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					Newsletter
Vol. 21, No. 2 Genealogical Society of Washtenaw County, Michigan 14 January 2003
MEETING PROGRAMS January 26, 2003 - Carolyn Griffin will speak on “Revolutionary War Research.” For the class after, Connie Olson will cover “Joining a Hereditary Society” with some comment on the use of the DAR Library. February 23, 2003 - President Marcia McCrary will speak on the “Finding Your Lumbering Ancestors in Michigan.“ The class after will be on “Planning Your Research Trip” by Sharon Brevoort. March 23, 2003 - Mrs. Betty Klavitter will speak on “Research in New York City, Brooklyn and the Bronx.” The session after will be made up of a panel of members who have done research in various counties in New York. April 27, 2003 - The speaker will be announced later. The class will be conducted by Marcia McCrary on “How to Write a Query.” May 18, 2003 - Annual Business Meeting and Election of Officers. Program is to be announced later. The class after will be “There Are No Dumb Questions in Your Genealogical Research.” A panel of members will answer questions of attendees. Bring in your questions. Note, the meeting is May 18 because Memorial Day is the 26th. 2002 GSWC WORKSHOP It's not often that you get a chance to step back from your struggles with ancestors who insist on remaining hidden, and get a chance to look at them in new lights. On October 26, 2002, Sandra Hargreaves Luebking provided the Genealogical Society of Washtenaw County, and other visitors with that opportunity. The all-day workshop at Washtenaw Community College's Morris Lawrence Building included more vendors than you could shake a stick at, and four top-notch presentations. The first, “Fire and Brimstone,” brought listeners ideas on using church records to discover new information. Various groups and addresses, the kinds of records, repositories, and hints of additional places to look, rounded out this eye-opening topic. The second, “From Note to Narrative,” encouraged all to pull together the bits and pieces we have gathered into an account of a life that others would want to read. From Why to How to adding Impact to Proof reading, this made me want to go grab an ancestor and share him with the world. After the box lunches and good conversation were finished, Sandra led us through “Trials and Tribulations.” Were you lucky enough to have a relative who had to go to COURT? She covered the possible reasons for the generation of these records, as well as where to find them, along with a dynamite bibliography. The final session, “Circumventing Blocked Lines,” gave many fresh ideas, and reminded us of some techniques we probably had thought of, but perhaps never tried.
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All in all, this was a most successful day, with fellow enthusiasts right at hand. Special thanks needs to be given to all the Society members who made this such a smooth flowing event, as well as Pro-Quest who gave us a generous donation for the breakfast, and many additional items. - Marcia McCrary 2002 GSWC WORKSHOP VENDORS The vendors that showed their items for sale at the workshop are listed below. Perhaps you saw something there that you wished you had purchased. Here is your chance to order it. - R L Miller Family Tree House - Don & Connie Ayres - Variety of books, maps and tapes, 7484 Indian Rd., Temperence, MI 48182, <ayresdr@aol.com> Fossil Tree - Christine Zywocki - Large variety of genealogy items and album accessories, 10060 Bancroft, Holland, OH 43528-8881, <Christine.Zywocki msn.com> Michiana History Publications - John Palmer Used books dealing with history and genealogy, PO Box 1537, South Bend, IN 46634, <rockingk@michiana.org> Creative Memories - Lyn Davidge - Album Accessories, 4551 Maple Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105, <ldavidge@umich.edu> Petersen Reproductions - Beverly Petersen - Fun Stuff for Genealogists, 16305 Chandler Blvd., Mishawaka, IN 46544, <bev@petersenprints.com> Family Tree Imports - Ken & Joanne Harvey, Variety of books, tapes, maps, many Ireland and England books, 2420 Newport Drive, Lansing, MI 48906-3541. Roots2Leaves - Joan Kitchen Murray - Archival products for the family historian, 11045 S. St. Louis Ave. Chicago, IL 60655-3321, <joan@Roots2Leaves.com> Heritage Productions - Laurel Emerson, Variety of books, 68491 Main, Richmond, MI 48012, <laurel48062@yahoo.com> Ancestor Detective - Liz Kerstens - Variety of genealogy material, P.O. Box 6386, Plymouth, MI 481708486, <liz@ancestordetective.com> Livingston County Genealogical Society - Tom Shehan - Variety of books and pamphlets, P.O. Box 1073 Howell, MI 48844, <shehant@chartermi.net> Genealogical Society of Monroe County - Variety of books and maps, P.O. Box 1428, Monroe, MI 481611428. B. Duritsky Grafix - Bonnie Duritsky - Computer enhancement of photographs and documents, 5207 Bennett, Toledo, OH 43612, <bduritskygrafix @aol.com> Pro Quest - Micro films, 300 Zeeb Rd., Scio Twp. MI 48103, 734-761-4700 Ye Olde Genealogical Shoppe - Pat Gooldy – Wide variety of genealogical materials, PO Box 39128, Indianapolis, IN 46239

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Vol. 21, No. 2 Genealogical Society of Washtenaw County, Michigan 14 January 2003
Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War – Austin Blair Camp #7 – Bill Lowe – Civil War graves registration data base, Graves Registration Officer, 3916 Allston Dr., Jackson, MI 49201. <dorbil@prodigy.net> - Karen Nichols MEETING REPORTS The September 22, 2002 speaker was Marge Waterfield whose first topic was Depression Era Records. She pointed out that the Works Progress Administration (WPA) was responsible for putting people to work. To help people prove their births for Social Security enrollment, the WPA soundexed the 1880 census for families with children under ten and all of the 1900, 1910, 1920 census. The 1930 Soundexing was done for a few southern states. WPA people also did Oral Histories, Genealogies and Histories. They also did a Survey of Church Records called the WPA Historical Records Survey. This can be found in many libraries. Indiana recorded birth and death records in all Court Houses. One can find these records at the Allen County Library in Fort Wayne. The Civilian Conservation Corp Camps kept records. Anyone making a query should contact: National Personnel Record Center, Civilian Record Facility, 11 Winnebago St., St. Louis, MO 62118-5761. Also use a search engine on the Internet and type in CCC Camps. This will lead to more information. Michigan had many of these Camps. There is a CCC Museum at North Higgins Lake State Park, Roscommon, Michigan. The Michigan Historical Museum in Lansing also has information. There is a National Association of CCC Alumni. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) project flooded many cemeteries. They had to make records of where these cemeteries were moved. The DAR library has WPA records. All records are now open. Also try <www.nara.gov/guide>. The biggest program is the Social Security Program. Remember, not everyone was covered by it. Farmers, selfemployed, federal employees and teachers were left out at first. In the 1930s and 1940s applications asked for mother’s and father's names. The National Archives Branch in Chicago may have applications. The FBI can be a source of information. Address inquiries to FBI, Attn: Freedom of Information Privacy Act Unit, Office of Public and Congressional Affairs, 93 PA Ave, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20535-0001. In writing to them give your name, address and phone, the date and proof of death in order to get information. There are many interesting things the FBI investigated during the Depression: bootlegging, speakeasies, the KKK (in Midwest it was more against Catholics, in the south against blacks), aliens, and conscientious objectors. Make letters very businesslike. Ask for Main Files and any
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cross-references to other government agencies. – Mary Lou Barry Marge Waterfield's second topic on September 22, 2002 was the Civil War and beyond. In 1890 a special Civil War census was taken which tells where the veteran was living, health problems and may list a widow’s name. Ohio has Veteran's records and grave registrations. WWI records burned and few were saved. Ancestry.com has some of these records. Try Michigan Military Rolls, 19171918. Those in the Mexican War were also considered WWI vets. One might find information through Army Personnel Records, Veterans Administration, American Legion, Veteran's of Foreign Wars Organizations, Deceased Personnel Files are for someone killed overseas. Try Army Personnel Command, Attn: TAPC-PAO (FO1A), 200 Stovall St., Alexandria, VA 22332-0404. It can take 6 to 7 months to get an answer so be patient. American Battle Monuments Commission is on the Internet and gives information and burial location. This site takes you to Arlington National Cemetery first with links to other National Cemeteries. There are Draft Records for WWI: and WWII. These may be State Records from Draft Boards. Check Coast Guard and other jobs on the Great Lakes as well. To request a letter from the President for a Veteran's special occasion, a letter should be addressed to: Office of President Correspondence, Attn: Code VA-WCS, The White House, Washington, D.C. There are many military sites on the Internet. Other places to try would be the State National Guard. Write to Adjutant General National Guard, State Capitol of the state being searched. Other places to try would be Disabled Veterans Records, Veterans Home Records, and don't forget newspapers. Names and pictures of men and women in the service were published and information and deaths were reported throughout the war. A copy of Discharge papers of each veteran was supposed to be filed at the County Court House where the veteran lived after service. This was from the Civil War on. Some courthouses don't even know they have these papers. It was also hit and miss whether they were ever filed. If you had a relative born between 1872 and 1899 he had to register for the draft in WWI. You must know his name, date of birth, town, county and state where he lived when he registered (also his Ward if he was in a large city. Write for a form to the Fed Archive and Record Branch, 1557 St. Joseph Ave, East Point, GA 30344. – Mary Lou Barry At the October 27, 2002 meeting Mrs. Willie M. Edwards spoke on the Underground Railroad in Washtenaw County. She has worked with students at the University of Michigan in compiling and researching this subject. The Underground Railroad was a loosely formed network to help slaves escape. They were helped by Abolitionists from the North and the South, and religious

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Vol. 21, No. 2 Genealogical Society of Washtenaw County, Michigan 14 January 2003
