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					Table of Contents
COST OF LIVING AS A POSTGRADUATE STUDENT ...................................... 3 ON-CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION........................................................................ 3 OFF-CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION...................................................................... 4 LIVING WITH A LOCAL FAMILY .................................................................................... 4 SELF-CATERING ACCOMODATION................................................................................ 4 LEASES AND RIGHTS ................................................................................................... 5 OFF-CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION INFORMATION FROM DCU ....................................... 5 REGISTRATION ........................................................................................................ 6 POSTGRADUATE STUDENT FACILITIES .......................................................... 6 IRISH HEALTH SYSTEM ............................................................................................... 6 Medical Coverage for EU Citizens in Ireland ....................................................... 6 HEALTH SERVICE IN DCU .......................................................................................... 7 CLUBS & SOCIETIES .................................................................................................... 7 POSTGRADUATE CENTRE ............................................................................................ 7 LIBRARY FACILITIES IN DUBLIN ....................................................................... 8 DCU LIBRARY ........................................................................................................... 8 INTER-LIBRARY LOANS ............................................................................................... 8 VISITING LIBRARIES IN OTHER IRISH UNIVERSITIES .................................................... 8 COLLABORATIVE STUDY ROOMS ................................................................................ 9 POSTGRADUATE AREAS IN THE LIBRARY .................................................................... 9 CHILDREN IN DCU ................................................................................................... 9 PLAYING AREAS .......................................................................................................... 9 CRECHE ...................................................................................................................... 9 PLAYSCHOOL ............................................................................................................ 10 PRIMARY SCHOOL ..................................................................................................... 10 IRISH CENTRE FOR TALENTED YOUTH ...................................................................... 10 ACCOMMODATION FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN .................................................... 10 INFORMATION ON IRELAND ............................................................................. 10 GENERAL FACTS ....................................................................................................... 10 Area ...................................................................................................................... 11 Geography............................................................................................................ 11 Location ............................................................................................................... 11 Peace .................................................................................................................... 11 Language.............................................................................................................. 11 Currency .............................................................................................................. 11 Climate ................................................................................................................. 11 Government .......................................................................................................... 11 TRANSPORT ............................................................................................................. 11 INTERNATIONAL........................................................................................................ 11 NATIONAL................................................................................................................. 12

Bus........................................................................................................................ 12 Train..................................................................................................................... 12 DUBLIN ..................................................................................................................... 13 Bus........................................................................................................................ 13 DART.................................................................................................................... 13 Getting to DCU .................................................................................................... 13 DRIVER'S LICENCES .................................................................................................. 14 Provisional Licences ............................................................................................ 14 MOVING TO IRELAND ................................................................................................ 15 Visas and Passports ............................................................................................. 15 Cars ...................................................................................................................... 15 Religion in Irish Life ............................................................................................ 15 Public and National Holidays .............................................................................. 15 Tourist information .............................................................................................. 16

Cost of living as a Postgraduate student
See www.dcu.ie/student/finan/guide.html for general information from DCU about the cost of living. We will soon draw up our own version of this, based on personal experience …

On-campus accommodation
There are 548 undergraduate rooms and 104 postgraduate rooms oncampus. (With another 435 rooms available soon). The Postgraduate Centre offers accommodation for over 100 postgraduate students on campus. There are 37 apartments with 2,3 or 4 bedrooms (each bedroom with bathroom) on a 12-month lease basis. Entire apartments can be let to small families. Each apartment comprises a kitchen, living room and 2,3 or 4 en-suite bedrooms. Bedrooms have study desks, internet and telephone access. The Centre also has facilities on the ground floor for the use of all postgraduates and researchers on campus, including a Seminar Room, Function Room and Games Room. Monthly rent varies from 315 to 508 euro, depending on which room you take.
www.research.dcu.ie/accommodation.html

For undergraduates, the Larkfield Apartments have 127 units, each with two study bedrooms and a shared living/kitchen/dining area. The Hampstead Apartments consist of 57 units, each with five en-suite bedrooms and a shared living/kitchen/dining area and 3 units each with three en-suite bedrooms and a shared living/kitchen/dining area. The College Apartments are due for completion in 2004 and will become available on a phased basis from September 2003. These new apartments consist of 450 units each with four, five or six en-suite bedrooms. All residences are served by a central reception, run by Campus Residences Ltd. CONTACTS
Patricia Barry Accommodation Administrator Tel: +353 1 700 5646 Fax: +353 1 700 5777 Email: Patricia.Barry@dcu.ie Lorraine McEvoy On Campus Accommodation Assistant Tel: +353 1 700 5903 Fax: +353 1 700 5777 Email: Lorraine.McEvoy@dcu.ie

