Docstoc

Explosives Properties

Document Sample
Explosives Properties Powered By Docstoc
					Explosive Properties

      Explosives 189
      Dr. Van Romero
        26 Jan 2012
Proximity Fuse
       Some Definitions
• Explosion – rapid expansion of matter into a 
  volume much greater than the original volume
        Some Definitions
• Explosion – rapid expansion of matter into a 
  volume much greater than the original volume
• Burn & Detonate – Both involve oxidation
  – Burn – relatively slow
  – Detonate – burning at a supersonic rate producing 
    a pressure Wave
        Some Definitions
• Explosion – rapid expansion of matter into a 
  volume much greater than the original volume
• Burn & Detonate – Both involve oxidation
  – Burn – relatively slow
  – Detonate – burning at a supersonic rate producing 
    a pressure Wave
• Deflagration – Burning to detonation (DDT)
        Some Definitions
• Explosion – rapid expansion of matter into a 
  volume much greater than the original volume
• Burn & Detonate – Both involve oxidation
  – Burn – relatively slow
  – Detonate – burning at a supersonic rate producing 
    a pressure Wave
• Deflagration – Burning to detonation (DDT)
• Shock wave – High pressure wave that travels 
  faster then the speed of sound
 Explosives Vs. Propellants
• The difference between an explosive and a 
  propellant is functional as apposed to 
  fundamental.
 Explosives Vs. Propellants
• The difference between an explosive and a 
  propellant is functional as apposed to 
  fundamental.
• Explosives are intended to function by 
  detonation from shock initiation (High
  Explosives)
 Explosives Vs. Propellants
• Propellants are initiated by burning and then 
  burn at a steady rate determined by the devise, 
  i.e. gun  (Low Explosives)
•  Single molecule explosives are categorized by 
  the required initiation strength
      Primary Explosives
• Primary Explosives – Transit from surface 
  burning to detonation within a very small 
  distance.  
  – Lead Azide (PbN6 )
   Secondary Explosives
• Secondary Explosives – Can burn to detonation, 
  but only in relatively large quantities.  
  Secondary explosives are usually initiated 
  from the shock from a primary explosive (cap 
  sensitive)
•  TNT
      Tertiary Explosives
• Tertiary Explosives – Extremely difficult to 
  initiate.  It takes a significant shock (i.e. 
  secondary explosive) to initiate.  Tertiary 
  explosives are often classified as non-
  explosives.
• Ammonium Nitrate (NH4NO3) 
      Exothermic and
   Endothermic Reactions
• Chemical reaction
  – Reactants  Products.
  – Internal energy of reactants ≠ internal energy of 
    products.
  – Internal energy: contained in bonds between 
    atoms.
  – Reactants contain more energy than products—
    energy is released as heat.
  – EXOTHERMIC Reaction.
       Exothermic and
    Endothermic Reactions
• Products contain more internal energy than 
  reactants
• ENDOTHERMIC Reaction
• Energy must be added for the reaction to 
  occur.
• Burning and detonation are                      
      Exothermic and
   Endothermic Reactions
• Products contain more internal energy than 
  reactants
• ENDOTHERMIC Reaction
• Energy must be added for the reaction to 
  occur.
• Burning and detonation are Exothermic
  Oxidation: Combustion
• Fuel + Oxidizer  Products (propellant)
     Oxidation: Combustion
• Fuel + Oxidizer  Products (propellant)
• CH4 + 2 O2  CO2 + 2 H20
    Methane Oxygen   Carbon    Water
                     Dioxide

 
  Oxidation: Combustion
• Fuel + Oxidizer  Products (propellant)
• CH4 + 2 O2  CO2 + 2 H20
 Methane Oxygen   Carbon    Water
                  Dioxide

• Oxidation (combustion) of methane
  • 1 methane molecule : 2 oxygen molecules 
    (4 oxygen atoms). 
            Oxidation:
          Decomposition
• Oxidizer + Fuel  decomposition to products 
 (Explosive)
              Oxidation:
            Decomposition
• Oxidizer + Fuel  decomposition to products
 (Explosive)
• Example: Nitroglycol
• O2N—O—CH2—CH2—O—NO2  
    Fuel (Hydrocarbon) + Oxidizer (Nitrate Esters)
                Oxidation:
              Decomposition
• Oxidizer + Fuel  decomposition to products
 (Explosive)
• Example: Nitroglycol 
• O2N—O—CH2—CH2—O—NO2  
    Fuel (Hydrocarbon) + Oxidizer (Nitrate Esters)


