pacific Islanders – that promise is not being
                          kept. The chart below shows that thousands of children every year are falling off the
                          college path.

                          California will face a shortfall of 2.3 million college-educated and technically trained
                          workers by 2025, predicts California Competes (see californiacompetes.org). We need to
                          prepare the rising generation to seize 21st-century opportunities – our region’s economic
                          vitality depends on it.

                          This report looks at all public schools and districts in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties,
                          with special attention on the achievement of underserved groups of students. Here are a
                          few of the major findings:

                          Who is Ready for College & Career in Silicon Valley?
                                                                                   Algebra pro ciency                         Four year graduation &
                                                                                   by end of 8th grade                        eligible for UC/CSU
                          English Language Learners                                            14%                                         NA*
                          Low income                                                           29%                                         NA*
                          Latino                                                               24%                                         20%
                          African-American                                                     21%                                         22%
                          Paci c Islander                                                      28%                                         19%
                          Filipino                                                             50%                                         42%
                          White                                                                58%                                         53%
                          Asian                                                                80%                                         71%
                          *Data not available because State of California does not disaggregate this high school data for English Language Learners or Low-Income students.




                          • We have a region-wide problem: Low percentages of college readiness for Latino,
                          African-American, and Pacific Islander students, as well as low-income students and
                          English Language Learners, across districts in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties.
                          Individual schools buck the trends, but districts do not.

                          • Charter schools are over-represented among the top public schools serving Latino
                          students. Among all schools, charters are three times more likely to be ranked in the
                          top 10%.

                          • There are surprises at the top and the bottom. From the perspective of a low-income
                          Latino family looking for good schools, one of the best places to live is now Alum Rock,
                          where there are high-quality charter schools and several of the top district-run schools in
                          the region. On the other hand, the numbers are particularly low in places like Sunnyvale
                          and Berryessa, where less than 10% of Latinos reach proficiency in algebra by 8th grade.

                          • Schools at the top of the list have a culture of high expectations, focused on getting
                          every child to grade level and college-ready.
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                       3
                                       Table of Figures
                          Figure 1:    Median Annual Earnings of Adults                                        Page 7

                          Figure 2:    Algebra Proficiency by End of 8th Grade –                               Page 9
                                       Average across San Mateo and Santa Clara counties

                          Figure 3:    Algebra Proficiency by End of 8th Grade and Participation Rates –       Page 9
                                       Sunnyvale School District

                          Figure 4:    Percent of Students with 4-Year Graduation and UC/CSU Eligibility,     Page 11
                                       2012 – Districts in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties

                          Figure 5:    Percent of Students with 4-Year Graduation and UC/CSU Eligibility      Page 11
                                       (2012 average across San Mateo and Santa Clara counties)

                          Figure 6:    Top 10 Elementary Schools for English Language Learners API / Lowest   Page 14
                                       Scoring Elementary Schools for English Language Learners API

                          Figure 7:    Top 10 Elementary Schools for Latino API/ Lowest Scoring               Page 15
                                       Elementary Schools for Latino API

                          Figure 8:    Top 10 Middle Schools for Algebra Proficiency for Latinos/ Lowest      Page 16
                                       Scoring Middle Schools for Algebra Proficiency for Latinos

                          Figure 9:    Preparing Latino students for success: Top 10 high schools for % of    Page 17
                                       Latino students with 4-year graduation and UC/CSU eligibility

                                       Appendix

                          Figure 10:   National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) State Scores –        Page 20
                                       Low Income Students

                          Figure 11:   National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) State Scores –        Page 21
                                       Higher Income Students

                          Figure 12:   Latino Students Algebra Proficiency by End of 8th Grade –              Page 22
                                       San Mateo County and Santa Clara County School Districts

                          Figure 13:   Low-Income Students Algebra Proficiency by End of 8th Grade –          Page 23
                                       San Mateo County and Santa Clara County School Districts

                          Figure 14:   Top 10 Middle Schools for Algebra Proficiency for Low-Income           Page 24
                                       Students/ Lowest Scoring Middle Schools for Algebra Proficiency
                                       for Low-Income Students

                          Figure 15:   Top 10 Middle Schools for Algebra Proficiency for English Language     Page 25
                                       Learners/ Lowest Scoring Middle Schools for Algebra Proficiency
                                       for English Language Learners

                          Figure 16:   Who Takes Algebra? Algebra 1 7th/8th Grade Participation Rates         Page 26
                                       by District in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

                          Figure 17:   Latino Students API – San Mateo County and Santa Clara County          Page 27
                                       School Districts:

                          Figure 18:   Low-Income Students API – San Mateo County and Santa Clara County      Page 28
                                       School Districts

                          Figure 19:   Top 10 Elementary Schools for Low-Income Students API/ Lowest          Page 29
                                       Scoring Elementary Schools for Low-Income API

                          Figure 20:   2013 API for English Language Learners and Low-Income Students —       Page 30
                                       High Need Elementary Schools In Silicon Valley
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                             4
                           Broken Promises
                          “ When I came to this country, I saw the American
                            dream. You get an education, go to college...
                            But now even American citizens can’t reach
                            the American dream,” says Roberto Aguirrez,
                            a Morgan Hill father.
                           After years volunteering at his children’s school, he’s now working with People Acting
                           In Community Together (PACT) and others to bring quality charter schools to Morgan
                           Hill. If he can’t get his 5th-grade daughter into a good charter middle school – there
                           are wait lists at all the high-performing charters – he’ll pay for private school. “You
                           know that movie? I’m not waiting for Superman,” he says.

                           Aguirrez and his wife earned college degrees. They were able to help their daughter
                           with homework when she fell behind. They could afford to hire a tutor. When teachers
                           said their kids were doing “OK,” they could read the report card and see that wasn’t
                           true. Most Latino parents don’t know their children are scoring Below Basic, says
                           Aguirrez. And few have the choice of paying for private schools.

                           His daughter has four Latina friends who will start 6th grade reading at the second or
                           third grade level. “They push kids from one grade to the next,” says Aguirrez. Once
                           kids fall too far behind, they won’t catch up if they repeat the grade, and they’ll fail if
                           they’re moved ahead, he says. “They’re not going to make it.”

                           Silicon Valley remains the land of opportunity – for the college educated and the
                           technically trained. But who will seize those opportunities?

                           Once known as the Valley of Heart’s Delight, Silicon Valley draws talented people
                           from around the world. In 2011, 64% of the valley’s college-educated, high-tech
                           professionals were born outside the U.S., reports Joint Venture Silicon Valley. Nearly
                           half of college-educated professionals in other industries were foreign born.1

                           Latinos, who make up nearly one-quarter of the region’s workforce, hold less than
                           5% of computer-related jobs, estimates the San Jose Mercury News.2

                           In schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties, most Asian, white and Filipino
                           students are on the college track. Most Latino, African-American and Pacific Islander
                           students are not.

                           Latinos make up 38% of K–12 enrollment in the two counties’ public schools.
                           African-Americans and Pacific Islanders add another 4%. That’s a lot of kids.

                           Our charts and graphs look at proficiency in elementary reading and math, who takes
                           and who passes 8th-grade algebra and what percentage of 9th graders graduate in



Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                  5
In the Valley, most Asian,                 four years with the college prep coursework needed to pursue a bachelor’s degree
white and Filipino students                at the University of California and California State University. We are not just looking
                                           at college eligibility for students who make it to 12th grade because too many kids –
are on the college track.
                                           disproportionately Latino – don’t get that far.
Most Latino, African-
American and Pacific                       There are many ways to measure school performance. To learn more about local
Islander students are not.                 schools, go to Ed-Data (ed-data.k12.ca.us), which has links to school and district
                                           reports, or GreatSchools (greatschools.net).



   Gilroy Prep                             Ahead of the vast majority of schools        ter books and write paragraphs. They
                                           in the state, teachers have already          draw or make models to understand
   Build a Strong                          broken down the new Common Core
                                           standards into daily learning objec-
                                                                                        math. By third grade, they’re ready for
                                                                                        social studies and science.
   Foundation                              tives. In some classes, students use
                                                                                        Most teachers are young: Half are
                                           mobile devices to answer questions.
   Top elementary school in the            The teacher can see immediately who          in their first year. All teachers are
   region for Academic Performance         needs more help. Teachers specialize         observed and videotaped weekly.
   Index (API) for Latino, Low-            in either literacy or math and facilitate    Dent, Principal Sharon Waller, or an
   Income, and English Language            students moving quickly through sev-         academic coach meets with each
   Learner students*                       eral types of instruction, including work    teacher and aide every week to
                                           in pairs, small groups, and the whole        discuss how to make “bite-sized
                                           class.                                       improvements” in their teaching.

                                           Structured language practice and             “There does not need to be an
                                           “tons of reading” help students master       achievement gap,” says Dent.
                                           English, says Dent. “Our students talk
                                                                                        Navigator Schools runs Gilroy Prep
                                           300 to 400 percent more than kids at
                                                                                        and Hollister Prep, which opened this
                                           an average school.”
                                                                                        fall. Navigator hopes to add a Morgan
                                           Students answer questions in com-            Hill school, then expand to Santa Cruz
                                           plete sentences using “because.” They        and Monterey counties.
   Achievement gap? Not at Gilroy Prep,    don’t just explain why an answer is          * Among schools with at least region average
   a K-4 charter school that’s growing     correct. They have to explain why other      for percent of Latino, Low-Income, and English
   into a K-8.                             possibilities are wrong. The prove/          Language Learner students.
                                           disprove method builds critical thinking
   Two-thirds of students are English      skills, Dent says.                            Gilroy Prep Charter
   Learners and come from low-income
                                                                                         API:                                        942
   families; 60 percent are Latino. Yet    “Spiral review” ensures students repeat
                                                                                         Total number of students:                   242
   most ace state exams – with more        a concept till they’ve mastered it. Stu-
                                           dents chant, sing, gesture and turn to a      Student Characteristics                  Percent
   scoring “advanced” than “proficient.”                                                 Latino                                      60%
                                           classmate for “partner talk.”                 Asian                                        7%
   Students spend 90 minutes a day                                                       White                                       20%
   using computers to “fill in holes”      Gilroy Prep’s day runs from 8 to 4 with
   or “zoom ahead,” says co-founder        the last 45 minutes devoted to art,           English Language Learner                    60%
                                           chorus, board games and other enrich-         Eligible for Free / Reduced Price Meal      65%
   James Dent, executive director of
                                                                                         Special Education                            7%
   Navigator Schools. The teacher works    ment activities. Physical education is
   with small groups of students who       part of the regular school day.               2013 3rd Grade Latino             % Pro cient
   need more help, while an aide super-                                                                                     and Above
                                           The first three years focus on literacy       English Language Arts                    74%
   vises students working on computers.                                                  Math                                     97%
                                           and math. Students learn to read chap-


Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                     6
                                              Slipping Off The
                                              College Track
                                              Latinos are “slipping off the college track in elementary and middle school, signified
                                              by their inability to pass algebra in 8th grade and often in 9th,” says Muhammed
                                              Chaudhry, who runs the Silicon Valley Education Foundation.

