Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Q12 Answers_2_

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 17

									Samsung Galaxy S 
‧Android 2.1 (update to Android 2.2 in Nov,2011)
‧64.2 x 122.4 x 9.9mm 
‧GSM 850/900/1800/1900,UMTS 900/1900/2100
‧HSDPA 7.2Mbps,HSUPA 5.76Mbps
‧Wi-Fi (WLAN)
‧4 inches Super AMOLED touch screen display,WVGA
‧mDNIe 
‧4.9 megapixels camera resolution、auto camera focus 
‧0.3 megapixels secondary camera
‧Support MPEG4、H.264、H.263、DivX HD、XviD、  
    VC-1 
‧Support 3GP、MP4、WMV、ASF、AVI、MKV、FLV 
   、 MP3、AAC、AAC+、WMA 
‧AGPS
‧Samsung-Intrinsity S5PC110 1 GHz Processor
‧SMS、MMS、Email、Exchange ActiveSync                     HKD 5,588
‧Office 2007 document reader and editor 、 Swype 
‧USB 2.0, Bluetooth 3.0
‧Secure storage 16GB 
‧microSDHC memory card
Samsung Service support after sales

Ø Online Warranty Registration
Ø Samsung Customer Service Center
Ø Samsung Apps
Ø Super Amoled
Ø EA mobile Game
Ø Facebook Fan Page
Ø Member Benefits
Ø Phone Firm Update
Ø Software & Manuals update
            HTC Desire  
            ‧Android 2.1 (update to Android 2.2 in 
                Aug,2010)
            ‧Advanced HTC Sense interface
            ‧Qualcomm Snapdragon QSD8250 
                1 GHz Processor
            ‧GSM 850/900/1800/1900,
                UMTS 1900/2100
            ‧7.2 Mbps HSDPA,2 Mbps HSUPA
            ‧Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n
            ‧3.7 inches 480x800 multi-touch   
                screen display
            ‧QWERTY keyboard
            ‧ 4.9 megapixels camera resolution、   
                 auto camera focus、LED camera 
                 flash 
            ‧AGPS / Quick GPS
HKD 4,598   ‧Bluetooth 2.1+EDR 
            ‧Optical Joystick 
            ‧Support Adobe Flash
            ‧microSD memory card (Max 32GB)
            ‧1400mAh battery capacity
HTC Service support after sales


Ø Online Warranty Registration
Ø HTC Customer Service
Ø HTC Online Services
Ø Support via Hotline
Ø Support via e-Mail
Ø Free Training Course for Customers
Ø HTC Sync™ 
Ø Customer Satisfaction Survey
Apple iPhone 4 16GB
‧Apple iOS 4 
‧GSM 850/900/1800/1900,3.5G 850/900/1900/2100
‧115.2x58.6x9.3mm / 137g
‧HSDPA 7.2Mbps、HSUPA
‧Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n 
‧AGPS / Geo tagging
‧3.5 inches 960x480 326dpi multi-touch screen display
‧5 megapixels camera resolution、auto camera focus、
     LED camera flash
‧0.3 megapixels secondary camera
‧Built-in battery
‧HE-AAC、MP3、AAX、Apple Lossless、AIF、
    WAV 、 H.264、MPEG4、m4v、mp4、mov 
‧Proximity Sensor 、 Accelerometer 
‧Secure storage 16GB 
‧Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
‧Samsung-Intrinsity Apple A4 (S5PC110A01)               HKD 4,988
    1 GHz Processor
Apple Service support after sales
Ø iPhone Authorized Service Provider
Ø Apple Technocal Support Line
Ø AppleCare Protection Plan
Ø App Store
Ø 3Smart Club, 3Shops, 3Repair Centre, 24-hour hotline (3)
Ø iPhone Workshop (one2free) / SmarTone
Ø One2free Services (one2free)
Ø SV apps (SmarTone)
Ø Apps Select (SmarTone)
Ø LUXE City Guides Mobile (1010)
Ø Realtime Stock Stream Master, 3tv, 3Books, Messenger – 3HK, 
    KKBOX, Data Roaming Daily Pass, Stereo HD Ringtone, 
    Handset Replacement Plan, Visual Voicemail (3)
                                            Interface
iPhone 4
The iOS4 interface is more evolution than revolution, but that doesn't mean it's not a lot better than 
before. Things like double tapping the home button to call up multitasking and iPod controls work 
well, and the menu system is as familiar as ever.
However, the time is right for Apple to start thinking about widgets – people might have been scared 
before, but now iPhone users are starting to 'get' what smartphones are about, and a few things like 
weather widgets wouldn't go amiss – it's not always 23 degrees and sunny.