• Undergoes Decomposition to:
  2 CO2 + 2 H2O + N2
    Carbon      Water       Nitrogen
    Dioxide
          CHNO Explosives
• Many explosives and propellants are composed 
  of:
   –   Carbon
   –   Hydrogen
   –   Nitrogen
   –   Oxygen
• General Formula: CcHhNnOo
• c, h, n, o are # of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and 
  oxygen atoms.
• For Nitroglycol: C2H4N2O6
          CHNO Explosive
          Decomposition
• CcHhNnOo  c C + h H + n N + o O 
• Imagine an explosive detonating.
  – Reactant CHNO molecule is completely broken 
    down into individual component atoms.
          CHNO Explosive
          Decomposition
• CcHhNnOo  c C + h H + n N + o O 
• Imagine an explosive detonating.
  – Reactant CHNO molecule is completely broken 
    down into individual component atoms.
• For Nitroglycol:
  – 2N  N2
  – 2H + O  H20
  – C + O  CO
  – CO + O  CO2
          Overoxidation vs
           Underoxidation
• In the case of nitroglycol
• O2N—O—CH2—CH2—O—NO2  
      2 CO2 + 2 H2O + N2
• Exactly enough oxygen to burn all carbon to CO2
• Some have more than enough oxygen to burn all 
  the carbon into CO2
  – OVEROXIDIZED OR FUEL LEAN
• Most explosives do not have enough oxygen to 
  burn all the carbon to CO2
  – UNDEROXIDIZED OR FUEL RICH
  Simple Product Hierarchy
    for CHNO Explosives
• First, all nitrogen forms N2
  Simple Product Hierarchy
    for CHNO Explosives
• First, all nitrogen forms N2
• Then, all the hydrogen is burned to H2O 
  Simple Product Hierarchy
    for CHNO Explosives
• First, all nitrogen forms N2
• Then, all the hydrogen is burned to H2O 
• Any oxygen left after H20 formation burns carbon 
  to CO.
  Simple Product Hierarchy
    for CHNO Explosives
• First, all nitrogen forms N2
• Then, all the hydrogen is burned to H2O 
• Any oxygen left after H20 formation burns carbon 
  to CO.
• Any oxygen left after CO formation burns CO to 
  CO2
  Simple Product Hierarchy
    for CHNO Explosives
• First, all nitrogen forms N2
• Then, all the hydrogen is burned to H2O 
• Any oxygen left after H20 formation burns carbon 
  to CO.
• Any oxygen left after CO formation burns CO to 
  CO2
• Any oxygen left after CO2 formation forms O2 
  Simple Product Hierarchy
    for CHNO Explosives
• First, all nitrogen forms N2
• Then, all the hydrogen is burned to H2O 
• Any oxygen left after H20 formation burns carbon 
  to CO.
• Any oxygen left after CO formation burns CO to 
  CO2
• Any oxygen left after CO2 formation forms O2
• Traces of NOx (mixed oxides of nitrogen) are 
  always formed. 
           Decomposition of
            Nitroglycerine
• C3H5N3O9  3C + 5H + 3N + 9O
  –   3N  1.5 N2
  –   5H + 2.5O  2.5 H2O (6.5 O remaining)
  –   3C + 3O 3 CO (3.5 O remaining)
  –   3 CO  3O  3 CO2 (0.5 O remaining)
• 8.5 of 9 oxygen atoms consumed
  – 0.5 O  0.25 O2
            Decomposition of
             Nitroglycerine
• C3H5N3O9  3C + 5H + 3N + 9O
   –   3N  1.5 N2
   –   5H + 2.5O  2.5 H2O (6.5 O remaining)
   –   3C + 3O 3 CO (3.5 O remaining)
   –   3 CO + 3O  3 CO2 (0.5 O remaining)
• 8.5 of 9 oxygen atoms consumed
   – 0.5 O  0.25 O2
• Overall Reaction:
   – C3H5N3O9   1.5 N2 + 2.5 H2O + 3 CO2 + 0.25 O2
• Oxygen Remaining = Nitroglycerine is 
   – OVEROXIDIZED
   Decomposition of RDX
                                               H2
• C3H6N6O6  3C + 6H +6N +6O
  –   6N  3N2
  –   6H + 3O  3H2O (3 O remaining)
  –   3C + 3O  3CO (All O is consumed)   H2        H2
  –   No CO2 formed.
   Decomposition of RDX
                                                H2
• C3H6N6O6  3C + 6H +6N +6O
   –   6N  3N2
   –   6H + 3O  3H2O (3 O remaining)
   –   3C + 3O  3CO (All O is consumed)   H2        H2
   –   No CO2 formed.
• Overall Reaction:
   – C3H6N6O6  3 N2 + 3 H2O + 3 CO 
• Not enough oxygen to completely burn 
  all of the fuel
   – UNDEROXIDIZED
           Oxygen Balance
• OB (%) 
  –  1600/MWexp[oxygen-(2 carbon+ hydrogen/2)]
• Oxygen balance for Nitroglycol C2H4N2O6
  – c = 2, h = 4, n = 2, o = 6
  – Mwexp=12.01 (2) + 1.008 (4) + 14.008 (2) + 16.000 
    ( 6) = 152.068 g/mol
  – OB =                                                   = 0% 
            1600             6 – 2 (2) –  4
          152.068                                2         Perfectly Balanced
           Oxygen Balance
• Oxygen balance for Nitroglycerine C3H5N3O9
  – C = 3, h = 5, n = 3, o = 9
  – Mwexp=12.01 (3) + 1.008 (5) + 14.008 (3) + 16.000 
    ( 9) = 227.094 g/mol

             1600                                 5
  – OB =                                                   = 3.52% 
                            9 – 2 ( 3) – 
          227.094                                 2
                                                           Slightly overoxidized
           Oxygen Balance
• Oxygen balance for RDX: C3H6N6O6
  – C = 3, h = 6, n = 6, o = 6
  – Mwexp=12.01 (3) + 1.008 (6) + 14.008 (6) + 16.000 
    ( 6) = 222.126 g/mol

             1600                                 6
  – OB =                                                   = -21.61% 
                            6 – 2 ( 3) – 
          222.126                                 2
                                                           Underoxidized
                  Homework
• Calculate the oxygen balance for:
  – TNT
  – Picric Acid

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:11/11/2013
language:
pages:40