Off-campus accommodation
The bad news is that students are not very popular people with landlords and you can expect to see „professionals only‟ in lots of advertisements. The good news is that postgraduates are the most popular kind of students to rent to, so emphasise this fact as well as your maturity when trying to find a place to live. Finding accommodation in Dublin can be difficult, therefore incoming students should come to Dublin as early as possible and to allow for at least a couple of days to secure accommodation. A good website for self-catering accommodation is www.daft.ie, where you can post ads and search for accommodation all over Dublin. Also, many newspapers such as the Evening Herald have lots of ads for accommodation every day.

Living with a local family
One option is to live with a local family as a paying guest. You will have your own room with a place to study but otherwise share the house and its facilities with the members of the household. Costs can vary but usually includes meals, heat and light etc. - all of your basic living costs except lunch in college/institution and transport. There are a number of items you need to check and agree on with the host family before you enter an arrangement of this kind. A deposit (usually 2/4 week's rent) is expected from the student/trainee at the point when the agreement is made. This is given back to you when you leave or it is kept instead of your last payment. You pay at least one week in advance but some householders require payment for one month in advance. Householders must provide you with your own keys to the house so you can have access to your own room at all times. Student/trainee guests can expect good study facilities in their room. Check that there is a table/desk and chair, good lighting, shelf space for books, and good heating. You will have access to bath and/shower facilities, and there should be enough wardrobe and storage space in your room for clothes, etc. You will have breakfast and an evening main meal provided by the householder. You should be able to have tea/coffee later in the evening. You need to agree with the host family the degree of access you may have to the kitchen. The householder may wash some small clothes for you (shirts, underwear etc.) as part of the family wash, but you could be responsible for the laundry of large items of clothing yourself. The student lives as part of the family, sharing the living room and having access to TV etc.

Self-catering accomodation
There are three main types of self-catering accommodation: bedsitters, flats (apartments) and houses. Bedsitters are usually for one person. A "bedsit" comprises of one room for sleeping, eating, cooking and living. Bathroom and toilet facilities are usually shared with other tenants.

Flats (apartments) are for one or more persons. One-bed apartments are much in demand, very expensive and very hard to find. The standard is two bedroom apartments. A flat consists of separate living and bedroom areas. It normally has its own bathroom. House sharing is the third self-catering option, where you live in a house with other people, sometimes including the owner. You generally share all rooms in the house except bedrooms. Most city houses throughout Ireland are 3 to 4 bedroom, semidetached, with total areas of 1200 or so square feet. A garden is standard.

Leases and Rights
By law, a tenant is entitled to a rent book or a written tenancy agreement. A lease may also be offered. Don't forget that if you sign a lease, you're committing yourself to renting for a specified period of time - usually a year. So, it's worth checking the terms and conditions carefully. Certain minimum standards apply to all rented accommodations (hot and cold water, appliances in working order, structural repairs, and so on). You can find out more about these standards by contacting Threshold, 19 Mary's Abbey, Dublin 7. Tel: (within Ireland) 01-8726311.

Off-campus accommodation information from DCU
For students who want to live off-campus, there is an Off-Campus Accommodation Coordinator who can give you lots of information on the different kinds of accommodation as well as lists of available accommodation.
Aoife O'Sullivan Off Campus Accommodation Assistant Tel: +353 1 700 5344 Fax: +353 1 700 5777 Email: aoife.osullivan@dcu.ie

Off-campus accommodation lists are available to all students from the Accommodation Service, which is located in Larkfield Apartments (Student Residences). Students wishing to collect any of these lists must produce either their DCU identity card, a letter confirming their course offer or a copy of their CAO offer. They are also available online at www.findahome.ie. International students are advised to contact the Off Campus Accomodation Coordinator before they arrive for information International students are advised to contact the Off Campus Accommodation Coordinator before they arrive for information. Accommodation lists will not be given to non-DCU students or those who have no DCU id. Letting agreements, inventory forms and insurance information and forms are available from the Accommodation Office. Rent books (now obligatory) are available from the SPAR shop on-campus. Make sure to get your copy of the accommodation

handbook, Information and Advice on Accommodation for Students, which are available free from the Off Campus Accommodation Coordinator.