                                              Not every 21st-century worker needs a four-year degree, he says. But every student
                                              should have access to a college-prep curriculum and to career tech courses. “The
                                              future for a student with only a high school diploma is very limited and the future for a
                                              student without one is very grim.”

                                              There’s a close connection between years of education and earnings (see Figure 1).
                                              Less-educated workers not only earn less, they face longer stretches of unemploy-
                                              ment. Workers with a high school diploma or less lost 5.6 million jobs in the reces-
                                              sion, estimates the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce.3 There is
                                              no sign of recovery for less-educated workers.

                               Figure 1       Median Annual Earnings of Adults
                                              (Full time Workers, Age 25 and over, 2011)

                    No High School Diploma                               $23,504
               High School Diploma (or GED)                                         $33,176
                  Some College, No Degree                                               $37,388
                          Associate Degree                                                  $39,936
                          Bachelor’s Degree                                                                  $54,756
                           Master’s Degree                                                                              $65,676
                          Doctorate Degree                                                                                                $80,652
                        Professional Degree                                                                                                    $86,580

                                              0        $10        $20        $30        $40        $50        $60        $70        $80        $90    $100
                                              Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement.
                                              Last Modi ed Date: March 23, 2012



                                              It’s possible to earn a middle-class income with a one-year certificate or a two-year
                                              degree in a technical or medical field. But nearly all the high-paying credentials
                                              require good reading and math skills.4

                                              Many Latino children are behind on the first day of kindergarten. Their parents are
                                              less likely to be educated and to speak English well. Many may not know how to
                                              help their children catch up; schools try, but often fail.

                                              “Kids from poor families tend to have less access to reading material” and don’t
                                              always know about high-tech jobs, says M. Danielle Beaudry, who retired from a
                                              technology career to teach math at Fremont High School. To succeed in Silicon
                                              Valley, young people need reading comprehension as well as math, says Beaudry,
                                              who’s now retired from teaching. “Problem solving is the ‘math’ skill most used in



Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                  7
                                            many jobs in a high-tech company – and you can’t solve problems without reading
                                            to understand the problem and research potential solutions.”

                                            Many children seem to be doing OK in the early grades, when they’re reading simple
                                            stories and doing arithmetic by rote. In third and fourth grade, they need to read
                                            complex material and understand why 4 x 6 = 6 x 4. Some are left behind, never to
                                            catch up.




   Renaissance Academy                      but Renaissance has rethought the          Students work on practice problems
                                            schedule. Teachers teach 80-minute         in class. Those who finish early coach
   Learn To Do                              blocks four days a week and get a full
                                            day to prepare lessons and work with
                                                                                       slower students. The strong students
                                                                                       “learn to look at problems from a
   What’s Hard                              colleagues. “We never run out of time,”    different perspective,” deepening their
                                            says Iwasaki.                              understanding, he says. “Heterogene-
                                                                                       ity is a huge advantage for us.”
                                            Many students don’t believe that math
                                            makes sense, he says. “They feel           With a degree in mechanical engineer-
                                            it’s magic.” Even students who are         ing and experience as a systems ana-
                                            “proficient” on multiple-choice tests      lyst, Iwasaki can explain to students
                                            don’t know why the procedures work,        how math is used in the world.
                                            Iwasaki says.
                                                                                       When his students are in the work-
                                            He asks: “When we’re adding two            force, they’ll need to understand what
                                            fractions, why do we need a common         they’re doing and do it right, Iwasaki
   Second Highest Middle School             denominator?”                              says. They’re learning a valuable
   in the region for Latino Algebra                                                    lesson in middle school: “Learn to do
                                            Students say: “Because the teacher         what’s hard.”
   proficiency*                             said so.”
                                                                                       * Among schools with at least region average
   Renaissance Academy isn’t a              Renaissance teachers show students         for percent of Latino students (38%).
   charter, but the innovative public       how to attack a math problem, break-
   middle school operates with many         ing it into solvable chunks. Students
   of the same freedoms. The school         must answer in complete sentences,          Renaissance Academy 1
   was created through a partnership        showing they understand the underly-       API:                                           845
   between PACT and the Alum Rock           ing concept. Getting the right answer      Total number of students:                      287
   School District, as were LUCHA and       by “magic” isn’t good enough.              Student Characteristics                Percent
   Adelante, two other “small, autono-                                                 Latino                                    82%
   mous schools.”                           Renaissance teachers work closely          African American                           2%
                                                                                       Asian                                      8%
                                            together. Math concepts also are           White                                      3%
   High expectations and attention to       taught in science and humanities           Paci c Islander                            1%
   detail are keys to the school’s suc-     classes. “In English, we teach students    Filipino                                   3%
   cess, says Vince Iwasaki, who taught     how to assert a proposition and defend     English Language Learner                   8%
   algebra for the first six years and is   it with evidence,” says Iwasaki. “That’s   Eligible for Free/Reduced Price Meal     100%
   now the academic dean. “Nobody           fully translatable into math.”             Special Education                          4%
   says, ‘That’s good enough’.”
                                            All eighth graders take algebra, even      2013 8th Grade Latino             % Pro cient
   Renaissance is small, but the classes                                                                                  and Above
                                            if state tests show they’re “basic” or     English Language Arts                    58%
   are not, averaging 32 students in a      below in math. It’s important to include   Math – Algebra 1                         59%
   class. The school day is the same        a mix of students, Iwasaki believes.       Science                                  73%
   as other Alum Rock district schools,


Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                     8
                                     Paths Diverge in
                                     Middle School
                                     At most middle schools, the paths diverge when some kids take pre-algebra in 7th
                                     grade and algebra in 8th, while others wait till high school to try algebra. Passing
                                     algebra in 8th grade is the first step on the track that leads to geometry in 9th grade,
                                     advanced algebra in 10th grade, pre-calculus in 11th and calculus in 12th grade.
                                     Students who aspire to a university degree in a STEM field – science, technology,
                                     engineering and math – need to be on this track.

                                     In 8th grade, most Asian and white students take algebra and pass the class, opening
                                     the possibility of 12th-grade calculus and a shot at a high-tech career. By the end
                                     of 8th grade, only 24% of Latino students in the two counties score as proficient or
                                     advanced in algebra on state exams, compared to 80% of Asians and 58% of whites.
                                     Just 14% of students who are English Language Learners are proficient, and only
                                     29% of low-income students. (See Figure 2.)

                          Figure 2   Algebra Pro ciency by end of 8th Grade
                                     (Average across San Mateo and Santa Clara counties)
                                     100 %
                                      90 %
                                                                                                    80%
                                      80 %                                                    76%                                                2011/2012
                                      70 %
                                      60 %                                                                57% 58%
                                                                                                                                  52% 50%
                                      50 %
                                      40 %                                                                                                       2012/2013
                                      30 %                27% 29%                                                     26% 28%
                                                                      23% 24% 24% 21%
                                      20 %    14% 14%
                                      10 %
                                       0%
                                               English       Low       Latino      African     Asian         White      Paci c    Filipino
                                              Learners     Income                 American                             Islander
                                     CST Algebra 1 results from 2011, 2012 and 2013


                                     School districts have very different standards for deciding who gets a chance to
                                     take Algebra I. (See Figure 16 in Appendix: "Who Takes Algebra By 8th grade?".)
                                     For example, Sunnyvale School District places just 25% of Latinos in algebra in
                                     middle school (called the “Participation Rate”), compared to 82% of Asians and 63%
                                     of whites. While 69% of Asians and 50% of whites achieve proficiency, only 7% of
                                     Sunnyvale Latinos will start high school on the STEM university track. (See Figure 3.)

                          Figure 3   Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade and Participation Rates
                                     Sunnyvale School District
                                     100 %                                                                                                   Pro ciency
                                      90 %                                                                                                   Rate:
                                                                                                       82%
                                      80 %
                                      70 %                                                                           63%
                                                                                                    69%
                                      60 %                                                                                    57%            Participation
                                      50 %                                                                                                   Rate:
                                                                                                                50%
                                      40 %
                                      30 %                      27%                    29%
                                                                            25%
                                      20 %
                                                  12%        12%
                                      10 %       4%                       7%                                                13%
                                                                                        NA*
                                       0%
                                                 English        Low       Latino      African      Asian       White     Filipino
                                                Learners Income                     American
                                     CST Algebra results from 2012 and 2013
                                     NA*: Indicates that fewer than 11 students took the test and pro ciency rates are not available.
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                 9
                                 Sunnyvale uses grades, test scores and teacher recommendations to determine
                                 which students are ready to take algebra. The idea behind the policy is that it’s best for
                                 students to take the course just once and be successful, usually not until high school.
                                 Most Latino 8th graders in Sunnyvale take Algebra Concepts, which introduces
                                 vocabulary and skills they’ll need when they tackle Algebra 1 in 9th grade.

                                 The Sunnyvale School District doesn’t track how well their 8th-grade graduates do
                                 when they move on to the high school district. But most Sunnyvale graduates go to
                                 Fremont and Homestead high schools. Latinos who take 9th-grade algebra at the
                                 two high schools do very poorly: Only 11% reach proficiency.

                                 Pushing unprepared students into 8th-grade algebra doesn’t work either. The San
                                 Mateo-Foster City School District places 72% of Latinos in algebra in middle school
                                 and posts 13% proficiency, only slightly better than Sunnyvale. Campbell Union lets
                                 100% take algebra, but only 19% reach proficiency. (See Appendix Figure 12.)

