catalog qxd Marymount University in Arlington Virginia by ixieshaofang

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									MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY
 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog

                     2006-07




       MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY HALLMARKS
       Liberal Arts Education and Career Preparation
                      Academic Quality
                            Values
                  Focus on the Individual
               Resources of Washington, DC
                     Enterprising Spirit

         These hallmarks have defined the character of
        Marymount University since its founding in 1950.
2
                                      U N I V E R S I T Y C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N                                   3



Marymount University                                              Enrollment and Student Services
Main Campus                                                       Butler Hall — (703) 284-1511
2807 North Glebe Road
                                                                           Admissions
Arlington, VA 22207-4299
                                                                           Undergraduate:
www.marymount.edu
                                                                           Butler Hall — (703) 284-1500, (800) 548-7638
Ballston Center (send mail to Main Campus address)                         Graduate:
1000 North Glebe Road                                                      Ballston Center — (703) 284-5901, (800) 548-7638
Arlington, VA
                                                                           Athletics
                                                                           Rose Benté Lee Center — (703) 284-1619
Reston Center*
Location TBA                                                               Campus Ministry
                                                                           The Lodge — (703) 284-1607
General Information: (703) 522-5600,
                                                                           Campus Safety and Transportation
         (800) 828-1120 for TTY access through
                                                                           Ireton Hall — (703) 284-1601
         Virginia Relay Service
Weather and Emergency Information Line                                     Career and Internship Center
         (class cancellations): (703) 526-6888                             Ballston Center — (703) 284-5960
                                                                           Counseling Center
Academic Affairs
                                                                           Berg Hall — (703) 526-6861
Rowley Hall — (703) 284-1550
                                                                           Disability Support Services
         Academic Success Center
                                                                           Gerard Hall — (703) 284-1615
         Rowley Academic Center — (703) 526-6927
                                                                           Financial Aid
         Honors Program
                                                                           Rowley Academic Center — (703) 284-1530
         The Lodge — (703) 284-1629
                                                                           International Student Services
         Library and Learning Services
                                                                           Gerard Hall — (703) 526-6922
         Emerson G. Reinsch Library — (703) 284-1533
          Ballston Center Library Extension — (703) 284-5949               Residence Life and Housing
         Instructional Media Center — (703) 284-1536                       Berg Hall — (703) 284-1608
         Learning Resource Center — (703) 284-1538
                                                                           Student Activities
         Registrar                                                         The Lodge — (703) 284-1611
         Rowley Academic Center — (703) 284-1520
                                                                           Student Health Center
         School of Arts and Sciences                                       Berg Hall — (703) 284-1610
         Gailhac Hall — (703) 284-1560
                                                                           Student Development
         School of Business Administration                                 Gerard Hall — (703) 284-1615
         Ballston Center — (703) 284-5910
                                                                  Financial Affairs
         School of Education and Human Services
                                                                  St. Joseph Hall — (703) 284-1480
         Rowley Hall — (703) 284-1620
                                                                           Student Accounts
         School of Health Professions
                                                                           Rowley Academic Center — (703) 284-1490
         Butler Hall — (703) 284-1580
         Study Abroad                                             President’s Office
         Ballston Center — (703) 284-1677                         Rowley Hall — (703) 284-1598




  *At publication time for this catalog, the location of
  Marymount’s Reston Center was under negotiation.
4                                                                        TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S


    Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5                   Interior Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
                                                                                                   Liberal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
    University Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6                Literature and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
                                                                                                   Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
    Fields of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8             Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
                                                                                                   Politics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
    About Marymount University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10                               Theology and Religious
                                                                                                       Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
    Admission
       Undergraduate Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15                        School of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . .90
           Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16             Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
           International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16                           Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
       Post-baccalaureate Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19                            Health Care Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
       Graduate Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19                    Human Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
           International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19                           Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
                                                                                                Legal Administration/
                                                                                                    Paralegal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
    Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
                                                                                                Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
    Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24        School of Education and Human Services . . . . .105
                                                                                                Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
    Student Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31                      Criminal Justice/
                                                                                                    Forensic Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
    Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34        Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
                                                                                                Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
    Academic Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36                   Forensic Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
                                                                                                Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
    Academic Programs
       Liberal Arts Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49               School of Health Professions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
       Pre-professional Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50                         Health Sciences/
       Honors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50                         Health Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
       Marymount Academic Research                                                              Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
           Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51             Pre-Physical Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
       Study Abroad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51               Physical Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
       Consortium of Universities of the
           Washington Metropolitan Area . . . . . . . . .52                                  Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138

    School of Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54                    Board of Trustees/Board of Visitors . . . . . . . . . . .224
       Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
       Biology/Physical Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58                      Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
       Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
       Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62                  Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
       English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
       Fashion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70         Notices to Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .236
       Graphic and Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
       History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74       Maps and Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
       Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
                                                                                             Index         . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
                                                ACADEMIC CALENDAR                                                               5



FALL SEMESTER 2006                                               SUMMER SEMESTER 2007
August 24        Last day for Final Registration                 Summer Sessions are also referred to as SS.
August 25        New resident students arrive                    May 14            Summer Sessions I and III begin
August 25-26     Orientation for new freshman students           May 25            Last day to withdraw from a class without
August 26        Returning resident students arrive                                academic record (SS I and III)
August 28        Classes begin                                   May 28            Memorial Day Holiday
September 4      Labor Day Holiday                               June 11           Last day to withdraw from a class with a
September 6      Mass of the Holy Spirit                                           grade of W (SS I)
September 8      Last day to late register or add a class        June 11           Summer Session IV begins
September 29     Last day to withdraw from a class without       June 22           Last day to withdraw from a class with a
                 academic record                                                   grade of W (SS III)
October 9-10     Fall Break                                      June 23           Summer Session I ends
October 20       Midterm grades due                              June 25           Summer Session II begins
October 21-22    Family Weekend                                  June 29           Last day to withdraw from a class without
                                                                                   academic record (SS IV)
November 3       Last day to withdraw from a class with a
                 grade of W                                      July 4            Independence Day Holiday
November 22-26 Thanksgiving Holidays                             July 6            Last day to withdraw from a class with a
                                                                                   grade of W (SS IV)
November 27      Classes resume
                                                                 July 6            Last day to withdraw from a class without
December 9       Last day of classes
                                                                                   academic record (SS II)
December 11-16   Final exam period
                                                                 July 20           Last day to withdraw from a class with a
December 19      Final grades due to the Registrar’s Office by                     grade of W (SS II)
                 noon
                                                                 August 4          Summer Sessions II, III, and IV end
                                                                 August 6          All Summer Session final grades due to the
SPRING SEMESTER 2007
                                                                                   Registrar’s Office by noon
January 12-13    Final Registration
January 15       Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday                 NOTE: The most up-to-date calendar information is available
January 16       Classes begin                                   on Marymount’s Web site: www.marymount.edu.
January 29       Last day to late register or add a class
February 9       Last day to withdraw from a class without
                 academic record
March 2          Midterm grades due
March 5-11       Spring Recess
March 12         Classes resume
March 16         Last day to withdraw from a class with a
                 grade of W
April 5-9        Easter Holidays
April 28         Last day of classes
May 2-8          Final exam period
May 10           Final grades due to the Registrar’s Office by
                 noon
May 12           Recognition Day, Baccalaureate Mass, and
                 Graduation Reception
May 13           Commencement Day
6                                                        UNIVERSITY PROFILE



    University Profile                                                          ACCREDITATION
                                                                                Marymount University is accredited by the Commission on
    ENROLLMENT                                                                  Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
                                                                                [1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097; Phone:
    TOTAL ENROLLMENT: 3,684
                                                                                (404) 679-4500; Web site: www.sacscoc.org] to award doctoral,
    UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT: 2,327
                                                                                master’s, bachelor’s, and associate degrees.
    GRADUATE ENROLLMENT: 1,357
    NUMBER OF RESIDENT STUDENTS: 695                                            •   The Bachelor of Business Administration and Master of
                                                Based on fall 2005 statistics
                                                                                    Business Administration programs are accredited by the
                                                                                    Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs.

    FACULTY                                                                     •   The Counseling and School Counseling programs are
                                                                                    accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling
    134 full-time teaching faculty; 218 part-time faculty.                          and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
    Approximately 85 percent of Marymount’s full-time faculty                   •   Teacher preparation programs are accredited by the
    hold the highest degree in their field.                                         Division of Teacher Education and Certification of the
                                                                                    Virginia Department of Education and by the National
    STUDENT-TO-FACULTY RATIO                                                        Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
    13:1                                                                        •   The M.S. in Health Care Management program is accred-
                                                                                    ited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare
    ACADEMIC DIVISIONS                                                              Management Education (CAHME).

    School of Arts and Sciences                                                 •   The Interior Design undergraduate program and the First
                                                                                    Professional (Track Two) graduate degree program are
    School of Business Administration                                               accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation
    School of Education and Human Services                                          (CIDA).
    School of Health Professions                                                •   Nursing programs are accredited by the National League
                                                                                    for Nursing Accreditation Commission and the State
    ACADEMIC DISTINCTIONS                                                           Board of Nursing of the Commonwealth of Virginia. These
                                                                                    programs are also accredited by the Commission on
    •      The Liberal Arts Core requirements provide a broad                       Collegiate Nursing Education.
           general undergraduate education to integrate knowledge
           and enhance learning. The core experience prepares                   •   The M.A. in Legal Administration and the Paralegal
           students for graduate education, professions of their                    Studies programs are approved by the American Bar
           choice, and lifelong learning.                                           Association.

    •      A variety of pre-professional programs provide academic              •   The Physical Therapy program is accredited by the
           preparation for specialized professional pursuits and                    Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy
           graduate study.                                                          Education (CAPTE).

    •      All undergraduates are required to complete an internship,
           student-teaching experience, or clinical placement related
           to their majors.
    •      An Honors Program is available to qualified freshmen and
           transfer students.
    •      Through the Office of Study Abroad, students can spend a
           semester of study in many locations including Melbourne,
           Australia; London, England; Limerick, Ireland; Florence,
           Italy; Rome, Italy; and Madrid, Spain. Other destinations
           may also be arranged.
    •      A Marymount education draws upon the rich resources of
           the Washington, DC, area.
                                                                                                                                     7



ACADEMIC OUTREACH                                                  STUDENT SERVICES
                                                                   Marymount University is committed to meeting the needs of
Reston Center
                                                                   all students and provides support services through various
Responding to significant residential and commercial growth        offices, including Campus Ministry, the Career and Internship
in the Reston area, Marymount University has an extension          Center, Counseling Center, Disability Support Services, Housing
site at its Reston Center. The Center offers a variety of under-   and Residence Life, International Student Services, Student
graduate and graduate programs designed primarily for adult        Activities, and the Student Health Center.
learners.

Corporate Outreach                                                 ATHLETICS
Since 1996, Marymount’s Office of Corporate Outreach has           Marymount is an NCAA Division III institution and a member
developed partnerships with regional corporations and govern-      of the Capital Athletic Conference. The University offers the
ment agencies. Targeted graduate and undergraduate degree          following intercollegiate teams:
and certificate programs are offered on-site and at convenient          Men’s basketball, cross-country, golf, lacrosse, soccer,
regional locations.                                                     swimming
                                                                        Women’s basketball, cross-country, lacrosse, soccer,
Consortium of Universities of the Washington                            swimming, volleyball
Metropolitan Area
Marymount University is a member of The Consortium of
Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Other
members include American University, The Catholic University
of America, Gallaudet University, George Mason University,
Georgetown University, The George Washington University,
Howard University, Southeastern University, Trinity
University, University of the District of Columbia, and
University of Maryland at College Park. Eligible students from
Marymount may take approved courses at member institu-
tions. For more information about enrollment and registration
procedures, see page 38.
8                                                   FIELDS OF STUDY


    SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                             SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

    Undergraduate Degree Programs                           Undergraduate Degree Programs
      Art (B.A.)                                              Business Administration (B.B.A., B.B.A./M.B.A.)
        Art Management                                          Accounting
        Pre-Art Therapy                                         Business Law and Paralegal Studies
      Biology (B.S.)                                            Finance
        General Biology                                         General Business
        Molecular and Cellular Biology                          International Business
        Pre-Medicine                                            Management
      Communications (B.A.)                                     Marketing
      Computer Science (B.S., B.S./M.S.)                      Economics in Society (B.A.)
      English (B.A.)                                          Information Systems (B.S.)
       Dramatic Arts
                                                            Graduate Degree Programs
       Literature
                                                              Business Administration (M.B.A.)
       Writing
                                                                Finance
      Fashion Design (B.A.)
                                                                General Business
      Fashion Merchandising (B.A.)
                                                                Health Care Management
      Graphic Design (B.A.)
                                                                Human Resource Management
      History (B.A.)
                                                                Information Systems
      Interior Design (B.A.)
                                                                International Business
      Liberal Studies (B.A.)
                                                                Legal Administration
      Mathematics (B.S.)
                                                                Marketing
      Philosophy (B.A.)
                                                              Health Care Management (M.S.)
      Politics (B.A.)
                                                              Human Resource Management (M.A.)
      Theology and Religious Studies (B.A.)
                                                              Information Systems (M.S.)
    Graduate Degree Programs                                  Legal Administration (M.A.)
      Computer Science (M.S.)                                 Management (M.S.)
        Computer Security and Telecommunications
                                                            Undergraduate Certificate Program
        Software Engineering
                                                              Paralegal Studies
      Humanities (M.A.)
      Interior Design (M.A.)                                Graduate Certificate Programs
      Literature and Language (M.A.)                          Advanced Leadership
                                                              Health Care Informatics
    Undergraduate Certificate Programs
                                                              Human Resource Management
      English as a Second Language
                                                              Information Systems
      Web Design
                                                              Information Systems Program Management
    Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs                   Instructional Design
      Computer Science                                        Leading and Managing Change
      Forensic Computing                                      Management Studies
                                                              Organization Development
    Graduate Certificate Program
                                                              Paralegal Studies
      Computer Security and Information Assurance
                                                              Project Management
                                                  FIELDS OF STUDY                                                         9



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION                                       SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
AND HUMAN SERVICES
                                                          Undergraduate Degree Programs
Undergraduate Degree Programs                               Health Sciences (B.S., B.S./M.S.)
 Criminal Justice (B.A.)                                      Health Promotion
 Criminal Justice (B.S.)                                      Pre-Physical Therapy
    Forensic Science                                        Nursing (B.S.N.)
 Psychology (B.A.)
                                                          Graduate Degree Programs
 Sociology (B.A.)
                                                            Health Promotion Management (M.S.)
Graduate Degree Programs                                    Nursing (M.S.N.)
 Community Counseling (M.A.)                                  Family Nurse Practitioner
 Community Counseling/Forensic Psychology (M.A./M.A.)         Nursing Administration
                                                              Nursing Education
 Education (M.Ed.)
   Licensure Programs:                                      Physical Therapy (D.P.T.)
     Elementary Education                                 Graduate Certificate Programs
     English as a Second Language                           Family Nurse Practitioner (post-master’s)
     Learning Disabilities                                  Nursing Administration (post-master’s)
     Secondary Education                                    Nursing Education (post-master’s)
   Nonlicensure Programs:
     Catholic School Leadership
     Professional Studies
 Forensic Psychology (M.A.)
 Pastoral Counseling (M.A.)
 Pastoral and Spiritual Care (M.A.)                       PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
 School Counseling (M.A.)
                                                            Pre-Law
Undergraduate Certificate Program                           Pre-Medicine
 Criminal Justice/Forensic Science                          Pre-Physical Therapy

Graduate Certificate Programs
 Alternative Teacher Licensure
                                                          TEACHING LICENSURE PROGRAMS
 Catholic School Leadership
 Counseling (post-master’s)                                 Education
 Pastoral Counseling (post-master’s)                          Art (undergraduate)
                                                              Elementary — grades PK-6 (undergraduate and graduate)
                                                              English as a Second Language (undergraduate and graduate)
                                                              Learning Disabilities (undergraduate and graduate)
                                                              Secondary — grades 6-12 (undergraduate and graduate)
10                                          A B O U T M A RY M O U N T U N I V E R S I T Y



     About Marymount University                                         •   As a comprehensive university in the American higher
                                                                            education tradition, Marymount is a learning-teaching
                                                                            community that emphasizes excellence in teaching and
     Marymount University was founded in 1950 by the Religious              places primary focus on the learning-teaching process;
     of the Sacred Heart of Mary. Today, Marymount is an                    strives to contribute to the development of knowledge
     independent, comprehensive Catholic university serving nearly          through the scholarship of its members; and contributes
     3,700 undergraduate and graduate students. The University has          to the development of its community through service
     four Schools: Arts and Sciences, Business Administration,              outreach programs. The University recognizes the value
     Education and Human Services, and Health Professions.                  and importance of career preparation as a fundamental
     Programs are offered at Marymount’s Main Campus, Ballston              purpose of a university education. The University provides
     Center, and Reston Center, as well as various corporate and            both undergraduate and graduate education, serving a
     government sites. The University’s location in Arlington,              variety of student audiences, in response to the needs and
     Virginia — just minutes from Washington, DC — offers students          interests of its community and region.
     unparalleled opportunities for academic and personal enrichment.   •   As a Catholic university, Marymount affirms that the
                                                                            exploration of humanity’s relationship to the Divine is an
     MISSION                                                                integral part of the academic work of the University;
                                                                            challenges all members of the University community to
     As an independent, comprehensive Catholic university offering
                                                                            live ethically responsible lives; fosters a community of
     programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels,
                                                                            faith exploration open to individuals of diverse religious
     Marymount University strives to foster the intellectual, moral,
                                                                            backgrounds and beliefs; and strives to exemplify its
     spiritual, social, cultural, and physical development of each
                                                                            Catholic tradition within the University and in the way in
     student through an education that combines the liberal arts
                                                                            which all members of the University community interact
     tradition with career preparation.
                                                                            with one another and with the larger community outside
     A Marymount Education                                                  the University.
     Marymount University aspires to prepare students to be             •   In the spirit of the University’s founders, the Religious of
     thoughtful and effective persons within family, community, and         the Sacred Heart of Mary, Marymount strives to establish
     society; to develop students with the competencies necessary for       a shared sense of community among individuals drawn
     entry, growth, and success in their chosen careers; to build           from diverse national, cultural, and social backgrounds,
     within its students a shared sense of community among                  and emphasizes a spirit of service to others and respon-
     individuals drawn from diverse national, cultural, and social          siveness to the needs of persons and groups who do not
     backgrounds; to foster in its students a spirit of service to          fully share in the bounty of the larger community.
     others, a concern for social justice, and a commitment to living   The University also is shaped by the unique resources available
     in an ethically responsible way; and to develop in students both   through its location in the nation’s capital area, and by a
     the competencies and the motivation to be lifelong learners.       creative, future-oriented perspective on education.
          As an educational community, Marymount is formed by           •   The Marymount experience is enriched by the cultural,
     the heritage and traditions of liberal arts education, the             governmental, business, and professional resources of
     American higher education community, the Catholic Church,              Washington, DC, a city with an international character
     and the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary.                         and global perspective. The University’s location offers
     •   As a university in the liberal arts tradition, Marymount           extraordinary professional and scholarly opportunities for
         fosters the development of intellectual curiosity; an              faculty; the opportunity to bring leaders from government,
         unbiased pursuit of truth; an understanding of the                 commerce, and the professions to campus; specialized
         varying modes of inquiry utilized across the disciplines;          resources for instruction and research; unique internship
         and the development of the skills, competencies, and               placements for students; and outstanding employment
         motivation necessary for intellectual inquiry and lifelong         opportunities for graduates.
         learning. Marymount fosters the pursuit of excellence in       •   Marymount has grown and changed extensively since its
         teaching, learning, and scholarship, and forms a commu-            founding in 1950, reflecting a dynamic period of change in
         nity marked by intellectual freedom, civility, and diverse         American higher education, and also reflecting the
         interpretations of the human experience.                           openness, creativity, and enterprising spirit of the men
                                                                            and women who comprise the Marymount community.
                                         A B O U T M A RY M O U N T U N I V E R S I T Y                                                  11



    Marymount has been willing to look creatively at the             medical centers, and public schools.
    educational needs of the region it serves, to respond                An independent institution related to the Roman Catholic
    quickly, and to try new approaches. The University strives       Church, Marymount University is governed by a Board of
    to sustain a future-oriented perspective and to serve as a       Trustees that includes corporate and professional executives,
    leader in responding to the educational needs of its region      members of the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary, and
    and in utilizing innovative instructional technologies and       Marymount University alumni.
    practices.
                                                                     LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION
HISTORY
                                                                     Marymount is located in Arlington, Virginia, a prosperous urban
The name “Marymount” has long been associated with excel-            community adjacent to Washington, DC. The public Metrorail
lence in education. The Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary        system connects the University with the entire metropolitan
(RSHM), founders of Marymount University, have a long                Washington area. The University also maintains a shuttle bus
history of providing thoughtful responses to societal needs.         service, offering free transportation connecting the Main
Today, elementary, secondary, and collegiate institutions            Campus, Ballston Center, and Ballston-MU Metro station.
bearing the name “Marymount” are located in California, New          Students have easy access to national landmarks, cultural sites,
York, Virginia, England, France, Italy, and Mexico.                  restaurants, and shopping. Ronald Reagan Washington National
      Marymount University in Arlington was founded as a             Airport and Dulles International Airport are near the University,
women’s college in 1950 at the suggestion of Bishop Peter L.         as are Interstates 66, 95, 395, and 495.
Ireton of Richmond. Its first president was Mother Gerard
Phelan. Thirteen freshmen entered the first year, and nine of        A COMMITMENT TO ETHICS
them comprised the first graduating class in 1952. In 1960 the
institution was incorporated as Marymount College of Virginia,       The Center for Ethical Concerns
an independent college governed by an autonomous board of
                                                                     One of the hallmarks of Marymount University is its commit-
directors.
                                                                     ment to providing a values-based education. Marymount’s
      Enrollments steadily increased, and the physical plant and
                                                                     Center for Ethical Concerns was founded in 1993 to provide a
facilities were expanded to serve a growing student population.
                                                                     forum for the exchange of ideas about ethical issues and to
From the original property, which included a mansion, stone
                                                                     recognize leaders who advance a strong values-based culture.
guest house, and two cottages — all comprising the residence of
                                                                     Through lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops, and
Rear Admiral Presley M. Rixey, White House physician to
                                                                     symposia, the Center offers students, faculty, and the public
Presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt — the
                                                                     opportunities to examine ethical concerns facing society.
institution has grown to be a modern residential campus.
                                                                          A faculty committee works with the Center’s director to
      From 1950 to 1972, as a college, Marymount offered only
                                                                     develop programs that are responsive to the needs of the
the associate degree. In 1973, it became a senior college offering
                                                                     academic community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the
the bachelor’s degree in more than 20 fields. In 1979, graduate
                                                                     Center assists faculty in developing effective ways to teach
programs leading to the master’s degree were added.
                                                                     ethical concepts in the classroom. The Center also brings
Marymount’s first male students were admitted in 1972 in a
                                                                     together students and faculty from the University’s various
nursing program sponsored by the National Institutes of
                                                                     disciplines to increase awareness of ethical problems and
Health. In 1979, coeducational graduate programs in a number
                                                                     develop effective techniques to confront these issues.
of fields were added. In 1986, the institution responded to its
changing student profile by becoming coeducational at all            Marymount Ethics Award
levels and changing its name to Marymount University. In
                                                                     Marymount University presents an Ethics Award to recognize
2005, Marymount was approved by the Southern Association
                                                                     individuals who have taken an outstanding leadership role in
of Colleges and Schools to offer its first doctoral degree, the
                                                                     promoting and developing ethical standards and behavior. The
clinical Doctor of Physical Therapy.
                                                                     Marymount University Ethics Award honors leaders who, by
      The University responded to its dramatic enrollment growth
                                                                     commitment, effort, and example, advance a strong values-based
by acquiring new buildings near the Main Campus and increas-
                                                                     culture in their field of endeavor. Recipients, listed with their
ing accessibility through a shuttle service. The Ballston Center,
                                                                     title at the time of receiving the award, have been:
established in 1992, houses classrooms, offices, computer labora-
tories, and support services. Marymount University also reaches      Norman Augustine, chairman and CEO, Lockheed Martin Corporation
out to the northern Virginia region through its Reston Center        Benjamin Bradlee, vice president at large, The Washington Post
and off-campus offerings at corporate and government sites,
12                                              A B O U T M A RY M O U N T U N I V E R S I T Y


     Charles Harry Epps, M.D., former chief of Orthopedic Surgery, Howard     The Honorable William T. Coleman, senior partner and the senior
          University Medical School and Howard University Hospital                counselor, O’Melveny and Myers, LLP; former Secretary, U.S.
     Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., professor emeritus of Medicine and Medical          Department of Transportation
         Ethics, Georgetown University Medical Center                         Rita R. Colwell, director, National Science Foundation
     Sir John M. Templeton, chairman, The John Templeton Foundation           William E. Conway, Jr., founding partner and managing director,
     The Most Reverend Desmond M. Tutu, Nobel Laureate, Archbishop                 The Carlyle Group
         Emeritus of Cape Town, South Africa                                  John J. Curley, chairman, president, and CEO, Gannett Company, Inc.
                                                                              James O. Edwards, chairman and CEO, ICF Kaiser International, Inc.
     The John J. McDonnell, Jr. Endowed Chair in Ethics
                                                                              Amitai Etzioni, director, Institute for Communitarian Policy Studies,
     Marymount’s first endowed faculty chair was established in
                                                                                  The George Washington University
     2000. Provided through the generosity of John J. McDonnell,
     Jr., a leader in the electronic commerce field, the chair supports       Barry J. Fitzpatrick, chairman and CEO, First Virginia Banks, Inc.
     a faculty position in the field of ethics, enhancing the resources       Senator J. William Fulbright, former United States Senator
     directed toward infusing ethics into the curriculum and the              J. Peter Grace, chairman and CEO, W. R. Grace and Company
     academic life of the University. The faculty appointee provides
                                                                              Michael Hegarty, president and COO, The Equitable Life Assurance
     leadership for exploring how students’ understanding of ethics
                                                                                  Society
     can be deepened and strengthened. The McDonnell Chair in
     Ethics is a highly visible symbol of Marymount University’s              Thomas S. Johnson, former president, Manufacturers Hanover
     commitment to ethical decision making and behavior.                          Corporation
                                                                              The Honorable Jack F. Kemp, former Secretary, U.S. Department of
     SPEAKERS SERIES                                                              Housing and Urban Development
                                                                              Lawrence A. Kudlow, senior managing director and chief economist,
     The Distinguished Visiting Professor                                         The Bear Stearns Company, Inc.
     Colloquium Series
                                                                              Frederic V. Malek, chairman, Thayer Capital Partners
     The Distinguished Visiting Professor Colloquium Series is a
                                                                              J. Willard Marriott, Jr., chairman and president, Marriott International
     Universitywide program that brings outstanding speakers to
                                                                                   Corporation, Inc.
     each of Marymount’s four Schools.
          The goal of the series is to enrich the intellectual life of the    John J. McDonnell, Jr., chairman and CEO, Transaction Network
     University by providing opportunities for faculty and students               Services, Inc.
     to interact with individuals who have significant influence in a         John F. McGillicuddy, chairman and CEO, Chemical Banking
     wide array of fields. Distinguished Visiting Professor presenta-             Corporation
     tions enable the members of Marymount’s academic community               Dana Mead, chairman and CEO, Tenneco
     to become more attuned to the challenges and opportunities of
                                                                              Edward D. Miller, senior vice chairman, The Chase Manhattan
     diverse areas of endeavor. The following is a list of Marymount
                                                                                  Corporation
     University Distinguished Visiting Professors, with their title at
     the time of their presentation:                                          Mario Morino, chairman, The Morino Institute and Venture
                                                                                  Philanthropy Partners; special partner, General Atlantic Partners
     John A. Allison, IV, chairman and CEO, BB&T Corporation
                                                                              Allen E. Murray, chairman and CEO, Mobil Corporation
     Lawrence T. Babbio, Esq., president and COO, Bell Atlantic Corporation
                                                                              Olza M. Nicely, president and CEO, GEICO
     Celestino Beltran, president and CEO, Comprehensive Technologies
          International                                                       The Honorable Antonia Novello, Surgeon General of the United States

     Frank A. Bennack, Jr., president and CEO, The Hearst Corporation         Norma T. Pace, president and CEO, Economic Consulting and Planning;
                                                                                  chairman, Board of Governors, U.S. Postal Service
     William J. Bennett, co-director, Empower America
                                                                              The Honorable Maxwell M. Rabb, former U.S. Ambassador to Italy
     Rose Marie Bravo, CEO, Burberry
                                                                              Diane Ravitch, assistant Secretary for Education, U.S. Department of
     Warren E. Buffett, chairman and CEO, Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.
                                                                                  Education
     Marybeth Brown, professor of Physical Therapy, University of
                                                                              Joseph E. Robert, Jr., chairman and CEO, J.E. Robert Companies
         Missouri-Columbia
                                                                              Cokie Roberts, ABC News chief congressional analyst; correspondent,
     Vinton Cerf, vice president, Architecture and Technology, MCI
                                                                                   This Week with Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts
          WorldCom
                                            A B O U T M A RY M O U N T U N I V E R S I T Y                                                  13



E. John Rosenwald, Jr., vice chairman, The Bear Stearns Company, Inc.     Roger Mudd, former CBS and PBS correspondent, NBC anchor, and
Charles O. Rossotti, chairman and CEO, American Management Systems            History Channel host

Frederic V. Salerno, vice chairman, NYNEX Corporation                     Bob Schieffer, chief Washington correspondent, CBS News;
                                                                               anchor/moderator, Face the Nation
William A. Schreyer, chairman and CEO, Merrill Lynch & Company
                                                                          Robert Steele, Nelson Poynter Scholar for Journalism Values,
Dr. Thomas A. Shippey, Walter J. Ong Chair in Humanities, St. Louis
                                                                              The Poynter Institute
     University
                                                                          Helen Thomas, columnist, Hearst News Service
Dr. Rajendra Singh, chairman and CEO, Telcom Ventures, LCC
Lawrence M. Small, president, Federal National Mortgage Association
                                                                          FACILITIES
Frederick W. Smith, chairman and CEO, FedEx Corporation
                                                                          The Ballston Center at 1000 North Glebe Road houses the
Bishop Joseph M. Sullivan, D.D., auxiliary Bishop, Diocese of
                                                                          School of Business Administration; Graduate Admissions; the
     Brooklyn; executive vice president, Board of Trustees Catholic
                                                                          Office of Study Abroad; the Physical Therapy, Forensic
     Charities of Brooklyn
                                                                          Psychology, and School Counseling programs; the Career and
H. Brian Thompson, chairman and CEO, LCI International, Inc.              Internship Center; the Ballston Conference Center; computer
Preston Robert Tisch, chairman and Co-CEO, Loews Corporation              labs; a library extension; and a dining facility. This building
Mark R. Warner, managing director, Columbia Capital Corporation           also provides general classroom facilities for all programs.
                                                                          Majella Berg Hall, named for Marymount’s third president,
Celtic Studies Lecture Series                                             offers student housing. The Student Health Center, the
Over the past decade, Marymount University has sponsored a                Counseling Center, and the Housing and Residence Life offices
number of events highlighting this nation’s — and the capital             are also located in this building.
area’s — ties to Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, offered under the          Butler Hall serves academic and residential functions. The
auspices of the Celtic Studies Lecture Series. Included in this           undergraduate Admissions Office and School of Health
series have been presentations of scholarship in such fields as           Professions Office, several other administrative offices, and
archaeology, history, and politics. Lectures have been presented          many classrooms share Butler Hall with suite accommodations
by the following individuals, listed with their title at the time         for approximately 100 resident students.
of their presentation:
                                                                          Gailhac Hall houses classrooms as well as faculty and adminis-
Barry Cunliffe, professor of Archaeology, University of Oxford            trative offices. This building, home to the School of Arts and
Garret FitzGerald, former Prime Minister of Ireland                       Sciences, also contains drafting and design studios and a
James Flannery, professor of Performing Arts, Emory University            resource center serving the Interior Design, Graphic Design,
                                                                          Fashion Design, and Fine Arts programs.
Philip Freeman, professor of Classics, Washington University, St. Louis
                                                                          Gerard Phelan Hall is a student residence hall. It also houses
Dermot Keogh, professor of History, University College, Cork
                                                                          the central dining rooms, which seat 500, and the Office of
Andrew MacDonald, professor of History, Brock University                  Student Development.
Marya McLaughlin Endowed Lectureship in                                   Ireton Hall, a small colonial building in the center of the
Media Communications                                                      campus, houses faculty offices, the Office of Campus Safety
A lectureship in media communications has been endowed at                 and Transportation, and the Office of Human Resource
Marymount University in honor of Marya McLaughlin, a well-                Services/Affirmative Action.
known CBS News radio and television correspondent.                        The Rose Benté Lee Center provides space for all members of
     The annual lecture serves as an ongoing reminder of Ms.              the University community to enjoy extracurricular activities.
McLaughlin’s contributions to national broadcast journalism               The building includes the 1,000-seat Verizon Sports Arena; a
and provides Marymount students and faculty and members of                fitness center; Bernie’s café; Jazzman’s coffee kiosk; the
the larger community with valuable insights and inspiration               University bookstore and marketplace; a recreational gym; a
from journalists of national stature. Marya McLaughlin lectur-            swimming pool, with seating for 400 spectators; a game
ers, with their title at the time of their presentation, have been:       room/lounge; and the Honors Program Seminar Room.
Bob Edwards, radio journalist, NPR and XM Satellite Radio                 The Lodge houses the Student Activities Office, Campus
Bob Levey, columnist, The Washington Post
                                                                          Ministry, student government and club offices, student newspa-
                                                                          per and yearbook offices, meeting rooms, classrooms, lounges,
                                                                          and a full kitchen for student use.
14                                          A B O U T M A RY M O U N T U N I V E R S I T Y


     The Main House and its stately white pillars are a familiar and   The Rowley Academic Center includes the Office of Alumni
     beloved symbol of Marymount University. This beautiful            Relations; the Enrollment Services Center, comprising
     Georgian home is where Marymount hosts programs honoring          Financial Aid, the Registrar’s Office, Student Accounts, and the
     outstanding students and faculty, special alumni events, and      Academic Success Center; and the School of Education and
     receptions for distinguished friends and visitors.                Human Services on the lower level. Its upper levels house
     The Emerson G. Reinsch Library houses the University’s            student residence facilities.
     library and learning resource services, including the             Rowley Hall is connected to the Rowley Academic Center; both
     Instructional Media Center and the Learning Resource Center.      are named in honor of the late Mother Rita Rowley, superior
     The building also contains the Barry Art Gallery, the Lee         general of the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary. On its
     Reception Room, the Gomatos Reading Room, and a 180-seat          upper floors, this building houses 250 students. Rowley Hall’s
     auditorium.                                                       lobby level houses administrative offices including the
     The Reston Center, a Marymount extension site, provides           President’s Office, Academic Affairs, Development, and
     space for academic programs, classes, and conferences. It         University Communications. Lower floors are devoted to class-
     offers classrooms, a computer lab, a library extension, a         rooms, laboratories, and support services.
     testing facility for administering College-Level Examination      St. Joseph Hall houses computer labs and the Office of
     Program (CLEP) tests, as well as faculty and administrative       Financial Affairs.
     offices.
                                                           ADMISSION                                                                    15




Admission                                                            or better on a 4.0 scale; their combined SAT scores are within
                                                                     100 points of the national average; and their academic prepara-
                                                                     tion, recommendations, and character indicate that they are
Notification
                                                                     qualified to undertake Marymount University programs.
Marymount University has a rolling admissions policy, unless              The following minimum high school courses are
otherwise noted in this catalog. The University notifies appli-      recommended:
cants as to whether they have met the criteria for admission
                                                                         English                 4 units
after the application procedure is completed and the
Admissions Committee has acted on the application.                       Foreign Language        3 units
     All acceptances to Marymount University are tentative               Mathematics             3 units
until the applicant’s final high school or college grades are            Science                 2 units*
received and conditions of the acceptance, if any, are met.
                                                                         Social Sciences         3 units
     Offers of admission may be deferred for one year. Updated
transcripts and professional information must be provided            *It is strongly recommended that applicants to the School of
prior to enrollment.                                                 Health Professions programs have completed high school
                                                                     biology and chemistry. Other secondary-level science experi-
                                                                     ence will be considered in special cases.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS                                                     Applicants who do not meet these regular admission
                                                                     norms are referred to a committee that uses an academic
Marymount wishes to attract students whose educational
                                                                     potential predictor to admit those who (it believes) have the
interests and intellectual abilities are consistent with the goals
and character of the University. The University’s undergradu-        best potential for success. The committee may choose to place
ate curriculum provides a balance between liberal arts educa-        these students in Marymount’s First-Year Success Program,
tion and career preparation. The curriculum also prepares stu-       which provides intensive academic coaching.
dents to become educated citizens in a complex society and                 Applicants must submit the following items to be consid-
equips them with the skills and knowledge necessary for entry        ered for admission:
or advancement in their chosen career fields.                        •   a completed application form with the nonrefundable
     In reviewing applications for admission, Marymount                  application fee of $40;
University places primary emphasis on the strength of an
                                                                     •   the recommendation form completed by a high school
applicant’s academic record — the high school record for an
                                                                         counselor or other appropriate school official;
entering freshman or the prior college studies of a transfer
student. The University also takes into consideration national       •   official scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT-1) of
test scores, breadth of academic preparation, positive recom-            the College Entrance Examination Board or a Student
mendations, and personal character in making its decisions. All          Profile Report of the American College Testing Program
submitted documents become University property and cannot                (ACT) taken in the senior year;
be returned.                                                         •   evidence of graduation or expected graduation from an
                                                                         accredited high school (Marymount will also consider on a
Medical Requirements                                                     case-by-case basis students who have participated in an
A confidential medical examination record that includes a                approved home-school program);
complete record of immunizations is required for all under-          •   a high school transcript showing academic performance
graduate students. This record must be completed before the              and a minimum of 15 high school credits in preparatory
student may register for classes. The form is available from the         courses. In reviewing an applicant’s high school record, the
Admissions Office or the Student Health Center.                          Admissions Committee is more concerned with the quality
    Some students are required to have accident and/or health            of preparation than with the numerical distribution of
insurance. For details, please see “Insurance” on page 23.               courses. The Admissions Committee also takes into consid-
                                                                         eration the educational objectives and specific needs of
FRESHMEN
                                                                         the particular applicant.
At Marymount, a freshman student is defined as a first-time
college student. Most freshmen enroll at the University directly
out of high school.
     Applicants to the freshman class may be considered for
admission if their high school grade point average (GPA) is 2.5
16                                                                ADMISSION