HTC Desire
The HTC Sense UI is one of the best overlays we've seen on a mobile – it's the perfect blend of 
style and functionality.
From being able to pinch the screen to see all Home screens at once to the integrated social 
networking in the contacts menu, the overall feeling is one of intuition. Granted, it takes a while to 
set up, but once done you're sorted for the entire journey with your new phone.

Samsung Galaxy S
Adding the TouchWiz 3.0 interface was a good move for Samsung, as it offers more than the basic 
Android overlay we've seen on its other Android phones.
Seven Home screens are accessible for widget and icon dropping, and the menu system is simple 
to use.
However, the widgets on offer are woeful – why are there so few available, Samsung?
The contacts menu is better, but a little convoluted compared to the intuitive Sense UI.


                                    Winner : HTC Desire
                                              Screen
iPhone 4
The Retina Display from Apple packs the highest amount of pixels into a mobile phone screen, and 
offers a very sharp image on the screen indeed.
You can zoom right into letters on a web page and there's no graining – Apple says this is so high-
res that the human eye doesn't need any more.
It uses LCD technology, rather than OLED, so it's a little thicker – although the iPhone 4 is still the 
thinnest smartphone on the market.

HTC Desire
The OLED screen on the Desire is pretty nice in its own right – decent colour saturation, high 
contrast ratio, good response – but despite it being at the sharp end of the industry, it's still beaten 
comfortably by its rivals.
It has the same resolution as the Samsung Galaxy S but doesn't have the same clarity – although 
watching video on the screen is still a nice experience, and you can really ramp the brightness up 
when necessary.

Samsung Galaxy S
The Super AMOLED screen on the Galaxy S is the most advanced the Koreans have created – and 
it shows.
The screen is pin sharp, and the speed and response time is the best we've seen on a mobile, 
which means watching movies is a really nice experience. According to the spec sheet, the iPhone 
4's Retina Display is actually superior – but to our eyes we prefer looking at things on the Galaxy S.


                              Winner : Samsung Galaxy S
                                             Calling
iPhone 4
The iPhone has traditionally been plagued with dropped call issues – that seems to have been 
remedied in the latest version, which is lucky, as people were about to lose faith in Apple.
However, somehow Jobs' lot managed to let a big problem slip through the net: holding the iPhone 4 
in your left hand will force signal to drop dramatically. We haven't encountered any dropped calls 
because of it, but it's a poor show.
Call quality is good thanks to the noise cancelling microphone though – and FaceTime is there if you 
like living in the early part of the millennium.

HTC Desire
The Desire loses one key feature from the Nexus One in a separate noise cancelling microphone – 
although that does mean it's £5 a month cheaper on contract.
Call quality is only average as a result – not poor by any means, but get caught on a noisy street 
and you'll struggle to be heard.

Samsung Galaxy S
Like the Desire, there's no noise cancelling here – call quality is improved simply because the 
device is longer than most others thanks to a 4-inch screen.
Other than that it's the same basic experience – you get a fun beepy sound when calls are 
connected, the buttons are nice and easy to hit, and you'll feel pretty chirpy about the whole thing to 
be honest.



                             Winner : Samsung Galaxy S
                                            Messaging
iPhone 4
The iPhone has always come at messaging from the right angle – Exchange email, threaded conversations 
and so on, and now it's got a unified inbox too. We agree it's not groundbreaking, but all the small steps are 
in the right direction. The QWERTY keyboard is ridiculously good on the touchscreen – so many people will 
use the iPhone as their first taste of non-keyed handsets and will be blown away at how easy it is.