                                 Leaving out districts with few Latino students, Gilroy Unified does best at getting
                                 Latino students to proficiency in algebra in 8th grade: 63% take the course and 38%
                                 score as proficient or better.

                                 Even when students pass algebra in middle school, they may repeat it in 9th grade,
“The level of academic           according to the Noyce Foundation’s Pathways Study in 2010. Some schools are
 achievement that students       requiring students with B’s and proficient scores to repeat algebra, according to the
 attain by 8th grade has a       “Held Back” report. Latinos, African-Americans and Pacific Islanders are the most
 larger impact on their col-     likely to take the course twice.5
 lege and career readiness...    Disadvantaged students may find it even harder to get on the STEM university track
 than anything that happens      in the future. California is shifting to Common Core standards, which return algebra
 academically in high school.”   to 9th grade and discourage districts from letting students take it earlier. “Placing
          — ACT Report, 2008     students into an accelerated pathway too early should be avoided at all costs,” the
                                 draft framework advises.

                                 In affluent areas, however, there will be enough advanced students to offer a middle
                                 school algebra class, and educated parents in Silicon Valley are sure to demand as
                                 much “acceleration” as possible. But algebra may disappear from most California
                                 middle schools serving primarily low-income children. This could result in an even
                                 larger education gap between rich and poor.

                                 The middle school years are critical, concludes “The Forgotten Middle,” a 2008 ACT
                                 report. “The level of academic achievement that students attain by 8th grade has a
                                 larger impact on their college and career readiness by the time they graduate high
                                 school than anything that happens academically in high school.”6




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                  10
                                     Weak Math Skills
                                     Are a Dream Killer
                                     The gap widens in high school. Successful students don’t just take the A-G courses
                                     required by UC and CSU. They take honors and Advanced Placement classes. But
                                     the promise of college is fading for many Latino students. They’re more likely to drop
                                     out and far less likely to complete the college-prep courses that would give them a
                                     chance to attend a UC or CSU school.

                                     In Morgan Hill, where Roberto Aguirrez and his wife are raising their two children,
                                     only 19% of Latinos graduate from high school on time and eligible for UC and
                                     CSU admission. That’s why they’re fighting to bring a charter school to Morgan
                                     Hill. “Charter schools give kids a shot at college,” says Aguirrez. He thinks a college
                                     degree is essential for his children and their friends.

                          Figure 4   Percent of Students with 4-year Graduation and UC/CSU Eligibility, 2012
                                     Districts in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                                     School District                          Latino    African    Asian    White     Paci c     Filipino
                                                                                        American                      Islander
                                     Los Gatos-Saratoga Joint Union High       61%         0%       90%      75%      100%         50%
                                     Palo Alto Uni ed                          48%        49%       89%      78%         NA        67%
                                     Jefferson Union High                      35%        37%       66%      32%       53%         49%
                                     South San Francisco Uni ed                34%        27%       77%      46%        0%         54%
                                     Mountain View-Los Altos Union High        29%        27%       88%      75%       20%         61%
                                     Cabrillo Uni ed                           26%         0%       83%      62%      100%        100%
                                     San Mateo Union High                      26%        21%       78%      57%       19%         51%
                                     Fremont Union High                        22%        26%       81%      63%       25%         42%
                                     San Jose Uni ed                           22%        37%       72%      46%       31%         48%
                                     Gilroy Uni ed                             20%        38%       65%      47%       50%         46%
                                     Sequoia Union High                        20%        19%       72%      65%       17%         47%
                                     Milpitas Uni ed                           19%        23%       67%      36%       50%         36%
                                     Morgan Hill Uni ed                        19%        21%       62%      46%       20%          6%
                                     Campbell Union High                       16%        24%       62%      41%        0%         15%
                                     Santa Clara Uni ed                        16%        26%       53%      33%       11%         48%
                                     East Side Union High                      12%        17%       55%      27%       15%         31%




                                     Among districts serving at least the region average of Latino children, South San
                                     Francisco Unified is at the top, with 34% of Latinos graduating on time and college
                                     eligible. But that’s as good as it gets. (See Figure 4.) In Santa Clara and San Mateo
                                     counties, just 20% of Latinos and 22% of African-Americans graduate in four years
                                     with the credits to attend a UC or CSU campus, compared to 71% of Asians and
                                     53% of whites. (See Figure 5.)

                          Figure 5   Percent of students with 4-Year Graduation and UC/CSU Eligibility
                                     (2012 average across San Mateo and Santa Clara counties)
                                     100   %
                                      90   %
                                      80   %
                                                                           71%
                                      70   %
                                      60   %
                                                                                       53%
                                      50   %
                                                                                                            42%
                                      40   %
                                      30   %
                                                 20%          22%                                  19%
                                      20   %
                                      10   %
                                       0   %
                                                Latino       African       Asian       White     Paci c    Filipino
                                                            American                            Islander
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                     11
                                            High school graduates who aren’t UC/CSU eligible can go to low-cost community
                                            colleges, which offer job training and general education courses that can be the
                                            start of a bachelor’s degree. Almost 75% of college-going Latinos in California and
                                            two-thirds of African-Americans enroll in community colleges. But few complete a
                                            vocational certificate or a two-year degree, much less a bachelor’s degree.7

                                            Weak math skills are a dream killer. 85% of the state’s community college students
                                            aren’t ready for college math, estimates the Campaign for College Opportunity. By
                                            one estimate, only 22% of students who start in remedial math will go on to take a
                                            college-level math course.8



   Summit Prep                              Everyone takes six Advanced Place-           Rousseau and Voltaire, students write
                                            ment (AP) courses and fulfills the           from one philosopher’s perspective
   An Early Start                           requirements for admission to Califor-
                                            nia state universities. Nearly everyone
                                                                                         on the question: Can people govern
                                                                                         themselves? In teams of four (actor,
   at College                               is accepted at a four-year college or        PR agent, historian and investigative
                                            university.                                  reporter), they represent the philos-
                                                                                         ophers’ views on human nature and
                                            Ninth graders who’ve started out             government at a press conference.
                                            behind take a basic skills class in
                                            addition to college-prep classes. They       For eight weeks each year, Summit
                                            can take more time to pass if they need      students explore their interests and
                                            it, says Summit CEO Diane Tavenner.          potential careers through internships,
                                            “Algebra I ends when you show com-           visual and performing arts workshops,
                                            petency. It doesn’t necessarily end in       community service projects and other
                                            June.”                                       “real world” activities.

   Highest-performing high school in        Because the school is small -- only 400      The Summit network has expanded
   the region for percentage of Latino      students -- nobody is lost in the shuffle.   to six schools from San Jose to Daly
   students who graduate in 4 years         All students meet weekly with a faculty      City, including a new school in Sunny-
   eligible for a state university*         mentor who helps them set daily and          vale that will be grades 6-12.
                                            weekly goals, track their progress,
                                                                                         * Among schools with at least region average for
   At Summit Prep, a janitor’s daughter     refine their college plan and cope with
                                                                                         percent of Latino students (38%).
   and the son of a high-tech million-      academic or personal challenges.
   aire may be partnering for a lab on
   environmental toxins or a discussion     Summit Prep’s day starts with reading.       Summit Prep Charter
   of dystopian novels. The 10-year-old     To build comprehension, students             API:                                        845
   Redwood City charter high school is      answer questions on an e-reading             Total number of students:                   406
   diverse in every way, but all students   platform.                                    Student Characteristics                  Percent
   are on the college track.                                                             Latino                                      49%
                                            Technology lets students work at their       African American                             3%
   Half the students are Latino, black      own pace during “personal learning           Asian                                        6%
                                                                                         White                                       36%
   and Pacific Islanders. Most come from    time.” Students use online playlists
                                                                                         Paci c Islander                              3%
   low-income and working-class fami-       developed by teachers, peer-to-peer
                                            coaching and tutoring to meet their          English Language Learner                    12%
   lies. Many speak English as a second                                                  Eligible for Free / Reduced Price Meal      38%
   language.                                individual goals.                            Special Education                           14%

   The other half are white and             Most of the time is devoted to projects.     2012             % of Students with 4-Year
   Asian-American, typically from           For example, after studying Plato, Aris-              Graduation and UC/CSU Eligibility
                                            totle, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu,           Latino                                90%
   well-educated, well-to-do families.                                                   African American                      95%




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                     12
                             Schools Bucking
                             The Trends
                             It’s not hopeless. Despite all the challenges, there are a growing number of schools in
                             Santa Clara and San Mateo counties where most Latino students are reaching profi-
                             ciency in reading and math, passing algebra in 8th grade and qualifying for university
                             admission.

                             Across the two counties, most of the top-performing schools for Latinos are charter
                             schools or new, small, autonomous schools in East San Jose that are part of the Alum
                             Rock School District.

                             Three top schools are profiled in this report: Gilroy Prep, a charter elementary school
                             in Gilroy; Renaissance Middle School, a district school in Alum Rock; and Summit
                             Prep, a charter high school in Redwood City.

Effective schools organize   Led by PACT, East San Jose parents have been fighting for new schools for 13 years.
                             Alum Rock, once known for low-performing schools and political infighting, now
to reach their goals. They
                             boasts high-performing charters and new district schools such as Russo, McEntee,
focus intensely on track-
                             LUCHA, Adelante Dual Language Academy and Renaissance. Many of the other
ing students’ progress to    district schools have improved, too. For the first time in generations, parents have real
make sure they get help      choices in the district.
when they need it – before
                             Of the 10 Latino-serving elementary schools with the highest proficiency scores
they lose hope.
                             (among schools with at least 38% Latino students, which is the region average), four
                             are charter schools, led by Gilroy Prep, with a 938 Latino API, followed by two charter
                             schools in Franklin-McKinley School District. The top district elementary schools for
                             Latino students are in South San Francisco, Millbrae, Evergreen, Oak Grove, Gilroy,
                             and Moreland. (See Figure 7.)

