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Food Safety - Be Food Safe - Drexel University

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					Food Safety
  Be Food Safe
             Project Sponsors
• USDA project funded
  through the Supplemental
  Nutrition Assistance Program

• School District of
  Philadelphia

• Department of Nutrition
  Sciences, Drexel University
What Is Foodborne Illness?
• Disease that comes from food that is
  contaminated with harmful
  pathogens:
  – Bacteria
  – Viruses
  – Molds
• Preventable!
Bacteria and Viruses
   How Is Foodborne Illness
         Prevented?
Key points from the Dietary Guidelines:
•Wash hands
•Rinse vegetables and fruits
•Prevent cross-contamination
•Cook foods to safe internal
temperatures
•Store foods safely in the home
               Fight BAC!®
• Follow the 4 safe food handling
  principles:
  – Clean
  – Separate
  – Cook
  – Chill
                         Clean
              Avoid cross-contamination
• Hands
  – Practice proper hand-washing techniques
• Surfaces
  – Clean all surfaces that food touches
    including utensils and appliances
  – Clean out the fridge!
• Food
  – Rinse all fruits and vegetables prior to eating,
    peeling, cutting, or cooking
               Separate

• Always separate foods
  that are ready to eat
  from those that need
  to be cooked


  When shopping and storing:
    - Place raw seafood, meat, and poultry in
    plastic bags
    - Separate them from other foods in your
    grocery cart and bags
Separate
  When preparing and
  serving:
   – Use separate cutting
     boards
   – Separate foods when
     storing in the
     refrigerator
   – Never place ready-to-
     eat food on a plate
     that previously held
     raw meat, poultry,
     eggs, or fish
                    Cook
• Measure cooked foods with a food
  thermometer at the THICKEST part
• Cook steaks, roasts, and chops to 145ºF
• Cook ground beef, pork, veal, and lamb to
  160ºF
• Cook poultry to 165ºF
• Cook eggs until the yolk and white are firm
• Keep hot foods at a minimum of 140ºF
• Avoid the “danger zone” - 40-140°F
                      Chill


• Keep cold and cooked foods in the
  refrigerator, making sure it is set to 40° or
  below
• Refrigerate leftovers and takeout foods
  within 2 hours of being in the danger zone
  – This should be 1 hour if the air temperature is
    above 90°F
  – It includes the time in the shopping basket,
    car, and on the kitchen counter
                   Chill
• Throw away cooked leftovers after 4 days in
  the fridge
• Thaw frozen food in the refrigerator, cold
  water, or microwave – NEVER at room
  temperature!


          When in doubt,
           throw it out!
          High-Risk Foods
• Some foods pose higher risk of causing
  foodborne illness
  – Unpasteurized milk and cheese
  – Raw or undercooked eggs, meat, poultry,
    and seafood
  – Raw sprouts

                               Look for the
                               word
                               PASTEURIZED on
                               dairy products
       High-Risk Populations
• Everyone is at risk for food-borne illness, but
  some populations are more at risk than
  others
   – Pregnant women and their unborn
     children
   – Infants and young children
   – Older adults
   – Those with cancer, HIV/AIDS, or other
     diseases that compromise the immune
     system
Activity
Questions?

				
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posted:11/12/2013
language:English
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