HTC Desire
With the Desire you're actually pretty limited in terms of how much you can do messaging-wise. Sure, you 
can add widgets for Facebook and Twitter and such, but in terms of core functionality, it's pretty much the 
same as the iPhone. That's not to say it's a bad experience, but we'd hope a forward-thinking company like 
HTC would be seeing opportunities to create a unified inbox for Facebook, Twitter, email and everything 
else, like the BlackBerry range manages so easily. That said, the keyboard is almost on a par with the 
iPhone, spookily working out what you're trying to say even if you just look at the correct keys. (Note: not 
actually true about the eye thing. But typing-wise it's tip top).

Samsung Galaxy S
Like the other two phones on test here, the Galaxy S doesn't really have much in the way of unification. 
Like the Desire's Friend Stream, it has social networking all in the same place, and the cool 'Write and Go' 
application works nicely too if you find you have something to say but can't initially decide whether to email, 
text or Twitter it. The keyboard is decent too – it also packs Swype, where you trace instead of tapping 
letters out. It's clever and works well, but it's not so much re-inventing the wheel as creating something 
that's as good but different. Like… erm… we don't know what's as good as a wheel.



                             Winner : iPhone4 / HTC Desire
                                              Internet
iPhone 4
The iPhone series has been built on a solid internet experience and that hasn't changed since the inception 
of the range.
Pinch and zoom was a revelation, loading speeds for full HTML are brilliant and even the transitions 
between the window changes are cool
However, we're still not treated to Flash video, nor will we ever be – the iPhone 4 is a little stuck until 
HTML5 video pops up.

HTC Desire
We never thought a mobile could out-iPhone the iPhone when it comes to the internet, but the Android OS 
has offered that chance, and the HTC Desire has taken it.
A fast 1GHz processor and quick-loading internet pages might make it the equal of the iPhone 4, but it's in 
the details where the Desire comes alive.
Things like being able to easily share via Twitter or Facebook from the internet menu and a constantly 
updated list of your most-visited sites are awesome touches… and with Flash already onboard it makes 
internet video a cinch – and this will be improved even further when Flash 10.1 lands via the Froyo update 
in the near future.

Samsung Galaxy S
Making the best use of the Android web browser, the Samsung Galaxy S internet experience is pretty good 
– although not up to the level of its Desire brethren.
It's essentially the same experience, with a finer detail thanks to the Super AMOLED screen, but doesn't 
use Flash video, which is a little bit of a let down.
You can still share links and see the most visited pages as bookmarks, which is cool – plus the internet 
menu has a quick link to the brightness setting of the Galaxy S, which is a really nice touch.

                                     Winner : HTC Desire
                                                       Camera
iPhone 4
Apple's iPhone cameras have long been the stick with which to beat the handsets – sure, Safari Mobile is great, but the 2MP 
cameras in the first models were just rubbish.
Jobs must have taken umbrage with such criticism, as the iPhone 4 has a 5MP camera with LED flash and HD video 
recording.
It's a great option to have, simply because the pictures look so good and the shutter speed is out of this world – HD video 
recording is slick and stable too.
And when it comes to media, we're looking at up to 32GB of storage, the full range of iPod power making music and video 
browsing very easy, and a decent audio performance coupled with good video thanks to the retina display.

HTC Desire
It's strange to think that in a few short months the Desire has slipped so far back in terms of photography and media power.
Sure, the 5MP camera isn't going to set the world alight, as it only offered slightly above average photos, but it was certainly 
better than anything HTC had offered previously.
But it's not in the same league as the iPhone, as even though it has a flash it's not as powerful and the shutter speed isn't 
anywhere near – plus it only records at DVD quality, where others are moving to HD.
Media is the same – it's all very good, it's just not stellar with things like audio performance and ease of browsing (with videos 
lumped in with photos for some reason) not quite hitting the high levels its peers are managing with ease.