                             At KIPP Heartwood, an Alum Rock charter, an extraordinary 73% of Latinos are
                             proficient in algebra. Five of the top six middle schools are charters or autonomous
                             schools located in Alum Rock. Ida Jew Academies in the Mt. Pleasant District also
                             makes the top five, with 46% proficient. (See Figure 8.) The top middle schools make
                             sure that most, if not all, of their 8th graders have taken algebra.

                             Among high schools serving at least the region average of Latino students (38%),
                             four of the top five schools preparing Latino students for college are charters: Summit
                             Prep (90%), KIPP San Jose Collegiate (83%), Aspire East Palo Alto Phoenix Academy
                             (62%), and Downtown College Prep (49%). The one traditional school on the top five
                             list is Jefferson High in Daly City, where 78% of the Latino students graduate in 4 years
                             with the credits to enter a state university. (See Figure 9.)

                             Many of the schools that are effective for disadvantaged students are smaller schools.
                             Students and their parents have chosen to be there. Principals have chosen teachers
                             who want to be there. It’s much easier to create a sense of community and purpose.

                             Many of these schools enroll students who have struggled. ACE Charter Middle
                             School recruits low-scoring students: Its program is designed for children who are
Innovate Public Schools      way behind academically. Downtown College Prep has a similar philosophy.           13
                                             Figure 6         Top 10 Elementary Schools for English Language Learner Students API
                                                              2013 Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                                                              Among schools with at least region average of Spanish Speaking English Language Learners (23%)
                       Gilroy Prep Charter, Gilroy (53%)                                                                                                                      948
                                             Gilroy Uni ed
       Cornerstone Academy Preparatory Charter (31%)                                                                                                                   927
                            Franklin-McKinley Elementary
Voices College-Bound Language Academy Charter (46%)                                                                                                        889
                            Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                         Lomita Park Elementary (28%)                                                                                           850
                                      Millbrae Elementary
                        G. W. Hellyer Elementary (27%)                                                                                        849
                            Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                             Franklin Elementary (25%)                                                                                        846
                            Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                       James McEntee Academy (24%)                                                                                          839
                            Alum Rock Union Elementary
    Rocketship Mateo Sheedy Elementary Charter (64%)                                                                                       837
                           Santa Clara County Of ce of E
                      George Mayne Elementary (39%)
                                      Santa Clara Uni ed
                                                                                                                                          836
                         Ben Painter Elementary (23%)                                                                                     836
                            Alum Rock Union Elementary


                                                              Lowest Scoring Elementary Schools for English Language
                                                              Learner Students API
                                                              Among all schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                               Vallemar Elementary (3%)
                                                                                                699
                                                   Paci ca
                                 Grant Elementary (54%)
                                                                                               698
                                          San Jose Uni ed
                    San Martin/Gwinn Elementary (46%)
                                                                                               698
                                        Morgan Hill Uni ed
                                   Park Elementary (41%)
                                                                                               695
                                     San Mateo-Foster City
                                El Toro Elementary (23%)
                                                                                              692
                                        Morgan Hill Uni ed
                             Panorama Elementary (6%)
                                                                                              691
                                      Brisbane Elementary
                                  Laurel Elementary (8%)
                                                                                          685
                               Menlo Park City Elementary
                                Santee Elementary (66%)
                                                                                          685
                             Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                         Merritt Trace Elementary (39%)
                                                                                          684
                                          San Jose Uni ed
                             McKinley Elementary (69%)
                                                                                         680
                             Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                                    Highlands Elementary
                                                                                         677
                                     San Mateo-Foster City
                               Canoas Elementary (36%)
                                                                                        674
                                          San Jose Uni ed
          Fiesta Gardens International Elementary (43%)
                                                                                        674
                                     San Mateo-Foster City
                        Horace Mann Elementary (47%)
                                                                                       672
                                          San Jose Uni ed
                        Alvin S. Hatch Elementary (45%)
                                                                                    669
                                           Cabrillo Uni ed
                              Gardner Elementary (56%)
                                                                                    665
                                          San Jose Uni ed
                    Los Robles Magnet Academy (91%)
                                                                                    665
                             Ravenswood City Elementary
                       Farallone View Elementary (33%)
                                                                                   662
                                           Cabrillo Uni ed
                              John Gill Elementary (54%)
                                                                                  657
                                 Redwood City Elementary
                   Katherine R. Smith Elementary (44%)
                                                                                  657
                                     Evergreen Elementary
                Pescadero Elementary and Middle (67%)
                                                                                 656
                             La Honda-Pescadero Uni ed
                               Gar eld Elementary (74%)
                                                                            642
                                 Redwood City Elementary
                          Belle Haven Elementary (67%)
                                                                           639
                             Ravenswood City Elementary
                      Empire Gardens Elementary (64%)
                                                                           638
                                          San Jose Uni ed

                                                             600           650               700           750             800             850             900             950
                                                              Note: Percent of all students at the school who are Spanish Speaking English Language Learners (ELL) is indicated in
                                                              parentheses next to the school's name. The API score is for all ELL students, not just Spanish Speaking ELL students,
                                                              as the State of California does disaggregate the API by particular language groups.
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                               14
                                     Figure 7          Top 10 Elementary School for Latino API
                                                       2013 Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                                                       Among schools with at least region average of Latino students (38%)
                             Gilroy Prep Charter                                                                                    938
                                            Gilroy
                  Voices College-Bound Charter                                                                                894
                                Franklin-McKinley
       Cornerstone Academy Preparatory Charter                                                                           881
                                Franklin-McKinley
                         Ponderosa Elementary                                                                      853
                             South San Francisco
                        Lomita Park Elementary                                                                     851
                                          Millbrae
                       Cadwallader Elementary                                                                     846
                                        Evergreen
           Rocketship Mateo Sheedy Elementary                                                                     845
                                 Santa Clara COE
                       Santa Teresa Elementary                                                                    844
                                       Oak Grove
                         Rod Kelley Elementary                                                                   843
                                            Gilroy
                    George C. Payne Elementary                                                                   842
                                         Moreland

                                                       Lowest Scoring Elementary Schools for Latino API
                                                       Among all schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                           Highlands Elementary
                                                                                       708
                            San Mateo-Foster City
                           Lakewood Elementary
                                                                                       708
                                         Sunnyvale
                        College Park Elementary
                                                                                       707
                            San Mateo-Foster City
                            Parkside Elementary
                                                                                       707
                            San Mateo-Foster City
                            Edenvale Elementary
                                                                                      706
                                        Oak Grove
                        Daniel Lairon Elementary
                                                                                      704
                                 Franklin-McKinley
                             Orchard Elementary
                                                                                      703
                                           Orchard
                        Merritt Trace Elementary
                                                                                      702
                                          San Jose
                                Grant Elementary
                                                                                      701
                                          San Jose
                                 Park Elementary                                    694
                            San Mateo-Foster City
                              Canoas Elementary
                                                                                 692
                                          San Jose
                    Alexander Rose Elementary
                                                                                 689
                                           Milpitas
                       Alvin S. Hatch Elementary
                                                                                688
                                           Cabrillo
                            McKinley Elementary
                                                                                684
                                 Franklin-McKInley
                      Farallone View Elementary
                                                                                683
                                           Cabrillo
                             Gardner Elementary
                                                                              678
                                          San Jose
                   Los Robles Magnet Academy
                                                                          668
                                     Ravenswood
                               Santee Elementary
                                                                          668
                                 Franklin-McKinley
                       Horace Mann Elementary
                                                                          666
                                          San Jose
                     Robert Randall Elementary
                                                                         664
                                           Milpitas
                              Gar eld Elementary
                                                                        663
                                    Redwood City
                             John Gill Elementary
                                                                        662
                                    Redwood City
               Pescadero Elementary and Middle
                                                                        659
                             La Honda-Pescadero
                    Empire Gardens Elementary
                                                                        658
                                          San Jose
                         Belle Haven Elementary
                                                                    651
                                     Ravenswood
                  Katherine R. Smith Elementary             619
                                         Evergreen

                                                      600         650           700          750    800          850         900    950



Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                   15
                                        Figure 8         Top 10 Middle Schools for Latino Students
                                                         Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade (2012/2013)
                                                         Among schools with at least region average of Latino students (38%)

                       KIPP Heartwood Academy                                                                                                  73%
     Alum Rock Union Elementary School District
                           Renaissance Academy                                                                                  59%
     Alum Rock Union Elementary School District
              Adelante Dual Language Academy                                                                                56%
     Alum Rock Union Elementary School District
           Downtown College Prep (Alum Rock)                                                                          51%
           Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                             Ida Jew Academies                                                                    46%
           Mt. Pleasant Elementary School District
                        ACE Charter (Alum Rock)                                                                45%
           Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                               Solorsano Middle                                                               44%
                                     Gilroy Uni ed
                             South Valley Middle                                                         40%
                                     Gilroy Uni ed
                             Gar eld Elementary                                                         39%
         Redwood City Elementary School District
   Pollicita (Thomas R.) Middle, Jefferson Elem                                                        38%
               Jefferson Elementary School District


                                                         Lowest Scoring Middle Schools for Latino Students
                                                         Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade (2012/2013)
                                                         Among all schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties

                            Mathson (Lee) Middle                         12%
                                    Alum Rock Union
                                  Piedmont Middle                        12%
                                     Berryessa Union
                               Orchard Elementary                       11%
                                 Orchard Elementary
                         William Sheppard Middle                        11%
                                    Alum Rock Union
                          Cloud (Roy) Elementary                        11%
                          Redwood City Elementary
                   Cunha (Manuel F.) Intermediate
                                                                       10%
                                       Cabrillo Uni ed
                                  Campbell Middle                      10%
                                     Campbell Union
                                      Morrill Middle                   9%
                                     Berryessa Union
                                      Abbott Middle                  8%
                              San Mateo-Foster City
                                  Columbia Middle                    8%
                                            Sunnyvale
                                Sierramont Middle                  7%
                                     Berryessa Union
                                 Sunnyvale Middle                   7%
                                            Sunnyvale
                         Ronald McNair Academy                    6%
                                    Ravenswood City
                          Murphy (Martin) Middle                  6%
                                  Morgan Hill Uni ed
                                 Sylvandale Middle                5%
                                    Franklin-McKinley
                        Cesar Chavez Elementary                 4%
                       Ravenswood City Elementary
                   Benjamin Franklin Intermediate               4%
                                Jefferson Elementary
                   The Bayside S.T.E.M. Academy              1%
                              San Mateo-Foster City
                          Sunrise Middle Charter             0%
                                             San Jose

                                                         0        10%         20%        30%         40%         50%        60%         70%        80%         90%        100%
                                                         *Among schools with above region average (38%) for percent of Latino students in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.
                                                          Note: Schools with fewer than 11 students taking Algebra 1 are excluded as pro ciency scores are unavailable.



Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                          16
                                     Expectations are very high. From kindergarten on up, these schools believe all their
                                     students can succeed in college and push their students hard. Aspire Phoenix
                                     requires students to take community college courses. Summit Prep requires at least
                                     six Advanced Placement courses.

                                     Effective schools organize to reach their goals. All focus intensely on tracking
                                     students’ progress to make sure they get help when they need it – before they lose
                                     hope.

                                     At Summit Prep, every student is assigned a teacher mentor who serves as a college
                                     counselor, coach, family liaison and advocate. Students who struggle academically
                                     get extra help after school and during two month-long intersessions each year. Some
                                     complete a course in summer school.

                                     There are also differences between the top schools.

                                     Renaissance and Summit Prep believe strongly in mixing students of different
                                     achievement levels in the same class. Rocketship’s hybrid model uses technology to
                                     personalize learning: Some students zoom ahead, while others move slowly.

                                     Many of the charter schools have a longer school day. Other successful schools
                                     use a standard school day, but have redesigned the schedule to organize time more
                                     efficiently.

                                     At Phoenix, parents promise to spend 30 hours a year supporting their children’s
                                     education, including attending parent-teacher conferences, orientation meetings and
                                     workshops on college admissions and aid. Rocketship charters also ask parents for
                                     30 hours a year. Still, parent pledges are the exception, not the rule.


                          Figure 9   Preparing Latino students for success: Top 10 high schools for
                                     % of Latino students with 4-year graduation and UC/CSU eligibility
                                     Among schools with at least region average of Latino students (38%)
                                     School District                                  Latino African  Asian   White Paci c Filipino
                                                                                             American               Islander
                                     Summit Preparatory Charter High (Charter)         90%    100%    100%     95%     67%    100%
                                     Sequoia Union High School District
                                     KIPP San Jose Collegiate (Charter)                83%    100%     94%      NA      NA    100%
                                     East Side Union High School District
                                     Jefferson High                                    78%     72%     93%     75%     89%     79%
                                     Jefferson Union High School District
                                     Aspire East Palo Alto Phoenix Academy (Charter) 62%       25%      NA      NA      NA      NA
                                     Sequoia Union High School District
                                     Downtown College Preparatory (Charter)            49%    100%      NA      NA      NA      NA
                                     San Jose Uni ed School District
                                     Leadership Public Schools - San Jose (Charter)    46%      0%    100%     67%      NA    75%
                                     Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                                     Latino College Preparatory Academy (Charter)      39%      NA      NA      NA      NA      NA
                                     East Side Union High School District
                                     Abraham Lincoln High                              38%     47%     81%     55%    100%    30%
                                     San Jose Uni ed School District
                                     Capuchino High                                    35%     24%     77%     30%     32%     49%
                                     San Mateo Union High School District
                                     Half Moon Bay High                                32%      0%     83%     64%    100%    100%
                                     Cabrillo Uni ed School District




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                           17
                                       Latinos Have
                                       High Aspirations
88% of Hispanics said                  Immigrant parents care about their children’s futures and value education. In a Pew
it’s very important to                 survey, 88% of Hispanics said it's very important to go to college. In a survey of the
                                       general population, 74% said it was an important goal.
go to college – a higher
percentage than the                    Latino students in the class of 2012 had high aspirations, ACT reports.9 Of those who
general population.                    took the ACT, 36% were aiming at a professional or graduate degree, 42% wanted a
— Pew Research Hispanic Center, 2009   bachelor’s degree and 6% planned to earn an associate or vocational degree.

                                       But only 13% of Latinos who took the ACT were fully prepared to pass a college
                                       writing, algebra or biology class or read a college-level social science book. That
                                       compares to 32% of whites and 42% of Asian-Americans. 44% of Latinos were not
                                       prepared for college in any subject.

                                       They are dreaming the American dream: You get an education, go to college, get a
                                       good job. But many lost their chance in 3rd grade, when they fell behind in reading, or
                                       in middle school, when they dropped down to the low-expectations math track.

                                       These young people don’t have the reading, writing, math and science competence
                                       to study programming, accounting or nursing at San Jose State. They’re not prepared
                                       to train for a computer networking job at Foothill College.

                                       “Americans need to understand that the good jobs that require only a high school
                                       education are gone and will not be coming back,”10 writes Anthony Carnevale,
                                       Director of the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce. Postsecondary
                                       education – from a vocational certificate to a bachelor’s degree – is “the gatekeeper to
                                       the middle class,” a Georgetown report warns.11

                                       Many young people are failing in conventional schools. But there are mission-driven
                                       schools that are helping students make the dream a reality – places where that
                                       promise of a quality education for all children is being kept alive.

                                       “I feel powerless sometimes,” says Aguirrez. “But I keep fighting. It’s not just my kids.
                                       It’s about all the kids.”




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                         18
                          Methodology
                          Data Sources: All data were obtained from the California Department of Education (CDE)’s
                          website. Relevant research files downloaded for purposes of analyses included the 2012 and
                          2013 Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) data, 2013 Academic Performance Index,
                          2013 School Enrollment and English Language Learners, 2012 Graduate and Cohort Outcome
                          data, and 2013 Student Poverty – FRPM data. All data files were downloaded from the CDE
                          website and were accurate as of 9.19.13.

                          The following outlines the main analyses that were conducted.

                          1. Academic Performance Index (API)

                          a. The API data was obtained from the 2013 API research files. Subgroup API (e.g. Latino API
                          and Low-Income API) were also directly obtained from the research files.

                          b. Exclusion criteria: 1.) Schools or Districts with fewer than 11 students contributing towards
                          the subgroup API were excluded. 2) Schools with only one grade level of students (Grade 2
                          only) contributing towards the API score were also excluded.

                          2. Algebra 1 7th/8th Grade Participation and Proficiency Rates

                          a. For the 8th grade cohort graduating in 2013, aggregated participation and proficiency
                          rates for Algebra 1 were derived from the 2012 and 2013 STAR research files.

                          b. Our participation rate is derived from combining the number of 7th grade students who
                          tested for Algebra 1 in 2012 and the number of 8th grade students who tested for Algebra
                          1 in 2013 out of the total number of 8th grade students participating in CST Math tests
                          (including CST General Math, CST Algebra 1 and CST Geometry) in 2013.

                          c. Our proficiency rate is derived from combining the number of 7th grade students who
                          tested proficient and above in 2012 and the total number of 8th grade students who tested
                          proficient and above in 2013 out of the total number of 8th grade students participating in
                          CST Math tests (including CST General Math, CST Algebra 1 and CST Geometry) in 2013.
                          The number of proficient students was obtained from the CDE’s reported percent of students
                          who scored proficient and above in Algebra 1 multiplied against the total number of students
                          who tested in Algebra 1 in each of the two respective years.

                          Notes:
                          • In any use of aggregated datasets, year-to-year student level mobility is an unaccounted
                          factor that may affect a combined grade-level participation and proficiency rate. Participation/
                          proficiency rates may be under- or over-reported for schools with a large turnover of students
                          from the 7th to 8th grade in 2012 to 2013. However, this is primarily limited to turnover of
                          students taking Algebra 1 in 7th grade for 2012 or a large number of new 8th grade students
                          who had participated in Algebra 1 at another school.

                          • In cases where data are suppressed for a small group of students (fewer than 11 students),
                          the “end of course” (EOC) proficiency rate was utilized to derive the number of students who
                          tested proficient for that grade (usually 7th grade), where possible.

                          3. 4-Year Graduation and UC/CSU Eligibility

                          a. For the 2012 graduates, two data points are used: the 9th grade cohort graduation rate
                          and the percent of graduates who meet UC/CSU entry requirements by ethnicity.

                          b. Our 4-year graduation and UC/CSU eligibility rate is derived from multiplying the cohort
                          graduation rate by percent of graduates who meet UC/CSU eligibility. This represents the
                          percent of ninth-graders who graduate from high school four years later, having completed
                          the A-G course sequence required for UC/CSU eligibility.
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                  19
                                               Appendix
                          Figure 10            National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP):
                                               State Scores – LOW INCOME STUDENTS
                                               (Grade 8 – NAEP Math 2011)
                                   Texas
                          Massachusetts
                                Montana
                            North Dakota
                                 Vermont
                                Wyoming
                           South Dakota
                                  Kansas
                                   Maine
                               Minnesota
                          New Hampshire
                                   Idaho
                                    Ohio
                             New Jersey
                           North Carolina
                                  Indiana
                                Colorado
                             Washington
                                 Oregon
                                    Iowa
                                Kentucky
                                  Virginia
                               Oklahoma
                                Delaware
                                   Illinois
                                Arkansas
                               Wisconsin
                                    Utah
                          National Public
                               New York
                               Nebraska
                                 Missouri
                                  Alaska
                           South Carolina
                            Pennsylvania
                                  Hawaii
                                 Arizona
                                 Nevada
                                 Georgia
                                  Florida
                             New Mexico
                            Rhode Island
                                Maryland
                                Michigan
                                Louisiana
                             Connecticut
                            West Virginia
                              Tennessee
                              Mississippi
                                California
                                Alabama

                                              220         230           240           250           260        270   280   290   300

