Grant Writing in the Social Sciences – ARC Overview by hcj

VIEWS: 29 PAGES: 23

									Grant Writing in the Social 
Sciences – ARC Overview

                 Janeen Baxter
         Australian Professorial Fellow
       Member, ARC College of Experts, SBE

 Includes material from various previous presenters 
             OVERVIEW
• ARC allocates about $800 million per 
  year
• Approx $500 million to Discovery 
  projects
• Approx $300 million to Linkages 
  schemes
• Schemes designed to cater to all 
  disciplines and across various career 
  stages
• Schemes are not static
 Before you begin writing:
• Read the ARC Funding Rules and Guide to 
  applicants in detail.

• Look at the College of Experts and think 
  about who is likely to be assigned your 
  grant (usually 2-3 college members and 3-4 assessors).

• Get advice about your grant idea from 
  colleagues with ARC experience – do they 
  like the idea, do they think it is fundable, 
  who should you collaborate with?
   Before you begin writing:
• Familiarise yourself with deadlines (internal 
  deadlines for readership schemes, R&ID 
  deadlines, final ARC deadlines).
• Look at a couple of successful previous 
  grants in your discipline – check with R&ID 
  or ask colleagues.
• Line up a couple of senior colleagues to 
  read a draft (choose people who are not in 
  your specific research area).
• Start early 
    Collaborate with others
• Grants typically assume teams, not individuals – 
  preferences for team-based research in National 
  Competitive Grants schemes and other external 
  funding sources
• Complementary skills/capacities enable teams to do 
  things that individual researchers cannot
• Collaboration builds networks and helps 
  institutionalise enhanced research capacity
• Benefits to individual researchers of different 
  perspectives, objectives and approaches
• Encourages new research directions
General principles and strategies
• Grant application writing is a concrete skill that can be 
  learned
• Often a systematic tiered process:
   – start small, work up
   – Internal grants then external grants
   – Junior member of larger team to more extensive 
      leadership role
   – ARC Linkage to ARC Discovery
• Work with experienced colleagues
   – junior colleagues can learn skills in project 
      management, team-work, grant writing
   – Senior colleagues benefit from time, enthusiasm and 
      expertise of junior colleagues
•  Look for complementary skills and experiences
   – Theoretical and substantive knowledge
   – Prior experience of funded research
   – Research methods skills
   – Budgeting, project and time management
General Principles and Strategies
• Know funding rules, selection criteria and write 
  explicitly to them – not knowing funding rules and 
  criteria is one way to ensure failure
• Be prepared to collaborate across departments/schools, 
  discipline areas and institutions as way of leveraging 
  capacity and expertise
• Write explicitly, clearly and simply for busy assessors 
  who are highly experienced researchers, but not 
  necessarily field experts
• Obfuscation and ambiguity are not acceptable 
  responses to complexity
• Allow enough time to write proper proposals
• Everybody fails periodically – resilience is critical
       Discovery Projects 
Selection Criteria
Investigator(s) 40%
   - research opportunity and performance evidence (ROPE); and 
   - capacity to undertake the proposed research. 
Project Quality 40%
   - does the research address a significant problem? 
   - is the conceptual/theoretical framework innovative and original? 
   - will the aims, concepts, methods and results advance knowledge? 
   - are the project design and methods appropriate? 
   - will the proposed research provide economic, environmental and/or 
   social benefit to Australia? 
   - does the project address National Research Priorities? 
Research Environment 20% 
   - is there an existing, or developing, supportive and high quality research 
   environment for this Project? 
   - are the necessary facilities to complete the project available? 
   - are there adequate strategies to encourage dissemination, commercialisation, 
   if appropriate; and promotion of research outcomes? 
      Linkage Projects
Selection Criteria

Investigator(s) 20%
   - research opportunity and performance evidence 
   (ROPE); and 
   - capacity to undertake and manage the proposed 
   research. 
Proposed Project 50%
   -Significance and Innovation (25%) 
   -Approach and training (15%)
   -Research environment (10%)

