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Lisa Valente

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					Lisa Valente Kickapoo Nation School lvalente921@yahoo.com Lesson Title: Comparative Maya and Native American Study Class/Grade Level: High School Geography High School Global Issues High School History (world and/or U.S. history) Goals/Objectives: TSWBAT… 1. define indigenous 2. compare/contrast the current Maya political, economic, and cultural situation in Guatemala to that of Native Americans in the United States 3. identify the goals of the Maya Movement 4. create and complete an interview to assess the relationship between personal perspective and Native American history 5. use primary source documents and personal experiences to hypothesize as to broader implications historically and presently Curriculum Standards Addressed: High School Geography Benchmark 4: Human Systems: The student understands how economic, political, cultural, and social processes interact to shape patterns of human populations, interdependence, cooperation, and conflict. Application Indicator 5: The student gives examples of how cultural cooperation and conflict are involved in shaping the distribution of and connections between cultural, political, and economic spaces on Earth (e.g., cultural: Hindu vs. Muslims in India; political: International Court of Justice and Hong Kong; economic: World Trade Organization). High School World History Benchmark 5: The student engages in historical thinking skills. Application Indicator 1: The student analyzes a theme in world history to explain patterns of continuity and change over time. Application Indicator 3: The student uses primary and secondary sources about an event in world history to develop a credible interpretation of the event, forming conclusions about its meaning (e.g., use provided primary and secondary sources to interpret a historical-based conclusion). High School U.S. History Benchmark 5: The student engages in historical thinking skills. Application Indicator 3: The student uses primary and secondary sources about an event in U.S. history to develop a credible interpretation of the event,

evaluating on its meaning (e.g., uses provided primary and secondary sources to interpret a historical-based conclusion). Time/Class Period Required: 3-4 45-minute class periods Prior Knowledge: 1. Students should be familiar with basic information about the geography, economics, politics, and education of Guatemala 2. Students should be familiar with history of the Maya Movement, the Peace Accords, the current Maya movement, and the challenges and future of the Maya Movement Materials/Supplies: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Lecture Notes and/or PowerPoint: Introduction to Guatemala Venn Diagram Handout Computers with internet access Lecture Notes and/or PowerPoint: The Maya Movement Interview with Pecal B’alam Interview assignment handout

Primary Source Bibliography: According to the Kansas Standards for history, a primary source is a “first-hand account of an event, person, or place.” The interviews that the students will conduct, will become primary source documents. Interview with Pecal B’alam Other Resources: Lonely Planet: Guatemala 2004, 2nd edition Lecture notes from the University of Kansas Fulbright-Hayes Seminar Abroad in Guatemala Target Vocabulary: Indigenous – the first inhabitants of an area, native Strategy/Procedure for Lesson: Day One 1. Introduction to Guatemala 2. Distribute and explain the Venn Diagram Assignment: a Venn diagram is a graphic depiction of similarities and differences between two or more things or concepts 3. Students complete Venn Diagram Assignment 4. Compare and discuss Venn Diagrams as a class Day Two

1. The Maya Movement 2. Read/discuss interview with Pecal B’alam 3. Introduce and explain the Interview Assignment to the class Day Three 1. Interview presentations and discussion 2. Journal Entry: Using the primary source documents you all have collected, as well as the interview with Pecal B’alam, compare and contrast the personal experiences, reflections, and feelings expressed in these interviews with your own experiences and feelings. What might these experiences reveal about the world in general (both historically and presently)? Assessment/Evaluation: 1. Venn Diagram 2. Interview Assignment 3. Interview Presentation and discussion 4. Journal Entry Suggestions for adaptation: This lesson was written specifically for a Native American population. Adjustments can be easily implemented, however, to accommodate a variety of student populations. For example, a teacher may choose to focus the cross-cultural comparison on a minority group in the United States other than Native Americans. A teacher may also compare the personal perspectives of a dominate U.S. group with those of the indigenous Maya. The adaptations for this lesson are endless.


				
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