                                               Source: NAEP Data Explorer, NCES (Pro cient Scale Score = 299

Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                20
                           Figure 11           National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP):
                                               State Scores – HIGHER INCOME STUDENTS
                                               (Grade 8 – NAEP Math 2011)
                          Massachusetts
                                   Texas
                               Minnesota
                                Colorado
                             New Jersey
                                 Vermont
                                Montana
                                 Kansas
                           North Carolina
                                    Ohio
                                Maryland
                               Wisconsin
                             Washington
                            North Dakota
                                  Virginia
                           South Dakota
                            Pennsylvania
                             Connecticut
                                   Maine
                          New Hampshire
                                   Illinois
                                   Idaho
                          National Public
                            Rhode Island
                                 Oregon
                           South Carolina
                                  Indiana
                                  Alaska
                                Kentucky
                                    Iowa
                                Wyoming
                                 Georgia
                                Delaware
                               Nebraska
                               New York
                                Arkansas
                                 Missouri
                                 Arizona
                                  Florida
                                    Utah
                                Michigan
                               Oklahoma
                              California
                             New Mexico
                              Mississippi
                                 Nevada
                              Tennessee
                                Louisiana
                                  Hawaii
                                Alabama
                            West Virginia

                                              220      230         240        250        260        270        280   290   300   310   320
                                               Source: NAEP Data Explorer, NCES (Pro cient Scale Score = 299




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                 21
                               Figure 12          Latino Students Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade
                                                  San Mateo and Santa Clara County School Districts
                                                  (CST Algebra 1 results from 2012 and 2013)

                         Bayshore Elementary                                                                                                       79%
                  Los Gatos Union Elementary                                                              45%
                   Menlo Park City Elementary                                                     39%
                                Gilroy Uni ed                                                    38%
                       Burlingame Elementary                                                     38%
                       Paci ca School District                                                   38%
                       San Carlos Elementary                                                  35%
                         Los Altos Elementary                                               34%
                          Millbrae Elementary                                               34%
                             Palo Alto Uni ed                                               34%
                              Luther Burbank                                               33%
                     Mountain View Whisman                                                32%
                    Redwood City Elementary                                             30%
                  South San Francisco Uni ed                                          29%
                        Evergreen Elementary                                        27%
                 Alum Rock Union Elementary                                        26%
                             San Jose Uni ed                                    24%
          Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary                                     24%
                          Santa Clara Uni ed                                    24%
                      Mt. Pleasant Elementary                                   24%
                       Oak Grove Elementary                                    23%
                              Milpitas Uni ed                                  23%
                         Jefferson Elementary                                 22%
                            Union Elementary                                21%
                     Cambrian School District                             19%
                             Campbell Union                               19%
                             Cupertino Union                             18%
                 Ravenswood City Elementary                            16%
                 Franklin-McKinley Elementary                        15%
                           Morgan Hill Uni ed                        15%
                         Moreland Elementary                        14%
                   San Bruno Park Elementary                       13%
                       San Mateo-Foster City                       13%
                          Orchard Elementary                    11%
                              Cabrillo Uni ed                  10%
                  Berryessa Union Elementary                   9%
                        Sunnyvale Elementary                7%


                                                 0         10%         20%          30%         40%         50%         60%         70%          80%         90%        100%

                                                  Pro ciency Rate:                                  Participation Rate:

                                                 Note: Pro ciency data for the following districts are not available due to the low number of Latino students taking Algebra
                                                 in Grade 8: Brisbane Elementary, Hillsborough City Elementary, La-Honda-Pescadero Uni ed, Las Lomitas Elementary,
                                                 Portola Valley Elementary, Woodside Elementary, Loma Prieta Joint Union Elementary, and Saratoga Union Elementary.

Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                        22
                              Figure 13         Low Income Students Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade
                                                San Mateo and Santa Clara School Districts
                                                (CST Algebra 1 results from 2012 and 2013)
                       Bayshore Elementary                                                                                                  78%
                          Millbrae Elementary                                                       44%
                              Milpitas Uni ed                                                       44%
                 Berryessa Union Elementary                                                      41%
                       Evergreen Elementary                                                    40%
                 South San Francisco Uni ed                                                  38%
                                Gilroy Uni ed                                              36%
                             Luther Burbank                                              35%
                    Mountain View Whisman                                               34%
                      Burlingame Elementary                                            33%
                Alum Rock Union Elementary                                            32%
                Franklin-McKinley Elementary                                         31%
                        Brisbane Elementary                                          31%
                          Santa Clara Uni ed                                         31%
                      Oak Grove Elementary                                         29%
                   Redwood City Elementary                                       28%
                        Jefferson Elementary                                     28%
                    Mt. Pleasant Elementary                                     27%
                                     Paci ca                                   26%
                       Los Altos Elementary                                    26%
                             Cupertino Union                                 24%
                            San Jose Uni ed                                23%
                             Palo Alto Uni ed                             22%
                                   Cambrian                               22%
                             Campbell Union                              21%
                Ravenswood City Elementary                             19%
                 San Bruno Park Elementary                            18%
                       Moreland Elementary                           17%
                          Orchard Elementary                         17%
                          Morgan Hill Uni ed                        16%
                                   Sunnyvale                   12%
                      San Mateo-Foster City                  10%
                              Cabrillo Uni ed             8%


                                                0       10%         20%         30%         40%        50%         60%         70%         80%        90%        100%

                                                Pro ciency Rate:                                Participation Rate:

                                                Note: Pro ciency data for the following districts are not available due to the low number of Low-Income students taking
                                                Algebra in Grade 8:Belmont-Redwood Shores Elem, Hillsborough City Elem, La-Honda-Pescadero Uni ed, Las Lomitas
                                                Elementary, Menlo Park City Elementary, Portola Valley Elementary, San Carlos Elementary, Woodside Elementary,
                                                Loma Prieta Joint Union Elementary, Los Gatos Union, Saratoga Union, and Union Elementary.




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                   23
                                  Figure 14         Top 10 Middle Schools for Low Income Students
                                                    Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade (2012/2013)
                                                    Among schools with at least region average for percent of
                                                    Low-Income students (36%)
               Shirakawa (George) Elementary                                                                           73%
                   Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                    KIPP Heartwood Academy                                                                            71%
                   Alum Rock Union Elementary
                       Renaissance Academy I                                                                    65%
                   Alum Rock Union Elementary
            Adelante Dual Language Academy                                                             57%
                   Alum Rock Union Elementary
                       Downtown College Prep                                                           56%
          Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                        Thomas Russell Middle                                               49%
                                  Milpitas Uni ed
                            Ida Jew Academies                                               49%
                        Mt. Pleasant Elementary
                                   ACE Charter                                             47%
          Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                               Piedmont Middle
                    Berryessa Union Elementary
                                                                                           47%
                                      River Glen                                      43%
                                San Jose Uni ed


                                                    Lowest Scoring Middle Schools for Algebra Pro ciency for
                                                    Low Income Students (2012/2013)
                                                    Among all schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                          Orchard Elementary
                                                                         17%
                           Orchard Elementary
                             Moreland Middle
                                                                    15%
                          Moreland Elementary
                           Sylvandale Middle
                                                                    15%
                              Franklin-McKinley
                 Aspire East Palo Alto Charter
                                                                    14%
                  Ravenswood City Elementary
                           Willow Glen Middle
                                                                    14%
                               San Jose Uni ed
                             Campbell Middle
                                                                   13%
                                Campbell Union
                  Jordan (David Starr) Middle
                                                                   13%
                               Palo Alto Uni ed
                             Columbia Middle
                                                                   12%
                                      Sunnyvale
                     Ronald McNair Academy
                                                                   12%
                  Ravenswood City Elementary
                  CAVA @ San Mateo Charter
                                                               11%
                          Jefferson Elementary
                            Sunnyvale Middle
                                                               10%
                                      Sunnyvale
                       Murphy (Martin) Middle
                                                               10%
                        Morgan Hill Elementary
                    Cesar Chavez Elementary
                                                               10%
                  Ravenswood City Elementary
                             Cupertino Middle
                                                               10%
                               Cupertino Union
               Cunha (Manuel F.) Intermediate
                                                              8%
                                 Cabrillo Uni ed
                                 Abbott Middle
                                                          5%
                         San Mateo-Foster City
                       Sunrise Middle Charter
                                                          5%
                               San Jose Uni ed
               THE Bayside S.T.E.M. Academy
                                                         3%
                         San Mateo-Foster City

                                                    0%    10%        20%       30%   40%     50%   60%       70%       80%   90%   100%




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                               24
                                 Figure 15         Top 10 Middle Schools for English Language Learners
                                                   Algebra Pro ciency by End of 8th Grade (2012/2013)
                                                   Among schools with at least region average for percent
                                                   of English Language Learners (24%)
                                   ACE Charter                                  32%
          Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                   Luther Burbank Elementary                                   29%
                                 Luther Burbank
                           Costano Elementary                                 27%
                   Ravenswood City Elementary
                            Ida Jew Academies                                 27%
                        Mt. Pleasant Elementary
        Downtown College Prep - Alum Charter                            18%
          Santa Clara County Of ce of Education
                       Willow Oaks Elementary                        17%
                   Ravenswood City Elementary
                              Bridges Academy                       16%
                               Franklin-McKinley
                       Parkway Heights Middle                       15%
                    South San Francisco Uni ed
                               Campbell Middle
                                 Campbell Union
                                                                   12%
                           Orchard Elementary                     11%
                             Orchard Elementary


                                                   Lowest Scoring Middle Schools for Algebra Pro ciency for
                                                   English Language Learners (2012/2013)
                                                   Among all schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                            Davis Intermediate
                                                              9%
                          Oak Grove Elementary
                                 Hoover Middle
                                                              8%
                                San Jose Uni ed
                                 Boeger Middle
                                                              8%
                        Mt. Pleasant Elementary
                         Parkside Intermediate
                                                             7%
                     San Bruno Park Elementary
                            Willow Glen Middle
                                                         5%
                                San Jose Uni ed
                     Cesar Chavez Elementary
                                                         5%
                    Ravenswood City Elementary
                            Hoover Elementary
                                                        4%
                       Redwood City Elementary
                                 George Middle
                                                        4%
                    Alum Rock Union Elementary
                                 Murphy Middle
                                                        3%
                             Morgan Hill Uni ed
                                    Muir Middle
                                                        3%
                                San Jose Uni ed
                               Kennedy Middle
                                                        3%
                       Redwood City Elementary
                                  Ocala Middle
                                                        2%
                    Alum Rock Union Elementary
                       Ronald McNair Academy
                                                        2%
                    Ravenswood City Elementary
                     McKinley Institute of Tech.
                                                    0%
                       Redwood City Elementary
                        Selby Lane Elementary
                                                    0%
                       Redwood City Elementary
                        Sunrise Middle Charter
                                                    0%
                                San Jose Uni ed
                                 Abbott Middle
                                                    0%
                          San Mateo-Foster City
                                   Borel Middle
                                                    0%
                          San Mateo-Foster City

