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Investigation

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					Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies

Annotated Work Sample

Assessment Component 2: Course Work To facilitate reliable allocation of marks against the criteria, and assist the marker to discriminate different standards of student responses, a performance standards statement is available from the Aboriginal Studies support materials (return to the Aboriginal Studies menu to access these support materials) To indicate the standard of the attached piece of the student work, shading has been used on a grid below to show high, satisfactory, or low achievement for each clarifying question within the criteria. Caution should be used when interpreting the information on this grid. Teachers are advised to adopt a balanced approach when determining how well a student has addressed each criterion, rather than being limited by precise allocation of marks to each clarifying question. That is, deficiencies in one indicator can be offset by higher achievement in another, to determine the overall mark for a criterion. Contemporary Issues: Aboriginal Health This is an example of an ‘A’ standard piece of student work. The criteria selected by the teacher for this task were Investigation and Communication. Investigation The content of the pamphlet reflects thorough investigation. This is further supported by the final paragraph of the rationale and the bibliography. The student shows sensitivity in learning from, and addressing Aboriginal people. The pamphlet synthesises the information concisely. Communication The pamphlet is a thoughtfully constructed and informative tool. The choice of colours and the visual text are appropriate for the target audience and well justified in the student’s rationale. The bilingual dimensions increase the culturally sensitive and effective dimensions of the pamphlet.

Please note: SSABSA strives to treat Indigenous cultures and beliefs with respect. Indigenous persons who may be offended are warned that document may contain the names of deceased persons. SSABSA has permission from the student to use this work. Any errors in the original work have been replicated in this exemplar.

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Stage 2 Aboriginal Studies, Course Work
Investigation
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Performance Standards
Satisfactory Achievement well structured, thoughtful investigation of the issues; productive participation in discussions in appropriately, culturally sensitive ways; sound use of primary and secondary Aboriginal sources. Low Achievement little evidence of the issues; little evidence of participation in discussions in appropriate, culturally sensitive ways; little use of some primary and secondary Aboriginal sources

High Achievement intuitively and sensitively thoughtful and incisive investigation of the issues; highly productive participation in discussions, to listen and speak with Aboriginal people in appropriate, culturally sensitive ways; sophisticated extrapolation and synthesis of information from primary and secondary Aboriginal sources.

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Understanding
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High Achievement strong evidence of appreciation of the diverse points of view of Aboriginal people on issues; acute and incisive understanding of the effects of racism; highly effective recognition of, and countering arguments against, racism.

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Satisfactory Achievement sound evidence of appreciation of the diverse points of view of Aboriginal people on issues; good general understanding of the effects of racism; satisfactory recognition of, and countering arguments against, racism..

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Low Achievement little evidence of appreciation of the diverse points of view of Aboriginal people on issues; little evidence of understanding of the effects of racism; little evidence of recognition of, and countering arguments against, racism.

Critical Analysis High Achievement  well thought out and structured opinions, clearly linked to sound reasoning and analysis;
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Satisfactory Achievement clearly constructed opinions, linked to reasoning/analysis; satisfactory analysis of contemporary issues and topics.

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Low Achievement opinions often unsubstantiated by sound reasoning; narrative/descriptive summaries, often brief, rather than analysis of contemporary issues and topics.

highly skilled critical analysis of contemporary issues and topics.

Communication
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High Achievement effective, culturally sensitive and aware communication in both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal contexts.

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Satisfactory Achievement satisfactory communication in both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal contexts.

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Low Achievement little evidence of communication in both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal contexts.

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Health Reflection: Heart Disease I chose to create a pamphlet on Heart Disease because I thought that it was an easier way for me to present my message about the causes and prevention of heart disease. I was able to fit more information in to the pamphlet than a 3-4 minutes radio broadcast or poster. It also helped that there was enough room to display my information in another language to make it more reliable to Indigenous people who can’t read English very well. At first I wanted to focus on Diabetes or substance abuse because these are issues that I have witnessed in my family. They are recognised a lot around the community and heart disease is not something that I am not familiar with but it is a major problem. I get the impression that it is widely ignored. Aboriginal people are getting the message to quit smoking, and drinking but because all the bad substances have already passed through their bodies there is an increased risk of suffering from heart disease in the future. Quitting one thing is good but there are other factors like eating nutritious foods and exercising that can improve quality of life. I didn’t focus on anything else because I didn’t want to have a comparative assignment to other students and there is so much stuff out there I just had to put it all together. If my assignment could be more informative than I would have rather chose heart disease over a different disease that required extra research because it was all there. My pamphlet targets mothers to teach their children early in life about growing older, healthier. Their children will remember as they get older and this may change the future of indigenous Australians once they learn the benefits of eating nutritious foods and giving up the bad substances. Mothers talk to other mothers and I believe it is the right audience to target. I chose mothers as my target audience because the fact is that there are many Indigenous mothers out there. Women are also more likely to go in to a clinic/CONGRESS or other health centre and pick up a brochure just for simple reading. Women, I believe, have no shame (or have least shame then men) in regards to looking after themselves ant their children. It wouldn’t be effective to address my pamphlet at elderly Aboriginal people although they too would benefit from change in their lifestyle. There are some parts that I think would be most successful  Language Interpretation  Familiarity of subjects in diagram  Colour I believe that the Arrernte translation in my pamphlet would reach a wider reading audience and the idea that there is not shame in their own language because I know it can be an embarrassing thing when you don’t know how to read. It will provide the non-English readers with the knowledge of heart disease. Having the language translation would be comforting to the Arrernte people who would read the pamphlet because they may feel a connection with it.

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I used the food pyramid because it is a simple diagram that explores everyday food intake. The pictures are easy to look at and may even encourage people to read inside if they saw it on a stand. The colour of the pamphlet is bright overall with a lot red, yellow and black, the Aboriginal colours. It would be successful in the same way that colours are recognisable and the familiarity is strong. I also believe the language interpretation would work against me because there may be a few people who don’t know how to read there own language but I have the created the English translation to be simple to read so it wouldn’t be much of a problem. Overall I think it would be successful because of its simplicity. A lot of the information I collected was from the CONGRESS talk and the nurses that came to visit the class. Also from a couple of the videos we watched: “Health, a holistic approach” and “Crossing the Line”. They had a lot to say about the basic needs of the Aboriginal people and the areas in which they lacked exercise, nutritional food and were dependent on the Government’s help to improve conditions. My Mum is not an expert but she gave me some ideas on things. My Nana Mag, she translated the English in to Arrernte for me.

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Bibliography Angela Pick (Remote Health Nurse, Territory Health), May 2005 Australian Film Commission, Crossing the Line, 2005 Charmaine Nicholls (Branch Manager, CONGRESS), May 2005 Department of Education, Employment & Training, Health- A Holistic Approach, 1998 Jenny Haines (Remote Health Nurse, Territory Health), May 2005 Jenny Hampton (Aboriginal Health Workers), May 2005-06-17 Pat Corpus (Aboriginal Health Worker), May 20050 Paul Ryan (Community Health Programs Manger, CONGRESS), May 2005 Magdalene Lynch (Translator) 10th June 2005

Note: Reproduction of student’s original tri-fold pamphlet follows.

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