Nature of the alliance and commitment from a Partner
  Organisation (30%)
   Assessment process 
• Three types of reviewers – College Experts, detailed 
  (discipline) and specialised (international) assessors
• Exec Director (ED) assigns each application to three 
  college members. 
• EAC’s assign assessors, moderate assessments, look at 
   budgets and read rejoinders. 
• Keywords, FOR Codes and 100 word summary are 
  particularly important
    Ø they help determine the assessors
    Ø should not be too general or too specific
    Ø combine words that define the broad area & point to the specific 
      aspect of it that is under consideration
    Ø do not use 999 codes.
    Feedback and assessment
• You only get comments from assessors
• You get nothing from College. 
• You do not get scores or ranks.
• Assessor reports give you almost no 
  indication of likelihood of success. 
• In SBE, College members read 150-250 
  proposals/year
Initial Summary and Key Words
• Panel and discipline area
   – Indicate in key words, title, summary or 
     abstract
   – Indicate main aim and outcome of the 
     project
• Write for an intelligent but non-expert 
  audience
• 100 word summaries are first chance to 
  convey significance, innovation, national 
  benefit
Discovery Project headings
        Section C
 •   PROJECT TITLE
 •   AIMS AND BACKGROUND
 •   RESEARCH PROJECT
 •   RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT
 •   ROLE OF PERSONNEL
 •   REFERENCES
    Linkage Project headings
           Section C
• PROJECT TITLE
•  AIMS AND BACKGROUND
• SIGNIFICANCE AND INNOVATION
• APPROACH AND TRAINING 
• RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT
• PARTNER ORGANISATION COMMITMENT 
  AND COLLABORATION 
• ROLE OF PERSONNEL
• REFERENCES
Significance and Innovation
What is new about this project and why is 
 it important?

  – Evidence that this project is at the cutting 
    edge of research in this area
  – How will project advance theory and/or 
    method (and which)?
  – How will project produce important new 
    information or applications?
  – How does project advance the field?
  – How advance national research priorities?
  – How innovative in approach, 
    conceptualisation?
Research Plan/Approach
•   Exactly what will you do?  How is it innovative and cutting edge?
     –   Evidence (e.g., pilot work, research program) that method will work
     –   How is method connected to project’s aims?
     –   Timetable and sequencing
     –   How will research environment enhance project?

• Begin with overview of design then explicitly describe 
  specific elements (data collection strategy, measurement 
  instruments, selection of participants, analytic strategy)

• Justify choice of approach

• For linkages – show nature of relationship with partner (s) 
  and how will address needs of partner
        Track Record
• Outstanding team, best for project
  – Track record (quality and quantity) reflects 
    international reputation and reach in this 
    area
  – Team roles use special expertise of 
    members
  – Evidence of collaboration among members
  – First CI is best person to lead project, with 
    evidence of specific expertise in this area
  – Fellowships: Why is university best research 
    environment for project?  Project infeasible 
    without fellowship. Who are mentors?
           Investigator(s)
• The whole team is ranked, not individuals.
• Track record relative to opportunity is taken seriously.
• Top ten papers list – explain why you have chosen them, use 
  citations, impact factors if relevant.
• “A statement on your most significant contributions to this 
  research field”  -  be specific: “We discovered that the 
  lifetime income and happiness of adults is completely 
  determined by school performance on standardised tests”. 
  Provide evidence of impact.  
• Use the section on other evidence of impact (include keynote 
  addresses, editorial responsibilities, p/grad supervision, 
  citations, professional exp, roles in societies, prizes, awards, 
  other esteem indicators).
• Do not embellish your record.
          Budget
• don’t over inflate the budget 
   Ø this may impact on scores
• don’t under inflate budget 
   Ø this will impact on scores
• budget items will be scrutinised
   Ø Conference and whimsical travel seldom approved
   Ø Avoid excessive personnel costs
   Ø Expensive methodologies/equipment need to be 
     justified.
   Ø Don’t deviate too much from scheme and discipline 
     funding norms for successful grants
     ARC applications which are highly ranked 
    tend to have the following characteristics:

•   They present exciting or ambitious goals. 
•   They explain why funding is needed now – why is it important to 
    make progress on the particular questions posed in the 
    application at this time. 
•   They describe hypotheses and/or controversies and explain how 
    the proposed work will address or resolve them. 
•   They give context - how the proposed work fits into international 
    work in the field. 
•   They manage to strike a balance between technical detail and 
    general explanations. 
•   They include clear and convincing material regarding National 
    Benefit.
ARC applications which are poorly ranked 
tend to have the following characteristics:

•   They are full of jargon, impenetrable and are difficult to read.
•   They demonstrate little or no knowledge of activity in the field 
    elsewhere.
•   They make implausible claims about outcomes.
•   The methodology is flawed.
•   They relate to areas which are widely seen to be well worked over, 
    or without momentum.
•   They convey a negative tone or feeling about the field or state of 
    play within the area.
•   They do not contain clear or plausible evidence of prior excellence 
    or progress.
•   The track record is weak.
      Success rates
• Discovery Overall 21.9%
• UQ Discovery Overall 29.7%
  – SBE 23.2%
  – HCA 22.8%
  – DORA’s  overall 5.62%
     Success Rates
• Linkage Overall 36.1%
• UQ Linkage Overall 52.4%
  – SBE 30.6%
  – HCA 45.2%

								
To top