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See the Hazard Know the Risk

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					    See the Hazard Know the Risk
A wide variety of mechanical motions and actions may present hazards to the worker. These can include
  the movement of rotating members, reciprocating arms, moving belts, meshing gears, cutting teeth,
and any parts that impact or shear. These different types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions
 are basic in varying combinations to nearly all machines, and recognizing them is the first step toward
                           protecting workers from the danger they present.
        The basic types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions are:
           Machine Safeguarding
              Classifications
• Guards                 – Safety Controls
      • Fixed               • Safety trip
      • Interlocked           control
      • Adjustable              – Pressure-
      • Self-adjusting            sensitive
                                  body bar
• Devices
                                – Safety
   – Presence                     tripod
     Sensing
                                – Safety
      • Photoelectric             tripwire
        (optical)                 cable
      • Radiofrequen        • Two-hand
        cy                    control
        (capacitance)
                            • Two-hand trip
      • Electro-
        mechanical       – Gates
   – Pullback               • Interlocked
   – Restraint              • Other


                                         2
          Machine Safeguarding
             Classifications
• Location/Distance   • Miscellaneous
• Potential Feeding     Aids
  and Ejection           – Awareness
  Methods                  barriers
   – Automatic feed      – Miscellaneous
   – Semi-automatic        protective
     feed                  shields
   – Automatic           – Hand-feeding
     ejection              tools and
   – Semi-automatic        holding fixtures
     ejection
   – Robot




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     See the Hazard Know the Risk
A wide variety of mechanical motions and actions may present hazards to the worker. These can include
  the movement of rotating members, reciprocating arms, moving belts, meshing gears, cutting teeth,
and any parts that impact or shear. These different types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions
 are basic in varying combinations to nearly all machines, and recognizing them is the first step toward
                            protecting workers from the danger they present.
                    The basic types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions are:




Safeguards must meet these minimum general requirements:
• Prevent contact: The safeguard must prevent hands, arms, and any other part of a worker's body from making
   contact with dangerous moving parts. A good safeguarding system eliminates the possibility of of the operator or
   another worker placing parts of their bodies near hazardous moving parts.
• Secure: Workers should not be able to easily remove or tamper with the safeguard, because a safeguard that can
   easily be made ineffective is no safeguard at all. Guards and safety devices should be made of durable material that
   will withstand the conditions of normal use. They must firmly be secured to the machine.
• Protect from falling objects: The safeguard should ensure that no objects can fall into moving parts. A small tool
   which is dropped into a cycling machine could easily become a projectile that could strike and injure someone.
• Create no new hazards: A safeguard defeats its own purpose if it creates a hazard of its own such as a shear point,
   a jagged edge, or an unfinished surface which can cause a laceration. The edges of guards. for instance, should be
   rolled or bolted in such a way that they eliminate sharp edges.
• Create no interference: Any safeguard which impedes a worker from performing the job quickly and comfortably
   might soon be overridden or disregarded. Proper safeguarding can actually enhance efficiency as it can relieve the
   worker's apprehensions about injury.
• Allow safe lubrication: If possible, one should be able to lubricate the machine without removing the safeguards.
   Locating oil reservoirs outside the guard, with a line leading to the lubrication point, will reduce the need for the
   operator or maintenance worker to enter the hazardous area.
   See the Hazard Know the Risk
A wide variety of mechanical motions and actions may present hazards to the worker. These can include
  the movement of rotating members, reciprocating arms, moving belts, meshing gears, cutting teeth,
and any parts that impact or shear. These different types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions
 are basic in varying combinations to nearly all machines, and recognizing them is the first step toward
                           protecting workers from the danger they present.

  The basic types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions are:

Machine Safeguards must meet these minimum general
requirements:
• Prevent contact: The safeguard must prevent hands, arms, and any other part of a
  worker's body from making contact with dangerous moving parts. A good safeguarding
  system eliminates the possibility of the operator or another worker placing parts of their
  bodies near hazardous moving parts.

• Secure: Workers should not be able to easily remove or tamper with the safeguard,
  because a safeguard that can easily be made ineffective is no safeguard at all. Guards and
  safety devices should be made of durable material that will withstand the conditions of
  normal use. They must firmly be secured to the machine.

• Protect from falling objects: The safeguard should ensure that no objects can fall into
  moving parts. A small tool which is dropped into a cycling machine could easily become a
  projectile that could strike and injure someone.

• Create no new hazards: A safeguard defeats its own purpose if it creates a hazard of its
  own such as a shear point, a jagged edge, or an unfinished surface which can cause a
  laceration. The edges of guards. for instance, should be rolled or bolted in such a way that
  they eliminate sharp edges.

• Create no interference: Any safeguard which impedes a worker from performing the job
  quickly and comfortably might soon be overridden or disregarded. Proper safeguarding
  can actually enhance efficiency as it can relieve the worker's apprehensions about injury.

• Allow safe lubrication: If possible, one should be able to lubricate the machine without
  removing the safeguards. Locating oil reservoirs outside the guard, with a line leading to
  the lubrication point, will reduce the need for the operator or maintenance worker to
  enter the hazardous area.
Health Effects and Severe Risk
                     Health Effects:
There are several acute health effects associated with
entanglement with machinery. These injuries include
lacerations, amputations, degloveing and fractures.
          Ergonomics of
         Machine Guarding
• The ergonomic principals in conjunction with
  anthropometry data have an important influence
  upon the proper design of machine guards. The
  collection of body measurements as design criteria to
  improve the functionality, efficiency and safety of a
  human in a system is called anthropometrics. The
  ergonomic approach utilizes this information to
  determine allowable space and equipment size and
  shape used for the design of work environment.
• If barriers are used to protect workers from hazardous
  machines, reach is limited by the length of the arm,
  and in the case of opening, by the size of the hands
  and fingers. In applying the ergonomic principal of
  fitting the work place to the worker one can use the
  distance that a worker can reach to determine the
  height of a guard or the distance of barriers from the
  machine which they guard.
Measurements Associated
 with Machine Guards
  Machinery and Machine
   Guarding Standards
• Identify basic machinery terms
• Identify common machines
  found within a broad spectrum
  of industries
• Identify hazards that occur in or
  on machinery
• Select the appropriate
  LEGISLATIVE STANDARD that
  applies to a hazard
• Present options to achieve
  abatement




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posted:11/11/2013
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Description: equipment guards