Docstoc

Physics 1A - Download as DOC

Document Sample
Physics 1A - Download as DOC Powered By Docstoc
					Physics 1AL Introduction

CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM: Part 1

Sum05 Rev3

You have a summer job at Amtrak with a group designing a coupling mechanism that would allow two trains to connect with each other. The mechanism is designed for one train to move carefully into position and couple with another stationary train. Since the trains may be carrying different cargo, their masses may be different when they couple. Your supervisor wants you to calculate the velocity of the coupled trains as a function of the initial velocity of the moving train and the masses of the trains. You decide to calculate the resulting velocity for a system of two objects sticking together after colliding. You then build a laboratory model using gliders to check your calculation. Your Objective: To experimentally determine the final velocity of two objects that collide and stick together, as a function of their initial velocities and their masses. ______________________________________________________________________________ Pre-lab questions:

Read sections 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 in Serway & Faughn Answer each of the following questions in a few sentences of your own words: 1. What is the definition of momentum (in words)? Is momentum a vector? Is kinetic energy a vector? 2. A very massive football player is said to have a great deal of momentum as he runs down the field. Can a much less massive player have the same momentum? Explain. 3. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the momenta of objects 1-5. Show reasoning for your order.
1 30 g 1 m/s 2 30 g 2 m/s 3 15 g 3 m/s 4 15 g 1 m/s 5 300 g 0.1 m/s

4. Describe conservation of momentum (in words). Explain the concept of an “isolated system”. 5. Take a small bouncy ball and throw it at a brick wall. Catch it when it comes back to you. What is its momentum before the bounce? What is its momentum after the bounce? How can momentum be conserved here? 6. How is an elastic collision different from an inelastic collision? How are they similar? Give an everyday example of each. Explain your reasoning. 7. How is an inelastic collision different from a perfectly inelastic collision? Give an everyday example of a perfectly inelastic collision. Explain your reasoning.

1

Physics 1AL

CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM: Part 1

Sum05 Rev3

8. Draw diagrams showing a situation where a moving train collides with a train that is not moving. Assume that after the collision the trains stick together. Show separate diagrams for the situation just before the collision and just after the collision. Assume the trains have different masses. Make sure you identify your isolated system. 9. Write down the momentum conservation equation for the scenario in question #8. 10. Write down the initial and final energy of the scenario described in #8. Will the initial and final energies of the system be the same? Read through the lab before coming to class.

LAB WORK A. Becoming Familiar with the Photogates
How the photogates work: The photogates measure the amount of time an object remains inside the gate. In the case of this experiment, the photogates measure the amount of time it takes for the flag attached to the glider to pass through the gate (in seconds). A1. Can you calculate the velocity of the glider with the photogates? If so, how? If not, what other information do you need? A2. Open the file week7.xmbl using Logger Pro. A3. Start collecting data and try pushing a glider with a flag through one gate. Note that Logger Pro gives the total time it takes for the flag to pass through the gate. Only record data accurate to 10ms (i.e. 0.01 sec). Note that a red LED will light on top of the gate when something is in the middle. A4. Try pushing the glider so that it passes through both gates. What is the velocity of the glider as it passes through each of the gates? Record your raw data and your calculations in your notebook. Make sure the units of the velocity are m/s. A5. Is your track level? How can you tell? If the track is not level, trim its angle by adjusting the legs of the track? A6. Is the track frictionless? How can you tell?

B. Perfectly Inelastic Collisions
Prediction: B1. Choose a mass for each of the gliders to perform the experiment. The TA will tell each table which combination of masses to use. Keep the weights balanced on the glider (left vs. right).

2

Physics 1AL

CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM: Part 1

Sum05 Rev3

B2. Consider the following scenario: a moving glider collides with a glider at rest, and after the collision, the gliders stick together. Make a diagram of this scenario, showing the system before the collision and after the collision. Show and label velocity vectors for every object in your drawing (be conscientious about the relative lengths of these vectors; use the same values for the masses of the gliders that you have been given for the actual experiment in Step B1). B3. Which conservation principle(s) should you use to predict the final velocity of the stuck-together gliders? Why? B4. Look at your answers for the pre-lab questions #9 and #10. Identify all the terms in the equation. Write down which physical quantities all the variables correspond to in your notebook. Are there any of these terms that cannot be measured with the equipment at hand?