     TRANSFER STUDENTS                                                     order to study at Marymount. F-1 visa international undergrad-
     A transfer student is defined as a student with a semester or         uates may only enroll full time as degree-seeking students.
     more of college experience at another accredited college or           Contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office or International
     university.                                                           Student Services Office for more information regarding this
          To be considered for admission, transfer applicants with         immigration regulation and other immigration-related
     30 or more college credits must present a grade point average         questions.
     of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale from previous postsecondary insti-         Eligible international students must submit the following
     tutions. Transfer applicants with fewer than 30 credits must          items to be considered:
     also meet freshman admissions requirements. Please refer to           •   a completed application form with the nonrefundable $40
     individual School sections for additional requirements for                application fee;
     specific programs. Nursing program applicants should note             •   a letter of recommendation from the applicant’s school
     additional requirements beginning on page 129.                            principal or academic advisor. The letter must be either
          Applicants who have been enrolled in a college or univer-            written in or translated into English;
     sity prior to applying to Marymount must submit the following:
                                                                           •   evidence of graduation or expected graduation from an
     •    a completed application form with the nonrefundable                  accredited high school;
          application fee of $40;
                                                                           •   transcripts — all foreign transcripts must be evaluated and
     •    the recommendation form completed by the dean of                     translated before an admission or a transfer credit
          students at the last college attended, a college professor, or       decision can be made. The applicant is responsible for the
          current employer; and                                                timely translation and evaluation of documents and for all
     •    official transcripts from all postsecondary institutions             costs and fees associated with these services. Approved
          (delivered in a sealed envelope that bears the registrar’s           evaluation agencies can be found online at
          signature and/or seal).                                              www.marymount.edu/admissions/undergrad/
     Students who have been admitted for transfer to Marymount                 requirements-international.html. Suggested evaluation
     University will receive a formal transfer evaluation by the               agencies are World Education Services, Inc., P.O. Box 745,
     University registrar. It is the responsibility of the student             Old Chelsea Station, New York, NY 10011; Credentials
     applicant to provide the transcripts necessary for this evalua-           Evaluation Services, Inc., P.O. Box 66940, Los Angeles, CA
     tion. Marymount only accepts coursework for transfer credit               90066; World Educational Credentials Evaluators and
     from an institution accredited as degree-granting by a regional           College Planning, P.O. Box 341468, Tampa, FL 33694; and
     accrediting body for higher education at the time the course-             AACRAO (American Association of Collegiate Registrars),
     work was completed. For more information on transfer policies,            1 Dupont Circle, N.W., Suite 520, Washington, DC 20036;
     please see page 38.                                                   •   a completed international student supplemental informa-
                                                                               tion (ISSI) form;
     Articulation Agreements
                                                                           •   acceptable standardized test scores; and
     To facilitate the entrance of transfer students from Northern
                                                                           •   Nonnative speakers of English must submit a minimum
     Virginia Community College and Montgomery College in
                                                                               Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550
     Maryland into baccalaureate programs, the University has
                                                                               on the paper-based test, 213 on the computer-based test, or
     articulation agreements with these institutions. These agree-
                                                                               79 on the Internet test to be considered for admission.
     ments inform students of course equivalencies between
     institutions. Information about these equivalencies is available      International students in need of an I-20 form
     from counselors at Northern Virginia Community College and            (Certificate of Eligibility)
     Montgomery College, from Marymount University’s Office of
                                                                           The completed application must be received in the Admissions
     Admissions, Marymount’s Academic Success Center, and the
                                                                           Office by the following dates, depending on where the appli-
     University Web site.
                                                                           cant is presently residing:
     INTERNATIONAL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS                                       For fall semester:
                                                                                Students residing outside the U.S., July 1
     An international student is defined as an individual wishing
                                                                                Students residing inside the U.S., July 15
     to enroll who is neither a U.S. citizen nor a permanent
                                                                                For spring semester:
     U.S. resident.
                                                                                Students residing outside the U.S., October 15
          Visitors in B-1/B-2 status are not eligible to register. These
                                                                                Students residing inside the U.S., November 1
     individuals must change their status to an F-1 student visa in
                                                         ADMISSION                                                                    17



    For summer semester:                                               For details about the Honors Program curriculum, please
    Students residing outside the U.S., March 15                  see pages 50-51. Additional criteria and application require-
    Students residing inside the U.S., April 1                    ments can be found on the program’s Web site:
International students in need of an I-20 form must adequately    www.marymount.edu/honors.
document financial resources for the program’s duration. An I-
                                                                  CERTIFICATE-SEEKING
20 will be issued when:
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
•   the applicant has been admitted;
                                                                  All applicants to these programs must submit a completed
•   original financial documentation, such as a certified bank    application, along with a $40 nonrefundable application fee.
    statement, has been received;                                 Applicants should also see the School section offering the
•   a copy of the ID pages of the applicant’s passport has been   desired certificate program to learn of possible additional
    received; and                                                 admission requirements.
•   a deposit has been paid.                                           F-1 international students are not eligible to enroll in
                                                                  undergraduate certificate programs.
In cases where the applicant has been previously enrolled in
the United States, he/she must also submit:                       NONDEGREE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
•   a Transfer Clearance Form;                                    A nondegree undergraduate applicant is an individual who
•   copies of all previous I-20s;                                 intends to enroll in a limited number of courses to increase
•   a copy of his/her visa; and                                   vocational fitness, learn about recent developments in a field of
                                                                  interest, or transfer credits to a home institution. Nondegree
•   a copy of the back and front of the I-94 card.
                                                                  applicants must submit the following items:
HONORS PROGRAM                                                    •   a completed application form with the nonrefundable
The University offers an Honors Program for undergraduate             application fee of $40; and
students wishing to augment their academic experience with a      •   a final high school and/or postsecondary transcript
specialized curriculum designed to provide greater depth,             indicating a minimum GPA of 2.0.
breadth, and challenge. The program’s 21-credit course require-   An F-1 visa student is not eligible to apply as a nondegree
ments can be integrated into any major.                           student. F-1 visa undergraduate students may only be admitted
     Incoming freshmen and sophomores, as well as transfer        to the University as degree-seeking students. Please see page 16
students from other honors programs, may apply to the             for admission requirements and procedures.
Marymount University Honors Program, but admission is
competitive and limited to a maximum of 20 new participants       Nondegree Undergraduate Enrollment
each year. Applicants will be chosen based on a variety of        No more than 30 credit hours of undergraduate courses earned
credentials. The following criteria are recommended for those     as a nondegree student at Marymount University are applicable
seeking program admission:                                        to undergraduate degree requirements or electives. Nondegree
•   minimum high school or college GPA of 3.5;                    students are not eligible for financial aid, may not live on
•   minimum composite (Math and Critical Reading) SAT             campus, and may be unable to enroll in courses in some highly
    score of 1200 and/or composite (English, Reading, Math,       selective undergraduate programs.
    and Science) ACT score of 26;                                      Visiting nondegree students from institutions outside the
                                                                  Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan
•   strong background in English composition and literature;
                                                                  Area receive academic advising through the Academic Success
    and
                                                                  Center.
•   for international students, a minimum score on the Test of
    English as a Foreign Language of 617 on the paper-based       OFF-SITE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
    test, 260 on the computer-based test, or 105 on the           ENROLLED IN SPECIAL PROGRAMS
    Internet test.                                                Students enrolled in off-site programs through Marymount's
Those seeking admission to the program must submit an             Office of Corporate Outreach are required to submit official
Honors Program application in addition to the general             transcripts and, depending upon their academic objective, fol-
University admission application. Applicants must also submit     low admission requirements consistent with degree- or certifi-
an application essay and recommendations. Those admitted to       cate-seeking students.
the program are eligible for additional scholarship support.
18                                                              ADMISSION


          Students who complete certificate programs and wish to              higher level with an earned grade at a qualifying indicated
     be admitted as degree-seeking students must apply for admis-             level will be considered for transfer credit. Any student inter-
     sion to the degree program. Completion of a certificate offering         ested in receiving credit for the Higher Level Examinations
     does not guarantee admission to a degree program.                        of the International Baccalaureate program should arrange
                                                                              for an official grade report to be sent directly to the Office
     OPPORTUNITIES FOR CREDIT ACQUISITION                                     of Admissions. If credit is awarded, the student’s University
     Marymount participates in a number of programs that award                record carries a notation of credits, but no grade is recorded.
     credit to students for achievement or work experience, such as:          No credit is awarded for subsidiary-level examinations.
         Advanced Placement (AP): Marymount University partici-               For a list of IB subject examinations, the Marymount
         pates in the College Board Advanced Placement Program                course for which a student may earn credit(s), and the score
         and awards college credit to entering students with qualify-         required to earn those credit(s), please see the IB informa-
         ing scores. Applicants who seek advanced placement                   tion under the FAQ section of the Registrar’s Office Web
         because they have taken one or more of the Advanced                  page on the University Web site, www.marymount.edu/
         Placement Examinations should have the examination                   registrar.
         results sent to the Office of Admissions prior to enroll-            French Baccalaureate: Credit is granted for subjects with a
         ment. First-semester freshmen who have earned scores of 3,           minimum grade of 10. No credit is awarded for English or
         4, or 5 may be granted credit (without grades). Advanced             French language.
         credit earned in this manner by entering freshmen will
                                                                              A-Levels: Credit is awarded for grades of A, B, or C. No
         fulfill any University or departmental graduation require-
                                                                              credit is awarded for O-Level work.
         ment. Transfer students must have the scores sent directly
         to Marymount’s Office of Admissions if they wish to                  DANTES/PONSI: Marymount University follows ACE
         receive credit. For a list of AP subject examinations, the           guidelines for awarding credit applicable to a student’s
         Marymount course for which a student may earn credit(s),             program.
         and the score required to earn those credit(s), please see the       Portfolio Assessment and Credit by Examination (PACE): For
         AP information under the FAQ section of the Registrar’s              information on credit acquisition through portfolio assess-
         Office Web page on the University Web site,                          ment or examination, see the PACE information online.
         www.marymount.edu/registrar.                                         Visit the “Transfer Credit” section on the FAQ link of the
         College-Level Examination Program (CLEP): Marymount                  Registrar’s Office Web page on the University Web site,
         University also participates with the College Board in this          www.marymount.edu/registrar.
         program. Credit may be awarded for the CLEP subject
                                                                          Credit Acceptance Policy
         examinations depending upon the score earned. The
         University follows the guidelines recommended by the             Acceptance of course credits earned elsewhere for credit toward
         American Council on Education (ACE) for awarding credit.         degree requirements is at the sole discretion of Marymount
         The student’s University record will carry a notation of         University. No more than 30 undergraduate credits can be
         credit, but no grade will be awarded. The University does        earned by a Marymount student through any combination of
         not recognize credits earned by CLEP general examinations.       CLEP, ACT/PEP, DANTES examinations, or assessment of portfo-
         Undergraduate students interested in receiving credit for        lios of prior learning administered through the Liberal Studies
         CLEP examinations should arrange for their official score        program. None of these 30 credits may be used to complete the
         reports to be sent directly from Educational Testing Service     residency requirement for graduation from Marymount.
         to the Office of Admissions.
         For a list of CLEP subject examinations, the Marymount
         course for which a student may earn credit(s), and the
         score required to earn those credit(s), please see the CLEP
         information under the FAQ section of the Registrar’s Office
         Web page on the University Web site,
         www.marymount.edu/registrar.
         International Baccalaureate (IB): A student who does work
         based on college-level studies in an International
         Baccalaureate program in a secondary school may take the
         Higher Level Examinations. Subjects examined at the
                                                            ADMISSION                                                                       19



POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDENTS                                           GMAT test scores, with the exception of Physical Therapy
                                                                      program applicants. Physical Therapy program applicants must
Students who already have a bachelor’s degree and wish to
                                                                      submit GRE scores even if they have a master’s degree in
complete further study may apply to a post-baccalaureate
                                                                      another field. Acceptable Praxis I or SAT scores are required for
certificate program. Applicants seeking a post-baccalaureate
                                                                      admission to all teacher licensure programs.
certificate must submit the following items to be considered for
acceptance:                                                           INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS
•   a completed application form with the nonrefundable               An international student is defined as an individual wishing
    application fee of $40; and                                       to enroll who is neither a U.S. citizen nor a permanent U.S.
•   official transcript(s) showing at least a bachelor’s degree.      resident.
Applicants should also read the School section offering the                Visitors in B-1/B-2 status are not eligible to register. These
desired certificate program to learn of possible additional           individuals must change their status to an F-1 student visa in
admission requirements.                                               order to study at Marymount University. Contact the
     F-1 visa students are not eligible to enroll in post-baccalau-   International Student Services Office or Office of Graduate
reate programs.                                                       Admissions for more information regarding this immigration
     Post-baccalaureate students follow the same academic             regulation and other immigration-related questions.
policies as undergraduate students.                                        Eligible international students must submit the following
     Courses needed to complete post-baccalaureate certificate        items to be considered:
requirements do not fulfill any graduate course requirements.         •    a completed application form with the nonrefundable $40
                                                                           application fee;
GRADUATE STUDENTS                                                     •    evidence of graduation or expected graduation from an
                                                                           accredited college or university in the form of an official
Marymount University takes into consideration an applicant’s
                                                                           transcript or letter on institutional letterhead from a
previous college or university coursework, test scores (when
                                                                           representative of that institution;
applicable), and positive recommendations in making decisions
for admission.                                                        •    transcripts — all foreign transcripts must be evaluated and
                                                                           translated before an admission or a transfer credit
DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS                                                    decision can be made. Transcripts must be certified as true
Unless otherwise noted, students are admitted on a full- or                copy by a notary public, an official of the institution in
part-time basis for the fall, spring, and summer semesters.                which the student is enrolled, or a United States consular
     Some Schools and individual graduate programs vary in                 official. Transcripts not in English must be accompanied
their requirements for standardized test scores,* portfolios,              by an official or certified translation and must be literal.
interviews, work experience, or other criteria. Some programs              The academic record should include a list of the subjects
have specific application deadlines. For detailed information,             studied and a qualitative rating. The applicant is responsi-
students should consult the section for the School or program              ble for the timely translation and evaluation of documents
to which they are applying.                                                and for all costs and fees associated with these services.
     Applicants who have or will receive a bachelor’s degree from          Suggested evaluation agencies are listed on page 16;
an accredited college or university prior to enrollment must          •    a completed international student supplemental informa-
submit the following items to be considered for acceptance:                tion (ISSI) form;
•   a completed application form with the nonrefundable               •    a copy of the applicant’s passport ID pages, visa (if applica-
    application fee of $40; and                                            ble), and I-94 form with the front and back completed;
•   official transcripts showing all postsecondary coursework         •    acceptable standardized test scores (see preceding “Degree-
    (delivered in a sealed envelope that bears the registrar’s             seeking Students” section); and
    signature and/or seal).                                           •    Nonnative speakers of English must have a minimum score
These items are Universitywide requirements for every program.             on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of 600
*NOTE: All scores should reflect testing within the last five              on the paper-based test, 250 on the computer-based test, or
years or be subject to review by the Admission, Progression,               100 on the Internet test to be considered for admission.
and Graduation Committee. Applicants who already hold a                    Those students who have a baccalaureate degree from an
master’s degree are not required to submit GRE, MAT, LSAT, or              accredited school where the language of instruction is
                                                                           English are exempt from this requirement.
20                                                               ADMISSION


     All international students in need of a Certificate of                Nondegree Graduate Enrollment
     Eligibility (I-20) please see pages 16-17 for application             Students who wish to continue graduate study beyond the
     deadlines.                                                            limits for nondegree status must apply for program admission
                                                                           and meet all regular admission requirements for the degree
     CERTIFICATE-SEEKING GRADUATE STUDENTS                                 programs. Graduate credits earned at Marymount University
     The following are required for certificate-seeking applicants in      while a student is enrolled through nondegree status may be
     order to be considered for acceptance:                                applicable to graduate degree requirements or electives.
     •   a completed graduate admission application with the
                                                                           OFF-SITE GRADUATE STUDENTS
         nonrefundable $40 application fee;
                                                                           ENROLLED IN SPECIAL PROGRAMS
     •   transcripts reflecting postsecondary work and showing at
                                                                           Students enrolled in off-site programs through Marymount's
         least a bachelor’s degree; and
                                                                           Office of Corporate Outreach are required to submit official
     •   an interview with the appropriate program representative,         transcripts and, depending upon their academic objective, fol-
         if required.                                                      low admission requirements consistent with degree- or certifi-
     Students admitted to graduate certificate programs are limited        cate-seeking students.
     to enrollment in those courses and prerequisites that fulfill              Students who complete certificate programs and wish to
     certificate requirements. Marymount graduate certificate              be admitted as degree-seeking students must apply for admis-
     coursework that is applicable to a given master’s degree may be       sion to the degree program. Completion of a certificate offering
     applied to that degree; however, students must apply for degree       does not guarantee admission to a degree program.
     status prior to or upon completion of the certificate. No more
     than 18 credits of courses earned in certificate programs may
     be applied to graduate degree requirements. Completion of a
     certificate offering does not guarantee admission to a degree
     program.
          International students must follow the same admission
     procedures listed under “International Graduate Students.” (See
     page 19.)

     NONDEGREE GRADUATE STUDENTS
     Some programs offer nondegree applicants admission to gradu-
     ate courses taken to increase vocational fitness and to learn
     about recent developments in a field of interest. Such students
     are urged to seek academic advice from the appropriate gradu-
     ate program coordinator before registration. Students interested
     in nondegree studies should consult the School or program
     section in which he/she is interested to learn if there are further
     details concerning nondegree studies. The following are required
     in order to be considered for acceptance:
     •   a completed graduate admission application with the
         nonrefundable $40 application fee;
     •   transcripts reflecting postsecondary work and showing at
         least a bachelor’s degree; and
     •   an interview with the appropriate program representative,
         if required.
     An F-1 visa student is not eligible to apply as a nondegree
     student. F-1 visa graduate students may only be admitted to the
     University as graduate degree- or graduate certificate-seeking
     students. Please see the appropriate category for admission
     requirements and procedures.
                                               F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N                                                   21




Financial Information                                               only). Do not mail cash. Checks and money orders should be
                                                                    made payable to Marymount University. All checks and money
                                                                    orders must include the student’s ID number, address, and
The following financial information applies to the 2006-07          phone number on the face of the check. All returned checks are
academic year.                                                      subject to a $35 service fee.
                                                                         If, for any reason, a parent, a guardian, an employer, or an
TUITION                                                             embassy does not honor their financial obligation to the
                                                                    University on behalf of the student, the student will be held
Undergraduate Students                                              responsible for those financial obligations.
•   $9,524 per semester full time (12-18 credit hours)              DISCOUNTS
•   $19,048 per academic year (September-May)
•   Undergraduate students enrolled for more than 18 credits in     Tuition Prepayment
    a semester are charged $620 per credit hour in excess of 18.    Full-time students are given a discount of $200 on tuition and
•   $620 per credit hour part time (up to 11 credit hours)          $100 on room and board if the entire year’s charges have been
                                                                    paid in full by August 6. NOTE: Students may not deduct their
Graduate Students                                                   financial aid package when paying for the year to qualify for
•   Full and part time: $620 per credit hour                        the discount.

Physical Therapy Program Tuition                                    Family

Tuition for those who begin study in September 2006 is              When a first member of a family pays full-time undergraduate
$20,900 each year for a total of $62,700 for the three-year         tuition, any additional family members concurrently enrolled
program.                                                            in the full-time undergraduate program may receive a 25-
                                                                    percent tuition discount. Family is defined as parents and
Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy Program Tuition             dependent children, or married couples.
Tuition for this distance-education program is $6,500 for
                                                                    Senior Citizen
Marymount University graduates and $7,000 for graduates of
other programs.                                                     As a service to senior citizens residing in its community, the
                                                                    University offers to persons 65 years or older a tuition discount
Summer Tuition                                                      of 50 percent for undergraduate and graduate courses.
Undergraduate and graduate students pay $620 per credit hour        Applicants must first meet all regular admission criteria for
for summer session classes.                                         either degree candidacy or nondegree status.

Consortium Tuition                                                  FEES
Payment for consortium credits is due at the time of registra-
tion. Marymount consortium students pay the Marymount               Room and Board
tuition rate to the Marymount Student Accounts Office. Credits      •   $4,106 per semester, double occupancy
taken through the consortium are counted toward full-               •   $8,212 per academic year (September-May), double
time/part-time status at Marymount for the purposes of                  occupancy
financial aid. Any attendant fees (lab, books, study materials)
are to be paid by the student to the visited institution.           •   $147 per semester for resident telephone, data, and cable
     Refunds for consortium courses follow the Marymount                TV service
refund schedule.                                                    •   Single occupancy is an additional $779 per semester (to the
                                                                        preceding rates), subject to availability.
TUITION PAYMENT
                                                                    •   University housing is not available without a resident
For tuition payments and deadlines, please visit Marymount’s            board plan; meal plan options are available.
Web site at www.marymount.edu/financialinfo/payment.html.
                                                                    •   Health service privileges and student health insurance are
Monthly late payment fees of $55 will be assessed to all delin-
                                                                        included in the fee for room and board.
quent accounts. All payments must be made in U.S. currency
and drawn on U.S. banks. Marymount University accepts cash,         •   Rates for University off-campus housing for select upper-
checks, money orders, and credit cards (Visa or MasterCard              class students are available through the Office of Housing
                                                                        and Residence Life.
22                                                   F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N


     Commuter Meal Plans                                                      Communications                                $110 per course
     •   $370 per semester for a 50-meal plan in the Gerard Phelan            COM 304
         Dining Hall or Ballston Center Cafeteria, including $100 in          Criminal Justice                                $55 per course
         dining points that can be used toward purchases in                   CJ 308, 309, 508, 509
         Bernie’s café or Jazzman’s coffee kiosk                              Fine Arts                                       $55 per course
     •   $195 per semester for a 25-meal plan in the Gerard Phelan            FA 209, 211, 350A-F
         Dining Hall or Ballston Center Cafeteria, including $50 in           Geology                                             $55 per lab
         dining points that can be used toward purchases in                   GEOL 102
         Bernie’s café or Jazzman’s coffee kiosk
                                                                              Graphic Design                            $50 per course
     New Student Fee                                                          GD 200, 202, 203, 255, 265, 302, 303, 308, 309, 360, 405
     A one-time new student fee is assessed on the following basis:           Graphic Design                                $110 per course
                                                                              GD 304
     •   First-college freshmen: $160
                                                                              Interior Design                              $55 per course
     •   Transfer students: $55
                                                                              ID 111, 201, 202, 212, 214, 303, 313, 405, 406, 412, 485, 487,
     •   Graduate students: $30                                               503, 504, 507, 508, 509, 512, 513
     All new students will be charged this fee to cover such items as         Nursing Clinical Fees                   $160 per clinical
     student ID cards, Orientation, and new student programs.                 NU 220, 221, 222, 223, 331, 332, 333, 400, 430, 432
     Student Activity Fee                                                     Nursing Lab Fees
                                                                              NU 231                                                      $150
     All full-time undergraduate students pay a $25 per semester
                                                                              NU 302                                                       $30
     Student Activity Fee.
                                                                              NU 363                                                       $55
     Technology Fee                                                           NU 503                                                       $80
     Each fall, spring, and summer term students will be assessed             NUF 503                                                     $145
     $6.30 per credit up to a maximum of $75.60 as a fee to support           NUF 504                                                       $135
     computer enhancement in the laboratories. In addition, some              Nursing Test Fees
     courses require that students purchase stand-alone computer              These test fees are one-time fees that can only be refunded if the
     software and/or textbook software packages.                              course is dropped within 14 days of the beginning of the semester.
     Course Fees                                                              NU 310                                                    $300
                                                                              NU 331                                                    $370
     Fees are charged to partially support periodic equipment
                                                                              Paralegal Studies                               $60 per course
     maintenance and replacement, added instruction costs
                                                                              LA 491, 519
     incurred, and costs for consumable materials in the following
     courses:                                                                 Physics                                             $80 per lab
                                                                              PHYS 171, 172
         Applied Arts                               $55 per course
         AA 250, 265, 270, 272, 350, 365, 370, 372, 374, 385, 407,            Psychology                                      $80 per course
         414, 415, 418, 420                                                   PS 510, 511, 513, 514
         Astronomy                                      $55 per lab           Student-teaching application                                 $40
         ASTR 101                                                             Graduate Psychology internship application                   $55
         Biology                                    $55 per course            PACE reading fee                            $200 per portfolio
         BIO 110, 111, 120                                                    PACE credit hour fee                    $200 per credit hour
         Biology                                          $80 per lab
         BIO 151, 152, 161, 162, 220, 250, 260, 262, 272, 368, 369        Late Registration Fee
         Chemistry                                     $110 per lab       A $55 fee is charged if registration is not completed prior to the
         CHM 125, 151, 152, 221, 222, 352                                 last day of Final Registration.
         Communications                             $55 per course
         COM 200, 203, 303, 308, 309
                                                 F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N                                                      23



Continuous Registration Fee                                            to year until the resident leaves University housing. Unless the
A continuous registration fee of $35 is payable at registration        University approves or grants a deferral of the housing deposit, a
each semester to maintain registration when not matriculating          student who chooses to decline or discontinue residence in
in classes. For more information on continuous registration,           University housing remains liable for the payment of the
please see page 37.                                                    housing deposit in accordance with the housing contract.

                                                                       New Freshman and Transfer Commuters
INSURANCE
                                                                       A $100 nonrefundable deposit is required from freshman and
Marymount University offers all students enrolled for at least 9       transfer commuting students to confirm an intention to enroll.
credits the opportunity to participate in a 12-month (August-          This is credited toward tuition charges upon registration.
August) accident and sickness plan provided by Academic
Health Plans. Rates and terms are available at the beginning of        Forensic Psychology and Counseling Students
each academic year. Resident students are automatically                A $300 nonrefundable deposit is required from students in the
covered as part of their room and board fees.                          Forensic Psychology program, as well as the Community,
     Accident and health insurance is mandatory for all inter-         Pastoral, and School Counseling programs within 30 days of
national students on nonimmigrant F-1 visas, Nursing students,         acceptance.
student-athletes, and Physical Therapy students.
     Students who are required to carry insurance and who              Human Resource Management Cohort Students
elect not to accept the University-approved policy must produce        A $500 nonrefundable deposit is required from students
adequate and acceptable documentation of coverage in Virginia.         enrolling in the Human Resource Management cohort program
Commuter students who are required to have insurance may               offered through the Reston Center. This is due within 30 days
not register until they present an approved waiver or pay the          of acceptance.
premium. Commuter intercollegiate student-athletes will be
required to obtain the University-approved policy and will             Physical Therapy Students
automatically be charged the insurance premium. F-1 visa               A $500 nonrefundable deposit is required from Physical
students who are commuters will automatically be charged the           Therapy students within three weeks of notification of acceptance.
insurance premium plus an additional fee for Repatriation and
Evacuation coverage. F-1 visa students who already have                COLLECTION POLICY
adequate medical insurance coverage must complete a waiver
form. The open enrollment period ends at the close of business         A student with an outstanding balance at the end of the semes-
30 days after the semester begins.                                     ter will have his/her grades, transcripts, and registration
                                                                       withheld until the outstanding balance is paid in full. The
                                                                       University will make every effort to contact the student.
DEPOSITS
                                                                       However, if the University’s attempts are unsuccessful, the
                                                                       account will be turned over to a collection agency for collection
New Resident Students
                                                                       or to attorneys for litigation. The student will be responsible
For new freshman and sophomore students who are 20 years of            for all costs, including collection agency fees, attorney fees, and
age or younger and entering in the fall semester with fewer than       court costs.
60 transferable credits, a $300 nonrefundable deposit is required
by May 1 to reserve a place in a residence hall. For those students
                                                                       REFUNDS
entering residence halls in the spring semester, a $300 nonre-
fundable deposit is required by November 1.
                                                                       GENERAL TUITION REFUNDS
      Transfer students who are 21 years of age or younger enter-
ing with 60 or more transferable credits will be accommodated          To be eligible to receive a refund, students must officially
in student housing or University-sponsored off-campus housing          withdraw from a class or separate from the University before
on a space-available basis. If space is available, a $300 nonrefund-   the deadlines that appear under “Dates and Deadlines” in the
able deposit is required by June 15 to reserve a place.                Schedule of Classes. See Marymount University’s Web site for
      If housing is available after the deposit deadlines, appli-      refund deadlines.
cants must make the deposit within 15 days of acceptance.                   Refunds will be processed generally within 14 days of the
      The one-time $300 housing deposit, submitted prior to            receipt of a written request to the Student Accounts Office. The
filling out the Housing Application, will be rolled over from year     University does not issue refunds in cash; only check and credit
                                                                       card refunds are issued. Federal financial aid recipient refunds
24                                                   F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N


     will be determined based on the federal pro-rata refund regula-       COMMUTER MEAL PLAN REFUNDS
     tions. Information and examples of federal pro-rata refunds are       Commuter meal plans are nonrefundable and expire at the end
     available in the Financial Aid Office.                                of each semester.
     Fall and spring semester courses
                                                                           PAYMENT PLANS
     Students are eligible for refunds as follows: Week 1 — 100
     percent of tuition and fees; Week 2 — 75 percent of tuition only,     Payment plans are available to qualifying students. To obtain
     no fees; Week 3 — 50 percent of tuition only, no fees. Students       an application, call (703) 284-1490. All arrangements, including
     are not eligible for any refunds after the third week of class.       the down payment, must be completed at least one week prior
                                                                           to registration.
     Summer session classes                                                     Academic Management Services (AMS) offers a ten-month
     Students are eligible for refunds as follows: Week 1 — 75 percent     budgeting plan that begins in June prior to the fall semester.
     of tuition and fees; Week 2 — 50 percent of tuition only, no          All or part of the annual costs may be budgeted with no inter-
     fees; Week 3 — 25 percent of tuition only, no fees. Students are      est rate assessed. A nonrefundable annual enrollment fee of $55
     not eligible for any refunds after the third week of class.           (includes insurance) is needed to apply. Applications are avail-
                                                                           able from the Office of Student Accounts or from AMS at (800)
     Weekend and concentrated courses                                      635-0120, www.tuitionpayenroll.com/marymount.
     Students are eligible for a 100 percent refund if the class is             FACTS Tuition Management offers a semester budgeting
     dropped at least 31 days before the class begins. A 75 percent        plan. For more information, visit www.marymount.edu and
     refund will be given if the class is dropped within 30 days of        select “Financial Info” from the Quicklinks menu. From the
     the start of the class. No refunds will be given after classes        Financial Info page, link to “Online Payment.” Follow the
     have begun.                                                           instructions to set up an account. Students who need further
                                                                           assistance may call the Student Accounts Office, (703) 284-1490.
     Class/University Withdrawal Policy
     In order to receive a refund in accordance with the advertised        VETERANS
     refund/withdrawal period, a student must officially withdraw
     from a class, even if someone other than the student registered       Information on veterans’ benefits from the Department of
     him or her for the class. Failure to do so will constitute a finan-   Veterans Affairs is available in the Registrar’s Office.
     cial obligation to the University because classroom seats
     reserved during registration continue to be held for a student        FINANCIAL AID
     until he/she officially withdraws from the class. Stopping
     payment on a tuition check or not attending a class does not          UNDERGRADUATE
     constitute an official withdrawal from class. A student who           The Marymount University program of financial aid attempts
     received financial aid should check with the Financial Aid            to help those students who have academic potential and
     Office before withdrawing from any classes. For procedural            limited financial resources. In addition, scholarships are
     information about withdrawing from a class, please see page           awarded to students who demonstrate outstanding academic
     37. For additional information on separating from the                 potential and performance, with financial need considered but
     University, please see page 48.                                       not a prerequisite.
                                                                                The objective of all federal and most state aid programs is
     ROOM AND BOARD REFUNDS
                                                                           to provide opportunities for those who would not be able to
     If a student moves out of the residence halls before the end of       complete their college education without financial assistance.
     the semester, refunds will be calculated on the same basis as         Certain states, such as the Commonwealth of Virginia, award
     tuition refunds. If a resident student chooses a meal plan with       grants without regard to financial need to those students who
     dollars attached and moves out of the residence hall, no part of      apply and can prove state residence.
     the dollar amount of the meal plan will be refunded. The vice
     president for Enrollment and Student Services may authorize           Eligibility for Need-based Aid
     an exception to this policy in extenuating circumstances based        Financial aid is any grant, scholarship, loan, or paid employment
     on documentation provided by the student.                             offered for the express purpose of helping a student meet educa-
                                                                           tionally related expenses. Determining how much financial aid a
                                                                           student will receive is calculated in the following manner:
                                                F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N                                                        25



1.   The budget for a student’s academic year living and educa-       for the Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant and follow the finan-
     tional expenses is determined, taking into account factors       cial aid application procedure. Repayment is not required.
     such as residence, enrollment, and dependence.                   The Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant (TAG) Program, not based on
2.   The expected contribution by the student and family              financial need, is available to all legal Virginia residents who
     toward the student’s yearly expenses is determined               are full-time students. The amount of the award varies each
     through a federal formula.                                       academic year based on state funding. Awards will be made by
3.   The resources contributed by the student and family are          the Commonwealth to students who file their applications by
     subtracted from the budget, and the remaining amount is          July 31. Repayment is not required. Late applications will be
     referred to as the student’s “financial need.”                   considered if funds are available. For further information,
                                                                      contact the Financial Aid Office. The program is funded by the
Financial Aid Application Procedure                                   Commonwealth of Virginia.
1.   New and currently enrolled undergraduate students must
                                                                      Loans
     file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The
     information is analyzed and a report sent to the                 The Federal PLUS Loan may be used to supplement other finan-
     University on the estimated contribution expected from           cial aid programs. Parents of dependent undergraduates are
     the family or the self-supporting student. Marymount’s           eligible to apply for this loan each academic year at a variable
     federal school code is 003724.                                   interest rate. Eligibility is based on credit worthiness. Students
                                                                      must follow the financial aid application procedures. Specific
2.   Awards are offered when applications are complete and
                                                                      details may be obtained by contacting the Financial Aid Office.
     the student has been accepted for enrollment into a degree
     program.                                                         The Federal Stafford Loan is for students enrolled on at least a
                                                                      half-time basis in a degree program; it enables them to borrow
3.   Financial aid applications must be submitted by March 1
                                                                      an annual amount based on their grade level and length of
     for each academic year in which financial assistance is
                                                                      program. The federal government will pay the interest until the
     required.
                                                                      repayment period begins, six months after the student leaves
Grants                                                                school. The Financial Aid Office provides information on
                                                                      obtaining the loan with Award Letter notification. Students
DC Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) Grant is a
                                                                      must complete the financial aid application process and demon-
need-based program for undergraduates who meet DC residency
                                                                      strate need in order to qualify. A Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
requirements. Applicants must enroll at least half time in a
                                                                      is available for those who do not demonstrate need. The terms
degree program. Students must follow financial aid application
                                                                      are the same as those for the Federal Stafford Loan except that
procedures. The DCLEAP application must also be completed. It
                                                                      the student is responsible for the interest while in school.
can be found online at www.seo.dc.gov.
                                                                           Students who plan to pay tuition through a Federal
The Federal Pell Grant program provides federal gift aid for          Stafford Loan should apply for this loan in time for it to be
students. The grants range from $400 to $4,000 a year based on        processed before registration.
enrollment status. Eligibility is determined by the federal
                                                                      The Federal Perkins Loan is a program providing long-term loans
government. A student applies for this grant by following the
                                                                      to students who demonstrate financial need and are capable of
financial aid application procedures. Repayment is not required.
                                                                      academic performance at an acceptable level. No interest
The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)         accrues on the loan as long as the borrower remains at least a
is a grant for eligible full-time undergraduate students who          half-time student. Interest begins to accrue nine months after
demonstrate financial need. Awards range from $100 to $4,000          the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student. The
per academic year. Students must follow financial aid applica-        interest accrues at the rate of five percent per year. There are
tion procedures to apply.                                             special cancellation provisions for borrowers who either
Marymount Tuition Assistance Grants are sponsored by the              become teachers in designated schools educating students from
University to make education affordable for as many full-time,        low-income families, or are teachers of handicapped students
first-degree undergraduate students as possible. To apply,            or students in Head Start programs. Students must follow
students must follow financial aid application procedures.            financial aid application procedures.
Awards are based on an indication of financial need.
The Virginia State College Scholarship Assistance Program (CSAP) is
available to Virginia residents who will be full-time undergrad-
uates and who demonstrate financial need. Students must file
26                                                   F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N


     Undergraduate Scholarships                                           Transfer Academic Scholarship
     There are three categories of scholarships offered by                A competitive scholarship for new full-time students who
     Marymount University: Academic/Service Scholarships,                 present transfer credit for 30 semester credits or more with a
     awarded on the basis of academic and/or service performance;         cumulative GPA of 3.3 or better and intend to earn their first
     Need-based Scholarships; and Other Scholarships. All scholar-        bachelor’s degree from Marymount. The scholarship is renew-
     ships are designed for full-time, first-degree or transfer           able for full-time students maintaining eligibility. Deadline is
     undergraduates, and can be applied to undergraduate tuition          May 1. Contact: Admissions Office
     only, unless otherwise specified. Please see the following list
                                                                          Need-based Scholarships
     for eligibility criteria, contact information, and other details.
                                                                          The following scholarships all carry a need component in
     Academic/Service Scholarships                                        addition to other criteria. Therefore, students must complete
     Freshman Academic Scholarship                                        the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) process.
     Guaranteed for new full-time freshman students who have a            (See page 25.) Consideration for any of these scholarships
     high school cumulative average of B+ or better and a combined        occurs at the time a student’s financial aid form is reviewed.
     SAT score of 1100 or higher. The scholarship is renewable for        There are no separate applications required for any of these
     students who maintain academic eligibility. Contact:                 scholarships. Funding in some programs is limited to one recip-
     Admissions Office                                                    ient who retains the scholarship for four years. Contact the
                                                                          Financial Aid Office with questions about any of the following
     Clare Boothe Luce Scholarship
                                                                          need-based scholarships:
     Offered pursuant to a major bequest to the University by Mrs.
     Luce. The fund provides scholarships to highly qualified female      William P. Ames, Sr. Family and Leon V. Harrow Family Endowed
     undergraduates to encourage them to enter; study; earn a             Scholarship
     degree in; and teach physics, chemistry, biology, meteorology,       Established in 2005 through a bequest from Marymount
     engineering, computer science, mathematics, or physical              alumna Frances Ames Harrow ’76. A longtime member of the
     science. Graduating high school seniors, transfer students, and      Arlington community with an interest in education, Mrs.
     currently enrolled students may apply. Awards are made solely        Harrow named this scholarship in honor of her families. The
     on the basis of merit and are calculated to include the cost of      Ames and Harrow Scholarship is awarded each year to a
     tuition and/or room and board. Eligibility is limited to women       student who demonstrates financial need.
     who are U.S. citizens and enrolled full time. Applications           Kazuko Barkey Scholarship
     received by February 1 will be given priority consideration; late    Established in 1997 in honor of Mrs. Kazuko Barkey Bach and
     applications are accepted until May 1 contingent upon funding.       awarded annually to a full-time undergraduate student major-
     Contact: Admissions Office                                           ing in Interior Design who possesses a minimum of a 3.0 grade
     Presidential Scholarship                                             point average and who demonstrates financial need.
     The University’s most competitive freshman scholarship               Mary Phelan Baynes Scholarship
     program. Students must have a combined SAT score of 1200 or          Awarded annually to a full-time undergraduate student pursu-
     higher and at least a B average. This scholarship is renewable       ing a degree in the School of Arts and Sciences and who
     for full-time students maintaining eligibility. All Presidential     demonstrates financial need. The student is eligible to retain
     Scholarship recipients are encouraged to apply to the Honors         the scholarship from initial receipt until graduation.
     Program, which carries an additional scholarship award. (See         Fred W. Beazley Scholarships
     page 17.) Contact: Admissions Office                                 Awarded annually to two entering full-time freshmen with
     Spirit of Service Scholarship                                        academic promise and financial need. Awards are limited to
     Offered to students who have met high academic standards and         Virginia residents and are renewable with maintenance of a
     have an outstanding record of volunteer service activity in their    satisfactory cumulative grade point average.
     high school, church, and/or community agencies. The award is         Sr. M. Majella Berg, RSHM, Scholarship
     added to any existing Marymount merit scholarships. Spirit of        Awarded competitively to full-time undergraduate students
     Service Scholarship awards range from $2,500 to $5,000.              demonstrating need.
     Scholars must continue full-time enrollment, maintain a
                                                                          Brady/O’Donnell Scholarship
     cumulative 3.0 grade point average (GPA) or higher, and
                                                                          A gift from two families, this scholarship is awarded each
     complete 60 hours of volunteer service work each semester.
                                                                          year to a Nursing student with financial need. Academic stand-
     Contact: Admissions Office
                                                                          ing is considered.
                                                F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N                                                      27