groups. Historians believe thousands were helped but not millions. Some of the names in Ann Arbor who were helpers were John Geddes who had two hiding places in his home, Glazers who were abolitionists and Quakers. Wm. Lloyd Glazier is listed as one of the best conductors in the area. Josiah Beckley and Sumner Hicks, William Perry, Rev. Guy Beckley had stations. The old schoolhouse on Traver Rd had a trapdoor. Sylvester Noble, Capt John Lowry, Selleck Wood who told about taking slaves in wagons to Wyandotte, James Morwick, Eberwhite Farm was a stop, Eli Benton, Sofi and Jacob Falon also were named. In Ypsilanti, Helen Degammo and Family, Mrs. Starkweather, Prescott Family, George McCoy, Mark and Rosina Norris, Asher Aray and Roswell Preston Jr., William Harwood. Many of the homes and stops have been identified and bus trips are being set up to take people on a tour of these places. They eventually hope to have a video and hopefully to get pictures of some of the hiding places still in existence. - Mary Lou Barry Oct. 27, 2002 - The 1930 Census was the topic of Bobbie Snow's class. The 1930 Census date was Tuesday, April 1, 1930. The census is now open for research, all 2,667 rolls. Information on the census includes place of abode (street and # and the # of dwelling in order of visit), name with middle initial, relationship of person to head of family, enumeration of any who kept separate housekeeping (more than one family in dwelling), home owned or rented, value if owned and monthly rent if not, was there a radio set in the home, did person own a farm. Personal descriptions are included: sex, race or color, age at last birthday, marital status, age at first marriage, education and high school or college since September 1929; can person read and write; children are indicated in years and months; place of birth and its location as of 1930 (in case country's name changed); mother tongue spoken before came to US, year of immigration and citizenship status. Citizenship codes are: NA-naturalized; PA-Papers applied for; AL-Alien not naturalized. Children under 21 who were naturalized with one or both parents were also asked. A person's Occupation or Industry, class of work and whether unemployed is also asked. The # on unemployment schedule is indicated. One was asked if a veteran and from which war. NARA has good tutorials on its site. <Google.com>, the search engine, gets you to the 1930 census. Look for books coming out on the census. Southern states have been soundexed. You need maps and to know city boundaries. Use city directories. You may even need to know what side of the street your family lived. Check out Barb's website at <barbsnow.net> and also <gale.ancestry.com>. - Mary Lou Barry MISCELLANEOUS NOTES The Saline Area Historical Society’s big fundraiser, the 16th Annual Antique Show, will take place at the Farm Council Grounds, Friday, January 17, 2003, 11 AM - 7 PM and Saturday 9 AM - 5 PM. Two buildings will be open with 45 dealers. The admission fee is $3. The money raised benefits the Saline Depot and Farm Museums, as well as the Society’s education program. - Agnes Dikeman Allen County Public Library will be closed until the end of January, while moving to their new temporary location for the next couple of years. All genealogy information will be moved and available when they reopen. Information and map for the new location on Berry Street is on their web site. <www.acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy> - Marge Burkheiser The Waterford Genealogy Study Group has read early Pontiac area newspapers from 1835-1860. We have read another old newspaper, The Pontiac Bill Poster, from 1882-1889, which will be indexed and put on the Waterford Township Library Web Site. <www.Waterford.lib. mi.us/adult/agenealo.htm>. We have indexed the Marriages, Deaths and Probate Notices. We have also indexed the Oakland Press obituaries for 1999 and 2000 and are currently working on 2001 and 2002. We will make a copy and only ask for a SASE and donation to cover cost of copies. All money received is used to purchase more genealogical material, which we donate to the Waterford library. - Dorothy Tyndell, 6831 Tangle Wood Lane, Waterford, MI 48327. Dortyn@aol.com Two New Surname Lists - I have started two new surname lists. They deal a lot with Lenawee and Washtenaw Counties. The lists are Jedele and Feldkamp You don't have to be from these two counties to join. To join just send an email to <feldkamp-l-request @rootsweb.com> or <jedele-l-request@rootsweb.com> Put subscribe in the subject line. - Cathy Shelley The State Library of Ohio has moved to 274 East First Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 43201. 614-644-6966. The Genealogy collection includes records for not only Ohio, but also Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky. Five photocopiers and eleven microform reader/printers are available. Food may be eaten in the lounge area. Genealogy Services and online catalog are located at: <http://winslo.state.oh.us/services/genealogy/ index.htm> - Margaret Goodrich The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), consisting of more than 550 members societies and over 500,000 individual genealogists, publishes Forum, a quarterly magazine providing current information to the
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Newsletter
Vol. 21, No. 2 Genealogical Society of Washtenaw County, Michigan 14 January 2003
genealogists. GSWC is a member of FGS so your cost is only $15. See <www.fgs.org/fgs-forum.asp>, for more details and/or online subscription.

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