Samsung Galaxy S
Samsung has always had a heritage of making decent cameras, with the Pixon 12 among the most advanced cameraphones 
in the world.
However, that knowledge hasn't really shown up on the Galaxy S, as despite packing a 5MP sensor like the others on test, it 
hasn't got a flash and also struggles to take clear snaps.
The HD video recording is a bit better though, with decent footage possible providing you can hold the camera really still.
But when it comes to media, the Galaxy S really excels. Not only is the screen clear, large and bright, it's also got a ridiculous 
amount of sharpness to it when watching videos, and the contrast ratios are immense too.
Audio-wise it's great as well, with the bass and high-end particularly nice. However, thanks to the poorer camera, you'd have 
to argue the iPhone 4 is better overall.

                                                Winner : iPhone 4
                                            Apps and Maps
iPhone 4
Were you aware the iPhone family has an app store? It does, you know, and a very good one at that.
Packed with a whole host of apps, and boasting the largest number of big name brands chucking their wares in, the 
App Store has revolutionised the way we use smartphones.
Mapping is decent too – quick, easy to use and often updated, with the API offered out to developers for apps as 
well.
However, it lacks some of the critical elements that Google obviously saves for its Android platform, which means it 
will always be slightly inferior.

HTC Desire
The HTC Desire has access to the Google Android Market, which is apparently closing in on offering 100,000 
applications.
However, this portal is a little under-stocked still, with most of the tier-one applications only available on the iPhone. 
This should change in the next year, as many brands are seeing Android as a more mature platform, but it's a long 
way from matching the iPhone.
The Google Maps application is great, not least because it's making good use of the phone's 1GHz processor.
Elements like transit lines, free satellite navigation and a swift GPS signal make this a really good option if you're 
looking to find yourself – literally, not in the philosophical sense. Although there may be an App for that…

Samsung Galaxy S
Like the Desire, the Galaxy S has access to a whole range of applications through the Market, so there's no 
differentiation there.
However, the Galaxy S also has another portal: Samsung Apps.
It's a little odd as not only are there just six apps on offer, but these keep getting updates every two to three days.
It's not a great offering, but one that we hope will get bigger and offer tailor-made Galaxy S applications to users.
Map-wise, the Galaxy S slightly outdoes the Desire simply by having a better and clearer screen. This means if 
you're using the phone as a sat nav, seeing where you're going is that much easier, which is always a plus when 
navigating.
                                             Winner : iPhone 4
                                          Battery

iPhone 4
The battery life on the iPhone range has been notoriously poor over the last few years, with 
the phone constantly asking for more than the power pack can provide.
The iPhone 4 bucks that trend by making a battery that last 40% longer, with the Apple 
processor helping to make sure the device only sips power, rather than gulping it down in 
huge swathes.

HTC Desire
If there was one problem with the Desire, it would be the battery life, as users often struggle to 
get it to last the day at times.
It's not a terrible battery, because most are used to overnight charging of their phones, but it 
could still be a little bit better, especially when the competition has raised its game.

Samsung Galaxy S
The Galaxy S is neither awful at retaining battery nor good at lasting for a good length of time. 
Depending on whether you're enticed by the movie or music player, the power source can last 
from 8 hours to 1.5 days.
The main problem is the battery meter output – it will quickly slip down from 50% to almost 
nothing on occasion, meaning you can feel a little tricked by your handset.



                                    Winner : iPhone 4
                       iPhone 4   HTC Desire   Samsung Galaxy S

     Interface                       W
      Screen                                         W
      Calling                                        W
    Messaging            W           W
      Internet                       W
      Camera             W
   Apps & Maps           W
      Battery            W
       Cost                          W
After Sales Services                 W               W
      Verdict                        W
                              Conclusion
We like what we're seeing here: three smartphones that really offer a shedload of 
hardware for your cash.

The iPhone 4 and HTC Desire are very closely matched at the head of the field, 
with the Samsung Galaxy S not too far behind either.

It almost comes down to preference – are you a lover of the open Android 
approach, or do you prefer the controlled-but-app-filled Apple existence?


Thanks to the reception problem, the HTC Desire still represents the best all-
round device in our opinion – Apple's free case solution is a great step, but it 
doesn't alter the fact that the phone hardware still has the problem.


So well done to the HTC Desire – despite being the oldest on test, it's still the top 
smartphone in our eyes... and if something beats it in the next few months, we're 
looking forward to seeing that.

								
To top