Class of 1958 Memorial Scholarship                                   William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarships for Students in
When the Class of 1958 celebrated its 45th Reunion in 2003,          Nursing
they wanted to remember their deceased classmates in a very          Provided through an endowed fund established by the
special way. Led by Barbara M. Clark and Maureen “Mo”                William Randolph Hearst Foundation, these scholarships
Gallagher Gibbons, the Class of 1958 raised money to endow           are awarded to full-time undergraduate Nursing students
this fund to ensure that the class’s legacy and spirit live on at    who have financial need.
Marymount. This scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate           Sr. Marie Louise Hogan, RSHM, Scholarship
student with financial need.                                         Awarded annually to an adult undergraduate student who is
Claveloux/French/Shapiro Scholarship                                 returning to college full time for retraining in his or her field of
A gift from three families, this scholarship is awarded each         interest.
year to an undergraduate student pursuing a career in educa-         Rosemary Hubbard Endowed Scholarship
tion and who has financial need.                                     In 2005, after seven years as dean of the School of Arts and
Robert A. Draghi Endowed Memorial Scholarship                        Sciences, Dr. Rosemary Hubbard returned to the Marymount
When beloved Philosophy professor Bob Draghi passed                  faculty. She has been a member of the faculty since 1968. This
away in 2003, members of his family, along with                      scholarship honors her dedication to the School and to
colleagues and former students, made gifts to establish this         Marymount University. It is awarded each year to an under-
fund in his honor. The scholarship is awarded each year to           graduate in the School of Arts and Sciences with financial need
an undergraduate Philosophy student with financial need              who demonstrates academic excellence.
and academic merit.                                                  Victor E. Indrisano Memorial Scholarship
Richard Eaton Foundation Nursing Scholarship                         Awarded annually to a senior Psychology major showing
Established in 1995 with a grant from the Richard Eaton              demonstrated need and high academic potential. The fund was
Foundation, this scholarship is awarded each year to full-time       established in 1994 in memory of Dr. Indrisano, a dedicated
Nursing students with financial need.                                and caring Marymount University professor of Psychology
Dorothy Efner and Shirley Efner McManus ’79 Endowed Scholarship      from 1981 until 1994.
Awarded annually to Nursing students with financial need, a          Sadie W. Kyle Endowed Business Scholarship
demonstrated commitment to the nursing discipline and the            Awarded to an outstanding full-time undergraduate student
University, and who have earned favorable comment from the           pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration at
faculty in general. The Office of Financial Aid, in conjunction      Marymount University.
with the Nursing degree program chairs, will select recipients.      Rose Ann Benté Lee Endowed Nursing Scholarship
Faculty/Staff Scholarship                                            Established in 1984 by Mrs. Rose Ann Benté Lee for deserving
The faculty and staff of Marymount University, recogniz-             and qualified full-time Nursing students with financial need.
ing the need for student financial assistance, established           William G. McGowan Scholarship
this scholarship in 2003 for incoming freshmen who show              Awarded to full-time students with financial need, the scholar-
academic promise at Marymount. The scholarships,                     ship is offered through an annual grant from the William G.
awarded each year, are funded by gifts from faculty and              McGowan Foundation in memory of Mr. McGowan, founder of
staff members, and recipients are selected by a faculty/staff        MCI, who believed in creating educational opportunities to
committee, based on academic merit and financial need.               develop the gifts and talents of the young.
Finnerty-Sullivan Health Professions Endowed Scholarship             The Memorial Scholarship
This scholarship fund was established by Michael and                 Funded through memorial gifts from Marymount alumni and
Marcia Finnerty in 2004 to continue the Finnerty-Sullivan            friends who would like to honor a loved one without endowing
family tradition of encouraging and inspiring all to seek a          a scholarship. It is awarded each year to a full-time undergrad-
college education and to provide financial support for the           uate student with financial need.
neediest students. This scholarship is awarded annually to
                                                                     Henry C. and Bessie B. Newton Scholarship
an undergraduate student in the School of Health
                                                                     Sponsored by the University, this generous grant program is
Professions. Special consideration is given to any student
                                                                     designed to make a Marymount education affordable for as
who is, or has already worked, in the health care field and
                                                                     many full-time undergraduate students as possible.
wishes to advance his/her career.
28                                                  F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N


     Mary Lee Scatterday Scholarship                                      tions with a minimum 3.4 GPA earned at Marymount or trans-
     Awarded annually to an outstanding, full-time undergraduate          ferred from another educational institution. Applicant must
     student pursuing a degree in the Fine and Applied Arts at            also be carrying at least nine credit hours and working toward
     Marymount University.                                                full-time student status (as defined by University policy), intend
     Robert Sigethy Endowed Scholarship                                   to pursue graduate study and/or a career in communications or
     Created in recognition of Dr. Robert Sigethy’s 12 years of           writing, and be a U.S. citizen. Contact: Department of
     service as dean of Marymount’s School of Business                    Communications, School of Arts and Sciences
     Administration, this scholarship is awarded annually to a full-      Pablo Coto Endowed Scholarship
     time School of Business Administration undergraduate based           Supported by a fund established in memory of Pablo Coto. The
     on demonstrated need and merit. The School, in conjunction           scholarship is awarded annually to a senior student who
     with the Office of Financial Aid, chooses the recipient.             exemplifies excellence in academics and leadership and demon-
     Mary Caroline Ellis Spokas Endowed Scholarship                       strates a deep spiritual commitment and loyalty to family and
     Funded through a generous gift from Otto Spokas to honor the         classmates. Deadline is April 1. Contact: Financial Aid Office
     memory of his wife, Mary Caroline. This scholarship is awarded       HR Leadership Scholarship
     annually to an undergraduate student with financial need.            A scholarship awarded to a student with an interest in human
     Jennifer Tino ’94 World Trade Center Endowed Memorial                resource management. Sponsored by the HR Leadership
     Scholarship                                                          Awards of Greater Washington. Applicants must maintain a B
     Established by the family and friends of Jennifer Tino ’94, who      average. Contact: School of Business Administration
     was killed on September 11, 2001, in the World Trade Center.         The Lucille and Bruce Lambert Foundation Endowed Scholarship
     Awarded to an undergraduate School of Business                       These scholarships support Nursing students who are inter-
     Administration student with demonstrated need who                    ested in geriatric nursing practice. Each year, the scholarships
     maintains a minimum GPA of 3.0.                                      are awarded to senior Nursing students who demonstrate
     Steven C. Virbick Memorial Scholarship                               caring and an interest in geriatric nursing. Contact: School of
     Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student who has finan-          Health Professions
     cial need and a B average or better.                                 Ann Leary Finnegan Scholarship
     Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarships                                   Awarded annually to a full-time undergraduate Nursing
     Available to Christian women who are pursuing a degree in            student demonstrating academic promise and financial need.
     Nursing and are residents of Alabama, Florida, Georgia,              Contact: Department of Nursing, School of Health Professions
     Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, or             Leadership Scholarship
     Virginia. Applicants must apply for financial aid and demon-         Awarded to members of the student government and the Co-
     strate need.                                                         Curricular Council who are serving the University in eligible
                                                                          leadership roles. Student Leadership Scholarship recipients
     Other Scholarships                                                   must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above. Contact:
     These are other scholarships that have variable eligibility crite-   Student Activities Office
     ria, but do not require the filing of a FAFSA form. Students         William G. McGowan Scholarship
     interested in these scholarships should contact the office listed.   Provides full tuition to one undergraduate and one graduate
     Alumni Scholarship                                                   student each year who has a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA, is
     Contributed by William C. Frogale, this scholarship is awarded       recommended by the School of Business Administration
     to a full-time undergraduate who is a graduate of any                faculty, and submits an essay. Contact: School of Business
     Marymount school or is the child of a graduate of any                Administration
     Marymount school or college. Contact: Financial Aid Office           Linda R. McMahon Scholarship
     Kathleen O’Neill Bocek Scholarship                                   Established in 2003 by the University’s Board of Trustees in
     Awarded annually to a full-time sophomore student who                appreciation for Dr. Linda McMahon’s years of leadership and
     displays outstanding qualities of fairness, honesty, and a           unflagging dedication to Marymount. Each year, the McMahon
     positive attitude during the freshman year. Deadline is April 1.     Scholarship will be awarded to a full-time undergraduate
     Contact: Financial Aid Office                                        student who has completed two years of study at Marymount,
     Daniel Mack Cornell Endowed Scholarship                              maintained a GPA of at least 3.0, and demonstrated accom-
     Granted to a junior or senior in Communications who has a            plishments consistent with Marymount’s mission as a Catholic
     record as an outstanding student in the field of communica-          university. Contact: Financial Aid Office
                                               F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N                                                    29



National Science Foundation Scholarship for Service in Information   Student Employment
Assurance and Computer Security                                      Federal College Work-Study (FWS)
Marymount University, through the National Science                   This program makes on-campus jobs available to students with
Foundation Scholarship for Service Program, awards up to             demonstrated financial need. The earnings are not credited to
two new scholarships per year to students undertaking a              student accounts, but are paid directly to the student each
major that includes a concentration in Computer Security or          month. Students must follow financial aid application proce-
Information Assurance. Applicants must have a minimum                dures by filing a FAFSA. (See page 25.)
undergraduate GPA of 3.0. The scholarship funds up to two
                                                                     Campus Employment
years of study in return for one year of employment at a
                                                                     The University employs a large number of full-time students
federal agency for each year covered by the scholarship.
                                                                     and pays them from its own resources. Students who are not
Marymount is participating in this program jointly with The
                                                                     eligible for FWS awards may apply for employment under this
George Washington University and Gallaudet University.
                                                                     program. Students apply for jobs through the Student Campus
Contact: Department of Computer Science
                                                                     Employment Office.
Lisa Kristin Ola Endowed Memorial London Scholarship
Founded in 2002 by London alumni who wanted to support               GRADUATE
current students studying abroad with the London Program.
After the May 2003 death of Lisa Ola ’91, MBA ’94, her family,       Graduate Assistantships
friends, and fellow London alumni endowed this scholarship in        Graduate students are eligible for assistantships in all Schools
her honor. Awards will be made each term — the fall, spring,         and select offices upon presentation of appropriate credentials.
and summer semesters — to undergraduate students enrolled in         Assistantships provide tuition reimbursement and a living-
Marymount’s London Program. The director of Study Abroad             expense stipend. For details and procedures to apply for graduate
will review all applications and select award recipients based       assistantships, contact the Office of Human Resource Services.
upon criteria such as grade point average and financial need.
Contact: Office of Study Abroad                                      Grants
ROTC Scholarship                                                     The Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant (TAG) Program
Awarded by the U.S. Army on a competitive basis to outstand-         This grant offers to full-time, graduate degree-seeking students
ing young men and women interested in a military career              who are legal residents of the state, a grant for graduate study,
option. Marymount offers on-campus partial resident scholar-         regardless of need. The amount of the grant varies each
ships on a space-available basis to students chosen as ROTC          academic year based on state funding. Applications, which are
scholarship winners, and partial tuition scholarships to             available from the Financial Aid Office, must be submitted
students enrolled in the ROTC program who do not win an              annually by July 31. Late applications will be considered if
ROTC scholarship. Contact: Academic Success Center                   funds are available. There is no requirement for repayment.
Virginia Teaching Scholarship-Loan Program                           This program is funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia.
The Virginia Department of Education offers teaching scholar-
                                                                     Loans
ship-loans for teacher education candidates in certain critical
shortage endorsement areas. Men at the elementary and middle         Federal Stafford Loan
school levels and minority candidates in all teaching areas are      Graduate students may borrow under this program each
also eligible for the Virginia Teaching Scholarship-Loan             academic year. Graduate students must enroll at least half time
Program. When the student completes his/her program, the             in a degree program for six credits per semester. For further
scholarship-loan is totally forgiven if the student teaches for      details, see page 25.
four semesters in the public schools of Virginia in the critical     Graduate Scholarships
shortage field. If, upon completion of the program, the student
does not teach, the scholarship-loan must be paid back to the        Diotima Scholarship for Humanities
Commonwealth of Virginia. This award is available only if            This scholarship is named in honor of Diotima of Mantinea
funded by the Virginia legislature. Contact: School of Education     who, in Plato’s Symposium, taught Socrates about love. An anony-
and Human Services                                                   mous benefactor founded this scholarship to provide a
                                                                     significant way to let students know of Marymount’s excellence
                                                                     in teaching the humanities. This scholarship is awarded annually
                                                                     to a graduate student in Humanities who has completed at least
                                                                     nine hours in the program and has at least a 3.5 GPA. Applicants
30                                                 F I N A N C I A L I N F O R M AT I O N


     must also write an essay on the role the humanities plays in       National Science Foundation Scholarship for Service in Information
     their lives. Contact: School of Arts and Sciences                  Assurance and Computer Security
     HR Leadership Scholarship                                          Marymount University, through the National Science
     A scholarship awarded to a graduate student pursuing a degree      Foundation Scholarship for Service Program, awards up to
     in the human resource field. Sponsored by the HR Leadership        two new scholarships per year to students undertaking a
     Awards of Greater Washington. Applicants must maintain a GPA       major that includes a concentration in Computer Security
     of 3.0 or better. Contact: School of Business Administration       or Information Assurance. Applicants must have a
                                                                        minimum graduate GPA of 3.2. The scholarship funds up to
     Virginia Kincaid Foundation Scholarship
                                                                        two years of study in return for one year of employment at
     A $4,000 scholarship awarded to entering first-year Physical
                                                                        a federal agency for each year covered by the scholarship.
     Therapy students, selected via a competitive application
                                                                        Marymount is participating in this program jointly with
     process. Up to two students from Marymount’s PT program are
                                                                        The George Washington University and Gallaudet
     selected. Contact: Department of Physical Therapy
                                                                        University. Contact: Department of Computer Science
     William G. McGowan Scholarship
     Provides full tuition to one undergraduate and one graduate
     student each year who has a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA, is
     recommended by the School of Business Administration
     faculty, and submits an essay. Contact: School of Business
     Administration
                                          STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES                                                                       31




Student Support Services                                           Library consortium members share an online catalog of collec-
                                                                   tions, and loan requests can be made online and delivered to
                                                                   the student’s home institution or via the Internet. Interlibrary
LIBRARY AND LEARNING SERVICES                                      loan requests from libraries throughout the United States are
                                                                   arranged if materials are unavailable in the collection.
Dean: Dr. Zary Mostashari
Library and Learning Services facilitates learning, teaching,      Learning Resource Center
scholarship, and lifelong learning opportunities by providing      The Learning Resource Center (LRC) is a year-round academic
Marymount University students, faculty, staff, and the commu-      counseling and learning center designed to support and
nity with access to information and a variety of educational       enhance Marymount’s instructional programs. Staffed by full-
support services. Its facilities are the Emerson G. Reinsch        time learning specialists and by graduate and undergraduate
Library and its Ballston Center and Reston Center library exten-   peer tutors, the LRC provides tutoring assistance in writing,
sions, the Instructional Media Center, and the Learning            science, mathematics, and study skills for a broad range of
Resource Center.                                                   courses.
                                                                        Faculty can arrange for Supplemental Instruction or
Emerson G. Reinsch Library
                                                                   Guided Study Sessions to help their students review specific
The Emerson G. Reinsch Library is an integral part of the learn-   course objectives. Computer-assisted learning programs, such
ing resources of the University. The collection and services       as ModuMath and LearningPlus, are available in the LRC.
reflect both the curricula and the general informational needs          The LRC also provides a variety of testing services for
of the University community. The library offers:                   Marymount students including diagnostic tests, validation
•   a collection of more than 198,000 volumes                      exams, and special accommodations for students with
•   1,400 journal titles with access to more than 15,000           disabilities.
    journals through electronic resources
                                                                   Instructional Media Center
•   more than 100 online information resources — many of
                                                                   Using the specialized equipment of the Instructional Media
    which are full text — available on or off campus 24 hours a
                                                                   Center (IMC), students have access to media instruction and
    day, 7 days a week, to currently enrolled students, faculty,
                                                                   production that is provided on a walk-in basis, prearranged by
    and staff
                                                                   faculty, or scheduled individually. The IMC provides workshops
•   library research instruction                                   on varying topics throughout the semester. Additional services
•   reference assistance and an e-mail reference option avail-     include:
    able at all hours                                              Multimedia Production — A wide range of production capabilities
•   Internet access on all public computers; access to             including current hardware and software for video editing,
    Microsoft Office on most public computers                      Web page development, computer-based presentations, and
•   group study rooms                                              graphic design.
•   black and white photocopiers and public scanners               Graphic Arts — Space and materials to produce digital images,
                                                                   35mm slides, overhead transparencies, color prints and copies,
•   microform readers and printers
                                                                   presentation posters, lamination, signage, etc.
•   wireless access to the Marymount network
                                                                   Video Production — Studio, digital cameras, lights, microphones,
The Library’s goal is to respond to the changing needs of          backdrops, etc. for the production of videotapes and video
students, faculty, and staff who make up the University            segments for multimedia. The IMC staff will also provide assis-
community. Library faculty and staff work closely with             tance in a nonlinear Edit Suite to edit, add titles, narration, and
colleagues in academic departments to ensure that its              special effects to video projects.
resources and services meet the needs of its users.
                                                                   Equipment Delivery — Scheduled delivery, setup, user assistance
     Marymount University’s membership in the Washington
                                                                   and pickup of data projectors, laptops, microphones, video
Research Library Consortium (WRLC) allows students to also
                                                                   cameras, etc. by appointment.
borrow from the collections of American University; The
Catholic University of America; Gallaudet University; George
Mason University; The George Washington University;
Georgetown University; The University of the District of
Columbia; and Trinity University, an affiliate institution.
32                                              STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES


     TECHNOLOGY SERVICES                                                  Internships

     Information Technology Services supports the academic                Outstanding internship experiences are available throughout
     programs of the University. Computer labs are located on the         the Washington area with corporations, government agencies,
     fourth floor of the Ballston Center, in St. Joseph and Gailhac       schools, hospitals, and retail establishments. Marymount
     Hall on the Main Campus, and at the Reston Center.                   University is committed to helping students identify and
          All lab devices are connected to the campus fiber-optic         secure appropriate internship opportunities, and supports this
     ethernet backbone that provides each of these computers with         goal through its Career and Internship Center.
     access to the Internet; local computing resources; Blackboard,            Faculty and academic internship advisors work in collabo-
     the online course-management system; Marynet; the Reinsch            ration with the Career and Internship Center to help students
     Library; and the academic Novell network. Assistance is avail-       prepare for and successfully complete an internship. Firms and
     able to students and faculty by trained computer technicians         agencies sponsoring the intern are expected to provide a super-
     and professional staff. Services offered include individual tutor-   vised, structured, and suitable experience consistent with the
     ing and free seminars on many popular software packages.             student’s major field.
          Both Dell Pentium and Apple Macintosh machines are                   All undergraduate students who have advanced in their
     available. UNIX hosts are accessible from any networked              major are required to complete an internship. Waiver of this
     computer via TCP/IP. All lab sites are equipped with postscript      requirement may be authorized by the dean of the School on the
     laser printers. Scanners with OCR software are located in the        presentation of compelling evidence. If a waiver is obtained,
     labs. Among the many software packages available are                 coursework at the 300-400 level in courses within the major will
     Windows XP, Microsoft Office 2003, SPSS, Visual Studio .NET,         be substituted for the internship.
     Maple, AutoCad, Pad System, Internet Explorer, QuarkXPress,
     and FreeHand. Numerous departmental applications and differ-         HEALTH SERVICES
     ent object-oriented programming languages are also supported.
                                                                          The Student Health Center, located in Berg Hall, provides care
     Students, faculty, and staff may also purchase computer
                                                                          for those illnesses or accidents that may occur while the student
     hardware and software for a discount through a special
                                                                          is a campus resident and to coordinate with the resident
     University program.
                                                                          student’s personal physician in continuing treatment initiated
                                                                          at home. Emergency care is available to commuter students.
     CAREER AND INTERNSHIP SERVICES                                       Health Center personnel strive to maintain a healthful environ-
     Career counselors provide individual guidance and offer              ment for all students through health-education programs.
     frequent seminars and programs on establishing educational                 During the fall and spring semesters, the Health Center is
     goals suited to career and internship plans, choosing careers,       staffed by registered nurses. A University physician schedules
     developing a résumé and cover letters, supporting internship         regular clinic hours. Referral is made to specialists or clinics in
     site selection, gaining employment, and interviewing. A sched-       the Washington area, as appropriate.
     ule of career and internship programs is offered throughout                Because immunization records and adequate health infor-
     the year, including job fairs, career exploration events,            mation are essential to maintaining the health of the student
     networking opportunities, and on-campus recruitment sessions.        and the entire college community, a confidential medical form,
     Students are also invited to participate in area career programs     including a record of updated immunizations, is required for
     sponsored by The Consortium of Universities of the                   all undergraduate students. Failure to complete the medical
     Washington Metropolitan Area.                                        form may impact a student’s registration. The form is available
           The Career and Internship Center (CIC) is located at the       from the Admissions Office, the Health Center, or online at
     Ballston Center. The CIC houses a library containing informa-        www.marymount.edu/studentlife/health. Regulations govern-
     tion on all facets of the career and internship development          ing the Center are published in the Student Handbook.
     process as well as self-directed computer programs to support              Health and accident insurance is available through a
     students’ career planning and job searches. Several hundred          commercial underwriter for all students taking nine or more
     local, regional, and national employers, as well as the federal      credit hours. It is provided for resident students as part of their
     government, publicize position openings at the CIC. Students         room and board fee. See page 23 for more information about
     can also find career information, job search links, and a current    “Insurance.”
     database of job and internship opportunities on the CIC Web
     site, www.marymount.edu/studentlife/career.
                                          STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES                                                                       33



COUNSELING SERVICES                                                 DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES
The Counseling Center’s professional staff provides personal        Disability Support Services (DSS) are available for all eligible
counseling services to assist students with identifying and         students. The director of DSS assists students with disabilities
solving problems, increasing self-understanding, improving          in determining reasonable accommodations and is available
academic performance, adjusting to university life, developing      throughout the year for information and referrals. DSS comple-
and maintaining relationships, and managing stress and time.        ments, but does not duplicate, services offered to all students
Counseling sessions are private and confidential, and are avail-    through other campus offices.
able to all students by appointment and on an emergency basis.           To receive services from DSS, the student must give the
Both individual and group sessions are available.                   director written documentation from a qualified professional
                                                                    that describes the clearly diagnosed disability and its current
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES                                      functional impact on the student relative to academics.
                                                                    Marymount does not provide testing and/or diagnosis, but will
The International Student Services (ISS) staff provides an          make appropriate referrals.
extensive orientation program for new international students             The types of accommodations a student is eligible to receive
as well as confidential cross-cultural counseling and advising      are determined on a case-by-case basis by the student and the
on personal matters. ISS staff also provide immigration advis-      director using information contained in the student’s documen-
ing and assistance, including information on F-1 visa               tation. Students wishing to receive accommodations must
regulations, school transfers, work permission, travel, extension   develop a Faculty Contact Sheet (FCS) with the director of
of stay, and Social Security. ISS also coordinates a variety of     Disability Support Services. This should occur at the beginning
cultural and educational programs, including receptions, trips,     of each semester. However, students may consult with the direc-
coffee hours, International Week, and more.                         tor at any point during the academic year. The student must
                                                                    then present this contact sheet to each of his/her instructors and
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT SERVICES                                         discuss the accommodations documented on the FCS. This
                                                                    document helps students and instructors work together to
The Student Campus Employment Office connects students
                                                                    develop effective accommodation strategies. Some accommoda-
seeking on-campus jobs with professors, librarians, coaches,
                                                                    tions made in the past have included allowing extended time for
and other staff who need part-time office assistance. The Office
                                                                    examinations; the use of readers, volunteer note-takers, and sign
serves students seeking employment through the Federal Work-
                                                                    language interpreters; and the option to tape record lectures.
Study Program and through Campus Employment, available to
students who do not qualify for Federal Work-Study.
                                                                    SERVICES FOR OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS
ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER                                             Student development services are available to all students in
                                                                    accord with provisions in the Student Handbook. During fall and
The Academic Success Center advises students who have not
                                                                    spring semesters, upcoming student activities are listed on the
declared a major or wish to change majors. It also counsels
                                                                    Marymount University Web site under Student Life and in FYI,
students who are not in good academic standing. The Center
                                                                    the weekly calendar.
answers questions about University policies and procedures
and responds to student concerns. See additional information
about the Academic Success Center on page 52.
34                                                           STUDENT LIFE



     Student Life                                                        Off-campus Activities
                                                                         Students are encouraged to take advantage of the many fine
                                                                         resources of the nation’s capital and this region.
     STUDENT CLUBS AND PROGRAMS                                               Students may wish to visit The Kennedy Center, Ford’s
     Marymount encourages and supports a varied and imaginative          Theatre, Arena Stage, Verizon Center, Constitution Hall,
     activities program in keeping with the aims of the University.      National Theatre, Wolf Trap, or Lisner Auditorium to enjoy
     The Office of Student Activities guides students in planning        popular, classical, and traditional programs in drama, music,
     and implementing activities that are culturally enriching, intel-   and dance.
     lectually stimulating, and recreational. Current student interest        The University also arranges trips and encourages infor-
     influences the kinds of programs that receive emphasis.             mal visits to such places as the Smithsonian Institution, as
          The Activities Programming Board (APB) schedules               well as museums, art galleries, parks, and monuments. Most of
     comedians, movies, concerts, trips, performing arts, social         these Washington resources are no more than 15 minutes from
     events, and co-curricular activities. Most are open to members      the University by car or are easily accessible by public and
     of the Marymount community, local residents, and members of         Marymount shuttle transportation. Many Washington
     the Consortium of Universities of the Washington                    museums and monuments do not charge admission.
     Metropolitan Area.
          Please refer to the Student Handbook for further informa-      ATHLETICS
     tion about clubs and organizations at Marymount.
                                                                         Marymount University is a member of Division III of the
     Student Government                                                  National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Varsity inter-
                                                                         collegiate sports for men are basketball, cross-country, golf,
     The student governance system serves as a vehicle for building
                                                                         lacrosse, soccer, and swimming. Varsity intercollegiate sports
     community among students, faculty, and administration, and as
                                                                         for women are basketball, cross-country, lacrosse, soccer,
     an organization through which students may make policy
                                                                         swimming, and volleyball. The University is a member of the
     recommendations related to student issues. Student government
                                                                         Capital Athletic Conference. Intramural sports and activities
     members elect student representatives to participate in the
                                                                         include most of the aforementioned sports as well as flag
     work of the Admission, Progression, and Graduation; Academic
                                                                         football, softball, aerobic dance, weight training, and water
     Standards; Curriculum and Instruction; Student Services; and
                                                                         polo.
     Learning Resources committees of the Faculty Council.
     Developing leadership, communication, and negotiating skills
     are valuable byproducts of participation in student government.     RESIDENCE LIFE
                                                                         Students who are under 21 years of age and whose families do
     Campus Ministry
                                                                         not live within approximately a 25-mile radius of the University
     In accord with the mission of the University as a Catholic          are required to live on campus during their first two years of
     institution, the Campus Ministry program seeks to provide           college. Due to space limitations, and in accord with the mission
     religious services, activities, and counseling that encourage the   of the residence life program to provide a developmentally
     spiritual growth of all students. For Catholic students, Mass is    appropriate residential living experience, on-campus housing
     celebrated daily and at convenient times. Confessions are heard     and University-sponsored off-campus housing are only available
     regularly and a schedule is posted on the Campus Ministry Web       to undergraduate students who are 21 or under at the time they
     site. Retreats, prayer services, sacramental preparations,          first become residents. Residence life policies are fully described
     religious education programs, and social service activities are     in the Student Handbook. Please refer to this document for further
     sponsored by the Campus Ministry Office each semester.              information.
     Campus Ministry also sponsors Universitywide volunteer
     service programs operated by students under the guidance of
     the assistant directors of Campus Ministry.
           For students of other faiths and traditions, schedules for
     services at churches, temples, synagogues, and mosques easily
     accessible from the University and referrals for spiritual
     counseling are available through Campus Ministry. While
     attendance at any exclusively religious service is voluntary, all
     members of the community are invited to all Campus Ministry
     services and programs.
                                                         STUDENT LIFE                                                                   35



DINING SERVICES                                                           Students may take advantage of the University’s free
                                                                     shuttle bus service connecting the Main Campus, Ballston
There are meal plan and retail dining choices at both the Main
                                                                     Center, and Ballston-MU Metro station. Shuttle timetables are
Campus and the Ballston Center. The Gerard Dining Hall, on
                                                                     arranged to accommodate class start and end times and service
the Main Campus, is an “all-you-can-eat” facility for students,
                                                                     to the Metro on weekends. Security escort service is available
faculty, and staff. Bernie’s café and Jazzman’s coffee kiosk,
                                                                     by request to students, faculty, and staff 24 hours a day on the
offering snacks, beverages, and “grab-and-go” meals, are located
                                                                     Main Campus and during class hours at the Ballston Center.
in the Rose Benté Lee Center. The cafeteria at the Ballston
Center is an “all-you-can-eat” facility with à la carte breakfast.

CAMPUS SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION
All students are required to obtain a Marymount University
photo identification card, which is used in conjunction with a
card control system for access to certain campus locations and
facilities, as well as for general identification purposes.
      All cars parked on campus must be registered and display
a current Marymount parking permit. Information about
parking options, fees, and regulations is available from the
Office of Campus Safety.
36                                                       ACADEMIC POLICIES



     Academic Policies                                                          First responsibility for academic integrity lies with
                                                                           individual students and faculty members of this community. A
     The vice president for Academic Affairs is the official representa-   violation of academic integrity is an act harmful to all other
     tive of the University in matters pertaining to the scholastic life   students, faculty and, ultimately, the University.
     of the student body. Regulations made by her/him in addition to,           The Marymount University Academic Integrity Policy
     in abrogation of, or in interpretation of the following regula-       governs all student conduct directly related to the academic life
     tions have the same force as the regulations themselves.              of the institution and is in effect during all phases of a
          In case of discrepancy between the University catalog and        student’s academic career. The policy is applicable to any
     other publications or academic information provided by any            academically related experience involving Marymount
     faculty or staff member other than the vice president for             University students whether occurring on the campus, in a
     Academic Affairs, the catalog takes precedence.                       distance-learning situation, or at host institutions or sites.
          The University reserves the right to terminate or modify         Violations of this policy may include cheating, plagiarism,
     program requirements, content and sequence of courses, and            misuse of academic resources, falsification of information or
     program offerings.                                                    citations, and facilitating the academic dishonesty of others.
          Students separating from the University completely for a              When a violation of academic integrity is suspected,
     period of one year or more are bound by the catalog in effect         students and faculty are encouraged to meet to determine an
     when they re-enter.                                                   appropriate course of action. Penalties for first violations vary
          It is the responsibility of each student to be acquainted        with the severity of the offense and may be assigned by the
     with all requirements for his or her degree program and to            faculty member involved or through an academic integrity
     assume responsibility for meeting those requirements. In case         hearing process. Second violations require a penalty of suspen-
     of ambiguity, discrepancy, or disagreement, the regulations and       sion or expulsion, and must involve an academic integrity
     requirements stated in this catalog and any subsequent modifi-        hearing. All alleged violations of the policy must be resolved in
     cations or interpretations by the vice president for Academic         accordance with the Academic Integrity Policy and under the
     Affairs will prevail.                                                 direct authority of a Marymount University faculty member or
          The academic requirements and regulations of                     the Academic Integrity coordinator. The complete Academic
     Marymount University are published in this official University        Integrity Policy provides detailed information on the nature of
     catalog and in other University announcements. Further infor-         academic integrity violations, possible penalties, the adjudica-
     mation and advice regarding academic regulations may be               tion process and student rights and responsibilities under the
     secured by inquiring at the offices of the Vice President for         policy. The complete policy may be found in the Marymount
     Academic Affairs and the Registrar.                                   University Student Handbook.

     ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY                                             CODE OF CONDUCT
     Academic integrity is founded upon and encompasses the                Honesty and integrity are requirements for membership in the
     values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility.      Marymount University community. By enrolling in the
     Supporting and affirming these values is essential to promot-         University, students agree to accept the University Academic
     ing and maintaining a high level of academic integrity, and           and Community Conduct Code and abide by the University’s
     educating community members about the value and practice of           academic and social regulations.
     academic integrity is central to Marymount University’s                    Violations that may lead to suspension or dismissal from
     mission. Each member of the academic community must stand             the University include cheating and plagiarism. Cheating
     accountable for his or her actions. As a result, a community          includes using books, notes, or assistance from other students,
     develops in which students learn the responsibilities of citizen-     or giving such assistance to others while taking quizzes, tests,
     ship and how to contribute honorably to their professions.            or examinations, or doing graded assignments, unless such
          If knowledge is to be gained and properly evaluated, it          assistance is specifically authorized by the instructor.
     must be pursued under conditions free from dishonesty. Deceit         Plagiarism includes representing the work (words or ideas) of
     and misrepresentations are incompatible with the fundamental          others as one’s own on research papers, homework assign-
     activity of this academic institution and shall not be tolerated.     ments, essays, and other course assignments. Students should
     Members of the Marymount community are expected to foster             be thoroughly familiar with the Student Handbook, which
     in their own work the spirit of academic honesty and not to           describes in detail policies and procedures relating to the
     tolerate its abuse by others.                                         Academic and Community Conduct Code.
                                                   ACADEMIC POLICIES                                                                      37



     Regulations are published in this catalog, in the Student      REGISTRATION
Handbook, or in both. Regulations may be modified or changed
                                                                    Advance registration periods for continuing graduate and
at any time; revisions of regulations, written or oral, will be
                                                                    undergraduate students are posted on the Registrar’s Web page
appropriately promulgated and have the same binding force as
                                                                    at www.marymount.edu/registrar. Each undergraduate student
those in the catalog or Student Handbook. A student may be
                                                                    is required to register at the time and in the manner desig-
subject to disciplinary action for behavior in violation of the
                                                                    nated by the registrar after developing a schedule with the
Academic and Community Conduct Code or of other University
                                                                    academic advisor. The student is expected to seek the academic
regulations. Please see the Student Handbook for more detailed
                                                                    guidance of a faculty advisor and dean of the School in which
information on this code.
                                                                    the major is offered. No credit will be granted for any course,
                                                                    including independent study, unless registration is completed
ORIENTATION                                                         within the prescribed time at the start of a semester.
The University provides new students with an orientation            Responsibility rests with the student to register for the neces-
program to prepare them academically and socially for their         sary courses in the proper sequence to meet the requirements
Marymount experience.                                               of the chosen curriculum.
     The undergraduate first-year student orientation programs           All prescribed charges for the previous semester must be
prepare students for their academic experience. During the          paid before registration may begin. All charges for the ensuing
program, students will meet with an academic advisor and            semester must be paid or provided for before registration is
prepare a class schedule. Students also participate in social       complete. No student whose account is in arrears will be
activities, get acquainted with classmates, and familiarize         permitted to register until all obligations are met. This includes
themselves with the Washington, DC, area.                           submission of medical records and payment of parking fees.
     Transfer students also participate in orientation, advising,
                                                                    Late Registration
and registration sessions. The transfer program allows these
students to learn more about Marymount, as well as meet with        After the Late Registration class add/withdrawal period has
an advisor and register for classes.                                ended, students may register for courses only with written
     More information about Orientation programs at                 permission of the instructor and the program chair or School
Marymount can be found at www.marymount.edu/orientation.            dean.

                                                                    Adding or Withdrawing from Courses
ACADEMIC YEAR
                                                                    Students can add or withdraw from courses online or in person
Marymount University operates on a semester system. The two         up to the last day specified in the Academic Calendar. Students
terms of the regular academic year are known as the fall semes-     who stop attending courses without officially withdrawing
ter and the spring semester. The summer term is known as the        from the course or separating from the University will receive
summer semester, with courses taught in segments identified         an F. Any tuition refund will be calculated from the
as sessions. There are four sessions in the summer semester.        withdrawal/separation date recorded by the Registrar’s Office.
Consult the Academic Calendar on page 4 or the University           For information on procedures for separating from the
Web site at www.marymount.edu.                                      University, see page 48.