Registration
The Registry in DCU is going to be very important to you from the moment you request information from DCU to the moment you finally leave the college. It is responsible for the University's academic management from the moment when prospective students (both Irish and international) seek information about DCU, through the offer/admission process, registration, record management, examinations and dissemination of results to the Graduation Day. www.dcu.ie/registry/index.html There‟s no point in repeating everything they say, so you are better off having a search around their (sometimes confusing) website to find the information you are looking for. Another very valuable department in the University for research postgrad is the Finance office that provides us with money once a month: www.dcu.ie/finance/index.html

Postgraduate Student Facilities
Irish Health System
Ireland's health care system is modern and efficient. It is also free, if you don't count the taxes that pay for it all. Everyone resident in Ireland is entitled to free public health coverage. Free it may be, but you're also free to wait. Waiting lists for those without private insurance can stretch into years - even for critical operations like heart operations. There are tens of thousands of people waiting for their "free" medical services. Governments are always promising to clear these infamous waiting lists, but generations of neglect mean that even doubling the health budget by many billions of pounds doesn't seem to make a dent. Gradually the new hospitals are opening, medical services such as chemotherapy are reaching into the non-Dublin hinterlands and things are improving. www.dcu.ie/student/useful/index.html

Medical Coverage for EU Citizens in Ireland

Visitors from EU countries are also entitled to free urgent medical care so long as they present form E111 that can be obtained from their own health services before visiting Ireland. Visitors from the United Kingdom are even excused the necessity of having this form, so long as they obtain treatment at a public hospital or doctor participating in the General Medical Service scheme. There are 1,650 General Practitioners who are part of the scheme. A driver's license or other proof of residence in the UK is required.

Health Service in DCU
There is a Health Service in DCU that provides a free (for students) and confidential supportive service on campus. It consists of a team of nursing, medical, physiotherapy and psychiatric health Professionals. Open door access is provided daily (Mon- Fri) to the University Nursing Service with an Appointment System operating for Medical and Physiotherapy Clinics. Students are welcome to attend the Health Service on any health concerns including the following issues:             
Reproductive and Fertility Education Contraception Service Assessment / Treatment & Prevention of Cystitis Nutritional Advice/ Weight Management/ Smoking Cessation Skin Care Psychological Issues Repeat Prescriptions Vaccinations Assessment & Treatment of Infections including flu, digestive problems. Assessment & Treatment of Accidents/Injuries Telephone Consultation and Health Advisory Service Hospital/Dental Referral Service Medical Card Applications & Information Health Entitlements

www.dcu.ie/student/health/index.html

Clubs & Societies
There are loads of different clubs and societies in DCU, and if you look hard enough you will definitely find one that you are interested in. Mainly populated by undergraduates, they are a great source of fun while providing the means to doing something you enjoy. Clubs redbrick.dcu.ie/~scc/ are sports-related groups whereas societies redbrick.dcu.ie/~spc/ are everything else! You have to pay 2.50 euro to join one, but it is well worth it.

Postgraduate Centre
The Postgraduate Centre has facilities on the ground floor for the use of all postgraduates and researchers on campus, including a Seminar Room, Function Room, IT Room, Study Room and Games Room. There is a pool table, widescreen tv and video player as well as some very comfy sofas! If you want to gain access, show

your student ID to Campus Residence (see On-campus accommodation for details) and buy a swipe card for 1.50 euro that will get you in the main entrance.

Library facilities in Dublin
There is a public library just up the road from DCU for anyone who wants to get their hands on fiction or non-academic books. Once you have proof of your address, you can join for free and borrow books, CDs and videos from any of the public libraries in Dublin (www.iol.ie/dublincitylibrary/ ). The nearest one is Ballymun library, near the junction between the Ballymun road and Collins Avenue www.iol.ie/dublincitylibrary/da.htm.

DCU Library
Inter-library loans
Material not held in DCU Library may be requested through the Inter-library Loan Service. Books, journal articles, theses, conference papers, patents and any otherwise unobtainable items, apart from audio materials and videocassettes, may be sourced from other libraries via this service. This service is aimed primarily at academic and research staff and students. www.dcu.ie/~library/Students/ill.htm

Visiting libraries in other Irish Universities
Students from DCU may have access to the libraries of other colleges via the ALCID scheme to consult the material, but you will not be able to borrow from them. www.dcu.ie/~library/Students/visitinglibraries.htm ALCID is a co-operative arrangement between the libraries of: Dublin City University Dublin Institute of Technology Mater Dei Institute NUI Galway NUI Maynooth Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Royal Irish Academy St. Patrick's College, Drumcondra Trinity College, Dublin University College, Dublin University College Cork University of Limerick It is available to all DCU staff and postgraduate (research and taught) students and allows access to the collections of these libraries on production of the common ALCID card. To apply for an ALCID card, go to the Information Desk in the library to complete an application form.