Prediction:

Solve the appropriate equations to find the final velocity of the gliders in terms of the measurable variables. Experimental Practice: B5. For good balance make sure the mass is as evenly distributed to each side of the glider as possible. Install the pin on one glider and the wax cup on the other. B6. Practice colliding the gliders without taking data. Make sure the gliders move freely along the track. You will only get good results if the gliders don‟t collide too harshly – the pin should not „bottom out‟ in the cup. Observe qualitatively what happens. How does the final velocity of the stuck-together glider compare to the initial velocity of the moving glider? Discuss both magnitude and direction. Does this make sense? B7. Place the glider on the side of the track where the initially moving glider will start. Give the glider a push toward to stationary glider. When performing this experiment, use a range of initial velocities. Experiment & Analysis: B8. Make a table for your results. Your table should include all raw data and all calculations. Please include both time measurements from the photogates, both calculated velocities, and any other information that you feel is relevant. All columns should be labeled and should include units. If a calculation is made, the column containing the result should include the equation used to make the calculation. An example for a measurement of a speed is shown but your table will have more columns than this. Time [s] Distance [m] Speed[m/s] (Distance/Time) 5.5 6.1 6.3 5.8 1.565 1.559 1.562 1.550 0.28 0.26 0.25 0.27

B9. Make a run. Are there any peculiarities that you notice during the trial that might suggest that the data are unreliable? B10. Determine the initial and final velocities of the gliders from your experimental data.

3

Physics 1AL

CONSERVATION OF MOMENTUM: Part 1

Sum05 Rev3

B11. Determine the predicted final velocity of the glider using the initial velocity from the data and your Prediction equation. B12. Repeat steps B9-B11 five times with a range of initial velocities. Include each of your six data points in your table. Be sure to keep in mind the error associated with the photogates when recording your results in your table. B13. Make a plot of the final velocity of your glider from your experimental data verses the initial velocity of glider one. Please plot six data points on this graph. Remember, when making a plot, the independent variable goes on the x-axis and the dependent variable goes on the y-axis. In this situation, which variable is which? On this graph, please include error bars and a “best fit line.” Ask your TA for assistance if these are unfamiliar to you. B14. Find the slope of the best fit line for your plot. Compare this slope to predicted slope from your Prediction equations. How do these quantities compare? Is momentum conserved? Conclusion: How do your predicted and measured values of the final velocity compare? Compare both magnitude and direction. Did you find that momentum was always conserved? If not, can you state a range of initial velocities for which momentum was conserved? Explain? Class Discussion: There are three trains on a single track. The middle train is stationary, while the other two are moving towards the middle train from opposite sides. The two outer trains will collide with the inner train at the exact same moment, coupling and making one massive train. Calculate the final velociy of the new, mega-train given that train one has mass M1 and velocity v1 to the right, train two has mass M2, and train three has mass M3 and velocity v3 to the left. Check your skills: Suppose a 60.0 g mass moving at 3.0 m/s collides with another 60.0 g mass initially at rest. The two masses stick together. What is the final speed? How much energy is lost? Express the energy lost as a percentage of the initial energy.

Post-lab questions:
1. Train A (mass = 4500 kg) successfully couples with a Train B (mass = 3700 kg). Train A is moving at 5.0 m/s before the collision, and Train B is initially at rest. What is the final velocity of the coupled trains? What is the initial kinetic energy? What is the final kinetic energy? How much kinetic energy is lost? What fraction of the initial KE is lost? (Hint: refer to part B of this lab) 2. A 60.0 kg archer, standing on frictionless ice, shoots a 170 g arrow at a speed of 160 m/s. What is the recoil speed of the archer? 3. An ordinary example of conservation of momentum occurs for firefighters using big hoses to direct water onto fires. At the end of a hose is a nozzle. What happens to the speed of the water as it passes through the nozzle? Explain why it takes several fit and strong fire fighters to hold a big hose delivering water onto a fire. 4. Please do a write-up for the section of the lab that your TAs specified. You can download an example off the class website.

4


				
DOCUMENT INFO