Summer Programs                                                     Continuous Registration
Four sessions of varying length offer students the opportunity      Candidates for a degree must maintain continuous registration
to earn credit during the summer semester. Undergraduate            until all degree requirements are satisfied. By failing to register
students at every level use the summer sessions to accelerate       for one semester or more (not including summer semester), a
their studies or to satisfy their Liberal Arts Core requirements.   student breaks registration and must reapply. Continuous
Advanced undergraduate and graduate students use the                registration may be maintained for a maximum of two consec-
summer semester to continue steady progress toward the              utive semesters, not including the summer semester.
completion of their degree programs. The University welcomes             A nondegree student who breaks registration for one
visiting students to use the summer sessions to acquire credits     semester or more must reapply for admission to the University.
in general education or in a major field for transfer to their           Any student wishing to maintain continuous registration
home institutions.                                                  in absentia will be charged a fee of $30 per semester payable at
                                                                    regularly scheduled registration dates. Continuous registration
                                                                    requires the student’s signature and may be provided via the
                                                                    U.S. mail or by fax.
38                                                    ACADEMIC POLICIES


     Consortium Students                                                by a Marymount student through any combination of CLEP,
     All undergraduate and graduate degree-seeking students in          ACT/PEP, or DANTES examinations, validation examinations
     good academic standing are eligible to enroll in courses           administered by the academic departments of the University,
     offered through the Consortium of Universities of the              or assessment of portfolios of prior learning administered
     Washington Metropolitan Area. Nondegree students are not           through the Liberal Studies program. None of these 30 credits
     eligible.                                                          may be used to complete the residency requirement for gradua-
          Degree-seeking students may enroll under the following        tion from Marymount.
     conditions:                                                             Applicants desiring entry at the junior-senior level must
                                                                        submit to the Office of Admissions evidence of having met the
     •   The course may not be offered concurrently at
                                                                        following minimum collegiate requirements for junior-senior
         Marymount.
                                                                        status at Marymount University:
     •   A maximum of six credits, or two courses, may be counted
                                                                        •   A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 and 60 semester
         for credit toward Marymount degree requirements.
                                                                            credits or the equivalent in college credits.
     •   Students may not enroll in consortium classes in the
                                                                        •   A maximum of 64 transfer credits may be used toward a
         semester immediately preceding their anticipated gradua-
                                                                            Marymount degree. Marymount University does not
         tion.
                                                                            normally accept for transfer equivalent community college
     Consortium courses fulfill the minimum-credits requirement             specialized courses whose content appears comparable to
     for residency.                                                         junior- or senior-level courses at Marymount unless the
          For registration procedures, please visit                         applicant successfully completes validation exams.
     www.marymount.edu/registrar/FAQ/consortium.html
                                                                        •   Undergraduate credits older than 10 years are subject to
     Visiting Consortium Students                                           review by the appropriate department to determine the
                                                                            timeliness of the content and methodologies.
     Consortium students visiting Marymount must check in with
     the consortium coordinator in the Registrar’s Office. A            Transferring Credit After Entry
     completed permission slip must be presented. Visiting consor-
                                                                        Prior written approval is required if a current Marymount
     tium students are not eligible for Marymount internships,
                                                                        University student wishes to enroll in college or university
     clinical Nursing or Physical Therapy courses, or other special-
                                                                        courses offered elsewhere and receive transfer credit from
     ized courses. Visiting students must call the consortium
                                                                        Marymount. Forms for this purpose are available in each School
     coordinator at (703) 284-1520 if they have questions about their
                                                                        office and in the Registrar’s Office. Approved work at institu-
     eligibility for a course.
                                                                        tions other than Marymount University must be completed
                                                                        with a grade of C or better to be accepted. An official transcript
     UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER POLICIES                                    must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. No more than
     The Washington area is home to many residents from other           two courses may be accepted from another college after matric-
     parts of the country and the world. For this reason Marymount      ulation at Marymount. These courses are in addition to any
     is especially responsive to students transferring directly from    courses taken through the Consortium of Universities of the
     other institutions or bringing academic credits earned             Washington Metropolitan Area.
     elsewhere. Advising of transfer students is conducted by
     specially trained individuals who pay attention to the quality     POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDENT
     of prior academic learning.                                        ACADEMIC POLICIES
          Acceptance of course credits earned elsewhere for credit
                                                                        Unless otherwise noted, post-baccalaureate students follow the
     toward degree requirements is at the sole discretion of
                                                                        same academic policies and procedures as undergraduate
     Marymount University. Courses from other regionally accred-
                                                                        students at Marymount University.
     ited institutions must be completed with a grade of C or better
     to be considered for transfer credit.
          Marymount accepts College-Level Examination Program
     (CLEP) subject examination and Advanced Placement (AP)
     credits and provides special challenge credits for diploma
     graduates in Nursing. As a member of Servicemembers
     Opportunity Colleges (SOC), Marymount also accepts DANTES
     credits. No more than 30 undergraduate credits can be earned
                                                    ACADEMIC POLICIES                                                                     39



GRADUATE STUDENT                                                      ACADEMIC-LEVEL STATUS
TRANSFER AND ACADEMIC POLICIES
                                                                      Undergraduate student academic-level status at Marymount is
Graduate students should refer to their School and program            defined according to a student’s number of accumulated
sections for policies relating to acceptance of transfer credits,     academic credits. The academic credits in which a student is
minimum grade requirements, and other policies. Graduate              currently enrolled are not counted in the accumulated total.
credits older than five years are subject to review by the appro-     Under this definition, students are classified as follows: fresh-
priate department to determine the timeliness of the content          man, 1 to 29 credits; sophomore, 30 to 59 credits; junior, 60 to
and methodologies.                                                    89 credits; senior, 90 or more credits.
     Grading policies can be found beginning on page 40. The
University policy for repeating courses can be found on page          ACADEMIC ADVISING
42. Requirements for graduation begin on page 44.
                                                                      Academic advising is one of many ways in which a student
                                                                      individually works with a faculty member. An advisee and
ATTENDANCE
                                                                      advisor work collaboratively to develop and carry out an
It is University policy that students are expected to attend          academic plan that meets the student’s professional and
class. It is the prerogative of the individual instructor to estab-   personal goals. The University values the advising relationship
lish requirements for class attendance. Students are responsible      as a continuous dialogue from admission through graduation.
for complying with the instructor’s requirements. Without             This conversation encourages the student’s participation in the
permission of an individual instructor, no test or class material     University community, the exploration of the Liberal Arts Core,
will be repeated or rescheduled.                                      the fulfillment of major requirements, and the development of
      Prolonged illness or extraordinary circumstances such as a      a career.
death in the family must be reported to the Office of Student         Students are responsible for:
Development or the Academic Success Center.
                                                                      •   making decisions based upon their own best judgment and
      Individuals not officially enrolled in a course offered by
                                                                          upon the best information or advice available to them;
the University may not attend classes.
                                                                      •   arranging appointments with an advisor;
ACADEMIC LOAD                                                         •   coming prepared to advising meetings;
                                                                      •   knowing where to find information about their academic
Full-time undergraduate students normally carry a minimum of
                                                                          program;
12 or a maximum of 18 credits per semester. Full-time graduate
students normally carry a minimum of 9 credits per semester.          •   understanding degree and major requirements; and
All credits are semester credits. Exceptions to the maximum           •   being candid about personal reflection and self-awareness
load require written permission from the associate vice presi-            of goals, interests, needs, etc.
dent for Academic Affairs.                                            Faculty are responsible for:
     An undergraduate student whose cumulative grade point
                                                                      •   taking the initiative to engage advisees in the academic
average falls below 2.0 in any semester is placed on academic
                                                                          planning process;
probation and is limited to a maximum load of 15 credits in the
semester that follows except by written permission of the dean        •   monitoring the academic progress of their advisees;
of the School offering the student’s major. A graduate student        •   making referrals to support services and offices;
whose cumulative semester GPA falls below 3.0 is automatically        •   announcing and keeping regular, sufficient hours for
placed on academic probation. (For more information on                    consulting with advisees;
Academic Probation and Dismissal, see page 46.)
                                                                      •   monitoring personal and professional progress; and
     Courses numbered 500 and above are not open to under-
graduates except by written permission of the appropriate             •   becoming aware of the whole person.
advisor and the dean of the School. Such permission forms are         Each School is responsible for:
available in each School.                                             •   implementing an advising model that matches the institu-
                                                                          tion’s mission and the needs of all students;
                                                                      •   encouraging the development of advising skills by promot-
                                                                          ing “best practices”;
40                                                      ACADEMIC POLICIES


     •   assigning students to an advisor, then communicating             papers, written and oral quizzes, and participation in class and
         those assignments to advisors and advisees; and                  seminar discussions to determine the student’s grade. The
     •   evaluating faculty advisors to ensure continuous                 grade is a symbol of a student’s degree of mastery of a course.
         improvement.                                                     The University requires that all written work submitted by
                                                                          students conforms to standard English.
     The University is responsible for:
     •   promoting the central role of advising in the academic life      Midterm Grades for Undergraduate Students
         of the community;                                                At the end of the seventh academic week of each semester in
     •   assuring that advising policies are clear, that advising         the regular academic year, instructors submit interim grade
         procedures facilitate advisor and advisee relationships,         reports online. This grade is not a part of the permanent record
         and that advising resources are sufficient;                      of the student but is used as an indicator of scholastic progress.
     •   providing support and recognition for faculty advisors;               Midterm grades are an indication of the quality of the
                                                                          student’s performance at that point in the semester; they are
     •   providing advisors and advisees with user-friendly infor-
                                                                          not an indication or a guarantee of the student’s final grade in
         mation systems; and
                                                                          the course.
     •   assessing the advising program regularly.                             A student who wishes to earn a final grade that improves
                                                                          upon a grade received at the midterm should speak with his or
     DEGREE PLANNING                                                      her instructor and academic advisor.
     Each undergraduate degree program in this catalog offers a           Final Examinations
     “Suggested Degree Plan.” Each undergraduate student should
                                                                          Final examinations are scheduled during a final examination
     pursue a degree at a pace that maximizes his or her opportuni-
                                                                          week.
     ties for long-term success. Furthermore, some flexibility is
     required, as not every course is offered every semester.             Assessment of Learning Outcomes
     Consulting regularly with an academic advisor is the best way
                                                                          At Marymount University, faculty strive to improve the
     for a student to plan his or her degree program.
                                                                          curriculum and teaching by assessing student learning. Each
           All minor, certificate, and graduate programs include a list
                                                                          academic major of the University requires senior students to
     of courses required for fulfilling the desired program of studies.
                                                                          demonstrate to what extent such learning has occurred.
     There may be a recommended or specified sequence of courses.
                                                                          Various measures are used depending upon the nature of the
     Consulting with an academic advisor for program planning is
                                                                          program: comprehensive examinations, theses, portfolio
     recommended.
                                                                          submissions, and/or standardized professional board examina-
                                                                          tions. The results of these measures are used by faculty to
     REQUIRED PROFICIENCY                                                 continually improve and develop the University’s programs.
     The University requires competence in basic skills in reading,
     writing, and mathematics. Any faculty member may refer a             GRADING POLICIES
     student judged to be unsatisfactory in these skills to the           The following is a brief explanation of the letter grades that
     Learning Resource Center for evaluation. At the discretion of        may be further delineated by a plus sign (+), which is not used
     the appropriate School dean, such a student may be required to       for A grades, or a minus sign (-). The numerical equivalent of
     undertake and successfully complete developmental study              letter grades is determined by the instructor and is approved by
     provided by the University in the skill area in which the            the dean of the School that offers the course.
     student is deficient.                                                A   At the undergraduate and graduate level — superior,
                                                                              outstanding scholarship and intellectual initiative.
     EVALUATION OF STUDENTS                                               B   At the undergraduate level, high attainment and a notable
     The method of evaluation in each course is determined by the             degree of scholastic performance.
     individual instructor. The final grade given for any course is           At the graduate level, a B indicates satisfactory performance.
     based on the sum of evidence that the student gives the
     instructor, which demonstrates understanding and retention of
     the material presented in the course. In addition to formal
     examinations, the instructor makes use of recitation, term
                                                  ACADEMIC POLICIES                                                                     41



C   At the undergraduate level, satisfactory performance at an    AU Indicates that the course was audited and no credit or
    average level of college achievement. Indicates an under-        grade was received by the undergraduate or graduate
    standing of the essential elements of a course. C is the         student. An audit course is considered as a regular course
    minimum passing grade for courses in the major field in          for tuition payment and is entered on the transcript. A
    several Schools of the University. Undergraduate students        student must indicate that a course is to be audited at
    should refer to School requirements in the relevant              registration and it may not be changed to a course for
    sections of this catalog.                                        credit once it has been registered as an audited class. A
    At the graduate level, a C is deficient but passing in           student may not change from credit to audit after the last
    courses that do not require a minimum passing grade. A           day to add or register as published in the Academic
    grade of C ordinarily is not transferable.                       Calendar. Audited courses do not count toward degree or
                                                                     graduation requirements.
D   At the undergraduate level, deficient but passing. A grade
    of D indicates a bare minimum performance. Courses            NR No grade reported.
    graded D may count as prerequisites for advanced courses      PASS/FAIL An undergraduate or graduate student may register
    requiring a certain minimum of knowledge for further              for a course to be taken on a pass/fail basis. The pass/fail
    pursuit. A grade of D ordinarily is not transferable.             option may not be chosen for Liberal Arts Core require-
    At the graduate level, the grade of D is not given.               ments or requirements in the major field other than the
                                                                      internship. The pass/fail option must be approved by the
P   At the undergraduate and graduate level, P indicates a
                                                                      student’s advisor and dean. A student must indicate that a
    passing grade. This grade carries no quality points and is
                                                                      course is to be taken pass/fail at the time of registration and
    not calculated in the grade point average.
                                                                      may not change this status after the last day to add a class.
F   Failure to meet minimal standards at the undergraduate
    or graduate level. Course must be repeated to obtain          Consortium Grading and Credit
    credit. (See Course Repeat Policy on page 42 for further      Grades for consortium courses are sent to Marymount’s regis-
    details.)                                                     trar by the visited institution. They are recorded as Marymount
I   Incomplete work at the undergraduate or graduate level.       University credit and calculated into the Marymount
    An Incomplete is given at the discretion of the instructor    University cumulative grade point average.
    and approval by the School dean when circumstances                 Grades are recorded onto the Marymount University grade
    beyond the control of the student prevent the completion      report and transcript as soon as they are received. In most
    of some course requirements.                                  cases, this will be after regular Marymount credit has been
    A student who receives a grade of I must complete the         posted. In such cases, students will receive updated grade
    work in the time designated by the instructor. This time      reports and transcripts.
    may be no longer than one semester. Students carrying a            Consortium credits are converted to Marymount
    grade of I in the semester in which they petition to gradu-   University semester credits and count toward full-time/part-
    ate must complete the outstanding work within the time        time status at Marymount University. If necessary, grades are
    designated by the instructor, but no later than 30 days       converted to the nearest Marymount University equivalent.
    prior to the degree conferral date. The Incomplete must be
                                                                  Visiting Students’ Grades
    removed by the end of the semester immediately follow-
    ing, including the summer semester. Failure to remove an      Grades for visiting students will be reported by the consortium
    Incomplete by the time specified will result in a failing     coordinator to the home institution.
    grade. A student must then re-enroll and matriculate
    successfully in the course to obtain credit.
W Authorized Withdrawal for an undergraduate or graduate
  student. A grade of W is given to a student who withdraws
  from a course or separates from the University up until
  the last published date to withdraw without academic
  record. The grade of W carries no credit or academic
  penalty. It is recorded on the permanent record and
  transcript.
42                                                     ACADEMIC POLICIES


     CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE                                     This policy is limited to 16 hours of coursework.
     The cumulative grade point average is determined by dividing            Any appeals to the policy will be handled at the depart-
     the number of quality points a student has earned by the           ment level with approval from the dean and the vice president
     number of measurable credits of work. Quality points per           for Academic Affairs.
     credit are shown in the following chart:
                                                                        Nondegree Undergraduate Students
     Grade    Quality points
                                                                        Nondegree undergraduate students are expected to maintain a
     A        4.0
                                                                        minimum grade point average of 2.0, and are subject to review
     A-       3.7                                                       each semester by the Admission, Progression, and Graduation
     B+       3.3                                                       Committee.
     B        3.0                                                            Courses completed with a grade below C may be unaccept-
                                                                        able dependent upon specific requirements within the student’s
     B-       2.7
                                                                        program of study.
     C+       2.3
     C        2.0                                                       Graduate Students
     C-       1.7                                                       Each department determines the minimum grade for a course
     D+       1.3                                                       to complete a degree program. Students who do not meet the
                                                                        minimum grade expectation for a course may repeat the
     D        1.0
                                                                        course. If a student repeats a course:
     D-       0.7
                                                                        •   the course must be identical in listing and can be taken
     F        0.0                                                           only at Marymount;
     NOTE: No D grades are given at the graduate level.                 •   the second time, the course cannot be taken pass/fail;
                                                                        •   both courses and grades will be recorded in the student’s
     MINIMUM GRADE AND COURSE REPEAT POLICY
                                                                            file and transcript;
     Undergraduate Students
                                                                        •   for calculation of the cumulative grade point average and
     Each department determines the minimum grade for a course              for fulfillment of curriculum requirements, only the credit
     to complete a Liberal Arts Core or major requirement. Students         and the grade of the course with the highest grade will
     who do not meet the minimum grade for a course may repeat              apply and the credit and grade of the course with the
     the course. A student may repeat a completed course under the          lower grade will no longer count; and
     following criteria:
                                                                        •   the course may not be taken a third time.
     •    the course must be identical in listing and can be taken
          only at Marymount;                                            Graduate Nondegree Students
     •    the second time, the course cannot be taken pass/fail;        Graduate nondegree students are expected to maintain a
     •    both courses and grades will be recorded in the student’s     minimum grade point average of 3.0, and are subject to review
          file and transcript;                                          each semester by the Admission, Progression, and Graduation
     •    for calculation of the cumulative grade point average and     Committee.
          for fulfillment of curriculum requirements, only the credit        Courses completed with a grade below B may be unaccept-
          and the grade of the course with the higher grade will        able depending upon specific requirements within the student’s
          apply, and the credit and grade of the course with the        program of study.
          lower grade will no longer count;
     •    an undergraduate course with a grade of C or better may       ACADEMIC HONORS
          not be repeated unless a degree requirement demands a
          grade higher than C;                                          Dean’s List
     •    the course may not be taken a third time;                     The Dean’s List is comprised of the names of those undergradu-
                                                                        ate students who carry a full academic load for a given
     •    if a course in a field of concentration is not successfully
                                                                        semester, are in good academic standing, and obtain a grade
          completed the second time, the student may not be permit-
                                                                        point average of at least 3.4. For this purpose, a full academic
          ted to continue in the concentration.
                                                                        load will be considered 12 credits or more. This list is published
                                                    ACADEMIC POLICIES                                                                    43



soon after completion of the semester; therefore, students with       Kappa Delta Pi is an international honor society in Education
Incompletes will not be listed. A Dean’s List notation is made        dedicated to those demonstrating high academic achievement,
on the transcript for each semester it is awarded.                    a commitment to education as a career, and a professional
                                                                      attitude that assures steady growth in the field. Membership is
Honor Societies                                                       open to graduate students, undergraduates, and exceptional
Alpha Phi Sigma National Society in Criminal Justice. Beta Psi, the   local leaders in education. Undergraduate students must have
Marymount chapter of Alpha Phi Sigma, is for undergraduate            completed, or be enrolled in, 12 hours of Education courses, be
students in Criminal Justice and graduate students in Forensic        accepted into the teacher-education program, and have a
Psychology. The honor society is dedicated to making the              minimum overall 3.0 GPA. Graduate students must have
criminal justice professions and their practitioners more effec-      completed 12 hours of Education coursework, be fully accepted
tive, and encouraging research and the application of scientific      into the teacher-education program, and have a minimum 3.5
principles within criminal justice fields. Students must have         graduate GPA.
completed at least 12 credit hours in Criminal Justice and            Phi Alpha Theta is the national history honor society. To be
maintain a 3.0 overall grade point average and a 3.5 in               eligible, students must have completed at least 12 credit hours
Criminal Justice courses. Graduate students must maintain a           in History and maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 (3.1 in History
3.5 in their graduate program.                                        courses). Members are selected annually by the History faculty.
Beta Beta Beta National Biology Honor Society, also known as the      Psi Chi National Honor Society in Psychology is open to
Tri Beta honor society, is dedicated to overall academic excel-       Psychology students, who have completed at least 12 semester
lence with special emphasis on Biology. Tri Beta honor                credits (or 9 and be registered for 3) of Psychology courses.
students are strongly encouraged to pursue undergraduate              Undergraduate Psychology students must have a minimum 3.5
research opportunities. This honor society is open to Biology         grade point average in their Psychology courses and a
undergraduates who meet the membership requirements,                  minimum 3.0 overall GPA. Graduate students must have a GPA
which can be obtained from the Biology and Physical Sciences          of 3.5 or better. Students in good standing receive a card and
Department.                                                           certificate of membership.
Chi Sigma Iota International Counseling Academic and Professional     Sigma Tau Delta is an international honor society for students
Honor Society is for counseling professionals and professionals-      majoring or minoring in English. Membership is open to both
in-training. This honor society is dedicated to excellence in         undergraduate and graduate students. To be eligible for
scholarship, research, and clinical practice. Membership is open      membership, undergraduates must have completed at least
to qualified graduate Community Counseling, School                    twelve credits in English beyond the freshman composition
Counseling, and Pastoral Counseling students. Students must           level and have an overall GPA of 3.5. Graduate students must
have completed one or more terms of full-time Counseling              have completed at least nine credits in their graduate program
study or its equivalent with a minimum overall grade point            and have a GPA of 3.7.
average of 3.5.
                                                                      Sigma Theta Tau, the international honor society in nursing, is
Delta Epsilon Sigma National Scholastic Honor Society is open to      open to Nursing students if they have completed one half of
both graduates and undergraduates. Undergraduate students             their coursework leading to the bachelor’s degree, have at least
must have completed 50 percent of their requirements with at          a 3.0 grade point average in the Nursing major, and rank in the
least a 3.5 grade point average. Graduate students must have          top third of their class. Students should demonstrate their
completed 50 percent of their requirements with at least a 3.75       ability in Nursing both academically and clinically and should
grade point average. In addition, exhibition of good character,       exhibit overall leadership qualities.
intellectual activities, and leadership promise are necessary for
                                                                      Upsilon Phi Delta is the health care management honor society.
admission.
                                                                      Membership is open to both undergraduate and graduate
Delta Mu Delta National Honor Society in Business Administration      students. To be eligible, undergraduate students must have a
is open to qualified juniors, seniors, and graduate students.         minimum 3.25 GPA and graduate students must have a
Undergraduate students must have completed at least 30                minimum 3.5 GPA and/or be in the top 10 percent of their
credits in Business Administration courses (21 credits at             class. Members are selected on the basis of academic achieve-
Marymount University for transfer students) with a Business           ment, service to the community, and/or contributions to the
Administration grade point average of 3.5 and an overall grade        health care management profession.
point average of 3.5. Graduate students must have completed at
least 75 percent of their Marymount University graduate               Graduation Honors
degree program with a grade point average of 3.8.
44                                                      ACADEMIC POLICIES


     Students fulfilling requirements for a bachelor’s degree will be   In addition, all of these credit hours must be from courses that
     graduated with honors if they have completed a minimum of          were not completed for any other degree.
     60 credits at Marymount University and their cumulative                 The University cannot guarantee availability of all course
     grade point average meets or exceeds the following:                requirements without scheduling conflicts when pursuing a
     •   3.8 summa cum laude (with highest honors)                      dual academic program or degree.
     •   3.6 magna cum laude (with high honors)
                                                                        CHANGE OF MAJOR OR DEGREE
     •   3.4 cum laude (with honors)
     The grade point average is not rounded when calculating honors.    Request for change of academic program must be made in
                                                                        writing. Forms for this purpose may be obtained in School
     Graduation Awards                                                  offices. Only degree-seeking students are allowed to complete
     The Mother Butler Gold Medal, awarded at Commencement to           this form. A nondegree student must reapply to become a
     the undergraduate student who has shown the greatest               degree-seeking student.
     devotion to the ideals of the University.
     The Coopersmith Leadership Award, given to the graduating          REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
     senior who exemplifies outstanding leadership qualities.
                                                                        The Doctoral Degree and the Master’s Degree
     The insignia of the Gailhac Honor Society, awarded at
     Commencement to the members of the Society.                        A graduate degree is awarded to students who satisfy all
                                                                        University degree requirements and all requirements estab-
     The Bishop Ireton Gold Medal, awarded at Commencement to the
                                                                        lished by each degree program. Please see General Requirements
     undergraduate student who has exerted the greatest influence
                                                                        below as well as specific degree requirements, which are set
     of good on his or her companions.
                                                                        forth in the graduate program descriptions in this catalog.
     The Mother Gerard Phelan Gold Medal, traditionally presented at
     Commencement to a woman noted for achievement of an                The Bachelor’s Degree
     exemplary nature.                                                  The bachelor’s degree is awarded to students meeting the
     The Zerega Medal, awarded at Commencement to the student           following requirements (or their equivalent in transferred
     judged to be most promising and outstanding in talent and          credits in the case of transfer students):
     performance in the applied arts.                                   •   completion of all course requirements with a minimum
     The Sister Majella Berg Medal, awarded to a graduate who has           cumulative grade point average of 2.0; and
     made an outstanding contribution of service to the community.      •   earn a minimum of 120 credits by completing:
                                                                            •    all Liberal Arts Core requirements, including a
     DUAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OR DEGREES                                           minimum of 6 credits in open electives;
     An undergraduate student who elects to pursue a double major           •    all general education requirements imposed by the
     must complete all required coursework for each program,                     School in which the student is enrolled and that are
     completing at least 120 credit hours. An undergraduate student              different from Liberal Arts Core requirements; and
     who elects to pursue dual degrees must complete at least 120           •    all major requirements.
     hours for the first degree, an additional minimum of 36 hours
     for the second degree, and required coursework for each degree.    General
     A student electing a double major or dual degrees must file the    Residency requirements: In order to participate in graduation
     appropriate form and secure an advisor in each program or          ceremonies, a student must be receiving a degree. For the bache-
     degree.                                                            lor’s degrees, students must complete a minimum of 36 credits
           Each graduate degree program is considered to be separate    as a student at Marymount. NOTE: The total number of credits
     from any other degree program. Therefore, the policy governing     required to earn a degree varies by program. Please consult
     the pursuit of a second Marymount graduate degree is essen-        individual program sections in this catalog.
     tially the same for the pursuit of a first degree, including the         All master’s and doctoral degree students must complete at
     minimum number of credits required for residency, consortium       least 24 graduate credits at Marymount University. In programs
     course restrictions, and probation/dismissal policies. The         with credit requirements greater than 36, graduate degree candi-
     second degree must include at least two-thirds of the total        dates must complete at least two-thirds of the total number of
     number of credit hours normally required for a single degree.      program credits at Marymount. (The total number of credits
                                                  ACADEMIC POLICIES                                                                  45



required for each degree is stated in the degree requirements      School in which the student is matriculated once a student
section for each program.) Graduate students may transfer up to    petitions to graduate. The degree audit will determine if a
12 credits, unless otherwise indicated.                            student is eligible to graduate.
Completion requirement: For an undergraduate degree, all                A student who does not meet graduation requirements at
coursework must be completed at Marymount University within        the end of the semester in which a graduation petition was
10 years of the date of matriculation. For a graduate degree or    filed must file a new petition, pay relevant fees, and indicate
certificate, all coursework must be completed at Marymount         the new anticipated graduation date.
University within 5 years of the date of matriculation.
                                                                   Diplomas
Minimum grade point average (GPA): A cumulative GPA of
                                                                   Diplomas for May graduates are issued during the
2.0 or better must be obtained for the awarding of any under-
                                                                   Commencement ceremonies provided the graduation petition
graduate degree or certificate. This cumulative GPA applies to
                                                                   has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the posted
Marymount University coursework.
                                                                   deadline. Diplomas for August and December graduates are
     A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better must be obtained for
                                                                   mailed by the Registrar’s Office at the close of the summer and
the awarding of any graduate degree or post-baccalaureate or
                                                                   fall semester provided the graduation petition has been submit-
graduate certificate.
                                                                   ted in a timely manner. A $35 diploma fee is payable at
Course requirements: Marymount University requires success-        submission of the graduation petition. Graduation petitions
ful completion of all Liberal Arts Core and major coursework       submitted after the posted deadline will be processed at the
associated with a student’s degree program. The requirements to    discretion of the University and are subject to a $150 late
be met are stated in the University catalog current at the time    processing fee.
of the student’s initial matriculation. Transfer students must           Students who submit the petition after the published
complete all courses noted on their transfer evaluation and        deadline will not receive their diplomas at the close of the
program of study. This includes attaining minimum grades for       semester, may not graduate until the next graduation date, and
courses as stipulated in other sections of this catalog.           — in the spring semester — may not be listed in the
     A student who cannot fulfill the requirements of a major      Commencement program. A student who submits a late
program successfully will be dismissed from the program. If the    petition may not be eligible to participate in Commencement
student is otherwise in good academic standing, the student        exercises if a full audit of the student’s record cannot be
may remain at the University by selecting another major            processed to confirm eligibility.
program.                                                                 Diplomas are mailed at no charge. Diplomas are withheld
Documentation: All final documentation must be received by         from students who have unsettled obligations to the
the Office of the Registrar prior to the deadline for submitting   University.
grades. Documentation includes such items as official                    Students who participate in the Commencement with a
transcripts, test scores, completion of Incompletes, and grade     projected date of completion in the summer following will not
changes. A graduation petition must be received by the Office      receive the diploma at Commencement; the diploma will be
of the Registrar by the posted deadline.                           awarded only after all program requirements are completed.
Financial obligations: All financial obligations must be met             Students who need to earn six credits or fewer during the
prior to the University Commencement. These include parking        summer semester to complete their degree requirements may
fines, credit holds, tuition, etc.                                 participate in the May Commencement exercises if they meet
                                                                   both of the following conditions:
Academic certification: Certification for graduation by a
student’s dean and the registrar must be obtained prior to the     1.   complete a petition for graduation by the designated
University Commencement.                                                deadline; and
                                                                   2.   complete and have signed by their dean a Course
Graduation                                                              Completion Plan. The plan must specify all remaining
Degrees are conferred in May, August, and December. There is            requirements and in which prescribed session(s) in the
one formal Commencement ceremony in May.                                summer semester immediately following Commencement
     A student must file a graduation petition form                     the student intends to complete the work. The Course
(available online at www.marymount.edu/registrar/                       Completion Plan must be submitted to the Office of the
graduationpetition.pdf or in the Registrar’s Office) before             Registrar by the graduation petition deadline.
registering for the final semester. NOTE: The completion of a      No exceptions or exemptions to these two conditions will be
graduation petition does not guarantee that a student will         made or given.
graduate. A student’s degree audit will be completed by the
46                                                       ACADEMIC POLICIES


     Commencement                                                          A student who returns to the University within two calendar
     Marymount conducts formal Commencement exercises each                 years of the call to active duty is considered to have
     academic year in May.                                                 maintained continuous registration.
          Subject to the conditions set forth above for students                With instructor approval, a student may wish to elect the
     completing degree requirements in the summer, students                option of earning a grade if he/she has already completed most
     graduating at the completion of any other term are encouraged         of the coursework and can accelerate remaining assignments
     to participate in the subsequent Commencement exercise and            prior to departure from the University.
     should contact the Office of the Registrar for instructions.               The student should make the desired option known to the
                                                                           dean of the School in which he/she majors. A student without
                                                                           a declared major makes the option known to the associate vice
     TRANSCRIPTS
                                                                           president for Academic Affairs.
     Official transcripts of courses and credits will be forwarded by           A student who is called to active duty must provide
     the Office of the Registrar to other educational institutions,        documentation of his/her orders to the Office of the Vice
     agencies, or firms upon written request by the student.               President for Academic Affairs and complete a Change of
     Transcripts are $3 per copy, payable in advance. Same-day             Enrollment form.
     service is available for $7 per copy, payable in advance.
     Requests for transcripts will be processed usually within five        ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL
     working days; however, during registration and immediately
     following the end of a semester there may be a delay up to two        It is expected that students — full time and part time, under-
     weeks. In the event of unsettled obligations to the University,       graduate and graduate — will make continuous progress toward
     transcripts will be withheld.                                         a degree in a timely manner. The University — through the
                                                                           Admission, Progression, and Graduation Committee — monitors
                                                                           academic progress and takes action when a student is no
     STUDENTS CALLED TO MILITARY DUTY
                                                                           longer in good academic standing.
     Marymount University appreciates the situation of students                  The following directives are reviewed annually by the
     who attend classes while maintaining a military obligation. All       Admission, Progression, and Graduation Committee and they
     administrative offices and academic departments at the                may be suspended when, in the opinion of the Committee, the
     University will do their utmost in accommodating those                interests of the student and of the University will best be
     students called to active military duty while enrolled in classes.    served by such suspension. Such action, however, may not be
     The University’s goal is to make the transition as efficient,         construed as a precedent by any petitioner.
     equitable, and expeditious as possible.
         After consultation with instructors and the academic              Undergraduate Students
     advisor, a student may choose one of three options:                   An undergraduate student is subject to academic action after
     •   withdraw from some or all of his/her classes;                     12 completed credits. Part-time students must meet the same
                                                                           academic standards as full-time students.
     •   seek an Incomplete, outlined on page 41 of this catalog; or
                                                                                An undergraduate student whose semester grade point
     •   earn a grade.                                                     average (GPA) is below 2.0 is placed on academic probation for
     Under the withdrawal option, the student will receive a               the following semester.
     complete refund of tuition and fees if he/she withdraws from               During the first probationary semester, a student may
     all classes. If a student withdraws from some, but not all            enroll for a maximum of 15 credits in the fall or spring, or 8
     classes, tuition will be reassessed according to full- or part-time   credits in the summer semester. If a student remains on proba-
     status. Room and board charges will be prorated according to          tion or returns to probation, that student may enroll for a
     the number of days the student is housed on campus.                   maximum of 12 credits in the fall or spring, or 6 credits in the
           If the student elects to receive an Incomplete, the student     summer semester.
     must discuss arrangements for completion of coursework with                In addition, a cumulative GPA below 2.0 puts an under-
     the instructor; the arrangement must clearly state the work           graduate student at risk for academic dismissal when the
     completed and graded, and the work remaining. The instructor,         cumulative GPA does not meet the following standards:
     in turn, will complete and send to the Registrar’s Office the
     appropriate form. The deadline for completion of an
     Incomplete is six months after re-enrollment at the University.
                                                    ACADEMIC POLICIES                                                                     47



Credits completed*       Cumulative GPA must equal of exceed:        Appealing an Academic Dismissal from the
12-16 credits            1.25                                        University

17-30 credits            1.50                                        Undergraduate Students
31-59 credits            1.75                                        If an undergraduate student believes his or her performance
60+ credits or           1.95                                        has been negatively impacted by some type of unusual circum-
junior/senior standing                                               stance, that student has the right to appeal his or her dismissal
                                                                     as follows:
*completed credits are all courses for which a grade A-F has
                                                                     1.   The student must submit an appeal in writing to the
been earned.
                                                                          Admission, Progression, and Graduation Committee.
     Students slated for academic dismissal are notified of
their status by the Office of the Vice President for Academic        2.   The appeal is then sent to the Office of the Associate Vice
Affairs. A student being dismissed will have their registration           President for Academic Affairs. Appeals are due by the date
for the next semester cancelled and may not enroll at the                 specified in the letter of dismissal. No appeals will be
University unless he/she successfully appeals dismissal before            accepted after this time. It is the student’s responsibility,
the start of the next semester. If the student’s appeal is denied,        whether in the United States or abroad, to be aware of
the student may then apply for readmission to the University              mail sent to them by the University. The University
after the lapse of one full fall or spring semester.                      contacts the student in writing at the student’s address on
     Some degree programs have specific expectations for                  file with the Office of the Registrar.
academic achievement in the major. A student who does not            3.   An appeal must explain in full the student’s reasons for
meet these expectations will be dismissed from that program.              seeking a reversal of the academic dismissal. It should also
A student dismissed from a program, but eligible to remain at             propose a plan for returning the student to good academic
the University according to the aforementioned cumulative                 standing.
GPA guidelines, may declare a new major after consultation           Appeals will be responded to in writing by the associate vice
with the Academic Success Center.                                    president for Academic Affairs on behalf of the Admission,
                                                                     Progression, and Graduation Committee. The response of the
Graduate Students
                                                                     associate vice president to the written appeal will bring the
Graduate students are expected to make continuous progress           process to an official end.
toward a degree in a timely manner. In support of those efforts,
the University, through the Graduate Studies Committee and           Graduate Students
the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, reserves      Graduate students dismissed from the University due to aca-
the right to take the following academic actions:                    demic performance are notified by the Office of the Vice
                                                                     President for Academic Affairs.
•    Graduate students are required to maintain a cumulative
                                                                          Graduate students dismissed from the University have the
     grade point average of 3.0 or higher.
                                                                     right to appeal the dismissal.
•    Graduate students whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0               If a graduate student wishes to appeal academic dismissal
     during enrollment at Marymount University will be placed        from the University, the following procedures must be observed:
     on academic probation.
                                                                     1.   All appeals must be in writing and are to be addressed to
•    During the academic probationary period, graduate                    the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, with
     students must earn a semester GPA of 3.0 or higher, or they          a copy sent to the dean of the School in which the student
     will be dismissed.                                                   is enrolled.
•    To be removed from academic probation, students must            2.   Appeals are due to the Office of the Vice President for
     bring their cumulative GPAs to 3.0 or higher within nine             Academic Affairs and the appropriate dean by the date
     graduate credit hours or be dismissed.                               specified in the letter of dismissal. No appeals will be
•    Graduate students dismissed from the University may not              accepted after this date. The University will make every
     apply for readmission to the same academic program.                  attempt to contact the student in writing using the
•    Some graduate degree programs have additional academic               addresses on file with the Registrar's Office. The student,
     requirements. Students must refer to the appropriate                 whether in the United States or abroad, is responsible for
     program section of the catalog for information about the             keeping his or her official address up-to-date in the
     requirements for their respective programs.                          Registrar’s Office.
48                                                      ACADEMIC POLICIES


     3.   An appeal must explain in full the student’s reasons for       STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCESS
          seeking a reversal of the academic dismissal and provide a     Students who have academic complaints should attempt to
          plan for returning the student to good academic standing.      resolve them informally in discussions with the appropriate
     4.   The Graduate Studies Committee reviews all materials           faculty member or their advisor. Complaints that are not
          related to the student’s appeal and forwards all recommen-     resolved informally between students and faculty members are
          dations to the Office of the Vice President for Academic       to be referred to the appropriate department chairperson and
          Affairs.                                                       the School dean. The chairperson and the dean will attempt to
     5    The Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs will     adjudicate the complaint and resolve the matter. If the student
          notify the student in writing concerning the results of        is still not satisfied, he or she may bring the concern in writing
          his/her appeal. The response of the vice president for         to the Office of Academic Affairs. The decision of the vice
          Academic Affairs is final.                                     president for Academic Affairs regarding the issue or issues of
                                                                         concern is final.
     Seeking Readmission to the University                                     Nonacademic complaints should be addressed first to the
                                                                         office in which the problem originates. Complaints not
     Undergraduate Students                                              resolved at this level may be referred to the supervisor for that
     An undergraduate student who wishes to apply for readmis-           office. If the student is not satisfied with the resolution of the
     sion after academic dismissal from the University must do the       problem by the supervisor, he or she may refer the concern to
     following:                                                          the office of the vice president who supervises the area in
     1.   Contact the Academic Success Center for a readmission          which the complaint originated. The decision of the vice presi-
          application packet.                                            dent for that area regarding the issue or issues of concern is
                                                                         final. This policy applies to oral and written complaints.
     2.   Submit the completed packet including a $40 nonrefund-
          able application fee, along with documentation that the
          problems previously causing academic difficulties have         SEPARATION FROM THE UNIVERSITY
          been addressed. Readmission applications must include          Any undergraduate student contemplating discontinuing their
          evidence of satisfactory academic efforts (9-12 credits with   studies for more than one semester and separating from the
          an average of B) in the time he or she has been separated      University must consult with the associate vice president for
          from the University. The Committee will not review appli-      Academic Affairs and complete an official separation form. A
          cations that do not demonstrate academic success.              written statement of separation with authorization may be
     3.   Seek a positive recommendation from the program chair          required from a parent or guardian if the student is financially
          to which he or she is seeking re-entry. Students who do        dependent on same.
          not receive a positive recommendation from their previous           A graduate student may complete the separation process
          program may be readmitted as an undeclared major and           at the Office of the Registrar.
          be advised by the Academic Success Center until a new
          major is declared.
     Students who have been readmitted to the University after
     three or more semesters of academic dismissal will return to
     the University under the procedures listed in the catalog in
     force at the time of their readmission and must meet the
     requirements of their degree program stated in that catalog.