Collaborative Study Rooms
Collaborative Study Rooms are small seminar rooms intended for any DCU students who wish to collaborate in groups for projects or other work. They are not intended for individual use. There are 17 rooms, 1 on the ground floor, and the others distributed throughout the other two floors. www.dcu.ie/~library/Students/collrooms.htm

Postgraduate areas in the Library
A Taught Postgraduate Quiet Study Room is available on the first floor of the Library. The Training Room on the lower ground floor is available for use by Taught Postgraduates who wish to have an opportunity to work on PCs in a quiet environment at times when it is not in use for training purposes. The research commons is located on the lower ground floor of the library. It includes a lounge and reading area, a self-booking research consultation room, and a lobby housing PCs with full internet access to the library‟s electronic research resources. DCU staff engaged in research, DCU PhD and professional doctorate students and DCU Masters by research students can use the research commons.

Children in DCU
Playing areas
There is a nice public park beside DCU called Hampstead Park. It contains an enclosed playground for young children, football pitches, tennis courts as well as plenty of open space.

Creche
There is a crèche on campus that provides a professional day-care service for the infants and young children of students and staff. The fee for 2001/2002 was €133.35 per week per child full time. In the case of full time students without a working partner who are using the crèche full time a subsidy of €63.50 per week of semester time is being funded by Student Affairs and the Students' Union. Application forms are available from Student Affairs. It is important that applicants who intend to use the crèche contact the crèche supervisor as early as possible. It must be noted that the crèche payments can only be offered for the two semesters. There will be two infant places reserved for in-coming new students on a first-come, first-served basis. It is important that applicants contact Catherine Roche in Student Affairs regarding this.

Playschool
There are a number of playschool in the surrounding area that accept young children. They will also take children after school hours.

Primary School
Primary education in Ireland caters for the education of students aged 6 to 12 years. In practice, virtually all 5-year-olds are at school and about half of the country's 4-yearolds also attend school. As a result, much of what is regarded as early childhood education in other countries is included in the Irish primary school system. There are different types of primary school , including publicly funded schools and special schools. There are also private primary schools that do not receive any Government funding. The current and capital costs of primary schools, including teachers' salaries, are borne mainly by the Government and supplemented by local contributions. www.education.ie

Irish Centre for Talented Youth
The Irish Centre for Talented Youth (CTYI) works with young people of exceptional academic ability. Such students have been acknowledged by the Irish Department of Education as having “special educational needs”. The Centre provides services for these students, including Saturday classes, residential summer programmes, correspondence courses and Discovery Days. www.dcu.ie/ctyi

Accommodation for families with children
Depending on availability, entire apartments can be let to small families in the Postgraduate Centre on-campus. For more information, see the section on accommodation. ********************************************************************

Information on Ireland
General Facts
Population
7 million cows, 8 million sheep, 3.6 million people. More than a third of the people live in the Dublin area.

Area
70,282 sq. km There's plenty of open space once you get out of the five main cities of Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Galway, and Waterford.

Geography
Ireland is an island. You can't get more than 150 miles from the sea. The place is WET! If you're not near a beach, then a lake or river isn't far.

Location
The key thing about Ireland's location is that Britain is close. In fact, the northeast 6 counties of Ireland are part of the United Kingdom. This is the part of the island that always makes the news. Meanwhile, the peaceful and quiet 26 counties make up the Republic of Ireland.

Peace
These days, people hear the word Ireland and think of bombs and the peace process. Ireland is really two places - Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The Republic is the South, the 26 counties where peace has reigned for 80 plus years. The goings on up North do not affect the South save as a daily drumbeat of background news. The South is probably one of the most peaceful places on the planet. With continued luck, so too will the North.

Language
English is the language everyone speaks, but there's been an official push for decades to encourage the use of the traditional Celtic language called Irish. This is the everyday language in small bits of Ireland and you'll also find that road signs, television and radio use both languages. A fair percentage of people have some French, German, and more rarely, Spanish.