                                                   0%        10%        20%   30%     40%   50%   60%       70%   80%   90%   100%




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                          25
                          Figure 16   Who Takes Algebra by 8th grade?
                                      Algebra 1 7th/8th Grade Participation Rates by District (2012/2013)
                                       School District                            Latino     African       Asian       White       Paci c       Filipino
                                                                                             American                              Islander
                                       Cabrillo Uni ed                             14%           NA        100%         66%           NA          33%
                                       Union Elementary                            24%          18%         82%         53%           0%          55%
                                       Moreland Elementary                         24%          62%         90%         75%          33%          44%
                                       Sunnyvale                                   25%          29%         82%         63%          75%          57%
                                       Cupertino Union                             30%          43%         94%         78%          63%          50%
                                       La Honda-Pescadero Uni ed                   30%           NA        100%         50%        100%             NA
                                       San Carlos Elementary                       38%           0%        100%         67%        100%           33%
                                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary                38%          32%         81%         70%          50%          86%
                                       Menlo Park City Elem                        39%           0%         92%         79%          50%          50%
                                       Santa Clara Uni ed                          46%          57%         86%         68%          64%          69%
                                       Jefferson Elementary                        46%          39%         86%         62%          50%          66%
                                       Millbrae Elementary                         51%          20%         91%         56%          56%          89%
                                       Alum Rock Union Elem                        54%          33%         72%         65%          57%          75%
                                       Belmont-Redwood Shores El                   55%          42%       100%*         90%          50%          75%
                                       Evergreen Elementary                        56%          49%         94%         84%          75%          82%
                                       Portola Valley Elementary                   57%           NA        100%         87%           NA            NA
                                       Oak Grove Elementary                        61%          81%         97%         84%          60%          94%
                                       Berryessa Union Elementary                  61%          71%       100%*         80%       100%*          100%
                                       Gilroy Uni ed                               63%          56%         92%         79%        100%           93%
                                       Mountain View Whisman                       67%          46%        100%       100%*           0%          72%
                                       Los Altos Elementary                        68%        100%          97%         95%        100%          100%
                                       San Mateo-Foster City                       72%          85%         97%         97%          69%          91%
                                       Redwood City Elementary                     75%          61%         80%         79%          69%          85%
                                       Saratoga Union Elementary                   78%           NA         93%         79%           NA          50%
                                       Burlingame Elementary                       79%           NA       100%*         97%        100%           89%
                                       South San Francisco Uni ed                  82%          58%         99%         86%          86%          94%
                                       Morgan Hill Uni ed                          84%          90%         97%         98%        100%           89%
                                       Cambrian                                    84%        100%          98%         92%        100%          100%
                                       Milpitas Uni ed                             85%          86%       100%*         96%        100%           95%
                                       Paci ca                                     89%          83%         95%         95%        100%           90%
                                       Mt. Pleasant Elementary                     90%          83%         97%        100%        100%          100%
                                       Las Lomitas Elementary                      91%           0%       100%*         96%        100%           50%
                                       San Jose Uni ed                             91%          88%        100%         97%          71%          98%
                                       Palo Alto Uni ed                            97%          96%         95%         99%        100%           89%
                                       Bayshore Elementary                        100%        100%         100%        100%        100%          100%
                                       Brisbane Elementary                        100%        100%         100%        100%        100%          100%
                                       Campbell Union                             100%        100%        100%*       100%*        100%         100%*
                                       Hillsborough City Elem                     100%           NA         98%         95%           0%          88%
                                       Loma Prieta Joint Union Elementary         100%           NA        100%         98%           NA            NA
                                       Los Gatos Union Elementary                 100%        100%         100%        100%        100%             NA
                                       Luther Burbank                             100%        100%         100%        100%           NA            NA
                                       Orchard Elementary                         100%        100%         100%        100%        100%          100%
                                       Ravenswood City Elem                       100%        100%         100%        100%        100%          100%
                                       San Bruno Park Elementary                  100%        100%         100%        100%        100%          100%
                                       Woodside Elementary                        100%        100%         100%        100%           NA            NA

                                      *Participation rates at these districts exceed 100% due to changes in student enrollment from 7th to 8th grade.




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                 26
                                      Figure 17           Latino Students API – San Mateo and Santa Clara School Districts
                                                          Percentage of Latino students is in parentheses next to district. (Based on 2013 CST)

         Hillsborough City Elementary, San Mateo (3%)
            Las Lomitas Elementary, San Mateo (10%)
              Woodside Elementary, San Mateo (12%)
          Saratoga Union Elementary, Santa Clara (4%)
              San Carlos Elementary, San Mateo (16%)
  Loma Prieta Joint Union Elementary, Santa Clara (7%)
        Los Gatos Union Elementary, Santa Clara (8%)
         Menlo Park City Elementary, San Mateo (15%)
                  Union Elementary, Santa Clara (18%)
                Los Altos Elementary, Santa Clara (7%)
                Millbrae Elementary, Santa Clara (20%)
     Los Gatos-Saratoga Joint Union, Santa Clara (7%)
Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary, San Mateo (11%)
             Burlingame Elementary, San Mateo (16%)
                            Paci ca, San Mateo (25%)
           Portola Valley Elementary, San Mateo (10%)
                   Palo Alto Uni ed, Santa Clara (11%)
                    Cupertino Union, Santa Clara (5%)
                         Cambrian. Santa Clara (25%)
                         Moreland, Santa Clara (35%)
           Mountain View Whisman, Santa Clara (45%)
                Brisbane Elementary, San Mateo (31%)
                   Campbell Union, Santa Clara (47%)
                    Luther Burbank, Santa Clara (91%)
                      Gilroy Uni ed, Santa Clara (71%)
        South San Francisco Uni ed, San Mateo (47%)
         San Bruno Park Elementary, San Mateo (44%)
       Alum Rock Union Elementary, Santa Clara (78%)
              Evergreen Elementary, Santa Clara (28%)
               Jefferson Elementary, San Mateo (31%)
             Oak Grove Elementary, Santa Clara (48%)
        Berryessa Union Elementary. Santa Clara (24%)
          Redwood City Elementary, San Mateo (73%)
                    Milpitas Uni ed, Santa Clara (22%)
     Mountain View-Los Altos Union, Santa Clara (24%)
                 Santa Clara Uni ed, Santa Clara (36%
           Mt. Pleasant Elementary, Santa Clara (72%)
             San Mateo Union High, San Mateo (29%)
              San Mateo-Foster City, San Mateo (34%)
                Morgan Hill Uni ed, Santa Clara (48%)
                         Sunnyvale, Santa Clara (39%)
               Bayshore Elementary, San Mateo (38%)
       Franklin-McKinley Elementary, Santa Clara (61%)
                  San Jose Uni ed, Santa Clara (52%)
               Jefferson Union High, San Mateo (29%)
       Ravenswood City Elementary, San Mateo (81%)
                Sequoia Union High, San Mateo (47%)
                     Cabrillo Uni ed, San Mateo (50%)
                Orchard Elementary, Santa Clara (36%)
                Fremont Union High, Santa Clara (16%
              Campbell Union High, Santa Clara (35%)
       La Honda-Pescadero Uni ed, San Mateo (63%)
              East Side Union High, Santa Clara (50%)

                                                         600               650                 700                 750                 800                  850                 900
                                                          Note: Lakeside Joint District is excluded because there are fewer than 11 Latino students contributing towards the API score.

Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                                   27
                              Figure 18          Low-Income Students API – San Mateo and Santa Clara School Districts
                                                 Percentage of Low-Income students is in parentheses next to district. (Based on 2013 CST)

                  Woodside Elementary (9%)
                   Millbrae Elementary (21%)
                     Union Elementary (14%)
                       Cupertino Union (6%)
                              Paci ca (22%)
           Berryessa Union Elementary (39%)
                Las Lomitas Elementary (3%)
                Burlingame Elementary (14%)
         Los Gatos-Saratoga Joint Union (3%)
                       Milpitas Uni ed (41%)
                 Evergreen Elementary (34%)
         Alum Rock Union Elementary (100%)
    Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary (8%)
                             Moreland (34%)
                  Jefferson Elementary (58%)
           South San Francisco Uni ed (47%)
                       Luther Burbank (94%)
                 San Carlos Elementary (7%)
               Mountain View Whisman (43%)
                      Campbell Union (48%)
                   Orchard Elementary (54%)
          Franklin-McKinley Elementary (74%)
                            Cambrian (20%)
                       Palo Alto Uni ed (8%)
                Oak Grove Elementary (47%)
                         Gilroy Uni ed (56%)
            San Bruno Park Elementary (40%)
             Saratoga Union Elementary (1%)
                  Brisbane Elementary (30%)
            Los Gatos Union Elementary (3%)
                  Bayshore Elementary (40%)
                   Los Altos Elementary (5%)
             Menlo Park City Elementary (5%)
                    Santa Clara Uni ed (46%)
               Mt. Pleasant Elementary (74%)
                            Sunnyvale (48%)
             Redwood City Elementary (72%)
               Portola Valley Elementary (6%)
                  Jefferson Union High (42%)
                San Mateo Union High (21%)
                      San Jose Uni ed (47%)
                San Mateo-Foster City (32%)
         Mountain View-Los Altos Union (21%)
                   Fremont Union High (17%)
                    Morgan Hill Uni ed (36%)
          Ravenswood City Elementary (95%)
                  East Side Union High (53%)
                       Cabrillo Uni ed (45%)
           La Honda-Pescadero Uni ed (67%)
                   Sequoia Union High (44%)
                  Campbell Union High (26%)

                                                600               650                700                750                800                850                900
                                                 Note: Hillsborough, Lakeside Joint and Loma Prieta Joint Union are excluded because there are fewer than 11 Low-Income
                                                 students contributing towards the API score.


Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                                                   28
                                      Figure 19          Top 10 Elementary Schools for Low-Income Students 2013 API
                                                         Among schools with at least region average percentage of low-income students (36%)
                                 Gilroy Prep Charter                                                                                           941
                                        Gilroy Uni ed
        Cornerstone Academy Preparatory Charter                                                                                          915
                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary
 Voices College-Bound Language Academy Charter                                                                                     895
                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                      Millard McCollam Elementary                                                                                883
                        Alum Rock Union Elementary
                             Northwood Elementary                                                                           874
                         Berryessa Union Elementary
                           Cadwallader Elementary                                                                          866
                                Evergreen Elementary
                              Stonegate Elementary                                                                   850
                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                             Shirakawa Elementary                                                                    849
                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary
               Santa Teresa Elementary, Oak Grove
                               Oak Grove Elementary
                                                                                                                     849
                          James McEntee Academy                                                                     847
                        Alum Rock Union Elementary


                                                         Lowest Scoring Elementary Schools for Low-Income Students 2013 API
                                                         Among all schools in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties
                                Canoas Elementary
                                                                                             704
                                    San Jose Uni ed
                                 Barrett Elementary
                                                                                             704
                                  Morgan Hill Uni ed
                                 Santee Elementary
                                                                                        701
                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary
           Fiesta Gardens International Elementary
                                                                                        700
                              San Mateo-Foster City
                       Ernesto Galarza Elementary
                                                                                        700
                                    San Jose Uni ed
                               Parkside Elementary
                                                                                        699
                              San Mateo-Foster City
                             Panorama Elementary
                                                                                        698
                                Brisbane Elementary
                          Merritt Trace Elementary
                                                                                       691
                                    San Jose Uni ed
                                   Park Elementary
                                                                                      689
                              San Mateo-Foster City
      Jackson Academy of Music and Math (JAMM)
                                                                                      689
                                  Morgan Hill Uni ed
                 Pescadero Elementary and Middle
                                                                                       688
                        La Honda-Pescadero Uni ed
                              McKinley Elementary
                                                                                       688
                       Franklin-McKinley Elementary
                             Duveneck Elementary
                                                                                      685
                                    Palo Alto Uni ed
                        Farallone View Elementary
                                                                                  682
                                      Cabrillo Uni ed
                               Gardner Elementary
                                                                                 676
                                    San Jose Uni ed
                     Los Robles Magnet Academy
                                                                                 675
                       Ravenswood City Elementary
                         Horace Mann Elementary
                                                                                 673
                                    San Jose Uni ed
                         Alvin S. Hatch Elementary
                                                                                669
                                      Cabrillo Uni ed
                    Katherine R. Smith Elementary
                                                                            663
                               Evergreen Elementary
                                Gar eld Elementary
                                                                           662
                           Redwood City Elementary
                               John Gill Elementary
                                                                           661
                           Redwood City Elementary
                       Empire Gardens Elementary
                                                                           660
                                    San Jose Uni ed
                           Belle Haven Elementary
                                                                           659
                       Ravenswood City Elementary
                             Highlands Elementary
                                                                          653
                              San Mateo-Foster City
                                  Laurel Elementary
                                                                    641
                         Menlo Park City Elementary
                               Springer Elementary
                                                              611
                                Los Altos Elementary



                                                        600         650               700          750   800       850           900           950
Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                                              29
      Figure 20    2013 API for English Language Learners and Low-Income Students
                   High Need Elementary Schools in Silicon Valley
                   (Schools that are Majority Spanish Speaking English Language Learners and Majority Low-Income)

                     SCHOOL                                           DISTRICT                                English   Low
                                                                                                              Learner   Income
                                                                                                              API       API

                     Gilroy Prep Charter                              Gilroy Uni ed                           948       941
                     Rocketship Mateo Sheedy Elementary Charter       Santa Clara County Of ce of Education   837       843
                     Rocketship Mosaic Elementary Charter             Franklin-McKinley Elementary            835       832
                     Rocketship Si Se Puede Academy Charter           Santa Clara County Of ce of Education   827       832
                     Cesar Chavez Elementary                          Alum Rock Union Elementary              825       823
                     Rosemary Elementary                              Campbell Union                          820       828
                     Learning in Urban Community w/High Achievement   Alum Rock Union Elementary              817       820
                     Thomas P. Ryan Elementary                        Alum Rock Union Elementary              810       811
                     Spruce Elementary                                South San Francisco Uni ed              806       799
                     Martin Elementary                                South San Francisco Uni ed              802       805
                     O. S. Hubbard Elementary                         Alum Rock Union Elementary              801       807
                     Rocketship Alma Academy Charter                  Santa Clara County Of ce of Education   797       795
                     Leroy Anderson Elementary                        Moreland                                796       803
                     Anne Darling Elementary                          San Jose Uni ed                         795       805
                     Almaden Elementary                               San Jose Uni ed                         792       802
                     Rocketship Los Suenos Academy Charter            Santa Clara County Of ce of Education   788       778
                     Clyde Arbuckle Elementary                        Alum Rock Union Elementary              784       797
                     Luther Burbank Elementary                        Luther Burbank                          782       773
                     Anthony P. Russo Academy                         Alum Rock Union Elementary              778       791
                     Sherman Oaks Elementary                          Campbell Union                          777       793
                     Washington Elementary                            San Jose Uni ed                         776       797
                     Rocketship Discovery Prep Charter                Santa Clara County Of ce of Education   775       773
                     Mariano Castro Elementary                        Mountain View Whisman                   775       767
                     A. J. Dorsa Elementary                           Alum Rock Union Elementary              775       781
                     Edison-Brentwood Elementary                      Ravenswood City Elementary              773       780
                     Stipe (Samuel) Elementary                        Oak Grove Elementary                    773       764
                     Belle Air Elementary                             San Bruno Park Elementary               763       784
                     Bishop Elementary                                Sunnyvale                               761       752
                     Lowell Elementary                                San Jose Uni ed                         758       779
                     Mildred Goss Elementary                          Alum Rock Union Elementary              757       773
                     Costano Elementary                               Ravenswood City Elementary              753       763
                     Eliot Elementary                                 Gilroy Uni ed                           747       748
                     Taft Elementary                                  Redwood City Elementary                 744       750
                     Robert Sanders Elementary                        Mt. Pleasant Elementary                 743       745
                     Scott Lane Elementary                            Santa Clara Uni ed                      741       738
                     Mt. Pleasant Elementary                          Mt. Pleasant Elementary                 734       721
                     Fair Oaks Elementary                             Redwood City Elementary                 733       741
                     Willow Oaks Elementary                           Ravenswood City Elementary              729       739
                     Hawes Elementary                                 Redwood City Elementary                 719       728
                     Hoover Elementary                                Redwood City Elementary                 717       737
                     Green Oaks Academy                               Ravenswood City Elementary              715       712
                     Selma Olinder Elementary                         San Jose Uni ed                         714       734
                     P. A. Walsh Elementary                           Morgan Hill Uni ed                      713       723
                     Daniel Lairon Elementary                         Franklin-McKinley Elementary            710       715
                     Edenvale Elementary                              Oak Grove Elementary                    709       721
                     Selby Lane Elementary                            Redwood City Elementary                 707       727
                     Grant Elementary                                 San Jose Uni ed                         698       712
                     Santee Elementary                                Franklin-McKinley Elementary            685       701
                     McKinley Elementary                              Franklin-McKinley Elementary            680       688
                     Los Robles Magnet Academy                        Ravenswood City Elementary              665       675
                     Gardner Elementary                               San Jose Uni ed                         665       676
                     John Gill Elementary                             Redwood City Elementary                 657       661
                     Pescadero Elementary and Middle                  La Honda-Pescadero Uni ed               656       688
                     Gar eld Elementary                               Redwood City Elementary                 642       662
                     Belle Haven Elementary                           Ravenswood City Elementary              639       659
                     Empire Gardens Elementary                        San Jose Uni ed                         638       660

Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                          30
                          Endnotes
                          1
                              Index of Silicon Valley 2013, siliconvalleycf.org/sites/default/files/2013-jv-index.pdf

                          2
                              Blacks, Latinos and women lose ground at Silicon Valley tech companies, San Jose Mercury News,
                          Feb. 13, 2010, mercurynews.com/ci_14383730

                          3
                              The College Advantage: Weathering the Economic Storm, Georgetown Center on Education and
                          the Workforce, Aug. 15, 2012, ww9.georgetown.edu/grad/gppi/hpi/cew/pdfs/CollegeAdvantage.
                          FullReport.081512.pdf

                          4
                              Economic Success Metrics Program, College Measures, collegemeasures.org/esm

                          5
                              Held Back: Addressing Misplacement of 9th Grade Students in Bay Area School Math Classes,
                          Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area, siliconvalleycf.org/sites/default/
                          files/lccr_report_9th_grade_math_misplacement_2013.pdf

                          6
                              The Forgotten Middle: Ensuring that All Students Are on Target for College and Career Readiness
                          before High School, ACT, 2008, act.org/research/policymakers/reports/ForgottenMiddle.html

                          7
                              Divided We Fail, Campaign for College Opportunity, Nov. 21, 2011, collegecampaign.org/
                          resource-library/our-publications/divided-we-fail

                          8
                              Improving Developmental Mathematics Education in Community Colleges, Sept. 23 to 24, 2010,
                          National Center for Postsecondary Research, Jenna Cullinane and Uri Treisman, postsecondaryre-
                          search.org/conference/pdf/ncpr_Panel4_CullinaneTreismanPaper_Statway.pdf

                          9
                              The Condition of College and Career Readiness 2012, ACT, act.org/newsroom/data/2012/states/
                          pdf/Hispanic.pdf

                          10
                               For a Middle-Class Life, College is Crucial, Anthony P. Carnevale, New York Times, March 1, 2012,
                          nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/03/01/should-college-be-for-everyone/for-a-middle-class-life-
                          college-is-crucial

                          11
                               Help Wanted, Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, June 2010, ww9.georgetown.
                          edu/grad/gppi/hpi/cew/pdfs/HelpWanted.ExecutiveSummary.pdf




Innovate Public Schools                                                                                                            31
An Innovate Public Schools Publication
Written by Joanne Jacobs
With Matt Hammer and Dr. Linda Murray
December 2013



www.InnovateSchools.org

				
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