     Graduate Students
     Graduate students dismissed from the University may not apply
     for readmission to the same academic program, but may seek
     admission to another academic major.
                                                ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                                                     49




Academic Programs                                                  Social Sciences Courses (12 credits)
                                                                   Four fields — Economics, Politics, Psychology, and Sociology —
                                                                   constitute the social sciences. Students complete four courses
LIBERAL ARTS CORE                                                  that together meet the following criteria:
The Liberal Arts Core is the undergraduate general education       •   One of the four must be Introduction to the Social
program. Its curriculum is an integral component of every              Sciences at Marymount. This course is cross-listed as ECO
bachelor’s degree offered at Marymount; it aims to complement          100, POL 100, PSY 100, or SOC 100.
and enhance learning in all fields of study. The Liberal Arts      •   Three of the four fields of study in the social sciences
Core strives for an integration of knowledge; for an educational       must be represented among the four courses chosen.
experience that develops throughout the undergraduate experi-
                                                                   •   One of the four courses must be an advanced (300/400-
ence; and for a development of learning that is manifested in
                                                                       level) course from a social science field.
the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of students. The Liberal
Arts Core components and objectives are defined in terms of        Health and Wellness Course (2-3 credits)
critical reasoning, independent thinking, clear communication,
                                                                   Students complete one of the following: HPR 100 Concepts of
moral discernment, technological and informational literacy,
                                                                   Lifetime Fitness, HPR 225/PSY 225 Health Psychology, HPR
historical sense, contemporary and perennial awareness, global
                                                                   230 Community Health, HPR 340 Nutrition for Optimal
and cultural understanding, and the coherence and connected-
                                                                   Health, or NU 305 Alternative/Complementary Medicine.
ness of knowledge.
                                                                   Electives (6 credits)
Writing Courses (9 credits)
                                                                   Students complete six credits of electives outside the student’s
Students complete EN 101 Composition I, EN 102 Composition
                                                                   major field of study.
II, and one additional writing course designated by the major.
A minimum grade of C- is required in EN 101 and EN 102.            General Education Competencies
Humanities Courses (18 credits)
                                                                   Technological and Informational Literacy
Selected courses from Art History, History, Humanities, English
                                                                   Students fulfill a Liberal Arts Core competence in this area
and American Literature, Philosophy, and Theology and
                                                                   through EN 101 and EN 102. Some major fields of study will
Religious Studies constitute the humanities at MU. Students
                                                                   identify courses that fulfill additional Technological and
complete six courses that together meet the following criteria:
                                                                   Informational Literacy requirements. For example, School of
     One of the six must be an EN literature course, one an
                                                                   Business Administration students are required to fulfill four
HI, one a PH, and one a TH or RST course (for a total of four
                                                                   technological literacy modules. For more information, see
courses). The remaining two courses are humanities electives
                                                                   page 91.
and may be chosen from among any of the above humanities
disciplines. EN 102 must be completed prior to any literature      Basic Proficiency
course.
                                                                   Through its Directed Self-Placement process, the University
     One of the six must have content from the ancient,
                                                                   assists all entering freshmen and new transfer students who
medieval, or premodern periods (before 1700) and one must have
                                                                   present fewer than 15 credits earned elsewhere to identify
content from the modern or contemporary periods (after 1700).
                                                                   appropriate first courses in reading, writing, and mathematics.
Mathematics Course (3 credits)                                     Some entering students may start in developmental courses
                                                                   before progressing to required courses. Developmental courses
Students complete one MA course from among MA 121, MA 124,
                                                                   do not fulfill Liberal Arts Core requirements, but may be
MA 127, MA 132, MA 150, or higher. Note that MA 100A,
                                                                   applied to the degree as electives.
MA 100B, MA 142, or any course with a non-MA prefix do not
fulfill this requirement.                                          Freshman Seminar

Science Course (4 credits)                                         Freshmen are encouraged to enroll in SEM 101 Freshman
                                                                   Seminar, offered each year in the fall. The seminar focuses on
Students complete one course from ASTR, BIO, CHM, GEOL,
                                                                   learning and life skills required for academic success. Emphasis
PHYS, or PSC offerings; this course must include a laboratory
                                                                   is placed on time management, reading, note taking, test taking
experience.
                                                                   and preparation, study skills, use of campus resources, and
                                                                   general academic and career decision-making skills. One credit
                                                                   is awarded for the successful completion of Freshman Seminar.
50                                                     ACADEMIC PROGRAMS


     SPECIAL PROGRAMS                                                    Pre-Physical Therapy Studies and Advising
                                                                         See page 134 for further information. Students will be assigned
     UNDERGRADUATE PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES                              a Pre-Physical Therapy advisor from the Department of
                                                                         Physical Therapy in addition to their degree major advisor.
     Pre-Law Studies and Advising
     Students who plan to pursue a law degree after graduation           HONORS PROGRAM
     should contact the Academic Success Center. In addition to          The Honors Program consists of seven specialized classes (21
     an academic major advisor, the student will be assigned a           credits), many of which satisfy the University’s Liberal Arts
     Pre-Law advisor who will help with course selection,                Core requirements. The required courses are HON 101; four
     researching law schools, the law school application process,        Intermediate Honors courses; HON 399, the Honors Thesis
     and preparing for LSATs.                                            Proposal; and HON 400, the Honors Thesis. For course descrip-
          In general, to be a successful law school candidate, a         tions on HON 101, 399, and 400, please see page 175.
     student must achieve good grades in challenging courses,                 Following successful completion of HON 101, the
     develop excellent writing skills, demonstrate analytical ability,   Intermediate Honors courses (totaling at least 12 credits) may
     and be involved in one’s community, especially in leadership        be fulfilled in special sections of Liberal Arts Core classes,
     positions. Most law schools require that students obtain a          “contract” courses, or graduate classes. At least one intermedi-
     specific score on the LSATs.                                        ate Honors course should be completed by contract. Choose
                                                                         from the following:
     Pre-Medicine Studies and Advising
                                                                         Liberal Arts Core Honors classes: These courses will be
     Students who plan to pursue a medical degree after graduation           special sections of classes that currently fulfill Liberal Arts
     for a career in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optom-        Core requirements, but are appropriately modified and
     etry, or podiatry should contact the Academic Success Center.           denoted for Honors students.
     In addition to an academic major advisor, the student will be
                                                                         Contract Honors courses: In addition to special Honors
     assigned a Pre-Med advisor who will help with course selec-
                                                                             sections of Liberal Arts Core classes, participants may
     tion, researching medical schools, completing the medical
                                                                             enroll in contract courses with permission from the
     school application process, and preparing for MCATs.
                                                                             Honors Committee. Contract courses are normal courses
          Although medical schools do not require specific degrees
                                                                             open to every student in the University. However, an
     as prerequisites for admission, most require strong academic
                                                                             Honors student may petition (contract) to complete the
     performance in specific courses. The courses most often
                                                                             classes as part of his/her Honors requirements. Unlike
     required include General Biology I and II, Principles of
                                                                             independent study, Honors students will register for a
     Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II, General Physics
                                                                             regular course, but, in conjunction with the instructor,
     I and II, Calculus I, and General Psychology. For Marymount
                                                                             agree to perform additional work. (The requirements for
     students who choose to major in Biology, a Pre-Med track is
                                                                             the additional work is available from the Honors director.)
     offered. To be a successful medical school applicant, students
                                                                             This additional work is required for Honors credit, but
     must also demonstrate an understanding of the medical profes-
                                                                             will not affect the student’s grade for the course.
     sion through work or volunteer activities. Required MCAT
     scores vary by school.                                              Graduate Courses: Junior and senior Honors students, with
          At Marymount, students considering professional study in           permission of the instructor, the department chair, the
     health fields usually consider Biology as an undergraduate              student’s advisor, and Honors director, may substitute
     major, but pre-professional requirements can be met through a           graduate courses for his/her contract requirement (with no
     variety of undergraduate fields. Students should consider               additional contract work).
     majoring in the subject area in which they have the strongest       Primary academic advising for Honors students will be deliv-
     aptitude and interest. Acceptance into health-related profes-       ered by faculty from their respective majors. Additional
     sional schools is highly competitive and requires the               advising will be provided by the Honors director.
     maintenance of a fairly high undergraduate grade point                   Honors students are permitted to register for a maximum
     average. The Pre-Med advisor is available to help design the        of two Honors courses per semester. Furthermore, Honors
     best possible course sequence for all students interested in a      students should fulfill all program requirements and achieve a
     Pre-Med curriculum regardless of their major.                       yearly minimum GPA of 3.2 to maintain program benefits.
                                                                         Participants must earn at least a B in each Honors course.
                                                  ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                                                      51



     Honors Program requirements should be distributed as                Marym0unt’s London Program is sponsored by the
follows:                                                            University and is offered in partnership with the Foundation
Freshman year                                                       for International Education. Students can enroll for the fall,
Fall: HON 101, Introductory Honors Seminar                          spring, or summer semester. Qualified second-semester sopho-
Spring: Intermediate Honors Course #1                               mores, juniors, and first-semester seniors are eligible. The fall
                                                                    and spring semester programs require full-time enrollment for
Sophomore year
                                                                    12-15 credits; students enroll for six credits in the summer. Both
Fall: Intermediate Honors Course #2
                                                                    the semester and summer programs offer students the option
Spring: Intermediate Honors Course #3
                                                                    of enrolling in coursework alone or completing a London
Junior year                                                         internship plus coursework. Students in these programs receive
Fall: Intermediate Honors Course #4 (by contract)                   direct Marymount credit.
Spring: HON 399, Honors Thesis Proposal                                  Those electing an option that includes an internship will
Senior year                                                         have opportunities for experiential learning in the London
Fall: HON 400, Honors Thesis (or equivalent)                        offices of British, American, and multinational firms; British
Spring: Thesis Defense                                              department stores; fashion and design studios; health centers;
      The transcripts of students who successfully complete all     schools; and media outlets.
program requirements will note “Honors Scholar.”                         A recommendation from the dean for Student
                                                                    Development and the approval of the appropriate School dean
MARYMOUNT ACADEMIC RESEARCH INITIATIVE                              are required for registration. Students must have satisfied all
                                                                    financial obligations to the University as well. Full details
The Marymount Academic Research Initiative (MARI) program
                                                                    about cost, the program’s calendar, academic criteria, admis-
provides an opportunity for qualified undergraduate students
                                                                    sion requirements, including deadlines for applications, can be
to engage in collaborative research with volunteer faculty
                                                                    found online at www.marymount.edu/studyabroad. All costs
mentors. Students selected for the MARI program work with
                                                                    are subject to change, based on fluctuating international
faculty to develop and pursue original research or creative
                                                                    currency exchange rates.
projects that extend beyond the classroom setting.
     Students participating in MARI benefit from the experi-        Short-Term Programs
ence by becoming part of a collaborative learning community;
                                                                    Periodically, short-term, faculty-led study abroad programs
exploring new modes of inquiry; gaining deeper understandings
                                                                    sponsored by Marymount University are available to under-
of research methodologies; and developing research presenta-
                                                                    graduate and graduate students. Past programs have included
tions for appropriate university or professional conferences.
                                                                    an art and architecture study tour in Italy, a study of opera-
     Students interested in participating in the MARI program
                                                                    tions and management in Belgium, and a Forensic Psychology
may obtain information and an application at
                                                                    program in London, England.
www.marymount.edu/mari.
                                                                         Students in these programs typically receive direct
                                                                    Marymount credit.
STUDY ABROAD
                                                                         Marymount’s Office of Study Abroad can provide
The Office of Study Abroad administers, supports, and coordi-       additional information about these programs and the criteria
nates all University programs taking place outside the U.S.         for enrollment. The Study Abroad pages of the University Web
      In today’s international world, study abroad presents a       site also provides additional information about such programs.
meaningful component to liberal arts education. When
combined with practical experience such as an internship, its       Other Study Abroad Programs
value is even greater. Students abroad integrate into the daily     Marymount University’s Office of Study Abroad can also facili-
life of the host country and its people.                            tate study in other countries for undergraduate students
                                                                    representing a variety of majors.
The London Program
                                                                         Hosted by other institutions, semester programs are avail-
Marymount University offers a study abroad experience in            able to Marymount students who wish to study in Limerick,
England, a country linked to American culture through its           Ireland; Florence and Rome, Italy; Madrid, Spain; and
history, literature, and traditions. Study and internship experi-   Melbourne, Australia. Some of these programs are available for
ences in England do not require fluency in a foreign language,      summer study as well. Students in these programs receive
so the student can benefit fully from the stay abroad.              Marymount transfer credit.
52                                                   ACADEMIC PROGRAMS


          The Office of Study Abroad can assist students who seek            Enrollment procedures may be found under the FAQ
     other study abroad options to meet specific academic or profes-    section of the Registrar’s Office Web page on the University
     sional goals as well. Such programs are typically sponsored by     Web site, www.marymount.edu/registrar.
     other universities or agencies.
          Students who participate in all study aboard programs         Military Science-Army ROTC Program
     must receive prior approval from their advisor, the dean of the    ROTC, in conjunction with Marymount University, prepares
     School offering their major, and the Office of Study Abroad. To    students for careers as United States Army officers focusing on
     receive credit for any study abroad program, students must         all fields of military specialization. These areas include, but are
     complete a course approval form before departure. These forms      not limited to, Nursing, Military Intelligence, Engineering,
     are available in the Office of Study Abroad. (This form does not   Infantry, and Military Police. Marymount’s Army ROTC is
     need to be completed for students in the London Program or         taught at nearby Georgetown University as a part of the
     short-term Marymount-sponsored programs, as students in            consortium of local universities. Registration must be
     these programs receive direct Marymount credit.)                   completed through Marymount’s Registrar’s Office. ROTC’s
          More information about all of these opportunities, as well    purpose is to instill leadership techniques and principles. For
     as academic criteria, admission requirements, and deadlines for    more information regarding ROTC at Marymount, please
     applications can be found through the Office of Study Abroad       contact Marymount University’s Office of Admissions, the
     and on the Study Abroad pages of the Marymount University          Army ROTC at (202) 687-7056, or www.georgetown.edu/
     Web site.                                                          organizations/rotc.

     Transferring Study Abroad Credit                                   THE ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER
     Credits transferred from study abroad are not included in the      Director: Dr. Robert M. Otten
     University’s minimum residency requirement. (This does not         Academic Counselors: Amy Clay, Rhett Leverett
     apply to credits earned through the London Program or                   The Academic Success Center (ASC) at Marymount
     Marymount-sponsored short-term programs.)                          University assists students in setting and achieving their
          Acceptance of credits earned in a study abroad program is     academic goals. The Center offers academic advising to
     at the discretion of the University. Work must be completed        students who prefer the advantages of entering the University
     with a grade of C or better to be accepted.                        as an undeclared major.
          Students studying abroad in programs not sponsored by
     Marymount should also consult the Office of Study Abroad to        The Undeclared Major
     learn if they must also maintain continuous registration at        Some students are uncertain of their choice of major and
     Marymount. Those who must maintain continuous registra-            choose to enter the University as undeclared. For such students
     tion, but fail to do so will be considered separated from the      the Academic Success Center facilitates the process of choosing
     University. See page 37 for details on continuous registration.    a major. Beginning studies as an undeclared major allows the
                                                                        student to take time for careful reflection in selecting a major
     CONSORTIUM OF UNIVERSITIES OF THE                                  that best suits his/her interests and abilities.
     WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA                                            An undeclared student must choose a major by the end of
     Marymount University is a member of The Consortium of              his or her sophomore year because traditionally a student’s
     Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Eligible         junior and senior years are devoted to taking classes within the
     students from Marymount may take approved courses at               major. The ASC encourages undeclared students to begin
     member institutions. Other members include American                narrowing down their potential majors following the conclu-
     University, The Catholic University of America, Gallaudet          sion of the freshman year.
     University, George Mason University, Georgetown University,             Typically, there are three types of undeclared students,
     The George Washington University, Howard University,               each with a different suggested first-year course plan.
     Southeastern University, Trinity University, University of the
     District of Columbia, and University of Maryland at College        Undeclared Major Option 1
     Park.                                                              This option should be chosen by students who are open to
          Students wishing to enroll in a course offered through the    many possibilities or have no clear idea of how to choose a
     Consortium must select one that is acceptable to both              major. The focus will be on taking classes required for the
     Marymount University and the visited institution. See further      Liberal Arts Core.
     information about Consortium student registration require-
     ments on page 38.
                                                 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS                                                                  53



Suggested Course Plan                                           Undeclared Major Option 3

Year One                                                        This should be chosen by students who are able to narrow
                                                                down their choice of major to two or three possibilities, and at
  Fall                              Spring
                                                                least one of those choices is a field that is mathematics or
  ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100               EN 102 Composition II*      science intensive. In addition to taking Liberal Arts Core
    Introduction to the Social      Humanities (Philosophy)     requirements, these students will take introductory mathemat-
    Sciences*                        elective*                  ics and sciences courses. This will give the student an
  EN 101 Composition I*             Science elective*           opportunity to evaluate his/her aptitude in mathematics and
  Health elective*                                              science.
                                    Social Sciences elective*
  Humanities (History)              Explore elective**          Year One
   elective*                                                      Fall                               Spring
  Humanities                                                      ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                EN 102 Composition II*
   (Theology/Religious                                              Introduction to the Social       Humanities (Philosophy)
   Studies) elective*                                               Sciences*                         elective*
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                        EN 101 Composition I*              Mathematics or Science
Undeclared Major Option 2                                         Mathematics elective*               elective
This should be chosen by students who are able to narrow          Science elective*                  Social Sciences elective*
down their choice of major to two or three possibilities. In
                                                                  Explore elective**                 Explore elective**
addition to taking Liberal Arts Core requirements, these
students will take introductory courses in several fields of      SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
interest.                                                       *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
Year One                                                        **Explore electives: These should be selected from courses in the
  Fall                              Spring                      subject area(s) in which the student is considering a major.
  ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100               EN 102 Composition II*
    Introduction to the Social      Humanities (Philosophy)
    Sciences*                        elective*
  EN 101 Composition I*             Humanities (History)
  Health elective*                   elective*
  Humanities                        Social Sciences elective*
   (Theology/Religious              Explore elective**
   Studies) elective*
  Explore elective**
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
54                                           SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES



     School of Arts and Sciences                                                Coursework begins with foundations in design and
                                                                          drawing. Students choose from painting; printmaking; drawing;
     Dean: Dr. Teresa Reed                                                three-dimensional studies, such as jewelry, furniture, and book
     The School of Arts and Sciences supports the University’s            art; textile design; photography; video; and multimedia.
     objectives to provide a fundamental grounding in the liberal         Bolstered by rigor drawn from art history, the student creates a
     arts through programs of study in the fine and applied arts, the     body of work at the senior level, which is evaluated by artists
     humanities, mathematics, and the natural sciences.                   from the chosen field, and completes an internship in art
          At the undergraduate level, degree programs are available       agencies, galleries, or museums or in apprenticeships under
     in Art, Biology, Communications, Computer Science, English,          professional artists.
     Fashion Design, Fashion Merchandising, Graphic Design,                     Students in this major also have the option of choosing
     History, Interior Design, Liberal Studies, Mathematics,              tracks in Art Management or Pre-Art Therapy.
     Philosophy, Politics, and Theology and Religious Studies.                  A concentration in Book Arts is also available with a possi-
          Undergraduate students seeking teaching licensure on the        bility for exhibition and future postgraduate work.
     secondary level (grades 6-12) in Biology, English, History and             Students may earn a minor in Art History with a selection
     Social Science, or Mathematics follow a prescribed program of        of survey and period courses. Students interested in expanding
     studies that both fulfills the requirements of their major disci-    their study of art history should consult with a School of Arts
     pline and leads to secondary teaching licensure. The programs        and Sciences advisor about the interdisciplinary plan for
     in Art Education and English as a Second Language lead to            Liberal Studies majors. Art history and studio arts courses are
     licensure to teach students in kindergarten through 12th grade.      useful for students pursuing careers in graphic design, teach-
     Licensure at the elementary level (grades PK-6) can be pursued       ing, or museum and gallery work.
     through a major in Liberal Studies.                                        The study of art at Marymount is enhanced by easy access
          In addition, the School of Arts and Sciences offers the         to Washington’s many art galleries and museums. The broad
     majority of courses required in the Liberal Arts Core require-       general collection of the National Gallery of Art is supple-
     ments at the undergraduate level.                                    mented by the more specialized collections at the Corcoran and
          At the graduate level, the School offers programs in            Freer Art galleries, the Hirshhorn Museum, the National
     Computer Science, Humanities, Interior Design, and Literature        Portrait Gallery, the Phillips Collection, the Renwick Gallery,
     and Language. Teaching Licensure in Secondary English is also        Dumbarton Oaks, the National Museum of African Art, the
     available through the Master of Arts in Humanities program.          Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, and a host of smaller private
                                                                          galleries throughout the city and its suburbs.
     Nondegree Admission: Graduate nondegree admission, in
     programs which permit it, is limited to a total of 12 credits in     Suggested Degree Plan
     the Schools of Arts and Sciences. See individual program
     descriptions for further restrictions or requirements.               Year One
                                                                            Fall                               Spring
     ART                                                                    FA 103 Design I    §
                                                                                                               FA 104 Design II§
                                                                            FA 105 Drawing I§                  2-D elective§ **
     ART (B.A.)                                                             EN 101 Composition I*              EN 102 Composition II*
     Fine Arts courses are offered as electives for all students and as     Health elective*                   ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100
     requirements for students majoring in Art, Fashion Design,             Humanities elective*                 Introduction to the Social
     Graphic Design, and Interior Design. The formal elements of                                                 Sciences*
                                                                            SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
     observation and communication skills are introduced in basic                                              Mathematics elective*
     courses of design and drawing. Painting, printmaking, and
     book arts classes advance unification skills through form, color,
                                                                          Year Two
     and composition problems. The curriculum goals are strength-
     ened by additional courses in drawing and art history.                 Fall                               Spring
           The Art program provides an education in diverse media           FA 201 History of Art I §
                                                                                                               FA 202 History of Art II§
     and focuses on studying, interpreting, creating, and evaluating        2-D elective§ **                   2-D elective§ **
     art. The program capitalizes on Marymount faculty’s expertise
                                                                            Humanities elective*               3-D elective§ ***
     in design studies and fine arts.
                                                                            Social Sciences elective*          Humanities elective*
                                                                            Science elective*                  Social Sciences elective*
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                     55



Year Three                                                          Year Two
    Fall                             Spring                             Fall                             Spring
                         §                                §
    Art History elective *           Art History elective *             FA 201 History of Art I§         FA 202 History of Art II§
    3-D elective§ ***                3-D elective§ ***                  2-D elective§ **                 2-D elective§ **
    One (1) from the following:      One (1) from the following:        Humanities elective*             3-D elective§ ***
      AA 272/372 Textile Design        AA 272/372 Textile Design        MGT 123 The Business             Related study#
      I or II, COM 303 Video           I or II, COM 303 Video            Experience§                     MGT 304 Organizational
      Production, GD 202/302           Production, GD 202/302
                                                                        Science elective*                 Management§
      Illustration I or II, GD         Illustration I or II, GD
      203 Photography: Digital         203 Photography: Digital
      Imaging, GD 309 Web              Imaging, GD 309 Web          Year Three
      Multimedia Design§               Multimedia Design§
                                                                        Fall                             Spring
    Humanities 300/400-level         EN 301 The Writing Process:                            §
                                                                        Art History elective *           Art History elective§ *
     elective*                         Theory and Practice*
                                                                        3-D elective§ ***                3-D elective§ ***
    Social Sciences 300/400-         Elective
      level elective*                                                   MKT 301 Principles of            Related study#
                                                                         Marketing§                      MGT 391 Business Writing
Year Four                                                               Humanities 300/400-level          and Speaking*
                                                                         elective*                       Social Sciences elective*
    Fall                             Spring
                                                                        Social Sciences elective*
    Art History elective§            AA 421 Project§
    FA 400 Internship§               Four (4) electives
    Two (2) electives*                                              Year Four
                                                                        Fall                             Spring
§
Requirement for the major                                                                   §
                                                                        Art History elective *           FA 400 Internship§
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.              FA 426 Art Management§           Humanities elective*
**2-D electives: FA 106 Drawing II, FA 110 Cross-cultural Visual        Social Sciences 300/400-         Two to three (2-3) electives*
Thinking, FA 209 Figure Drawing, FA 211/307 Printmaking I &               level elective*
II, FA 213-214 Painting I & II, FA 313-314 Painting III & IV            MKT 319 Advertising and
***3-D electives: FA 350 A-C: 3-D Design, Jewelry Design, The Art        Integrated Marketing
of the Book; ID 412 Furniture and Display Design                         Communications§
                                                                        Related study#
All Art majors have the option of choosing a track.
                                                                    §
                                                                    Requirement for the major or track
Art Management track
                                                                    *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
This track educates students in the integrated application of
                                                                    **2-D electives: FA 106 Drawing II, FA 110 Cross-cultural Visual
art, marketing, and management theories to provide eligibility
                                                                    Thinking, FA 209 Figure Drawing, FA 211/307 Printmaking I &
for employment in galleries, museums, and other arts organiza-
                                                                    II, FA 213-214 Painting I & II, FA 313-314 Painting III & IV
tions, as well as non-art venues requiring related skills.
     Students choosing this track will follow Year One of the       ***3-D electives: FA 350 A-C: 3-D Design, Jewelry Design, The Art
suggested degree plan for the B.A. in Art, then complete the        of the Book; ID 412 Furniture and Display Design
program as follows:                                                 #Related Study: AA 272 Textile Design I or AA 273 Textile
                                                                    Design II, COM 303 Video Production, GD 202 Illustration I or
                                                                    GD 302 Illustration II, GD 203 Photography: Digital Imaging,
                                                                    GD 309 Web Multimedia Design
56                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Pre-Art Therapy track                                               Year Four
     This track educates students in the integrated applications of          Fall                              Spring
     art and psychology for entry-level positions in organizations           Art History elective§ *           FA 400 Internship§
     that employ art therapists. The program also provides the
                                                                             FA 425 Art Therapy§               Social Sciences elective*
     foundation for advanced degree programs, which lead to career
     opportunities as a practicing art therapist.                            One (1) from the following:       Two to three (2-3) electives
          Students choosing this track will follow Year One of the             AA 272/AA 372 Textile
     degree plan for the B.A. in Art, then complete the program as             Design I or II, COM 303
     follows:                                                                  Video Production, GD
                                                                               202/GD 302 Illustration I
     Year Two                                                                  or II, GD 203
       Fall                             Spring                                 Photography: Digital
       FA 201 History of Art I  §
                                        FA 202 History of Art II§              Imaging, GD 309 Web
                                                                               Multimedia Design§
       FA 213 Painting I§               2-D elective§ **
                                                                             Two (2) electives*
       Humanities elective*             3-D elective (clay-based)§ ***
       PSY 101 General Psychology§      Humanities elective*             §
                                                                         Requirement for the major or track
       Science elective*                PSY 210 Human Growth and         *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                          Development§
                                                                         **2-D electives: FA 106 Drawing II, FA 110 Cross-cultural Visual
                                                                         Thinking, FA 209 Figure Drawing, FA 211/307 Printmaking I &
     Year Three
                                                                         II, FA 213-214 Painting I & II, FA 313-314 Painting III & IV
       Fall                             Spring
                                                                         ***3-D electives: FA 350 A-C: 3-D Design, Jewelry Design, The Art
                            §
       Art History elective *           Art History elective§ *          of the Book; ID 412 Furniture and Display Design
       3-D elective§ ***                3-D elective§ ***
                                                                         ART EDUCATION (B.A. IN ART)
       One (1) from the following:      PSY 240 Personality
         AA 272/AA 372 Textile            Theories§
                                                                         This program of study allows students to complete a baccalau-
         Design I or II, COM 303
                                                                         reate degree in Art and also be licensed to teach art, levels K-12,
                                        EN 301 The Writing Process:
         Video Production, GD
                                                                         at the end of four years. Students pursuing licensure in this
                                          Theory and Practice*
         202/GD 302 Illustration I
                                                                         manner complete all requirements necessary for Virginia licen-
                                        PSY 330 Counseling               sure, including field experience and student teaching.
         or II, GD 203
                                          Theories and Process§ * or
         Photography: Digital                                            Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
                                          PSY 333 Abnormal Child
         Imaging, GD 309 Web                                             admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for
                                          and Adolescent
         Multimedia Design§                                              student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-
                                          Psychology§ *
       PSY 230 Abnormal
                                                                         sion requirements and procedures.
         Psychology§ *                                                   Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses
                                                                         specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
                                                                         sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of
                                                                         Education and Human Services for further information.
                                     SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                       57



Suggested Degree Plan                                          Year Four
Year One                                                           Fall                                Spring
  Fall                           Spring                            FA 385 Approaches to                AA 421 Project§
                                                                     Teaching Art#                     ED 360 Student Teaching§
  FA 103 Design I§               FA 104 Design II§
                                                                   Humanities 300/400-level            3-D elective§ ***
  FA 105 Drawing I§              2-D elective§ **
                                                                    elective*
  EN 101 Composition I*          EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                   Art History elective§
  ECO/SOC/POL/PSY 100            Mathematics elective*
                                                                   Two (2) electives*
    Introduction to the Social   Humanities elective*
    Sciences*                                                  §
                                                               Requirement for the major
  Health elective*                                             *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                     #Students interested in teaching at the elementary level (grades
                                                               K-6) should see an Education advisor during their freshman
Year Two                                                       year.
  Fall                           Spring                        **2-D electives: FA 106 Drawing II, FA 110 Cross-cultural Visual
  FA 201 History of Art I   §
                                 FA 202 History of Art II§     Thinking, FA 209 Figure Drawing, FA 211/FA 307 Printmaking
  2-D elective§ **               2-D elective§ **              I/II, FA 213-214 Painting I & II, FA 313 Painting III, or FA 314
                                                               Painting IV
  Humanities elective*           Humanities elective*
                                                               ***3-D electives: FA 350A-C: Design, Jewelry Design, The Art of
  Science elective*              ED 245S Educational
                                                               the Book; ID 412 Furniture and Display Design
  Social Sciences elective*        Foundations for
                                   Secondary Teachers#
                                                               ART HISTORY (MINOR)
                                 PSY 210 Human Growth
                                   and Development*            Minor Requirements
                                                                   FA 201-202 History of Art I & II
Year Three                                                         15 additional credits in Art History courses
  Fall                           Spring                            Students planning a minor in Art History or students required
  Art History elective§ *        Art History elective§ *             by their major to study period courses should complete FA
  3-D elective§ ***              3-D elective§ ***                   201-202 History of Art I & II before other Art History courses.
  One (1) from the following:    One (1) from the following:
    AA 272/372 Textile Design      AA 272/372 Textile Design   STUDIO ART (MINOR)
    I or II, COM 303 Video         I or II, COM 303 Video
                                                               Minor Requirements
    Production, GD 202/302         Production, GD 202/302
    Illustration I or II, GD       Illustration I or II, GD        FA 103-104 Design I & II
    203 Photography: Digital       203 Photography: Digital        15 additional credits from FA 105-106 Drawing I & II; FA 110
    Imaging, GD 309 Web            Imaging, GD 309 Web                Cross-cultural Visual Thinking; FA 209 Figure Drawing; FA
    Multimedia Design§             Multimedia Design§                 221/FA 307 Printmaking I/II; FA 213, FA 214, FA 313, FA 314
  PSY 341 Psychology of          ED 337 Reading in the                Painting I-IV; FA 350 A-F 3-Dimensional Topics (Jewelry
    Individuals with               Content Areas#                     Design, Book Arts, 3-D Design); FA 360 Narrative Image in
    Exceptionalities*                                                 Mixed Media; FA 421 Project
                                 Writing elective*
  ED 327S Curriculum Design:
    Secondary Education#
58                                           SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     BIOLOGY AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES                                         General Biology track

                                                                           Year Three
     BIOLOGY (B.S.)                                                            Fall                                Spring
     Students in this major will choose a track in General Biology,            PHYS 171 General Physics I      §
                                                                                                                   PHYS 172 General Physics
     Molecular and Cellular Biology, or Pre-Med.                                                           §         II§
                                                                               BIO 363 Cellular Biology
          Study in the biological sciences responds to the increasing
                                                                               BIO 368 Advanced Lab                Biology track course§ **
     demand for scientific expertise in a variety of professional
     settings, including industry and law.                                       Research Methods§                 Humanities elective*
          The program permits students to build on a common                    Humanities elective*                Health elective*
     foundation of introductory courses in biology and chemistry.              Social Sciences elective*           Elective*
     It provides preparation for advanced studies in biology and
     health-related professional fields, or for entry into a variety of
                                                                           Year Four
     areas within the biotechnology industries.
                                                                               Fall                                Spring
     Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C- is
     required in any course within the major courses (biology,                 Two (2) Biology track               BIO 410 Senior Seminar§
     chemistry, and physics) that serve as a prerequisite for a                  courses§ **                       Two (2) Biology track
     higher-numbered course. Courses in which the minimum grade                Humanities elective*                  courses§ **
     is not achieved may not be repeated more than once without                BIO 400 Internship§                 Humanities elective*
     permission of the Biology and Physical Sciences department
                                                                                                                   Social Sciences 300/400-
     chair.
                                                                                                                     level elective*
     Suggested Degree Plan                                                 §
                                                                           Requirement for the major or track
     Year One                                                              *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
       Fall                               Spring                           **Biology track courses: (complete at least 7 credits from Area 1
       BIO 151 General Biology I * §
                                          BIO 152 General Biology II   §   and both Area 2 courses) Area 1: BIO 224 Endocrinology or BIO
                                                                           272 Parasitology, BIO 361 Biochemistry, BIO 363 Cellular
       CHM 151 Principles of              CHM 152 Principles of
                                                                           Biology, BIO 364 Immunology, BIO 366 Virology, BIO 369
         Chemistry I§                       Chemistry II§
                                                                           Advanced Molecular Biology. Area 2: BIO 250 General Botany,
       EN 101 Composition I*              EN 102 Composition II*           BIO 312 Physiological Ecology.
       MA 142 Precalculus                 MA 181 Calculus I§ *
                                                                           Molecular and Cellular Biology track
       SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                                                           Year Three
     Year Two                                                                  Fall                                Spring
       Fall                               Spring                               PHYS 171 General Physics I      §
                                                                                                                   PHYS 172 General Physics
       BIO 260 Microbiology    §
                                          BIO 262 Genetics   §
                                                                               BIO 363 Cellular Biology    §         II§
       CHM 221 Organic                    CHM 222 Organic Chemistry            BIO 368 Advanced Research           Humanities elective*
         Chemistry I§                       II§                                  Methods§                          Social Sciences elective*
       BIO 300 Writing for                Humanities elective*                 Humanities elective*                Biology track course§ **
         Science§ *                       Social Sciences elective*            Health elective*
       ECO/POL 100 Introduction           Elective*
         to the Social Sciences*
       Humanities elective*

     All Biology majors then complete their studies with course-
     work in their chosen track during years three and four. Details
     about each track follows. (A four-year Suggested Degree Plan is
     outlined for those in the Pre-Med track.)
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                           59



Year Four                                                           Suggested Degree Plan
    Fall                             Spring                         Year One
    Two (2) Biology track            BIO 400 Internship§                Fall                                    Spring
      courses§ **                    BIO 410 Senior Seminar§                                            §
                                                                        BIO 151 General Biology I *             BIO 152 General Biology II§
    Humanities elective*             Biology track course§ **           CHM 151 Principles of                   CHM 152 Principles of
    Two (2) electives*               Humanities elective*                 Chemistry I§                            Chemistry II§
                                     Social Sciences 300/400-           EN 101 Composition I*                   EN 102 Composition II*
                                       level elective*                  MA 181 Calculus§ *                      MA 182 Calculus II§
§                                                                       SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
Requirement for the major or track
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                    Year Two
**Biology track courses: BIO 224 Endocrinology, BIO 272
                                                                        Fall                                    Spring
Parasitology, BIO 361 Biochemistry, BIO 364 Immunology, BIO
                                                                                                §
366 Animal Virology, BIO 369 Advanced Molecular Biology.                BIO 260 Microbiology                    BIO 262 Genetics§
                                                                        CHM 221 Organic                         CHM 222 Organic Chemistry
Pre-Med track                                                             Chemistry I§                            II§
Students in this track will be assisted with MCAT preparation           BIO 300 Writing for                     Humanities elective*
in their junior and/or senior year, if they choose. These                 Science§ *                            Social Sciences elective*
students will also have a Pre-Med primary advisor to ensure
                                                                        Humanities elective*
that all medical school questions are answered and that proper
progress is being made toward completion of the Pre-Med                 Health elective*
designated curriculum. The Pre-Med advisor will also assist         Year Three
students in choosing medical schools and advocating on behalf
                                                                        Fall                                    Spring
of students for a selection of medical schools.
                                                                                                            §
                                                                        PHYS 171 General Physics I              PHYS 172 General Physics
Admission Requirements: This track is reserved for students             BIO 363 Cellular Biology    §             II§
who have and will maintain a high academic standard. The                BIO 368 Advanced Lab                    BIO 361 Biochemistry§
Pre-Med designation will be available to entering freshmen                Research Methods§                     Biology 300/400-level
who have a minimum high school GPA of 3.6. Students who                                                           course§
                                                                        Humanities elective*
are accepted into Marymount University, but do not initially
                                                                        Social Sciences elective*               Humanities elective*
meet the requirements for entry into the Pre-Med track can
apply for entry any time after completing one semester at                                                       Social Sciences elective*
Marymount University.
Minimum Grade Requirements: Students will earn the Pre-
                                                                    Year Four
Med designation if they have and maintain a cumulative
Marymount University GPA of 3.5 or higher and Marymount                 Fall                                    Spring
University science GPA of 3.7 or higher.                                Biology 300/400-level                   Biology 300/400-level
Degree Planning: If the courses specified in the suggested                course§                                 course§
degree plan are not followed as outlined, a student in this track       BIO 400 Internship§                     BIO 410 Senior Seminar§
will be advised to take the MCAT after graduation and delay             Humanities elective*                    Humanities elective*
his/her application to medical school for one year.
                                                                        Elective*                               Social Sciences 300/400-
                                                                                                                  level elective*
                                                                                                                Elective*
                                                                    §
                                                                    Requirement for the major or track
                                                                    *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
60                                            SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     BIOLOGY WITH SECONDARY-LEVEL TEACHING                                Year Three
     LICENSURE (B.S. IN BIOLOGY)                                              Fall                                 Spring
     This program of study allows students to complete a baccalau-            PHYS 171 General Physics I   §
                                                                                                                   PHYS 172 General
     reate degree in Biology and also be licensed to teach secondary                                                 Physics II§
                                                                              BIO 363 Cellular Biology§
     Biology at the end of four years. Students pursuing licensure in
                                                                              ED 327S Curriculum Design:           ED 337 Reading in the
     this manner complete all requirements necessary for Virginia
                                                                                Secondary Education                  Content Areas
     licensure, including field experiences and student teaching.
     Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek               Two (2) Humanities                   Biology elective
     admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for                   electives*                         Humanities elective*
     student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-                                                 PSY 341 Psychology of
     sion requirements and procedures.                                                                               Individuals with
     Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses                                                     Exceptionalities*
     specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
     sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of         Year Four
     Education and Human Services for further information.                    Fall                                 Spring
     Suggested Degree Plan                                                    BIO 110 Introduction to              ED 360S Student Teaching:
     Year One                                                                   Environmental Science                Secondary level§