Currency
Ireland's official currency is now the Euro. The Euro is not only Ireland's money, but works equally well in Spain, Italy, Luxembourg, Germany, Holland, Belgium, France, and Portugal and, in all, 12 European nations..

Climate
Not bad. Moderate year round with winter temperatures averaging 39 F and summer 61 F. It does rain very regularly, but the weather is so changeable that a day that begins with showers often slides into sunshine.

Government
Ireland is a parliamentary democracy. For the past decade various coalitions of parties have ruled in turn. But, policy is notably stable since the populace is fairly uniform in its background and outlook. The Irish Government explains the details in their site.

Transport
International
Ireland is an island, obviously! So you have to take a boat or plane when coming here.

Our neighbour Britain more or less dominates the ferry connections to Ireland, apart from some possibilities from France. It is possible to get a coach to Dublin from mainland Europe with a company such as Eurolines www.eurolines.com/. They will take you from any of the major European cities onto the ferry to Britain, through Britain and onto the next ferry to Ireland. However, it‟s a LONG, TIRING journey but if you don‟t mind that it can be the cheapest option at times.

There are lots of different flights to Ireland from Europe and a few from transatlantic countries, but most long-distance flights involve transferring in European hubs such as London, Paris, Frankfurt or Amsterdam. You will probably land in Dublin (www.dublin-airport.com) Airport if you are coming to DCU. Ryanair (www.ryanair.com) offer cheap direct flights to Dublin from London, Paris and Brussels. Slightly more expensive, but arguably with it, Aer Lingus (www.aerlingus.com) offer lots of flights to Dublin from all over Europe as well as direct flights from America. Have a look at the official Irish tourist website for lots more detail www.ireland.travel.ie/gettinghere/.

National
Public transport in Ireland, although improving, is still far below the standard of many other countries. Transport is late (this is Ireland!), often too full and doesn‟t covering lots of places you want to get to. Some things are excellent though, such as the intercity connection to Belfast and Cork, and they really are trying very hard.

Bus
Bus Eireann (www.buseireann.ie) is the national bus operator, offering expressway services through all the main towns and cities in Ireland. It is definitely the cheapest way to travel, and students get discounts when you show your student ID. Most busses leave Dublin from Bus Aras, located between O‟Connell Street and Connelly Train station.

Train
Iarnroid Eireann (www.irishrail.ie) is the national train company and covers most of Ireland. Our trains have a magnetic attraction to Dublin, in that every main train route starts or ends in Dublin. Good for Dublin people, but very annoying for everyone else! Anyway, there are 2 very important train stations in Dublin; Heuston and Connolly station. You can get a north or southbound train from Connolly Train Station and a train to everywhere else from Heuston station. The number 90 bus connects the two stations. Tickets are more expensive than travelling by bus, but are more spacious, faster and you have a more scenic journey.

Dublin
Getting around the Dublin region can be done using the bus, DART (Dublin Area Rapid Transport), car, taxi, bicycle or using your feet.

Bus
Dublin Bus provides bus services in Dublin city and county. They operate from 06.00 -23.30 on weekdays with a limited late night bus service (Nitelinks) on Thursday, Friday and Saturday departing the city centre every 20 minutes from 00.30 till 04.30. Timetables for buses including details of various money-saving commuter and tourist tickets are sold in retail shops and other stores throughout the Dublin region. The Dublin Bus Information Office is at 59 Upper O'Connell Street and there is also a Dublin Bus desk in the Dublin Tourism Centre, Suffolk Street, Dublin 2 Tel: +353 1 8734222 www.dublinbus.ie

DART

The DART suburban rail service operates between Malahide at the Northernmost tip of the scenic eastern coastal strip, and Greystones to the South. Enquire at any of the 25 stations along the route about train times and the variety of travel ticket options available. Tel: +353 1 7033504 www.dart.ie