        Fall                              Spring                              BIO 385 Approaches to                BIO 410 Senior Seminar§
                                                                                Teaching Secondary                 Biology elective
        BIO 151 General Biology I§ *      BIO 152 General Biology II§
                                                                                Biology
        CHM 151 Principles of             CHM 152 Principles of                                                    Health elective*
                                                                              Biology elective
          Chemistry I§                      Chemistry II§
                                                                              Humanities elective*
        EN 101 Composition I*             EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                              Social Sciences elective*
        MA 142 Precalculus                MA 181 Calculus I*
        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                          §
                                                                          Requirement for the major
                                                                          *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
     Year Two
        Fall                              Spring
                                                                          BIOLOGY (MINOR)
                                §
        BIO 260 Microbiology              BIO 262 Genetics for Majors§
        CHM 221 Organic                   CHM 222 Organic                 Minor Requirements
          Chemistry I§                      Chemistry II§                     BIO 151-152 General Biology I & II
        BIO 300 Writing for               ED 245S Educational                 16 additional credits in BIO courses numbered above 200
          Science§ *                        Foundations for
        Humanities elective*                Secondary Teachers            PHYSICAL SCIENCE (MINOR)
        ECO/POL 100 Introduction          PSY 312 Adolescent
                                                                          Minor Requirements
          to the Social Sciences*           Psychology*
                                                                              BIO 151-152 General Biology I & II
                                          Humanities elective*
                                                                              CHM 151-152 Principles of Chemistry I & II or PHYS 171-172
                                                                                General Physics I & II
                                                                              12 additional credits from BIO or CHM courses numbered
                                                                                 above 200
                                       SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                  61



COMMUNICATIONS                                                     Year Two
                                                                       Fall                             Spring
COMMUNICATIONS (B.A.)                                                  COM 206 Introduction to          Two (2) Communications
The Communications major is designed for students seeking a              Public Relations§                emphasis courses§ **
strong focus on writing, speaking, and selected media skills.          COM 209 Introduction to          Humanities elective*
Students will choose an emphasis in public/corporate commu-              Journalism§                    Social Sciences elective*
nications, journalism/broadcasting, speech communications, or          Humanities elective*             Elective or minor course
visual/media communications. Graduates are prepared for
                                                                       Social Sciences elective*
entry positions in broadcasting, publications, public relations,
and other media. The major provides excellent preparation for          Elective or minor course*
graduate study in communications, law, and journalism.
     Students may also choose a double major in                    Year Three
Communications and English. The double major calls for the             Fall                             Spring
completion of 30 credits in Communications and 30 credits in
                                                                       Communications emphasis          Two (2) Communications
English. The designated track in Communications emphasizes
                                                                         elective§ **                     emphasis courses§ **
speech and journalism, while the designated track in English
emphasizes literature. Students who choose this double major           Writing 300-level elective*      Humanities elective*
may also pursue secondary school certification in English.             Social Sciences 300/400-         Two (2) elective or minor
Students interested in the requirements for a double major in            level elective*                  courses
Communications and English should confer with advisors in              Humanities elective*
each area.
                                                                       Elective or minor course*
Program Recommendation: It is recommended that
Communications majors purchase a personal computer and             Year Four
software designated by the major.                                      Fall                             Spring
                                                                       COM 425 Senior Seminar in        COM 400 Internship§
Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C- is
                                                                         Communications§                Two (2) Communications
required in any course within the Communications major that
serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered course.                 Communications emphasis            emphasis courses§ **
                                                                         course§ **                     Humanities elective*
Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                       Humanities 300-level
Year One                                                                elective*
  Fall                              Spring                             Two (2) elective or minor
                                                                         courses
  COM 100 Media                     COM 101 Public Speaking§
    Communications§                 EN 102 Composition II*         §
                                                                   Requirement for the major
  EN 101 Composition I*             Science elective*              *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
  MA 121 Introduction to            Health elective*               **Communications emphasis electives will be chosen from the
   Mathematical Problem                                            following:
                                    Elective or minor course
   Solving*
                                                                   Journalism/Broadcasting: COM 209 Introduction to
  ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                                              Journalism, COM 305 Journalism II, COM 315 Writing for the
    Introduction to the Social                                     New Media, COM 317 Editing and the Editorial Process, COM
    Sciences*                                                      307 Broadcast Delivery, COM 201 Communication History,
  Elective or minor course                                         COM 200 Desktop Publishing, COM 322 Principles of
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                         Communications Law
62                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Public/Corporate Communications: COM 206 Introduction to         COMMUNICATIONS (MINOR)
     Public Relations, COM 302 Public Relations Techniques, COM
     318 Public Relations Case Studies, COM 320 Organizational        Minor Requirements
     Communications, COM 310 Presentational Communications,             COM 100 Media Communications
     COM 301 Intercultural Communications, COM 322 Principles of        COM 101 Public Speaking
     Communications Law
                                                                        COM 206 Introduction to Public Relations
     Speech Communications: COM 101 Public Speaking, COM 211
                                                                        COM 209 Introduction to Journalism
     Principles of Language, COM 204 Oral Interpretation, COM 310
     Presentational Communications, COM 212 Introduction to the         Nine (9) additional credits in Communications courses
     Technique of Acting, COM 307 Broadcast Delivery, COM 301
     Intercultural Communication                                      COMPUTER SCIENCE
     Visual/Media Communications: COM 303-304 Video Production        Computer Science emphasizes object-oriented programming
     I & II, COM 200 Desktop Publishing, COM 203 Photography:         and includes the study of computer architecture and the design
     Digital Imaging, COM 308 Web Design, COM 309 Web                 and analysis of algorithms.
     Multimedia Design, COM 322 Principles of Communications Law
                                                                      COMPUTER SCIENCE (B.S.)
     TEACHING LICENSURE
                                                                      The major follows the guidelines for a Computer Science major
     ADDITIONAL ENDORSEMENTS
                                                                      set by the Association for Computing Machinery and provides
     Journalism                                                       students with a broad understanding of the field. It prepares
                                                                      students for careers in computer programming, systems admin-
     Students who have or will have completed a licensure program
                                                                      istration, software engineering, applications and systems
     and seek an additional licensure in Journalism must take:
                                                                      software development, network administration, and technical
       COM 100 Media Communications                                   support. It also prepares students for graduate study in
       COM 209 Introduction to Journalism                             Computer Science.
       Three (3) courses from the following: COM 305 Journalism II,        Students majoring in Computer Science are advised to
         COM 315 Writing for the New Media, COM 317 Editing and       consider minors in Information Systems, Economics, Graphic
         the Editorial Process, COM 200 or GD 200 Desktop             Design, Mathematics, and Web Design, or electives in these
         Publishing, COM 203 Photography, COM 303 Video               areas as well as coursework in Accounting, Management, and
         Production, COM 308 Web Design, COM 309 Web Multimedia       the sciences.
         Design
                                                                      Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C- is
     Speech Communication                                             required in any course within the Computer Science major that
     Students who have or will have completed a licensure program     serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered course.
     and seek an additional licensure in Speech Communication
                                                                      Suggested Degree Plan
     must take:
       COM 101 Public Speaking                                        Year One
       COM 204 Oral Interpretation                                      Fall                              Spring
       COM 307 Broadcast Delivery                                       CS 110 Programming I in           CS 111 Programming II in
                                                                          Java§                             Java§
       COM 310 Presentational Communication
                                                                        MA 142 Precalculus or MA          CS 120 Personal Security in
       COM 301 Intercultural Communication or COM 425 Senior
                                                                         181 Calculus I§                    the Digital Age§
         Seminar
                                                                        EN 101 Composition I*             MA 181 Calculus I§ or MA 182
                                                                        POL/PSY/SOC 100                    Calculus II§
                                                                          Introduction to the Social      EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                          Sciences*                       Social Sciences elective (ECO
                                                                        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar            199 Macroeconomics or
                                                                                                            ECO 210 Microeconomics
                                                                                                            recommended)*
                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                     63



                                                                    §
Year Two                                                            Requirement for the major
  Fall                             Spring                           *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
  CS 106 Programming on the        CS 210 Structure of              **CS electives: CS 370 Computer Forensics, CS 421 Project, CS
    Web in Java Script (odd          Programming Languages          433 Research, CS 391A-D Topics in Computational Mathematics.
    years)§ or CS 150 The            (even years)§ or
    UNIX Operating System            Humanities elective (odd       COMPUTER SCIENCE (MINOR)
    (even years)§                    years)*
                                                                    Minor Requirements
  CS 220 Data Structures and       CS 230 Computer
    Algorithms§                      Organization§                      CS 110-111 Programming in Java I & II

  MA 150 Discrete                  MA 182 Calculus II§ or               MA 150 Discrete Mathematical Structures
   Mathematical Structures§ *        elective                           MA 181 Calculus I
  BIO 151 General Biology I,       Humanities elective*                 CS 220 Data Structures and Algorithms
    CHM 151 Principles of          BIO 152 General Biology II,          CS 230 Computer Organization or CS 325 Data Communications
    Chemistry I, or PHYS 171         CHM 152 Principles of                and Networking
    General Physics I*               Chemistry II, or PHYS 172
                                     General Physics II             FORENSIC COMPUTING (MINOR)
                                                                    This program provides students with the knowledge required
Year Three
                                                                    by the International Society of Forensic Computer Examiners
  Fall                             Spring                           for their Certified Computer Examiner standing. It also
  CS 310 Software Engineering      CS 210 Structure of              provides students with a rigorous introduction to computer
    (even years)§ or CS 320          Programming Languages          science. It is ideal for students in the Computer Science major
    Database Systems (odd            (even years)§ or               or for students in the Criminal Justice major with a Forensic
    years)§                          Humanities elective (odd       Science concentration.
  CS 325 Data                        years)*                             This minor is offered jointly by the Department of
    Communications and             CS 360 Intelligent and           Mathematics and Computer Science in the School of Arts and
    Networking§                      Agent-Based Systems or         Sciences and the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice
                                     CS elective (even years)§ **   in the School of Education and Human Services.
  Health elective*
                                     or CS 350 Operating
  Humanities elective*                                              Minor Requirements
                                     Systems (odd years)§
  Social Sciences elective (300-                                        CS 110-111 Programming in Java I & II
                                   Humanities elective*
    level Economics                                                     CS 120 Personal Security in the Digital Age
    recommended)*                  Social Sciences elective*
                                                                        CS 230 Computer Organization
  Elective*                        Elective*
                                                                        CS 325 Data Communications and Networking
                                                                        CS 370 Computer Forensics
Year Four
                                                                        CJ 320 Cybercrime and Digital Terrorism
  Fall                             Spring
  CS 310 Software Engineering      CS 360 Intelligent and
                                                                    WEB DESIGN (UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
    (even years)§ or CS 320          Agent-Based Systems or
    Database Systems (odd            CS elective (even years)§ **   See page 73.
    years)§                          or CS 350 Operating
  ISY 335 Information                Systems (odd years)§
    Security§                      CS 400 Internship§
  Humanities elective*             Humanities elective*
  Writing elective*
  Elective
64                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     THE COMBINED B.S./M.S.                                             Suggested Degree Plan
     PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE                                        Students in this program will follow the degree plan for B.S. in
     This dual program allows advanced students to earn an M.S. in      Computer Science majors until year three, then complete the
     Computer Science (CS) and either a B.S. in Computer Science or     program as follows:
     a B.S. in any field with a minor in Computer Science. Those
                                                                        Year Three
     pursuing this program by earning the B.S. in Computer Science
     can complete the program in five years. Other students, depend-        Fall                             Spring
     ing upon the number of electives in their major, may take              CS 310 Software Engineering      CS 210 Structure of
     slightly longer.                                                         (even years)§ or CS 320          Programming Languages
                                                                              Database Systems (odd            (even years)§ or
     Admission Requirements: In addition to meeting                           years)§                          Humanities elective (odd
     Universitywide undergraduate admission requirements, the
                                                                            Two (2) Humanities                 years)*
     student must have:
                                                                              electives*                     Two (2) Humanities
     •   a declared major or minor in Computer Science
                                                                            Health elective*                   electives*
     •   90 credits (or acceptable transfer credits) completed toward
                                                                            Social Sciences elective (300-   Social Sciences elective*
         the undergraduate degree (typically by the end of the
         junior year);                                                        level Economics                Elective*
                                                                              recommended)*
     •   at least 18 credits of CS courses completed, including CS
         220 Data Structures and Algorithms;                                Elective*

     •   an overall GPA of 3.0;
                                                                        Year Four
     •   a GPA in Computer Science and Mathematics coursework
         of 3.5; and                                                        Fall                             Spring

     •   two recommendation letters (one of which must be from a            CS 310 Software Engineering      CS 500-level course require-
         Computer Science or Mathematics advisor).                            (even years)§ or CS 320          ments (6 credits)§ **
                                                                              Database Systems (odd          CS 400 Internship§
     Once admitted to the program, the student will take a mixture
                                                                              years)§
     of undergraduate and up to 12 credits of graduate courses for                                           Elective
     graduate credit in the senior year. The student is automatically       CS 500-level course require-
     admitted to the M.S. program at the end of his/her senior year           ments (6 credits)§ **
     after completing a total of 120 undergraduate credits while            Humanities elective*
     maintaining the required GPAs. The GRE and interview are               Writing elective*
     waived for entry into the M.S. in Computer Science program.
          Students complete their B.S./M.S. degrees by following one
                                                                        Year Five
     of two concentrations in their final three years: Computer
     Security and Telecommunications or Software Engineering.               Fall                             Spring
          Students who complete the traditional minor in Computer           CS 500/600-level degree          CS 500/600-level degree
     Science cannot take graduate Computer Science courses toward             requirements/                    requirements/concentra-
     the minor, However, students completing the Computer                     concentration electives          tion electives
     Science minor can still benefit from this program by virtue of           (12 credits)§ **                 (9 credits)§ **
     early admission to the graduate program and the ability to
                                                                        §
     take up to 12 graduate credits during their senior year.           Requirement for the major or degree
          The requirements for award of the M.S. in Computer            *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
     Science are identical to those stated for the traditional M.S.     **500-level course requirements and 500/600-level degree
     program.                                                           requirements/concentration electives: CS 500 Language Design,
                                                                        3 credits from CS 501A-H Programming courses (1-credit
     Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C- is
                                                                        courses), CS 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms, CS 610
     required in any course within the Computer Science major that
     serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered course.             Graduate Research Seminar in Computer Science, CS 698
                                                                        Master’s Project or CS 699 Master’s Thesis. Computer Security
                                                                        and Telecommunications concentration electives: CS 520 Data
                                            SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                65



Communications, CS 525 Computer Networking, CS 570                 FORENSIC COMPUTING
Computer Security 1, CS 571 Computer Security II, CS 620           (POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE)
Distributed Computing, CS 625 Cryptography, CS 670 Network         This program is for students who have previously earned a
Computer Defense. Software Engineering concentration               bachelor’s degree in a field other than Computer Science. This
electives: CS 530 Software Engineering, CS 535 Human               certificate is designed for individuals who want to prepare for
Engineering Issues in Computer System Design, CS 555 Theory        entry-level positions in forensic computing. The coursework is
and Application of Artificial Intelligence, CS 565 Data            inclusive of the material required by the International Society
Management Systems, CS 620 Distributed Computing                   of Forensic Computer Examiners for their Certified Computer
                                                                   Examiner certificate.
COMPUTER SCIENCE                                                   Admission Requirements: In addition to Universitywide
(POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE)                                   requirements for post-baccalaureate certificate admission (see
This program is for students who have previously earned a          page 19), the following is required:
bachelor’s degree in a field other than Computer Science. This     •     a demonstrated knowledge of high school algebra.
certificate is designed for individuals who want to prepare for          Students with insufficient mathematics preparation will
entry-level positions in software development. It also provides          be advised to take appropriate undergraduate courses to
the preparatory work necessary to enter Marymount’s Master               prepare for the certificate program.
of Science in Computer Science program. Students who begin
the certificate program in the fall semester can complete the      Certificate Requirements
program in one year.                                               23 credits
Admission Requirements: In addition to Universitywide                  CS 110-111 Programming in Java I & II
requirements for post-baccalaureate certificate admission (see
                                                                       CS 120 Personal Security in the Digital Age
page 19), the following is required:
                                                                       CS 230 Computer Organization
•     a demonstrated knowledge of high school algebra and
      trigonometry. Students with insufficient mathematics             CS 325 Data Communications and Networking
      preparation will be advised to take appropriate undergrad-       CS 370 Computer Forensics
      uate courses to prepare for the certificate program.             CJ 320 Cybercrime and Digital Terrorism

Course Waiver Policy: If a student can demonstrate a depth
of prior experience and/or education in MA 181, this course        COMPUTER SCIENCE (M.S.)
may be waived.                                                     This program offers advanced study to prepare students for
                                                                   leadership roles in the design and production of computer
Certificate Requirements                                           software. The program prepares students for careers in indus-
21 credits                                                         try, teaching, research, and for doctoral studies. Electives may
    CS 110-111 Programming in Java I & II                          be combined to provide a program tailored to the professional
                                                                   needs of the student. Concentrations in either Software
    CS 220 Data Structures and Algorithms
                                                                   Engineering or Computer Security and Telecommunications are
    CS 230 Computer Organization or CS 325 Data Communications     optional.
      and Networking                                                     Upon completion of the program, students should have
    MA 181 Calculus I                                              the knowledge to:
    MA 150 Discrete Mathematical Structures                        •     critically read and evaluate professional and trade litera-
                                                                         ture;
                                                                   •     independently conduct and evaluate research in computer
                                                                         science;
                                                                   •     analyze, design, and develop optimal solutions to real-
                                                                         world problems using advanced methods; and
                                                                   •     exercise leadership roles in the development and mainte-
                                                                         nance of computer systems.
66                                              SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Admission Requirements: In addition to the Universitywide              Software Engineering
     requirements for graduate admission (see page 19), applicants          CS 530 Software Engineering
     must demonstrate high promise by having earned a bachelor’s
     degree in Computer Science from an accredited institution              CS 535 Human Engineering Issues in Computer System Design
     with a grade point average of 2.75 or better on a 4.0 scale and a      CS 555 Theory and Applications of Artificial Intelligence
     satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE)            CS 565 Data Management Systems
     or a passing score on the Sun Java Programmer Certification
     exam. (See note on page 19.) Applicants must also interview            CS 620 Distributed Computing
     with a representative from the School of Arts and Sciences.
           Applicants who have an undergraduate degree in a field         COMPUTER SECURITY AND INFORMATION
     other than Computer Science will be considered for admission         ASSURANCE (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
     if they complete Marymount’s Post-baccalaureate Computer             This program will prepare students for this growing area of
     Science certificate, or if they complete the following prerequi-     interest, combining coursework in Computer Science and
     site coursework:                                                     Information Systems. The field is predicted to foster job
     •     Introduction to Programming (in C++, Java, or another          growth, especially in the Washington metropolitan area.
           object-oriented language)
     •     Data Structures and Algorithms                                 Admission Requirements: In addition to Universitywide
     •     Computer Organization/Hardware or Networking                   requirements for graduate certificate admission (see page
                                                                          19), the applicant should hold a bachelor’s degree with
     •     Differential and Integral Calculus                             coursework or experience in Computer Science,
     •     Discrete Mathematics                                           Information Systems, or a related field.
     Students not meeting these prerequisite undergraduate courses
     for admission to the program must complete undergraduate or          Course Waiver Policy: If a student can demonstrate a depth
     certificate courses to prepare for graduate work in Computer         of prior experience and/or education in CS 525 or ISY 515, these
     Science.                                                             courses may be waived.

     Degree Requirements                                                  Certificate Requirements
     33 credits                                                           15 credits
         CS 500 Language Design                                             CS 525 Computer Networking or ISY 515 Information Security
                                                                              and Telecommunications
         Three (3) credits from CS 501A-H Programming courses (1-credit
           courses)                                                         CS 570-571 Computer Security I & II
         CS 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms                           ISY 572 Information Assurance and Policy
         CS 525 Networking, CS 515 Advanced Computer Architecture, or       One (1) course from the following: ISY 573 Information Security
           CS 550 Principles of Operating Systems                             Management, CS 670 Computer Network Defense, or CS 625
                                                                              Cryptography
         CS 610 Graduate Research Seminar in Computer Science
         CS 698 Master’s Project or CS 699 Master’s Thesis
         12-15 credits in electives, chosen from any graduate course in
            Computer Science. Students have the option of choosing one
            of the following concentrations as a guide:
         Computer Security and Telecommunications
         CS 520 Data Communications
         CS 525 Computer Networking
         CS 570-571 Computer Security I & II
         CS 620 Distributed Computing
         CS 625 Cryptography
         CS 670 Computer Network Defense
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                       67



ENGLISH                                                              Year Two
                                                                         Fall                             Spring
ENGLISH (B.A.)                                                           EN 201 World Masterpieces:       EN 202 World Masterpieces:
The English major and minor provide preparation for entry                  The Ancient World§               The Middle Ages§
into graduate study, professional schools, and a wide variety of         EN 203 World Masterpieces:       EN 205 American Literature
career fields. English majors have the option of choosing a                Renaissance through              I§ or EN 206 American
track: Dramatic Arts, Literature, Writing, or one of several               Enlightenment§                   Literature II§
teaching licensure programs.                                             Humanities (Philosophy)          Humanities
      Through the literature and writing courses required for             elective*                        (Theology/Religious
the major, students develop valuable writing, critical reading,                                            Studies) elective*
                                                                         Social Sciences elective*
and research skills. The study of literature provides the tools of
                                                                         Major elective§ **               Social Sciences elective*
criticism, an awareness of major authors and issues in litera-
ture, and insight into how literary developments mirror and                                               Elective
influence major societal developments. The writing courses
teach the principles of clear and effective writing for a variety    Year Three
of purposes and audiences.                                               Fall                             Spring
      The internship gives students valuable practical experience        EN 301 The Writing Process*      Two (2) Major 300+-level
and affords them the opportunity to apply their skills in a                                                 electives§ **
                                                                         Two (2) Major 300+-level
professional context. In addition to the required internship,
                                                                           electives§ **                  Humanities 300/400-level
seniors must successfully complete a senior seminar research
                                                                         Humanities 300/400-level          elective*
paper.
      By choosing minors in such areas as Biology,                        elective*                       Social Sciences 300/400-
Communications, Business, Politics, and Psychology, students             Elective*                          level elective*
can prepare themselves to apply their skills in the professional                                          Elective*
world while at the same time obtaining a broad liberal arts
education from which to draw for a lifetime.                         Year Four
      Students may also choose a double major in
                                                                         Fall                             Spring
Communications and English. This major calls for the comple-
                                                                                              §
tion of 30 credits in Communications and 30 credits in English.          EN 400 Internship                EN 490 Major Author(s)§
Students interested in the requirements for a double major in            EN 424 Senior Seminar§           Major 300+-level elective§ **
Communications and English should confer with advisors in                Two (2) electives                Three (3) electives
each area.
                                                                     §
Suggested Degree Plan                                                Requirement for the major
                                                                     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
Year One
                                                                     **Students in the Dramatic Arts or Writing tracks should fulfill
  Fall                               Spring                          their concentration requirements through the elective courses
  EN 101 Composition I*              EN 102 Composition II*          in the major. Consult an advisor for specific requirements.
  HI 203 European History I*         EN 200 Approaches to
    or HI 204 European                 Literary Study§               ENGLISH WITH SECONDARY-LEVEL TEACHING
    History II*                      FA 201 History of Art I* or     LICENSURE (B.A. IN ENGLISH)
  ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                  FA 202 History of Art II*     This program of study allows students to complete a baccalau-
    Introduction to the Social       Science elective*               reate degree in English and also be licensed to teach secondary
    Sciences*                                                        English at the end of four years. Students pursuing licensure in
                                     Elective
  Health elective*                                                   this manner complete all requirements necessary for Virginia
  Mathematics elective*
                                                                     licensure, including field experience and student teaching.

  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                                                     Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
                                                                     admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for
                                                                     student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-
                                                                     sion requirements and procedures.
68                                            SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses          Year Four
     specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
                                                                              Fall                             Spring
     sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of
                                                                                                      §
     Education and Human Services for further information.                    EN 424 Senior Seminar            EN 490 Major Authors§

     Suggested Degree Plan                                                    EN 554 Applied Grammar:          ED 360S Student Teaching§
                                                                                Syntactic Structures§          Two (2) electives*
     Year One                                                                 Literature 300+-level
        Fall                              Spring                                 elective§
        EN 101 Composition I*             EN 102 Composition II*              Two (2) electives
        HI 203 European History I*        EN 200 Approaches to            §
                                                                          Requirement for the major
          or HI 204 European                Literary Study§
          History II*                                                     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                          COM 204 Oral
        ECO/POL/SOC 100                     Interpretation
          Introduction to the Social                                      ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE WITH
                                          Humanities (Philosophy)
          Sciences*                                                       K-12 TEACHING LICENSURE (B.A. IN ENGLISH)
                                           elective*
        Health elective*                                                  This program allows students to complete a baccalaureate
                                          Science elective*
                                                                          degree in English and also be licensed to teach English as a
        Mathematics elective*
                                                                          Second Language (ESL) at the end of four years. Students
        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                          pursuing licensure in this manner complete all requirements
                                                                          necessary for Virginia licensure, including field experience and
     Year Two                                                             student teaching.
        Fall                              Spring                          Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
        EN 201 World Masterpieces:        EN 202 World Masterpieces:      admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for
          The Ancient World§ *              The Middle Ages§ *            student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-
                                                                          sion requirements and procedures.
        EN 203 World Masterpieces:        EN 205 American Literature
          Renaissance through               I§ or EN 206 American         Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses
          Enlightenment§                    Literature II§                specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
                                                                          sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of
        Humanities                        EN 211 Principles of
                                                                          Education and Human Services for further information.
         (Theology/Religious                Language
         Studies) elective*                                               Suggested Degree Plan
                                          ED 245S Educational
        Literature elective§                Foundations for               Year One
        Social Sciences elective*           Secondary Teachers
                                                                              Fall                             Spring
                                          PSY 312 Adolescent
                                                                              EN 101 Composition I*            EN 102 Composition II*
                                            Psychology*
                                                                              POL/ECO 100 Introduction         EN 200 Approaches to
                                                                                to the Social Sciences*          Literary Study§
     Year Three
                                                                              HI 203 European History I*       Humanities (Philosophy)
        Fall                              Spring
                                                                                or HI 204 European              elective*
        EN 301 The Writing Process*       Literature 300+-level                 History II*                    Foreign Language§
        Two (2) Literature 300+-level        elective§
                                                                              Mathematics elective*            Science elective*
          electives§                      Humanities 300/400-level
                                                                              Foreign Language§
        ED 327S Curriculum Design:         elective*
                                                                              SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
          Secondary Education             ED 337 Reading in the
        PSY 341 Psychology of               Content Areas
          Individuals with                EN 385 Approaches to
          Exceptionalities*                 Secondary Teaching
                                          Elective
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                     69



Year Two                                                           ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
    Fall                             Spring                        (CERTIFICATE)

    EN 201 World Masterpieces:       EN 202 World Masterpieces:    Admission Requirements: Open to English majors. Non-
      The Ancient World§ *             The Middle Ages§ *          English majors may earn this certificate if they:
    EN 203 World Masterpieces:       EN 205 American Literature    •     apply to the department after taking 6 credits in courses
      Renaissance through              I§ or EN 206 American             required for the certificate;
      Enlightenment§                   Literature II§              •     have the recommendation of a language/linguistics faculty
    SOC 201 Cultural                 EN 211 Principles of                member;
      Anthropology§ *                  Language                    •     submit a 5- to 7-page writing sample, a one-page statement
    COM 101 Public Speaking or  §
                                     ED 245S Educational                 of purpose, and a current transcript; and
      COM 204 Oral                     Foundations for             •     earn a B average in the certificate courses.
      Interpretation§                  Secondary Teachers#
                                                                   Students seeking ESL certification may also enroll in a 3-6 credit
    Health elective*                 PSY 210 Human Growth          EN 400 Internship to develop their skills as ESL teachers.
                                       and Development*
                                                                   Certificate Requirements
Year Three                                                         18 credits
    Fall                             Spring                            EN 211 Principles of Language or EN 550 General Linguistics
    EN 301 The Writing Process*      EN 280 Perspectives on            EN 280 Perspectives on Language Acquisition
    COM 301 Intercultural              Language Acquisition§           EN 552 Applied Phonology
      Communication§                 EN 361 American                   EN 554 Applied Grammar: Syntactic Structures
    ED 463 Curriculum and              Multicultural Literature§
                                                                       ED 453 Methods and Strategies for TESL
      Assessment in ESL              ED 310 Reading and the
                                                                       COM 301 Intercultural Communication or ED 465 Literature and
    PSY 341 Psychology of              Language Arts or ED 337
                                                                         Language Arts Applications for Multicultural Education
      Individuals with                 Reading in the Content
      Exceptionalities*                Areas
                                                                   TEACHING LICENSURE
    Humanities                       EN 552 Applied Phonology§
                                                                   ADDITIONAL ENDORSEMENT
     (Theology/Religious             ED 453 Methods and
     Studies) elective*                Strategies for TESL         English as a Second Language
                                                                   English majors who have or will have completed a licensure
                                                                   program and seek additional licensure in ESL must take:
Year Four                                                              Six (6) credits of foreign language
    Fall                             Spring                            ED 563 ESL/ESP: Curricula, Materials, and Tests or ED 463
    Literature 300+-level            EN 490 Major Author(s)   §          Curriculum and Assessment in TESL
       elective§                     ED 360 Student Teaching§          ED 565 Cross-cultural Education and the Language Arts
                            §
    EN 424 Senior Seminar            Two (2) electives*                English Linguistics 500-level elective
    EN 554 Applied Grammar:                                            ED 570D Student Teaching: ESOL Students
      Syntactic Structures
    Humanities elective*                                           ENGLISH (MINOR)
    Elective
                                                                   Minor Requirements
§
Requirement for the major                                              EN 200 Approaches to Literary Study
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.             Six (6) credits from EN 201-204 World Masterpieces
#Students interested in teaching at the elementary level (grades       12 credits in English courses (excluding EN 101 and 102, but
K-6) should see an Education advisor during their freshman                including 6 credits from EN courses numbered 300 or above)
year.
70                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     FASHION                                                            Year Three
                                                                            Fall                              Spring
     FASHION DESIGN (B.A.)                                                  AA 272 Textile Design §
                                                                                                              AA 320 Fashion Research
     The Fashion Design major prepares students for positions in            AA 385 Apparel Design II§           and Communication*
     the fashion industry related to the roles of an assistant              Humanities 300/400-level          AA 361 Survey of Fashion§
     designer.                                                               elective*                        AA 365 Fashion
          Students in Fashion Design participate in an annual juried                                            Illustration II§
                                                                            ECO 210 Microeconomics*
     fashion show featuring garments they have designed and
                                                                            Social Sciences elective*         AA 415 Apparel Design III§
     constructed. An opportunity to cultivate professional skills can
     be developed through participation in the Marymount Fashion                                              Humanities elective*
     Club and through affiliations with the Baltimore-Washington,
     DC, Fashion Group International, Inc.                              Year Four
          Students are prepared to work for apparel manufacturers           Fall                              Spring
     or in departments of product development. Advanced students
                                                                            AA 400 Internship§                AA 420 Advanced Problems
     produce a line of fashions and a portfolio, and all senior
                                                                            AA 407 Product                      in Fashion Design II§
     students are expected to complete an off-campus internship
     with a cooperating employer. The program culminates in a                 Development§                    AA 423 Senior Fashion
     noted designer’s professional evaluation of the student’s origi-       AA 418 Advanced Problems            Design Portfolio§
     nal designs.                                                             in Fashion Design I§            Three (3) electives*
                                                                            Social Sciences 300/400-
     Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C is
     required in any course within the Fashion Design major that              level elective*
     serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered course.             §
                                                                        Requirement for the major
     Suggested Degree Plan                                              *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.

     Year One                                                           FASHION DESIGN (MINOR)
       Fall                             Spring
                                                                        Minor Requirements
       AA 250 Clothing                  AA 270 Clothing Analysis§
         Construction§                                                      21 credits from the following: AA 250 Clothing Construction, AA
                                        FA 104 Design II§
                                                                               265 Fashion Illustration I, AA 270 Clothing Analysis, AA 272
       FA 103 Design I§                 EN 102 Composition II*                 Textile Design I, AA 350 Apparel Design I, AA 365 Fashion
       FA 105 Drawing I§                ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                    Illustration I, AA 370 Tailored Garment Structures, AA 372
       EN 101 Composition I*              Introduction to the Social           Textile Design II, AA 385 Apparel Design II, AA 407 Product
       Mathematics elective*              Sciences*                            Development, AA 415 Apparel Design III, AA 418/420
                                        Humanities elective*                   Advanced Problems in Fashion Design I & II, AA 423 Senior
       SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                                                               Fashion Design Portfolio

     Year Two
                                                                        FASHION MERCHANDISING (B.A.)
       Fall                             Spring
                                                                        The major in Fashion Merchandising focuses on Business and
       AA 265 Fashion                   AA 274 Fashion Industry         Applied Arts courses. Graduates attain positions such as depart-
         Illustration I§                  and Its Promotion§            ment manager, assistant manager, assistant buyer, and fashion
       AA 350 Apparel Design I§         AA 370 Tailored Garment         events coordinator. Liberal Arts Core requirements sharpen
                               §
       FA 201 History of Art I *          Structures§                   communication and organization skills; ample provision for
                                        FA 202 History of Art II§ *     elective choices permits a variety of minors. Many students
       AA 151 Textiles§
                                                                        choose a minor in Business Administration, Communications,
       Science elective*                Humanities elective*
                                                                        or Fashion Design.
                                        Health elective*                     The required internship in the senior year brings students
                                                                        valuable experience with DC-area department stores, retail
                                                                        shops, and clothing manufacturers and distributors.
                                      SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                         71



     Students in Fashion Merchandising participate in the         Year Three
Marymount Fashion Club, in activities sponsored by the
                                                                      Fall                               Spring
Washington Fashion Group, Inc., and in fashion shows on and
off campus.                                                           MKT 301 Principles of              AA 320 Fashion Research
     There is an opportunity to study product development              Marketing§                          and Communication§ *
related to prominent businesses, such as Nordstrom and L.L.           AA 405 Fashion in the              AA 381 Buying Fashion
Bean.                                                                   Global Marketplace§                Apparel§
     Fashion Merchandising students plan and produce the              AA 407 Product                     AA 414 Fashion Show
annual student fashion show.                                            Development§                       Production§
     Seniors complete a seminar in which merchandising
                                                                      Humanities elective*               MKT 402 Retailing II§
problems are solved using the case method. The case analysis is
evaluated by representatives from the industry.                       Social Sciences 300/400-           Humanities 300/400-level
                                                                        level elective*                   elective*
Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                  Year Four
Year One
                                                                      Fall                               Spring
  Fall                             Spring
                                                                      AA 422 Senior Seminar in           AA 400 Internship§
  AA 151 Textiles                  AA 274 Fashion Industry
                                                                        Fashion Merchandising§           Four (4) electives*
  EN 101 Composition I*              and Its Promotion§
                                                                      Three (3) electives
  Health elective*                 EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                  §
  Mathematics elective*            Two (2) Humanities             Requirement for the major
                                     electives*                   *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
  ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100
    Introduction to the Social     Social Sciences elective*
    Sciences*                                                     FASHION MERCHANDISING (MINOR)
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                        Minor Requirements
                                                                      AA 361 Survey of Fashion
Year Two
                                                                      AA 381 Buying Fashion Apparel
  Fall                             Spring
                                                                      15 additional credits from the following: AA 151 Textiles, AA 273
  AA 250 Clothing                  AA 270 Clothing Analysis§             Visual Merchandising, AA 274 Fashion Industry and Its
    Construction§                  AA 361 Survey of Fashion§             Promotion, AA 320 Fashion Research and Communication,
  AA 273 Visual                    Two (2) Humanities                    AA 405 Fashion in the Global Marketplace, AA 407 Product
    Merchandising§                   electives*                          Development, AA 410 Clothing Selection and Behavior, AA 412
  MKT 308 Retailing I§                                                   The Great Designers, AA 414 Fashion Show Production, MKT
                                   Science elective*
                                                                         301 Principles of Marketing, MKT 308 Retailing I
  Humanities elective*
  ECO 210 Principles of
                                                                  FOREIGN LANGUAGES
    Microeconomics*
                                                                  Foreign language courses in French, German, and Spanish are
                                                                  offered as electives. These courses also fulfill language require-
                                                                  ments for students seeking ESL certification. The study of
                                                                  foreign language is both an excellent means for understanding
                                                                  other people and cultures and a vital preparation for a growing
                                                                  number of career opportunities in business, industry, and
                                                                  government service.
                                                                       Marymount students wishing to continue language study
                                                                  or to study additional languages may do so through
                                                                  Marymount’s membership in The Consortium of Universities
                                                                  of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Information on schedul-
72                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     ing and registering for courses offered by consortium member       Suggested Degree Plan
     universities is available from the Marymount Registrar’s Office.
                                                                        Year One
     For further information concerning Washington consortium
     guidelines see pages 52.                                             Fall                          Spring
                                                                                          §
                                                                          FA 103 Design I               FA 105 Drawing I§
     GRAPHIC AND WEB DESIGN                                               GD 101 Software Lab I:        GD 104: Software Lab IV:
                                                                            Photoshop§                    Dreamweaver§
     GRAPHIC DESIGN (B.A.)                                                GD 102 Software Lab II:       GD 200 Desktop Publishing§
                                                                            Illustrator§                EN 102 Composition II*
     This major prepares students for entry-level positions in design
     organizations. Graphic Design graduates find employment in a         GD 103 Software Lab III:      Science elective*
     variety of settings including the publication and printing             Flash§
                                                                                                        Elective*
     industries; advertising and marketing organizations; and             EN 101 Composition I*
     graphic design departments of corporations, government               Health elective*
     agencies, and retailers. The major focus is on skill development
                                                                          Mathematics elective*
     in basic design techniques and technology and their graphic
     application. Students in this major may choose an emphasis in        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
     Visual Communications (a Graphic Design major combined
     with a Communications minor) or Web Design (a Graphic              Year Two
     Design major with a Web Design certificate).
                                                                          Fall                          Spring
          The School also offers minors in Graphic Design and in
     Web Design.                                                          GD 308 Web Design§            GD 203 Photography:
          Those majoring in Graphic Design will participate in a          GD 202 Illustration I§          Digital Imaging§
     professional portfolio review during the senior year. The            FA 201 History of Art I*      GD 255 Typography I§
     requirements of the major are deliberately flexible to accom-                                      FA 202 History of Art II*
                                                                          COM 300 Report Writing*
     modate a variety of options within the discipline. Graphic
                                                                          Elective (Visual              Elective (Visual
     Design majors are urged to consider a minor in another field.
                                                                             Communications students:      Communications students:
     Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C is                     COM 100 Media                 COM 101 Public Speaking§;
     required in any course within the Graphic Design major that             Communications§)              Web Design students: CS 106
     serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered course.                                                Programming on the
                                                                                                           Web§)
     Program Requirement: Each student entering the sophomore-                                          ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100
     level Graphic Design curriculum will be required to have a per-
                                                                                                          Introduction to the Social
     sonal computer and the software supported by the Graphic
                                                                                                          Sciences*
     Design program. Recommended computer specifications are
     available from an advisor or by visiting the Communications
     and Graphic Design Department Web site.
                                            SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                    73



Year Three                                                               WEB DESIGN (MINOR)
    Fall                                Spring                           Minor Requirements
                             §
    GD 265 Typography II                GD 360 Graphic Design              CS 106 Programming on the Web
    Elective (Visual                      Studio§
                                                                           CS 110-111 Programming in Java I & II
       Communications students:         MKT 301 Principles of
                                                                           GD 101 Software Lab: Photoshop or elective**
       COM 303 Video                     Marketing§
       Production or COM 209                                               GD 104 Software Lab IV: Dreamweaver or elective**
                                        Humanities elective*
       Journalism I§; Web Design                                           GD 308 Web Design
                                        Social Sciences 300/400-
       students: CS 110                                                    GD 309 Web Multimedia Design
                                          level elective*
       Programming I in Java§ or
                                        Elective (Visual                   Three (3) more credits in Computer Science or Graphic Design
       GD 303 Video
       Production§)                        Communications students:      **See electives noted under Undergraduate Certificate below.
                                           COM 305 Journalism II§;
    Humanities (English
                                           Web Design students: GD 309   WEB DESIGN (UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
     Literature) elective*
                                           Web Multimedia Design§)
    Humanities elective*                                                 This certificate prepares students to create and maintain Web
                                                                         sites. Students study relevant computer programming and
    Elective*
                                                                         software applications.

                                                                         Certificate Requirements
Year Four
                                                                         22 credits
    Fall                                Spring
                                                                           CS 106 Programming on the Web
    GD 405 Senior Portfolio§            GD 400 Internship§
                                                                           CS 110-111 Programming in Java I & II
    Humanities (History)                MKT 319 Advertising and
     elective*                           Integrated Marketing              GD 101 Software Lab I: Imaging or elective**
    Social Sciences elective*            Communications§                   GD 104 Software Lab IV: Web Design or elective**
    Elective (Visual                    Social Sciences elective*          GD 308 Web Design
       Communications students:         Elective (Visual                   GD 309 Web Multimedia Design
       COM 316 Broadcast                  Communications students:         Three (3) more credits in Computer Science or Graphic Design
       Journalism§ or COM 317             COM 315 Writing for the
                                                                         **Students can place out of these courses and substitute other
       Editing and the Editorial          New Media§; Web Design
                                                                         CS and GD courses. The following courses are also relevant to
       Process§; Web Design               students: see an advisor
                                                                         Web design and can be used as electives: CS 150 The UNIX
       students: CS 111                   for CS course options§)
                                                                         Operating System, CS 170 Local Area Networks, CS 220 Data
       Programming II in Java§)
                                                                         Structures and Algorithms, CS 310 Software Engineering, CS
§
Requirement for the major or track                                       320 Database Systems, CS 360 Artificial Intelligence, CS 501G
                                                                         ASP or CS 501H Cold Fusion, GD 102 Software Lab II:
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                         Illustration, GD 202 Illustration I, GD 203 Digital Imaging, GD
                                                                         303 Video Production, GD 433 Research
GRAPHIC DESIGN (MINOR)

Minor Requirements
    GD 101, 102, 104 Software Labs I, II, & IV
    GD 200 Desktop Publishing or GD 256 Typography II
    GD 202 Illustration I
    GD 203 Photography: Digital Imaging
    Nine (9) additional credits in Graphic Design courses
74                                          SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     HISTORY                                                             Year Two
                                                                             Fall                             Spring
     HISTORY (B.A.)                                                          HI 210 History of the U.S.       HI 211 History of the U.S.
     Resources for the study of history in the Washington area are             to 1877§                         since 1877§
     extraordinary, and many students find opportunities to witness          HI 250 Research and              History elective§
     first hand history-making events in this capital city.                    Writing*                       Humanities (Philosophy)
           The study of history aims to improve an understanding of          Social Sciences elective*         elective*
     the modern world through a perspective that enables evalua-
                                                                             Humanities                       Social Sciences (Politics)
     tion of both its mature and its underdeveloped conditions. The
                                                                              (Theology/Religious               elective*
     History program at Marymount focuses primarily on the areas
                                                                              Studies) elective*              Science elective*
     of European and American history. Most freshmen are encour-
     aged to complete elementary survey courses in Western                   Humanities (English 200-
     civilization or American history.                                        level) elective*
           The History major — traditionally a preparation for careers
     in law, business, teaching, and research — provides courses         Year Three
     essential to the study of the European and American traditions.         Fall                             Spring
     The requirements of the major are deliberately flexible to
                                                                             Two (2) History 300/400-         Two (2) History 300/400-
     accommodate a variety of options within the discipline and
                                                                               level courses§                   level courses§
     with other fields of study.
           History majors are urged to consider a minor concentra-           Humanities elective*             Health elective*
     tion in another discipline.                                             Social Sciences (Economics)      Two (2) electives*
           The School also offers minors in History and Public                 300/400-level course*
     History, as well as a secondary-level teaching licensure program.       Elective
     Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                         Year Four
     Year One                                                                Fall                             Spring
       Fall                              Spring                              Two (2) History 300/400-         HI 400 Internship§
       HI 203 European History I§        HI 204 European History II§           level courses§                 HI 420 Senior Seminar§
       EN 101 Composition I*             EN 102 Composition II*              Three (3) electives              History 300/400-level
       HU 201 The Western                HU 202 The Western                                                     course§
        Tradition I§                      Tradition II§                                                       Elective
       Mathematics elective*             ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100             §
                                                                         Requirement for the major
       Elective                            Introduction to the Social
                                                                         *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                           Sciences*
       SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                         Elective
                                         SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                       75



HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE WITH SECONDARY-                               Year Three
LEVEL TEACHING LICENSURE (B.A. IN HISTORY)                               Fall                               Spring
This program of study allows students to complete a baccalau-            HI 322 Colonial and                HI 385 Approaches to
reate degree in History and also be licensed to teach secondary            Revolutionary America§             Teaching Secondary
History and Social Science at the end of four years. Students                                                 History and Social
                                                                         Non-Western History
pursuing licensure in this manner complete all requirements                                                   Sciences
                                                                           elective§
necessary for Virginia licensure, including field experiences and
                                                                         SOC 201 Cultural                   ED 337 Reading in the
student teaching.
                                                                           Anthropology*                      Content Areas
Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for                 ED 327S Curriculum Design:         RST 211 World Religions
student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-              Secondary Education              Humanities (English
sion requirements and procedures.                                        GEO 201 Introduction to             Literature) elective*
Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses                Geography                        Health elective*
specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of         Year Four
Education and Human Services for further information.                    Fall                               Spring
Suggested Degree Plan                                                    Three (3) History electives   §
                                                                                                            ED 360S Student Teaching§
Year One                                                                 RST 320 Religions of               HI 420 Senior Seminar§
   Fall                              Spring                                America*                         History 300-level elective§
   HI 203 European History I§ *      HI 204 European                     PSY 341 Psychology of
                                       History II§ *                       Individuals with
   EN 101 Composition I*
                                                                           Exceptionalities
   HU 201 The Western                EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                         Humanities (Philosophy)
    Tradition I§ *                   HU 202 The Western
                                                                          elective*
   PSY 100 Introduction to the        Tradition II§
     Social Sciences*                POL 204 American                §
                                                                     Requirement for the major
   Mathematics elective*               Government§
                                                                     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
   SEM 101 Freshman Seminar          BIO 110 Introduction to
                                       Environmental Science*
                                                                     HISTORY (MINOR)

Year Two                                                             Minor Requirements
   Fall                              Spring                              HI 203-204 European History I & II or HI 210-211 History of the
   HI 250 Research and               ECO 210 Principles of                 United States to 1877 and History of the United States since
     Writing*                          Microeconomics                      1877

   ECO 199 Principles of             POL 225 Comparative                 15 additional credits in History courses, 9 of which must be
     Macroeconomics*                   Government                           from courses numbered 300 or above

   PSY 312 Adolescent                HI 211 History of the U.S.
     Psychology*                       since 1877§                   PUBLIC HISTORY (MINOR)

   HI 210 American History I         History 300-level elective§     The Public History minor is an innovative, interdisciplinary
                                                                     track providing the kinds of skills and information associated
   POL 220 International             ED 245S Educational
                                                                     with careers in museums, historical societies, national parks,
     Relations                         Foundations for
                                                                     corporate archives, and heritage tourism industries.
                                       Secondary Teachers
                                                                     Capitalizing upon Marymount’s proximity to some of the
                                                                     nation’s premier cultural and historical institutions, it
                                                                     combines hands-on experience with traditional coursework.
76                                             SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Minor Requirements                                                   earn a master’s degree. Or an accountant seeking a few techni-
       HI 295 Introduction to Public History                              cal courses may combine these with the enrichment of the
                                                                          Humanities degree requirements.
       15 credits (minimum) from the following: COM/GD 303-304
                                                                                An insight into the interrelationship of ideas from the
          Video Production I & II; ID 454 Historic Preservation; ID 452
                                                                          humanities, the history of the sciences, and the value of the
          American Interiors and Furnishings; ID 556 Historic
                                                                          arts serves not only to develop personal intellectual growth,
          Research, Documentation, and Design; GD 104 Software Lab
                                                                          but also sharpens judgment in professional, civic, and interper-
          IV: Web Design; GD 200 Desktop Publishing. Working in
                                                                          sonal decision making.
          consultation with the History faculty, students may also take
                                                                                As part of the program, students will complete
          relevant courses through the consortium and may arrange
                                                                          Humanities Seminars, Focus Courses, and a Master’s Project.
          internships at public history agencies.
                                                                                Humanities Seminars examine the history and develop-
     NOTE: HI 295 Introduction to Public History is to be taken           ment of Western ideas and provide a basis for discussing
     before other courses in the program.                                 fundamental questions and ideas that have shaped the past
     To ensure adequate contextual grounding, non-History majors          and continue in the present. The principal purpose of the
     must also take either the European History (HI 203-204) or U.S.      seminar requirement is to establish a sense of the historical
     History (HI 210-211) sequence.                                       foundation of the humanities and to introduce the methodol-
                                                                          ogy of various disciplines. In addition, the seminars encourage
     HUMANITIES                                                           a sharpening of communication skills through discussion of
                                                                          major ideas and written assignments. The scope of a seminar
     Marymount offers opportunities at the undergraduate and              course fits one of three divisions of the history of Western
     graduate level for the study of Humanities.                          ideas: classical/medieval; 15th century through 18th century; or
         At the undergraduate level, Humanities is an interdiscipli-      19th century through 21st century.
     nary concentration in the Liberal Studies major. At the                    Focus Courses emphasize an interdisciplinary approach to
     graduate level, both a Master of Arts and an opportunity to          the humanist ideas and stress the interrelationships of the
     earn teaching licensure in Secondary English are available.          disciplines involved. Focus Courses are distinguished from the
                                                                          seminars in that they may center upon either a limited area of
     HUMANITIES                                                           concentration or a particular application of ideas to an inter-
     (UNDERGRADUATE CONCENTRATION)                                        pretation of the world in which we live. Students should refer
     Students may choose the Humanities as one of their Major             to graduate courses in English for additional options.
     Sequences in the Liberal Studies major. The concentration                  The Master’s Project is an independent, interdisciplinary
     applies resources, theories, and methodologies from six human-       report that demonstrates the student’s ability to integrate materi-
     ities disciplines and prepares students to address issues of         als from various disciplines, support independent conclusions, and
     values, ethics, and cultural enrichment. Students choosing this      communicate the results in writing. Unlike the traditional master’s
     concentration are well prepared for Marymount’s Master of            thesis, which emphasizes original research and the use of primary
     Arts in Humanities graduate degree program or other graduate         sources within a single discipline, the Master’s Project must
     programs in humanities disciplines.                                  demonstrate an ability to relate material from at least two fields of
           See Liberal Studies major (page 81).                           study. Examples of interdisciplinary projects might be a study of
                                                                          the influence of a technological problem on public policy, drawing
                                                                          on materials in science, sociology, and ethics; or an examination of
     HUMANITIES (M.A.)
                                                                          special problems in the aging process based upon history, psychol-
     This program responds to a need of many men and women,               ogy, and literature.
     already trained in a specialized field, for intellectual enrich-           An individual advisory committee is responsible for
     ment. The program attracts both students who seek to deepen          guiding the student through each phase of the Master’s Project.
     their undergraduate study in the humanities and students who         This includes the approval of both an initial proposal and the
     have developed an interest in the humanities while pursuing a        final product. A formal initial proposal must be approved
     career in another field.                                             before a student begins work on a project. The proposal must
          The curriculum permits students to shape interdiscipli-         include a statement and discussion of purpose, the methodol-
     nary programs that ensure broad education while providing for        ogy to be used, and a projection of the final product.
     the pursuit of specialized work. For example, the professional
     teacher may seek state endorsement in a special area as well as
                                           SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                     77



Admission Requirements: In addition to the Universitywide             Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
requirements for graduate admission (see page 19), the appli-         admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for
cant must present the following:                                      student teaching. See graduate Education section beginning on
•     official transcripts (must be in sealed envelopes that bear     page 112 for admission requirements and procedures.
      the registrar’s signature and/or seal) of all postsecondary
      education reflecting a grade point average of 3.0 or better     Degree Requirements
      on a 4.0 scale;                                                 36 credits
•     two years of successful career experience as evidenced by         Three (3) Humanities Seminars
      two letters of recommendation from employers or educators;        Three (3) Focus Courses
•     an autobiographical essay, prepared by the applicant,             EN 595 Master’s Project
      describing past educational and career experiences and            ED 537 Reading Across the Curriculum: Secondary
      stating the benefits expected from participation in the
                                                                        ED 568 Teaching English and Social Studies in the
      graduate Humanities program; and
                                                                          Middle/Secondary School
•     an interview with an official representative of the School
                                                                        ED 526 Cross-Cultural/International Curricula or ED 565 Cross-
      of Arts and Sciences.
                                                                          cultural Education and the Language Arts
NOTE: Applicants who wish to pursue the secondary teaching
                                                                        ED 570B Student Teaching: Secondary
licensure track must also submit GRE and Praxis or SAT scores.
(See note on page 19.)                                                  (Additional prerequisite Education courses may be needed to
                                                                          meet state licensure requirements. See a Secondary Education
Nondegree Admission: Students wishing to enroll in limited                advisor in the School of Education and Human Services.)
coursework may do so as nondegree students. A nondegree stu-
dent may apply for degree candidacy upon successful comple-
tion of one Humanities Seminar or contemporary Focus                  INTERIOR DESIGN
Course and fulfillment of all admission requirements.
                                                                      INTERIOR DESIGN (B.A.)
Transfer Credit: A maximum of 6 semester credits of trans-
                                                                      The mission of the M. Wilhelmina Boldt Interior Design under-
ferred graduate credits may be applied toward the degree, if
approved by the School dean and the registrar.                        graduate program is to prepare students for careers as creative,
                                                                      ethically responsible, proficient interior designers. The curricu-
Degree Requirements                                                   lum combines the Liberal Arts Core requirements with
                                                                      professionally directed coursework to develop practitioners
30 credits
                                                                      with a commitment to critical thinking, lifelong learning, and
    Three (3) Humanities Seminars                                     concern for the well-being of people and environment.
    Two (2) Focus Courses                                             Graduates enter practice as entry-level interior designers for
    EN 595 Master’s Project (3 credits)                               both residential and commercial interior spaces possessing a
                                                                      strong theoretical and practical knowledge in design, space
    12 elective credits chosen from graduate courses offered by the
                                                                      planning, and programming.
       Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, and
                                                                           Graduates may pursue careers with interior design firms,
       Education and Human Services.
                                                                      architectural firms, corporate facilities, and government
                                                                      agencies. The program is accredited by the Council for Interior
HUMANITIES: TEACHING LICENSURE IN                                     Design Accreditation (CIDA).
SECONDARY ENGLISH (M.A.)                                                   Internships are available during the junior and senior
This program is available to students who have earned the             years with nationally recognized architectural and design
equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in English. The program             firms, furniture and interior retailers, contract designers, and
provides continued intellectual growth in literature and related      other organizations utilizing design consultants. The program
fields, as well as the professional preparation for licensure and     offers exhibitions of student and professional work, takes
a career in teaching secondary school English.                        students on field trips, and taps the resources of the
                                                                      Washington, DC, design community.
                                                                           Interior Design majors are encouraged to join the student
                                                                      chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID).
78                                           SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


           A Professional Advisory Board reviews the curriculum,        Year Two
     recommends improvements, and identifies career possibilities.
                                                                            Fall                                    Spring
     Professional members from the metropolitan area provide
                                                                                                        §
     expertise and direction to students. Its members are Kazuko            ID 201 Interior Design I                ID 202 Interior Design II§
     Bach, ASID, IDEC, Interior Designer, Kazuko Sawaji Interiors;          ID 212 Architectural                    ID 214 Architectural
     Candice Kling, IES, IALD, Lighting Designer, C. M. Kling &               Graphics II§                            Graphics III§
     Associates, Inc.; Andrew Monje Jr., ASID, IDEC, Educator               FA 201 History of Art I*                ID 231 Textiles and Finish
     (retired), Marymount University; Mary Petrino; Janet Rankin,                                                     Materials§
                                                                            Humanities elective*
     Lehman-Smith + McLeish; Thea Scott-Fundling, Marymount
                                                                            Social Sciences elective*               FA 202 History of Art II*
     faculty liaison; Linda Sorrento, ASID, IIDA; and Jessica Taylor,
     Gensler.                                                                                                       Science elective*

     Nondegree Admission: Only interior design practitioners and
                                                                        Year Three
     students from other accredited colleges or universities may
     take courses on a nondegree basis. Enrollment is limited to two        Fall                                    Spring
                                                                                                                §
     courses.                                                               ID 303 Interior Design III              ID 304 Interior Design IV§
                                                                            ID 313 Computer-aided                   ID 333 Lighting Design§
     Program Requirement: Each student entering the junior-level
                                                                              Drafting and Design§                  ID 351 History of
     Interior Design curriculum is required to have a laptop com-
     puter. State-of-the-art electronic studios allow students to           ID 332 Building Technology§               Interiors II§
     access the Internet and software on Marymount’s server.                ID 350 History of                       Humanities elective*
                                                                              Interiors I§                          Elective*
     Residency Requirement: Students may transfer credits from
                                                                            Writing elective*
     an accredited school, but must complete a minimum of 36
     credits at Marymount. These credits must include ID 405
     Interior Design V, ID 406 Interior Design VI, and ID 400           Year Four
     Internship.
                                                                            Fall                                    Spring
                                                                                                            §
     Suggested Degree Plan                                                  ID 405 Interior Design V                ID 400 Internship§
                                                                            ID 434 Business Procedures§             ID 406 Interior Design VI§
     Year One
                                                                            ID elective§                            Humanities elective*
       Fall                              Spring
                                                                            Social Sciences elective*               Social Sciences 300/400-
       ID 101 Introduction to            ID 111 Architectural
                                                                            Elective*                                 level course*
         Interior Design§                  Graphics I§
                                                                        §
       FA 103 Design I§                  FA 104 Design II§              Requirement for the major
       FA 105 Drawing I§                 EN 102 Composition II*         *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
       EN 101 Composition I*             ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100
       Health elective*                    Introduction to the Social   INTERIOR DESIGN (M.A.)
                                           Sciences*                    The M. Wilhelmina Boldt Interior Design Program offers two
       Mathematics elective*
                                         Humanities elective*           tracks leading to a Master of Arts in Interior Design. The Post-
       SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                                                        Professional degree (Track One) is for those with an
                                                                        undergraduate degree in Interior Design or a closely related field.
                                                                        The First Professional degree (Track Two) is for those with a
                                                                        baccalaureate degree not in Interior Design or a closely related
                                                                        field. Applicants must complete a series of undergraduate
                                                                        Foundation Courses and admission requirements before final
                                                                        admission to the Track Two program.
                                                                              The graduate program builds on a Council for Interior
                                                                        Design Accreditation (CIDA)-accredited undergraduate program
                                                                        with specific objectives:
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                         79



•   to nurture intellectual growth and an increased capacity         •     two letters of recommendation from educators or employ-
    to engage in design practice, education, and research;                 ers who can attest to the applicant’s potential for
•   to develop proficiency in a specific aspect of the profession          graduate work;
    of interior design;                                              •     acceptable test scores on the Graduate Record
•   to further strengthen the knowledge, skills, and techniques            Examination (GRE) with analytical writing, or evidence of
    necessary to the competent practice of interior design; and            passing the examination of the National Council for
                                                                           Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) of the National
•   to develop and conduct research that will increase the
                                                                           Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) (see
    body of knowledge in the field.
                                                                           note on page 19);
Completion Requirement: Requirements for the program                 •     a letter from the applicant, including a statement of
must be completed within five years of initial registration                personal goals, objectives, motivations, and intended area
unless extenuating circumstances exist and an extension is                 of concentration;
authorized by the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences.
                                                                     •     a portfolio of student or professional design work demon-
Nondegree Admission: Only interior design practitioners and                strating creative ability and professional competence
students from other accredited colleges or universities may                (presented during interview); and
take courses on a nondegree basis. Enrollment is limited to two
                                                                     •     an interview with an official representative of the School
courses.
                                                                           of Arts and Sciences.
Program Requirement: Students are required to have their
                                                                     Any related degree must demonstrate completion of an equiva-
own laptop computers once they are admitted to the graduate
                                                                     lent series of prerequisites that assures an understanding of a
program.
                                                                     common body of knowledge within the field. If a departmental
Residency Requirement: Students are expected to complete             review of a student’s previous coursework reveals deficiencies
the Interior Design core requirements at Marymount                   in the common body of knowledge, the student may be
University.                                                          required to complete undergraduate prerequisite course(s).
                                                                     International Students: See page 19 for the Test of English as
Thesis or Design Research Project: Students in each program          a Foreign Language requirement. Students who hold a
will complete a Thesis or a Design Research Project. These proj-     baccalaureate degree from an accredited postsecondary institu-
ects, which incorporate original empirical research and analy-
                                                                     tion where the language of instruction is English are exempt
sis, are completed in a two-course sequence. Students must
                                                                     from this requirement.
present their work in a final oral examination before the
Interior Design faculty and others.                                  Degree Requirements

Transfer Credits: A maximum of 6 semester credits of transfer        36 credits
graduate credit may be applied toward the degree, if approved            ID 507-508 Advanced Design Studio I & II
by the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and the                   ID 520 Research and Development in Interior Design
registrar.
                                                                         ID 526 Current Issues in Interior Design
The Post-Professional Degree (Track One)                                 ID 598-599 Thesis or Design Research Project I & II
                                                                         18 credits from the following: ID 509 Advanced Design Studio
Admission Requirements: Admission to the program is com-                    III; ID 512 Furniture and Display Design; ID 513 Computer-
petitive. The application deadline is April 1 for summer and fall
                                                                            aided Drafting and Design; ID 522 Environmental Behavior;
and November 1 for spring admission. Students may attend on
                                                                            ID 523 Methodology, Theory, Criticism; ID 524 Design
a full- or part-time basis. In addition to Universitywide require-
ments for graduate admission (see page 19), applicants who                  Methods; ID 525 Health Care Design; ID 535 Illumination
have or will have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college            and Acoustical Design; ID 536 Technology for Interior Design;
or university prior to enrollment in the Post-Professional grad-            ID 552 American Interiors; ID 553 Modern Design and
uate degree program must provide the following items to be                  Architecture; ID 554 Historic Preservation; ID 555 Historic
considered for admission:                                                   Interiors; ID 556 Historic Research, Documentation, and
•   proof of a professional degree in Interior Design, or its               Design; ID 590 Practicum; ID 595 Directed Research
    equivalent, in the form of an official transcript of all         Additional courses are available in other areas of the graduate
    postsecondary coursework;                                        curricula, including Business Administration, Human
                                                                     Resources, Humanities, and Psychology. Approval must be
                                                                     received prior to registration.
80                                               SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     The First Professional Degree (Track Two)                                     To maintain progress toward degree completion, students
     The Interior Design First Professional degree program’s                  must submit work from the ID Foundation Courses for a
     mission is to educate professional interior designers to work            portfolio review. Reviews take place in December and April. In
     effectively within contemporary constraints in a changing                addition to the review, students will be evaluated according to
     society and profession and to formulate design concepts for a            the following additional admission requirements:
     better human environment.                                                •     3.0 or better GPA on Foundation Courses;
          Students in this program must successfully complete or              •     statement of goals, objectives, and proposed concentra-
     transfer 24 credits in undergraduate Foundation Courses.                       tion; and
     Following a portfolio review, an additional 51 credits in Core
                                                                              •     recommendations by Interior Design faculty.
     Courses will be completed.
                                                                              All admission requirements must be completed before portfolio
     Admission Requirements: Admission to the program is com-                 reviews.
     petitive. The application deadline is April 1 for summer and fall        Core Courses
     and November 1 for spring admission. Students may attend on              51 credits
     a full- or part-time basis. In addition to Universitywide require-
                                                                                  ID 503-504 Interior Design III & IV
     ments for graduate admission (see page 19), applicants who
     have or will have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college             ID 507-508 Advanced Design Studio I & II
     or university before enrollment in the First Professional gradu-             ID 513 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
     ate degree program must provide the following items to be con-               ID 532 Building Technology
     sidered:
                                                                                  ID 533 Lighting Design
     •     official transcripts showing all postsecondary coursework
                                                                                  ID 534 Business Procedures
           and proof of undergraduate degree completion (or
           expected completion);                                                  ID 550-551 History of Interiors I & II

     •     two letters of recommendation from educators or employ-                ID 520 Research and Development in Interior Design
           ers who can attest to the applicant’s potential for graduate           ID 598-599 Thesis or Design Research Project I & II
           work; and                                                              12 credits from the following: ID 512 Furniture and Display
     •     acceptable test scores on the Graduate Record                             Design; ID 522 Environmental Behavior: ID 523 Methodology,
           Examination (see note on page 19).                                        Theory, Criticism; ID 524 Design Methods; ID 525 Health
     Students admitted to the Track Two master’s program will not                    Care Design; ID 535 Illumination and Acoustical Design; ID
     be permitted to switch to the undergraduate B.A. program after                  536 Technology for Interior Design; ID 549 Advanced Design
     they have passed portfolio review.                                              Studio III; ID 552 American Interiors; ID 553 Modern Design
                                                                                     and Architecture; ID 554 Historic Preservation; ID 555
     Degree Requirements                                                             Historic Interiors; ID 556 Historic Research, Documentation,
     Foundation Courses                                                              and Design; ID 590 Practicum; ID 595 Directed Research

     24 credits
         FA 481 Design
         FA 201 History of Art I, FA 202 History of Art II, or FA 300-level
           Art History course
         ID 426 Current Issues in Interior Design
         ID 485 Accelerated Architectural Graphics
         ID 487 Accelerated Interior Design Studio
         ID 214 Architectural Graphics III
         ID 231 Textiles and Finish Materials
     While completing the Interior Design Foundation Courses a
     student may enroll in up to three graduate (500-level) ID
     courses with permission of the advisor/instructor.
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                  81



LIBERAL STUDIES                                                     Suggested Degree Plan

                                                                    Year One
LIBERAL STUDIES (B.A.)                                                Fall                           Spring
The Liberal Studies program is especially desirable for students      EN 101 Composition I*          EN 102 Composition II*
who have more than one specialized interest. It provides a
                                                                      ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100            Science elective*
broad general education and the opportunity to gain knowl-
                                                                        Introduction to the Social   Humanities (History)
edge in two major fields, designated as Major Sequences. Major
                                                                        Sciences*                     elective*
Sequence options are: Biology/Physical Sciences, Business and
related fields, Communications, Computer Science, English,            Health elective*               Humanities elective*
Fine and Applied Arts, Gender and Society, Graphic Design,            Mathematics elective*          Humanities (Religious
History, Humanities, Information Systems, Mathematics,                Elective                        Studies/Theology)
Philosophy/Religious Studies/Theology, Politics, and                                                  elective*
                                                                      SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
Psychology/Sociology/Criminal Justice.
     This program is especially appropriate for nontraditional
students with full-time work experience and previously earned
                                                                    Year Two
college credits, who desire an efficient way to use these credits
to complete a bachelor’s degree. This program also offers an          Fall                           Spring
opportunity earn licensure for those students who are inter-          Two (2) First Major Sequence   First Major Sequence
ested in teaching at the elementary level (grades PK-6).                electives§ **                   elective§ **
     The Liberal Studies program consists of three components:        Second Major Sequence          Two (2) Second Major
the Liberal Arts Core, the two Major Sequences, and the Liberal         elective§ **                   Sequence electives§ **
Studies Triad (LS 300, LDS 400, and LS 420). The requirements
                                                                      Social Sciences elective*      Social Sciences elective*
differ for those enrolled in the Elementary Education (PK-6)
teaching licensure program.                                           Humanities (English            Humanities (Philosophy)
     Upon completion of the program, a student is expected to          Literature) elective*          elective*
have achieved the following:
                                                                    Year Three
•   liberal learning, demonstrated by broad analytical skills,
    independent thought, empathetic judgment, and mature              Fall                           Spring
    values; and                                                       LS 300 Liberal Studies         Two (2) First Major Sequence
•   applied learning, demonstrated by experience documented             Readings and Portfolio         300/400-level electives§ **
    in a personal portfolio that may be shown to prospective            Development§                 Two (2) Second Major
    employers.                                                        Two (2) First Major Sequence     Sequence 300/400-level
The student must complete two Major Sequences for a total of            electives§ **                  electives§ **
42 credits of coursework in these fields. A minimum of 15             Humanities elective*           Writing elective*
credits is required in each field; a minimum of 6 credits in each     Social Sciences 300/400-
field must be in courses numbered 300 or above. The student             level elective*
must complete a combined total of 18 credits in courses
numbered 300 or above.
     Many students who intend to continue in Marymount’s
Master of Education program often choose Liberal Studies for
their undergraduate major. They are advised to select Major
Sequences from Biology/Physical Sciences, English, Fine and
Applied Arts, History, Mathematics, Politics, or Psychology.
Such students are permitted at the discretion of the program
advisor to substitute undergraduate courses in Education for
LS 400 Liberal Studies Internship, since these students must
complete a student-teaching experience at the graduate level.
82                                                SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


         Year Four                                                              ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (PK-6) TEACHING
         Fall                                 Spring                            LICENSURE (B.A. IN LIBERAL STUDIES)

         LS 400 Liberal Studies               LS 420 Senior Seminar§
                                                                                This program allows students to complete a baccalaureate
           Internship§
                                                                                degree in Liberal Studies and also be licensed to teach grades
                                              Four (4) electives*
                                                                                PK-6. Students pursuing licensure in this manner complete all
         Humanities elective*
                                                                                requirements necessary for Virginia licensure, including field
         Two (2) Second Major                                                   experiences and student teaching.
           Sequence 300/400-level                                               Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
           electives§ **                                                        admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for
     §
                                                                                student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-
     Requirement for the major                                                  sion requirements and procedures.
     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.                 Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses
     **Major Sequence electives are chosen from the options noted               specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
     in the introduction of this major. Students will choose two                sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of
     different Major Sequences.                                                 Education and Human Services for further information.

     Gender and Society sequence                                                Suggested Degree Plan

                                                                                Year One
     Sequence Requirements
                                                                                   Fall                              Spring
     15-21 credits
                                                                                   EN 101 Composition I*             EN 102 Composition II*
         IS 200 Approaches to Gender and Society (to be taken before
                                                                                   POL/SOC 100 Introduction          HI 203 European History,
           other courses in the sequence)
                                                                                     to the Social Sciences*           HI 210 History of the U.S.
         Select four (4) to six (6) courses in a minimum of 3 academic                                                 to 1877, or HI 211 History
                                                                                   MA 121 Introduction to
           disciplines from the following: AA 410 Clothing Selection and                                               of the U.S. since 1877§ *
                                                                                    Mathematical Problem
           Behavior, COM 301 Intercultural Communication, EN 340
                                                                                    Solving*                         MA 127 Geometry§
           Major Women Writers, EN 360 American Multicultural
           Literature, PSY 210 Human Growth and Development, PSY                   HPR 220 Health and Safety*        PSY 210 Human Growth
           220 Social Psychology, PSY 250 Biological Bases of Behavior,            Communications elective   §         and Development*
           PSY 321 Psychology of Gender, SOC 201 Cultural                          SEM 101 Freshman Seminar          BIO 110 Introduction to
           Anthropology, SOC 202 Social Problems, SOC 303                                                              Environmental Science*
           Development of Social Thought. Courses selected for this
           sequence cannot be used to fulfill Liberal Arts Core requirements.   Year Two

     Humanities sequence                                                           Fall                              Spring
                                                                                   EN 201-206 English litera-        HI 203 European History,
     Sequence Requirements                                                           ture course§                      HI 210 History of the U.S.
     15-21 credits                                                                 ECO 199 Principles of               to 1877, or HI 211 History
                                                                                     Macroeconomics*                   of the U.S. since 1877§ *
         HU 200 Imagination and Wisdom (to be taken before other
          courses in the sequence)                                                 ED 245E Exploring                 One (1) from the following:
                                                                                     Teaching**                        FA 121-122 Music History I
         Select four (4) to six (6) courses in a minimum of three (3) of the
                                                                                                                       or II, FA 201-202 History
           following academic disciplines: English, Fine Arts, History,            MA 124 History of
                                                                                                                       of Art I or II§
           Philosophy, and Theology and Religious Studies. Courses                  Elementary Mathematics§
           selected for this sequence cannot be used to fulfill Liberal                                              GEO 201 Introduction to
                                                                                   Science (Biology) elective§
           Arts Core requirements.                                                                                     Geography§
                                                                                                                     ED 301 Foundation of
                                                                                                                       Literacy Development**
                                                                                                                     EN 211 Principles of
                                                                                                                       Language§
                                             SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                            83



Year Three                                                                 LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE (M.A.)
    Fall                                 Spring                            This program offers students the opportunity for intellectual
    ED 310 Reading and the               EN 301 The Writing Process:
                                                                           enrichment in one of the traditional liberal arts disciplines
      Language Arts**                      Theory and Practice*
                                                                           while also offering those interested in the study of literature
                                                                           and language the opportunity for career enhancement through
    PSC 103 Introduction to the          ED 400 Teaching
                                                                           advanced study. It serves a variety of professional purposes and
      Physical Sciences§                   Mathematics and
                                                                           audiences — particularly teachers from the intermediate to the
    History or English                     Science**
                                                                           community college level. Through close consultation with an
      Literature 300-level               EN 351 Literature of              advisor, a student may choose courses that will either address
      elective§                            Childhood and                   gaps in educational background or provide concentrated study
    HI 203 European History,               Adolescence*                    that will lead to specialization in a more advanced degree.
      HI 210 History of the U.S.         PSY 341 Psychology of                  Candidates pursuing this degree may choose either of the
      to 1877, or HI 211 History           Individuals with                following options:
      of the U.S. since 1877§ *            Exceptionalities*               •     30-credit program, including a 3-credit Master’s Project and
    POL 204 American                     Humanities (History or                  a language requirement, which involves intermediate profi-
      Government§                         English Literature) 300-               ciency or passing grade on a reading test (those planning to
                                          level elective*                        pursue doctoral work should choose this option); or
                                                                           •     36-credit program without a Master’s Project or language
Year Four                                                                        requirement.
    Fall                                 Spring                            For information about the Master’s Project, please see page 162.
                                                                    §
    ED 311 Reading and the               ED 460 Student Teaching **
                                                                           Admission Requirements: In addition to the Universitywide
      Language Arts§ **                  ED 320 Assessing and              requirements for graduate admission (see page 19) applicants
    ED 410 Teaching History                Guiding Students in Early       must present:
      and Social Studies§ **               Childhood Settings§ **          •     a bachelor’s degree with a major in English or a major in a
    History or English                   Humanities                              humanities discipline with at least 18 credits in English (9
      Literature 300+-level               (Theology/Religious                    at the 300 or above level) or a major in any interdiscipli-
      elective§                           Studies) elective*                     nary humanities program;
    Humanities (Philosophy)                                                •     official transcripts of all postsecondary education reflect-
     elective*                                                                   ing a grade point average (overall or in the major) of 3.0 or
    LS 420 Senior Seminar§                                                       better on a 4.0 scale; and
                                                                           •     a sample critical paper.
§
Requirement for the major
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.                 Nondegree Admission: Applicants desiring enrollment for lim-
                                                                           ited coursework may do so as nondegree students. See page 20
**All Education courses must be taken in sequence noted.                   for further information on nondegree studies.