Getting to DCU
DCU is quite near the airport, so its easy to get a bus or taxi to the University. There is no direct connection from the airport to DCU, so if you have luggage, splash out on a taxi that should cost around 12 euro and takes around 15 minutes. If you are travelling light, you can get any bus travelling to the city centre and walk around 15 minutes to the University. From the city centre, it takes between 20 and 40 minutes to get the bus to DCU. The bus routes serving the campus are indicated on the University location map. Bus timetables for all Dublin Bus routes servicing the campus are available online, while Bus Eireann also offers timetable information on their website. DCU is serviced by the following routes: 103, 105, 11, 116, 11A, 11B, 13A, 19A, 46X, 58X, 77B: 1. Number 103 departs from Clontarf DART Station and the Omni Shopping Centre. 2. Number 105 operates from Malahide and leaves DCU at 15.40 and 17.20 during term time. 3. Numbers 11 and 11A service the city centre and Kilmacud from Wadelai Park and stops in O’Connell Street. The 11B also services the city centre and Belfield from Wadelai Park. The 13A services the city centre and Merrion Square from Poppintree. The 19A services the city centre and as far as Limeklin Avenue from Jamestown Road. 4. Number 116 services DCU to Ballinteer and Clonskea. 5. Numbers 46X and 58X (zone 2) run from Leeson Street Lower to Dublin Airport.

Number 77X runs from Jobstown to DCU, however there is no departure from DCU.

Driver's Licences
Transfers of Existing Licences Holders of a driving licence issued by any of the countries listed below may exchange it for an Irish licence for the same vehicle classes upon taking up permanent residence in Ireland, without having to sit a driving test. But, such a transfer must be done within one year of arrival.

Australia Austria Belgium Denmark Finland France Germany Gibraltar Greece Iceland Isle of Man Italy

Japan Jersey Liechtenstein. Luxembourg Netherlands Norway Portugal South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland UK

If you come from a different country, you can drive for up to a year using your International Driving licence, and rent a car indefinitely. If you own or buy a private car, you must obtain an Irish driving licence to continue driving after the first year of living in Ireland.

Provisional Licences
Current pass rates nationally are 55%. Not only does nearly one out of two fail, you'll have to wait months for the privilege of doing so. Waiting times for driving tests are up to 13 weeks long. Holders of a driving licence from any other country must pass a driving test before an Irish licence can be granted. Before undergoing this test a provisional licence may be obtained from the appropriate regional licensing authority (usually the county offices in your area). The procedure for getting a provisional licence has become a huge paperwork hassle since a new system was instituted in January 2002. You'll need to take a driving theory test, get an eye exam, produce assorted documents proving your age and hand over some money. However, once you're sent your provisional licence, you'll also be given a form to apply for a driver's test. Current waiting time is about 10 weeks, though it varies somewhat between jurisdictions. So once you've got the form, send it off right away to the Department of the Environment in Dublin together with the fee. In a few weeks you'll receive a reply detailing the date and time of your driving test. Full details of the test and the licence, together with application forms, may be obtained from:

Department of the Environment (Driver Testing) Government Buildings, Ballina, Co. Mayo, Tel: +353-96-70677 Fax: +353-96-70680

Moving to Ireland
Visas and Passports
Before you make big plans, make sure that you CAN come and stay in Ireland. Most western passport holders can visit Ireland for 90 days without a Visa, and citizens of the European Union can work in Ireland without a work permit or a passport - a national identity card will suffice. However, if you are not a citizen of the European Union, and even if you are, the best thing is to check it out.

Cars
Cars that have been more than 6 months in your ownership may be brought in duty free when you move here. You'll still have to pay Vehicle Registration Tax the same as everyone else. Car insurance is very expensive though, especially for young male drivers.

Religion in Irish Life
92% of the Republic of Ireland's population is Roman Catholic. Catholicism plays a large part in most public schools where the kids normally start each class with a prayer and whole schools celebrate mass occasionally. However, religious dicrimination is practically non-existant in the Republic of Ireland. In the early 1990's, a rural Irish constituency elected a Muslim representative to the Dail or Parliament.

Public and National Holidays
         

New Year's Day (January 1), if falling on a weekday, or if not, the next day. St Patrick's Day (March 17), if falling on a weekday, or if not, the next day. Good Friday - the Friday before Easter. Easter Monday - the day after Easter. May Holiday - the first Monday in May. June Holiday - the first Monday in June. Summer Holiday - the first Monday in August. October Holiday - the last Monday in October. Christmas Day, if falling on a weekday or, if not, the next Tuesday. St Stephen's Day (December 26), if falling on a weekday or, if not, the next day.

Tourist information
www.ireland.travel.ie/home/ (Irish tourism) http://www.visitdublin.com/ (Dublin Tourism) http://www.hostels-ireland.com/ (Independent holiday hostels) http://www.cie.ie/home/ (public transport in Ireland) www.dublin-airport.com (Dublin airport) www.usitnow.ie/countries/ireland (USIT) www.lonelyplanet.com/ (Lonely Planet)


				
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