GENDER AND SOCIETY (MINOR)                                                 Transfer Credits: A maximum of 6 semester credits of trans-
                                                                           ferred graduate credits may be applied toward the degree, if
Minor Requirements                                                         approved by the School dean and the registrar.
    IS 200 Approaches to Gender and Society
    18 credits in three (3) discipline areas from the courses listed for   30-credit Program Degree Requirements
       the Gender and Society sequence (see page 82)                           EN 540 The Transformation of Literary Study
                                                                               Six (6) credits from the following: EN 550 General Linguistics, if
LITERATURE                                                                       the student has no undergraduate linguistics course; EN 524
                                                                                 Myth, Symbol, and Language; EN 552 Applied Phonology; EN
                                                                                 554 Applied Grammar: Syntactic Structures; EN 558 History
ENGLISH (B.A.)
                                                                                 of the English Language
See page 67.
84                                                SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


         English 500-level literature courses (9 credits)                     Students who have successfully completed MA 142, MA 181, MA
         English or Language courses (9 credits, 6 of which may be in         182, or MA 221 may not subsequently register for a lower-
           Humanities Seminars)                                               numbered course in this sequence.
                                                                                   Transfer students or new majors will not be required to
         EN 595 Master’s Project
                                                                              make up Mathematics Seminar classes that met during semes-
     Candidates must also demonstrate proficiency in one foreign              ters in which they were not enrolled as a Mathematics major at
     language.                                                                Marymount. After meeting the Liberal Arts Core requirements,
                                                                              Mathematics majors have 18-21 elective credit hours. Such
     36-credit Program Degree Requirements
                                                                              students are encouraged to apply those credits toward a minor
         EN 540 The Transformation of Literary Study                          in areas such as Biology, Computer Science, or Economics.
         Six (6) credits from the following: EN 550 General Linguistics, if        Individual advising is important.
           the student has no undergraduate linguistic course; EN 524         Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C- in
           Myth, Symbol, and Language; EN 552 Applied Phonology; EN           any course that serves as a prerequisite for a higher-numbered
           554 Applied Grammar: Syntactic Structures; EN 558 History          course.
           of the English Language
         English 500-level literature courses (9 credits)                     Suggested Degree Plan
         English and Language courses (15 credits, 6 of which may be in       Year One
           Humanities Seminars and/or 6 credits in approved Education
                                                                                Fall                             Spring
           courses)                                                                               §
                                                                                MA 181 Calculus I * #            MA 182 Calculus II§ #
                                                                                CS 110 Programming I in          CS 111 Programming II in
     MATHEMATICS
                                                                                  Java§                            Java or elective
                                                                                EN 101 Composition I*            EN 102 Composition II*
     MATHEMATICS (B.S.)
                                                                                ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100              Health elective*
     The study of mathematics introduces students to mathemati-                   Introduction to the Social     Social Sciences elective (ECO
     cal abstraction as well as how mathematics can be used to                    Sciences*                        199 Principles of
     solve practical problems. Many courses in this discipline
                                                                                SEM 101 Freshman Seminar           Macroeconomics or ECO
     provide the basic foundations necessary to support study in all
                                                                                                                   210 Principles of
     majors. Whenever possible, Mathematics courses introduce
                                                                                                                   Microeconomics recom-
     concepts using applications, analytical solutions (equation
                                                                                                                   mended)*
     solving), numerical approximations, and graphical interpreta-
     tions. Graphing calculators and computer algebra software
     facilitate these efforts. In addition, Mathematics majors and            Year Two
     minors learn how to prove mathematical statements in a                     Fall                             Spring
     variety of areas in the discipline. A major in Mathematics                 MA 150 Discrete                  MA 257 Introduction to
     provides students with a strong foundation for careers in                   Mathematical                     Number Theory and Proof
     secondary mathematics education, actuarial science, business                Structures§                      Techniques§ or MA 258
     and research, as well as for further studies in mathematics and                                               Advanced Calculus§
                                                                                MA 209 Mathematics
     related fields.
                                                                                 Seminar§                         PHYS 172 General Physics
           Freshman Mathematics majors are encouraged to explore:
                                                                                MA 225 Differential                II§ or BIO 152 General
     •     teaching licensure in Secondary Mathematics                                                             Biology II§
                                                                                 Equations§ or MA 221
     •     a minor in Economics (see page 97) with additional course-            Calculus III§                   MA 215 Linear Algebra§ or
           work in Finance                                                                                        elective
                                                                                PHYS 171 General Physics I§ *
     •     a minor or second major in Computer Science                            or BIO 151 General             MA 228 Probability and
           (Mathematics majors are also eligible to consider participa-           Biology I§ *                    Statistical Inference§ or
           tion in the five-year B.S./M.S. in Computer Science                                                    elective
                                                                                Humanities elective*
           program. See page 64.)
                                                                                Social Sciences elective*        Social Sciences 300/400-
     •     additional coursework in Biology                                                                        level elective*
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                      85



Year Three                                                          MATHEMATICS WITH SECONDARY-LEVEL
    Fall                             Spring                         TEACHING LICENSURE (B.S. IN MATHEMATICS)

    MA 225 Differential              MA 257 Introduction to
                                                                    This program of study allows students to complete a baccalau-
     Equations§ or MA 221             Proofs with Number
                                                                    reate degree in Mathematics and also be licensed to teach
     Calculus III§                    Theory§ or MA 258
                                                                    secondary Mathematics at the end of four years. Students
                                      Advanced Calculus§
                                                                    pursuing licensure in this manner complete all requirements
    MA 300/400-level course§ or
                                                                    necessary for Virginia licensure, including field experience and
      MA 420 Abstract                MA 215 Linear Algebra§ or
                                                                    student teaching.
      Algebra§                        elective
                                                                         Transfer students or new majors will not be required to
    MA 309 Mathematics               MA 228 Probability and         make up Mathematics Seminar classes that met during semes-
     Seminar§                         Statistical Inference§, MA    ters in which they were not enrolled as a Mathematics major at
    Writing elective*                 328 Stochastic Modeling§,     Marymount. After meeting the Liberal Arts Core requirements,
                                      or elective                   Mathematics majors seeking teaching licensure have 6-9
    MA 433 Research, elective,
     or course in minor              Two (2) electives or courses   elective credit hours.
                                       in minor*                         Individual advising is important.
    Humanities elective*
                                                                    Admission Requirements: Students in this program must seek
                                                                    admission to the teacher licensure program and apply for
Year Four
                                                                    student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for admis-
    Fall                             Spring                         sion requirements and procedures.
                        §
    MA 400 Internship                MA 328 Stochastic              Degree Planning: Students in this program must take courses
    MA 300/400-level course or        Modeling§ or elective         specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment of state licen-
     MA 420 Abstract Algebra§        Three (3) Humanities           sure requirements. See an Education advisor in the School of
    MA 409 Mathematics                 electives*                   Education and Human Services for further information.
     Seminar§                        Elective or course in minor    Suggested Degree Plan
    MA 433 Research, elective,
                                                                    Year One
     or course in minor
                                                                       Fall                              Spring
    Humanities elective*
                                                                                        §
                                                                       MA 181 Calculus I * #             MA 182 Calculus II§ #
§
 Requirement for the major. (Students needing preparation for          CS 110 Programming I in           CS 111 Programming II in
MA 181 Calculus I should plan to complete that preparation               Java§                             Java or elective*
during the freshman year.) Course rotations are available on           EN 101 Composition I*             EN 102 Composition II*
the Mathematics Web site.
                                                                       POL/SOC 100 Introduction          Social Sciences elective (ECO
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.               to the Social Sciences*           199 Principles of
#Can be waived with appropriate AP credit.                             SEM 101 Freshman Seminar            Macroeconomics or ECO
                                                                                                           210 Principles of
                                                                                                           Microeconomics recom-
                                                                                                           mended)*
                                                                                                         PH 205 Logic§ *
86                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Year Two                                                       Year Four
       Fall                            Spring                           Fall                             Spring
       MA 150 Discrete                 MA 257 Introduction to           MA 385 Approaches to             ED 360S Student Teaching§
        Mathematical                    Proofs with Number               Teaching Secondary Math         MA 228 Probability and
        Structures§                     Theory§ or MA 258                or MA 420 Abstract               Statistical Inference§ or
       MA 209 Mathematics               Advanced Calculus§               Algebra§                         Humanities elective*
        Seminar§ **                    MA 124 History of                MA 409 Mathematics               Humanities elective*
       MA 225 Differential              Elementary Mathematics§          Seminar§
        Equations§ or MA 221            or MA 215 Linear Algebra§       MA 433 Research or
        Calculus III§                  MA 228 Probability and            elective*
       PHYS 171 General Physics I *§    Statistical Inference§ or       Health elective*
                                        Humanities elective*
       Humanities (History)                                             Two (2) Humanities
        elective*                      ED 245S Educational                electives*
                                         Foundations for
       Social Sciences elective*
                                         Secondary Teachers         §
                                                                     Requirement for the major. (Students needing preparation for
                                       PHYS 172 General             MA 181 Calculus I should plan to complete that preparation
                                         Physics II§                during the freshman year.) Course rotations are available on
                                                                    the Mathematics Web site.
     Year Three                                                     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
       Fall                            Spring                       #Can be waived with appropriate AP credit.
       MA 225 Differential             MA 257 Introduction to
        Equations§ or MA 221            Proofs with Number          MATHEMATICS (MINOR)
        Calculus III§                   Theory§ or MA 258
                                        Advanced Calculus§          Minor Requirements
       MA 385 Approaches to
        Teaching Secondary Math        MA 124 History of                MA 181-182 Calculus I & II
        or MA 420 Abstract              Elementary Mathematics§         MA 150 Discrete Mathematical Structures
        Algebra§                        or MA 215 Linear Algebra§       12 credits from MA courses numbered 200 or above
       MA 309 Mathematics              MA 228 Probability and
        Seminar§                        Statistical Inference§ or   PHILOSOPHY
       ED 327S Curriculum Design:       Humanities elective*
         Secondary Education           ED 337 Reading in the
                                                                    PHILOSOPHY (B.A.)
       EN 301 The Writing Process:       Content Areas
                                                                    The study of philosophy promotes rational and critical think-
         Theory and Practice*          PSY 312 Adolescent
                                                                    ing and provides a sense of our intellectual traditions from the
       PSY 341 Psychology of             Psychology
                                                                    ancient, medieval, and modern periods.
         Individuals with                                                The Philosophy major aims to develop a critical and artic-
         Exceptionalities*                                          ulated understanding of basic beliefs and value judgments.
                                                                    Students of Philosophy become acquainted with the intellec-
                                                                    tual foundation of much of Western culture and find
                                                                    opportunity to compare it to the tenets of other cultures. They
                                                                    also learn to analyze problems through a variety of methods.
                                                                         Philosophy majors become qualified for careers in which a
                                                                    liberal arts degree is desirable. It is the recommended under-
                                                                    graduate major for students intending to pursue advanced
                                                                    studies in Philosophy, Religion, or Theology, or in many areas
                                                                    of professional study, such as law. Internships in a variety of
                                                                    human service agencies or congressional offices add to the
                                                                    practical dimension of the study.
                                        SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                     87



    The achievement of senior students is measured through a        PHILOSOPHY (MINOR)
comprehensive examination, the requirements of the senior
seminar, and an internship evaluation.                              Minor Requirements
                                                                      PH 200 Introduction to Philosophy
Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                      18 additional credits in Philosophy courses
Year One
    Fall                             Spring                         POLITICS
    PH 200 Introduction to           PH 205 Logic   §


      Philosophy§                    EN 102 Composition II*         POLITICS (B.A.)
    EN 101 Composition I*            Science elective*              Resources for the study of politics in the Washington area are
    ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                                             extraordinary, and students participate frequently in many
                                     Humanities elective*
      Introduction to the Social                                    history-making events that occur in this capital city. The
                                     Social Sciences elective*      program presents a structured curriculum of courses in politi-
      Sciences*
                                                                    cal theory, international relations, and the politics and
    Health elective*
                                                                    governmental institutions of the United States and foreign
    Mathematics elective*                                           countries. Students majoring in Politics are encouraged to
    SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                        consider a minor in Communications, Computer Science,
                                                                    Economics, English, History, or Philosophy.
Year Two                                                                 Seniors are required to complete an internship in a
    Fall                             Spring                         government agency, a congressional office, or a corporate
    Philosophy 300-level course§     Philosophy 300-level course§   government affairs department, and to complete the senior
                                                                    seminar and a comprehensive examination.
    PH 309 Ethical Theory            Humanities elective*
    Humanities elective*             Information Systems            Politics Honors: Students who major in Politics, achieve at
    Social Sciences elective*          elective                     graduation a grade point average of 3.5 in Politics courses (at
    Elective                         Two (2) electives              least 8 of which must be completed at Marymount University),
                                                                    and achieve superior performance in the senior thesis and com-
                                                                    prehensive examination are eligible to graduate with honors in
Year Three
                                                                    Politics.
    Fall                             Spring
    Two (2) Philosophy 300-level     Two PH 300/400-level           Suggested Degree Plan
      courses§                         courses§
                                                                    Year One
    Writing elective*                Humanities elective*
                                                                      Fall                               Spring
    Social Sciences 300/400-         Two (2) electives
                                                                      HU 201 The Western                 POL 205 American Policy
      level elective*
                                                                       Tradition I§ *                      Process§
    Elective*
                                                                      HI 203 European History I§ *       POL 225 Comparative
                                                                      EN 101 Composition I*                Government I§
Year Four
                                                                      POL 220 International              EN 102 Composition II*
    Fall                             Spring
                                                                        Relations§                       HU 201 The Western
    PH 300/400-level course§         PH 400 Internship§                                                   Tradition II§
                                                                      PSY/SOC 100 Introduction
    PH 422 Senior Seminar§           PH 300/400-level course§           to the Social Sciences*          MA 132 Statistical Analysis*
    Humanities elective*             Humanities elective*             SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
    Elective*                        Two (2) electives

§
Requirement for the major
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
88                                               SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


     Year Two                                                             THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES
         Fall                                 Spring
         POL 210 Western Political            POL 211 Western Political   THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (B.A.)
           Concepts I§                          Concepts II§              This program offers introductory and advanced courses in
         POL 250 Research and                 ECO 210 Principles of       systematic and moral theology, scripture studies, and church
           Writing§ *                           Microeconomics§ *         history. Courses that aim to introduce students to the complex-
         ECO 199 Principles of                Humanities (English         ity of the religious experience in human existence, the major
           Macroeconomics§ *                   Literature) elective*      tenets of world religions, or the role of religion in the develop-
                                                                          ment of a culture are described under the heading Religious
         Humanities                           Health elective*
                                                                          Studies. The study of theology and religions guides a student
          (Theology/Religious                 Science elective*           in an examination of the historical and cultural expressions of
          Studies) elective*
                                                                          man’s concept of the divine. As a Catholic university,
         Politics elective§                                               Marymount aspires to offer courses that examine the richness
                                                                          of the Catholic faith and its theological heritage.
     Year Three                                                                The major in Theology aims to develop in students a criti-
         Fall                                 Spring                      cal understanding of basic religious beliefs and revealed truths.
                                                                          The approach to the discipline is critical and analytic and aims
         POL 335 American                     Two (2) Politics 300/400-
                                                                          to acquaint students with the principal foundations of
           Constitutional Law I§                level electives§
                                                                          Christian theology; additional studies provide opportunities for
         Politics 300/400-level               Humanities (Philosophy)     students to compare tenets among the major world religions.
           elective§ *                         elective*                       Senior students complete a senior seminar, a comprehen-
         Humanities (History)                 Two (2) electives*          sive examination, and an internship.
          elective*
                                                                          Suggested Degree Plan
         Two (2) electives
                                                                          Year One
     Year Four                                                              Fall                               Spring
         Fall                                 Spring                        PH 200 Introduction to             TH 230 Foundations of
         Two (2) Politics 300/400-            POL 400 Internship§             Philosophy                         Christian Theology§
           level electives§                   POL 420 Senior Seminar§       EN 101 Composition I*              EN 102 Composition II*
         Three (3) electives                  Two (2) electives             ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                Humanities elective*
                                                                              Introduction to the Social       Science elective*
     §
     Requirement for the major                                                Sciences*
                                                                                                               Elective
     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.             Health elective*
                                                                            Mathematics elective*
     POLITICS (MINOR)
                                                                            SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
     Minor Requirements
         One (1) from the following: POL 204 American Government, POL
           210-211 Western Political Concepts I or II, POL 220
           International Relations
         12 additional credits in Politics courses
                                    SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES                                                                     89



Year Two                         Spring                      Year Four
  Fall                                             §
                                 Theology elective **            Fall                               Spring
                                                                                         §
  RST 211 Religions of the       Two (2) Humanities              TH/RST 400 Internship              TH/RST 422 Senior Seminar§
    World§ or RST 320              electives*                    Theology elective§ **              Four (4) electives
    Religion in America§         Social Sciences elective*       Two (2) electives
  Theology elective§ **          Elective*
                                                             §
  Information Systems                                        Requirement for the major
    elective                                                 *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
  Humanities elective*                                       **Theology electives: TH 203 The Religion of the Old Testament;
  Social Sciences elective*                                  TH 204 The New Testament Gospels; TH 210 Christ in
                                                             Christianity; TH 220 Christian God: One and Three; TH 250
                                                             Faith in the Modern World; TH 320 Grace and Sin, Heaven and
                                                             Hell; TH 329 Early and Medieval Christianity; TH 330 The
Year Three                                                   Church in the Modern World; PH 326 Medieval Philosophy
  Fall                           Spring
  TH 340 The Foundations of      Three (3) Theology          THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (MINOR)
    Christian Morality§;           electives§ **
                                                             Minor Requirements
    TH 347 Friendship,           Humanities elective*
    Marriage, and God:                                           TH 230 Foundations of Christian Theology
                                 Elective*
    Catholic Perspectives§; or                                   TH 240 The Foundations of Christian Morality
    TH 450 Catholic Social                                       Three (3) credits from the following: TH 203 The Religion of the
    and Medical Morality§                                          Old Testament, TH 204 The New Testament Gospels, TH 205
  Theology elective§ **                                            The New Testament Epistles
  Social Sciences 300/400-                                       Six (6) credits from Theology or Religious Studies courses
    level elective*
  Humanities elective*
  Writing 300-level elective*
90                                    S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N



     School of Business                                                 Admission Requirements
                                                                        Undergraduate Students: Please see requirements beginning on
     Administration                                                     page 15, as well as individual program descriptions.
     Interim Dean: James F. Ryerson                                         Undergraduate Certificate-seeking Students: Applicants must
     The School is committed to building a learning community for           hold an associate degree from an accredited university and
     a student body comprising undergraduate and graduate                   have five years of work experience, or a bachelor’s degree
     students seeking intellectual, professional, moral, and personal       from an accredited university.
     development.                                                       Graduate Students: In addition to Universitywide requirements
          The School of Business Administration nurtures intellec-      (see page 19), graduate student applicants must submit the
     tual inquiry and participatory learning for the professional and   following:
     personal success of our students and alumni.
                                                                        •   a current résumé; and
          The School comprises a faculty focused on excellence in
     teaching, ethical conduct, and productive interaction with the     •   an acceptable standardized test score (see note on page 19).
     business, professional, and scholarly communities.                     This requirement is waived for students who have earned a
          As affirmation of its mission the School commits to the           master’s degree from an accredited college or university. In
     students:                                                              addition, students with significant professional experience
                                                                            and a record of outstanding undergraduate or graduate
     •   a quality undergraduate education that combines a founda-
                                                                            performance may petition the Admissions Committee for a
         tion in the liberal arts with a professional education that
                                                                            waiver of the standardized test requirement.
         provides a sound knowledge base, basic analytical skills,
         and solid values for successful career preparation;            Degree- and certificate-seeking applicants should also check
                                                                        individual program descriptions for additional requirements.
     •   a quality graduate education that through an advanced
         program of study adds to their knowledge base, hones               Graduate Conditional Acceptance: The School of Business
         their analytical skills, reinforces ethical values and             Administration will permit students who do not meet
         augments their academic and professional development;              minimum admission requirements, but have the potential
                                                                            to do well as a graduate student, to be admitted on a
     •   a student-focused learning environment where the curricu-
                                                                            conditional basis. Students who are admitted under condi-
         lum is set in both the scholarly world and the real world
                                                                            tional acceptance terms must take 6 credits identified by
         of business activities;
                                                                            the School and receive a grade of B or better in each
     •   a challenging interactive learning experience in small class       course in order to be considered for degree status.
         settings with enthusiastic and skilled faculty; and
                                                                            Graduate Certificate-seeking Students: Certificate-seeking
     •   a respect for ethical responsibilities in how we teach, what       students are not required to submit standardized test
         we teach, and how we work.                                         scores. Students who wish to continue graduate study
     The School commits to the business community:                          beyond certificate status must apply for program admis-
     •   an ongoing dialog and interaction among the community,             sion and meet all regular admission requirements for the
         the faculty, and students;                                         degree program.

     •   graduates who understand the relevance of professional             Graduate Nondegree Students: Graduate nondegree admission
         education to professional practice; and                            is limited to one semester (6 credits) in the School of
                                                                            Business Administration. Students who wish to continue
     •   graduates who understand the changing complexities and
                                                                            graduate study as a degree- or certificate-seeking student
         globalization of the world marketplace and the social
                                                                            must apply for program admission and meet all regular
         responsibilities these create.
                                                                            admission requirements for the program.
     The School commits to its faculty:
     •   the importance of excellence in teaching and learning;         Executives-in-Residence: Selected senior officers of various
     •   the confirmation of scholarly and professional develop-        local corporations and government agencies serve as execu-
         ment that strengthens our and others’ teaching and             tives-in-residence for undergraduate and graduate Business
         learning; and                                                  degree programs. These executives assist the faculty by acting
                                                                        as technical and teaching resources. They also act as mentors
     •   the importance of service that creates and reinforces
                                                                        for students by providing information for career planning.
         linkages with the business, professional, university, higher
         education, and student communities.
                                   S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                             91



Graduate Transfer Credits: Students who have completed an            •   have a practical understanding and utilization of the
equivalent graduate course within 5 years at an accredited col-          communications, critical-thinking, and problem-solving
lege or university, and received a grade of B or better, may             skills necessary in today’s business environment; and
transfer those graduate credits. No transfer credit is given for     •   be able to function in a business environment in an
internship or practicum experience at the graduate level. No             ethical manner.
more than 12 graduate credit hours may be transferred.
                                                                     B.B.A. Specialties: All B.B.A. majors will choose a specialty
Minimum Grade Requirements                                           from the following:
Undergraduates: see individual programs
Graduate Degree-seeking Students: A minimum grade of C is                Accounting
needed to receive credit for a graduate course in the School.            This specialty is designed to prepare students to pursue
Graduate Certificate-seeking Students: All certificate coursework        careers in public, private, and government accounting and
must be completed with a minimum grade of B.                             to pursue advanced degrees in business or law. The
                                                                         program also provides a basic foundation for students to
Technological and Information Literacy Requirements: All                 begin preparation for professional certification examinations.
undergraduate students in the School of Business
Administration are required to successfully complete four                Business Law and Paralegal Studies
technological literacy modules, ISY 095-098. These non-                  This specialty prepares students to work in corporate law
credit modules cover Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,                      departments, law firms, and law-related agencies. This
PowerPoint, and Access), Windows XP, and basic computer                  program is approved by the American Bar Association,
concepts. Transfer students who do not have equivalent                   providing students with paralegal certification, if earned.
coursework will be required to complete these four mod-                  Certification requires the successful completion of course-
ules. Students are expected to pass a minimum of one mod-                work and 24 hours of approved pro bono legal service to the
ule per semester, completing all four by the end of the                  community. Graduates of ABA-approved paralegal
sophomore year. However, students have the option of pro-                programs are not licensed to practice law or give legal
ceeding at a faster pace. For example, a student may pass                advice, but they are prepared for careers as paralegals or
all four modules in the fall semester of freshman year. Each             legal assistants. (Please consult with the director of the
module is graded as pass or fail. For further information,               specialty for guidance regarding the degree plan.)
see Information Systems course listings on page 179.
                                                                         Finance
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION                                                  This specialty prepares students to pursue careers in corpo-
                                                                         rate finance. The program of study provides instruction in
                                                                         the theory and quantitative techniques used to analyze
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (B.B.A.)                                         organizational performance, financing, and investment
The Bachelor of Business Administration includes general                 decisions.
courses in the primary areas of business as well as specialized
areas. For highly qualified students, there is a B.B.A./M.B.A.           General Business
program. (See page 93 for details.)                                      This specialty offers the greatest degree of flexibility and
     Central to the requirements of the B.B.A. program is the            choice within the B.B.A. major.
internship, which provides an opportunity for application of
theory and for the cultivation of business skills. It also enables       International Business
the student to include at least one segment of experience in a           This specialty is designed to give students the entry-level
Washington-area business corporation, government agency, or              skills needed to succeed in the diverse and complex
financial institution on his or her résumé.                              environment of international business operations.
     Students completing this major will:                                Competition is increasingly global. Business organizations
•    understand and apply the basic concepts of business                 have become international in their financing, production,
     practices in accounting, business law, economics, finance,          and marketing operations. Foreign competition is
     management, and marketing;                                          seriously challenging domestic firms and forcing U.S.
                                                                         managers to rethink traditional business practices.
•    understand and apply basic and advanced concepts in an
                                                                         Students in this specialty are strongly urged to take at
     area of specialization within a field of business;
                                                                         least one year of a foreign language.
92                                        S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


            Management                                                    Year Two
            This specialty prepares students to succeed in this               Fall                             Spring
            dynamic, intellectual discipline concerned with the
                                                                              ACT 201 Financial                ACT 202 Introduction to
            solution of problems and the improvement of business
                                                                                Accounting§                      Managerial Accounting§
            operations using specialized knowledge, skills, and system-
            atic analysis.                                                    LA 248 Business Law I§           LA 249 Business Law II§
                                                                              ECO 210 Principles of            MSC 202 Applied Business
            Marketing                                                           Microeconomics§ *               Problem Solving§
            This specialty offers students marketing expertise in             ISY 097 PowerPoint 2003          ISY 098 Access 2003*
            advertising and sales, as well as such diverse topics as            and Office XP                  Humanities elective*
            Internet marketing, consumer behavior, marketing                    Integration*
            research, international marketing, and marketing manage-                                           Elective*
                                                                              Two (2) Humanities
            ment. Graduates may find employment in advertising,
                                                                                electives*
            public relations, brand management, marketing research,
            and retailing.
                                                                          Year Three
     Internship Prerequisites: A minimum of 90 credits with a                 Fall                             Spring
     cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better and a cumulative GPA of 2.0              FIN 301 Financial                HRM 335 Human Resource
     or better in all Business courses are required in order to regis-          Management§                     Management§
     ter for the internship (ECO 490, ISY 400, LA 490, MGT 490).
                                                                              MGT 304 Organizational           MSC 337 Production and
     Minimum Grade Requirements:                                               Management§                      Operations Management§
     •      C or better in each of the following courses in order to          MKT 301 Principles of            ISY 301 Information
            continue in the B.B.A. degree program: MGT 123, ACT 201,           Marketing§                        Systems§
            and MGT 304;                                                      MSC 300 Business Statistics§     MGT 391 Business Writing
     •      cumulative 2.0 GPA or better in the B.B.A. specialty              Elective*                         and Speaking§ * (Business
            courses and in all coursework in order to graduate; and                                             Law and Paralegal Studies
                                                                                                                students: LA 391 Legal
     •      for Business Law and Paralegal Studies specialty students,
                                                                                                                Research and Writing§ *)
            a minimum grade of C- in every course that serves as a
            prerequisite for a higher-numbered legal specialty course                                          Specialty course§ **
            in the Business Law and Paralegal Studies specialty.
                                                                          Year Four
     Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                              Fall                            Spring
         Year One                                                             MGT 451 Strategic               MGT 489 Senior Business
           Fall                             Spring                             Management§                     Seminar§
           MGT 123 The Business             ECO 199 Principles of             PH 305 Business Ethics§ *       MGT/LA 490 Internship§
            Experience§                       Macroeconomics§ *               Two (2) Specialty courses§ **   Two (2) Specialty courses§ **
           MA 155 Finite Mathematics*       EN 102 Composition II*            Social Sciences 300/400-
           EN 101 Composition I*            ISY 096 Excel 2003 and              level elective*
           SOC/POL/PSY 100                    Windows XP*
                                                                          §
                                                                          Requirement for the major
             Introduction to the Social     Health elective*
             Sciences*                                                    *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                            Humanities elective*
           ISY 095 Word 2003 and                                          **Specialty Requirements:
                                            Science elective*
             Computer Concepts*                                           Accounting: ACT 303-304 Intermediate Accounting I & II, ACT
           Humanities elective*                                           306 Cost Accounting, ACT 406 Tax Accounting, ACT 410
                                                                          Auditing, and either ECO 485 International Economics or FIN
           SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                                                          485 International Finance (Recommended courses: ACT 420
                                                                          Advanced Accounting Topics, ECO 332 Money and Banking)
                                   S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                                  93



Business Law and Paralegal Studies: LA 280 Introduction to              THE COMBINED B.B.A./M.B.A.
the Legal System, LA 301 Civil Litigation, LA 302 Criminal              PROGRAM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Litigation, LA 305-306 General Practice I & II, LA 491                  Students wishing to accelerate their progress toward comple-
Computerized Legal Research (Recommended for those who                  tion of the Master in Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree at
wish to attend law school or work as a paralegal: LA 409 Public         Marymount can apply for the Pre-M.B.A. option. Students
Law and Procedure)                                                      accepted into this competitive program begin their M.B.A.
Finance: FIN 334 Investments, FIN 362 Intermediate Financial            studies while completing their B.B.A. Upon graduation from the
Management, FIN 485 International Finance, FIN 400 Senior               B.B.A. program, students will complete an additional 36 credit
Seminar in Finance, ECO 332 Money and Banking                           hours to earn an M.B.A. (B.B.A. students not enrolled in this
(Recommended courses: ACT 306 Cost Accounting, ECO 485                  program would complete a minimum of 45 credit hours to earn
International Economics)                                                the M.B.A.)
General Business: Four (4) courses from other Specialty areas or             The specialty for entering freshman and transfer students
300/400-level Economics courses and one (1) international course        wishing to enroll in this program would be designated as
from the following: ECO 485 International Economics, FIN 485            “General Business.”
International Finance, MGT 385 International Business, MGT 485
                                                                        Admission Requirements: In addition to meeting
International Management, MKT 485 International Marketing
                                                                        Universitywide undergraduate admission requirements (see
International Business: ECO 485 International Economics, FIN            page 15), the student must have:
485 International Finance, MGT 385 International Business,              •       60 credits completed in the undergraduate degree
MGT 485 International Management, MKT 485 International                         (typically by the end of the sophomore year); and
Marketing
                                                                        •       an overall GPA of 3.25 or better and a GPA of 3.25 or better
Management: MGT 485 International Management, MSC 345                           in all Business courses (Students who fail to maintain
Project Management, HRM 336 Labor Relations, HRM 423                            these required GPAs would not be allowed to take the 500-
Performance Management and Compensation, one (1) from the                       level courses in this program. They would revert to, and
following: ACT 306 Cost Accounting, ECO 330 Managerial                          follow the requirements for, the “General Business”
Economics, MGT 385 International Business, MKT 360                              specialty and could apply to the M.B.A. program in the
Consumer Behavior                                                               same manner as any other student.)
Marketing: MKT 412 Marketing Research, MKT 416 Marketing                Students successfully meeting these requirements will
Management, MKT 485 International Marketing, two (2) from               automatically be accepted into the M.B.A. program and will not
the following: MKT 313 Sales Skills and Strategies, MKT 319             be required to take the GMAT exam.
Advertising and Integrated Marketing Communications, MKT
360 Consumer Behavior                                                   Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                        Students in this program will follow the degree plan for B.B.A.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MINOR)                                         majors until year three, then complete the program as follows:

Minimum Grade Requirements: Cumulative GPA at the end                       Year Three
of the freshman year must be 2.0 or better. MGT 123 and MGT                   Fall                             Spring
304 must be completed with a grade of C or better.
                                                                              FIN 301 Financial                HRM 335 Human Resource
Minor Requirements                                                              Management§                     Management§

  MGT 123 The Business Experience                                             MGT 304 Organizational           MSC 337 Production and
                                                                               Management§                      Operations Management§
  MGT 304 Organizational Management
                                                                              MKT 301 Principles of            ISY 301 Information
  15 additional credits in Marymount Business courses approved by
                                                                               Marketing§                        Systems§
     the dean of the School or his designee. (Information Systems
     majors: these additional credits cannot include ISY 301 or other         MSC 300 Business                 MGT 391 Business Writing
     ISY courses.)                                                             Statistics§                      and Speaking§ *
                                                                              Elective*                        International Business
                                                                                                                 course§
94                                     S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


     Year Four                                                        BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
         Fall                            Spring                       The Master of Business Administration degree prepares gradu-
         MGT 451 Strategic               MGT 489 Senior Business      ates for broader management responsibilities or for specialized
          Management§                     Seminar§                    technical work in business. Its specific goals are to:

         PH 305 Business Ethics§ *       MGT 490 Internship§          •     foster understanding of today’s competitive global
                                                                            business environment;
         MBA 514 Quantitative            MBA 513 Organizational
          Methods for                     Communications§             •     develop the ability to identify problems, obtain relevant
          Management§
                                                                            information, devise and evaluate alternative approaches,
                                         MBA 516 Managerial
                                                                            and successfully implement the best choice;
         B.B.A. 300/400-level             Accounting§
           specialty course§
                                                                      •     establish a basis for dealing effectively with others —
                                                                            individuals and groups, in person and in writing — and to
         Social Sciences 300/400-
                                                                            become aware of recent developments in the behavioral
           level elective*
                                                                            sciences;

     Year Five                                                        •     obtain an interdisciplinary understanding of fundamental
                                                                            concepts and principles from the various business disci-
         Summer                          Spring
                                                                            plines in order to deal effectively with the problems that
         MBA 515 Organizational          ISY 503 Managing                   face tomorrow’s managers; and
          Behavior§                        Information Technology§
                                                                      •     encourage students to think broadly and to bridge all gaps
         LA 561 Law and the              MBA 524 Strategic                  between the theory and practice of business administration.
           Business Environment§          Marketing Management§
         Elective§                       MSC 516 Production and       Admission Requirements: It is strongly recommended that
         Fall                             Operations                  candidates have at least two years of work experience before
                                          Management§                 applying.
         MBA 518 Managerial
          Economics§ or MBA 520          Summer
                                                                      Degree Requirements
          Macroeconomics§                MBA 526 Strategic
                                                                      45 credits
         MBA 522 Corporate Finance§       Management Seminar§
                                                                          MBA 513 Organizational Communication
         MGT 560 Ethical Issues in       Two (2) electives§
                                                                          MBA 514 Quantitative Methods for Management
          Business and Society§
                                                                          MBA 515 Organizational Behavior
     §
     Requirement for the major or degree                                  MBA 516 Managerial Accounting

     *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.           LA 561 Law and the Business Environment
                                                                          MGT 560 Ethical Issues in Business and Society
                                                                          MSC 516 Production Operations and Management
                                                                          MBA 518 Managerial Economics or MBA 520 Macroeconomics
                                                                          ISY 503 Managing Information Technology
                                                                          MBA 522 Corporate Finance
                                                                          MBA 524 Strategic Marketing Management
                                                                          MBA 526 Strategic Management
                                                                          One (1) international course from the following: ECO 585 Global
                                                                            Markets and Economics, FIN 585 International Finance, MKT
                                                                            585 Global Marketing, MSC 585 Global Operations Strategy,
                                                                            or international course specified by track requirements
                                                                          Two (2) School of Business Administration 500-level elective
                                                                            courses or track requirements as follows:
                                S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                           95



MBA Track Options                                                 International Business Track
Students seeking a greater depth of knowledge may elect to        12 credits
  complete a track in their program of study. Track require-      Four (4) courses from the following: MKT 585 Global Marketing,
  ments may be substituted for the two electives. (Those            ECO 585 Global Markets and Economics, FIN 585
  completing a track may require more than 45 credit hours.)        International Finance, MGT 585 Global Business
Finance Track                                                       Management, MSC 585 Global Operations Strategy
15 credits                                                        Legal Administration Track
FIN 585 International Finance                                     9 credits
Four (4) courses from the following: FIN 502 Investment           LA 550 Law Office Management
  Analysis and Portfolio Management, FIN 503 Financial            LA 590 Supervising Legal Research and Writing
  Markets and Institutions, FIN 560 Advanced Financial
                                                                  LA 591 Advanced Legal Research and Writing/Computerized
  Management, FIN 582 Neural Networks in Finance and
                                                                    Legal Research
  Investing, FIN 590 Finance Seminar
                                                                  (Students in this track must complete MGT 585 International
(Students in this track must complete MBA 520
                                                                     Management to fulfill the international course requirement.)
   Macroeconomics as part of their program of study.)
                                                                  Marketing Track
Health Care Management Track
                                                                  12 credits
12 credits
                                                                  MKT 585 Global Marketing
HCM 510 Health Care Management
                                                                  Three (3) courses from the following: MKT 510 Advertising
HCM 520 Health Care Reimbursement Systems
                                                                    and Integrated Marketing Communications, MKT 512
HCM 535 Health Care Policy and Ethics                               Market Research, MKT 520 Business-to-Business Buying
LA 540 Health Care Law                                              Behavior and Strategic Selling, MKT 530 Promotional
Human Resource Management Track                                     Strategies, MKT 550 Marketing Seminar, MKT 560
                                                                    Marketing to the Federal Government, MKT 589 Marketing
9 credits
                                                                    High Technology Products and Services
Three (3) courses from the following: HRM 503 Training and
  Development, HRM 530 Foundations of Human Resource
                                                                ECONOMICS
  Management, HRM 531 Labor Relations, HRM 534 Total Pay
  Perspective, HRM 537 Human Resource Information
  Systems, HRM 538 Human Resource Selection and                 ECONOMICS IN SOCIETY (B.A.)
  Recruitment, HRM 539 Performance Management, OD 521           This major is designed as an interdisciplinary program of
  Organization Development and Change, OD 524 Consulting        studies, combining the primary study of economics with
  Skills                                                        related study in sociology and politics. Students pursuing this
Information Systems Track                                       major will investigate the basic economic problem of satisfying
12 credits                                                      material wants with limited resources within the broader
                                                                context of society’s values, objectives, and institutions.
ISY 501 Information Technologies
                                                                Students will be encouraged by advisors to choose their
Three (3) courses from the following: ISY 521 E-Business; ISY   elective courses with specific postgraduate goals in mind.
  525 Systems Analysis, Design, and Acquisition; ISY 510        Through careful selection of electives, students pursuing a B.A.
  Enterprise Data and Data Administration; ISY 515              in Economics in Society can prepare for careers in business, in
  Information Security and Telecommunications; ISY 523          international relations, or in social or public policy fields. The
  Knowledge Management; ISY 550 Supply Chain Management;        Economics in Society major can also provide sound preparation
  MSC 545 Project Management                                    for students considering law school or graduate studies in
                                                                economics, public policy, or business.
                                                                     Students in Economics in Society are also encouraged to
                                                                consider a minor in Mathematics.
                                                                     At the completion of this program, the student will be able
                                                                to use his or her professional knowledge, a variety of research
96                                        S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


     skills (bibliographic, quantitative, and computerized informa-         Year Two
     tion), and communication skills to:
                                                                                Fall                            Spring
     •       analyze how markets establish equilibria and identify
                                                                                ECO 210 Principles of           Politics/Sociology course§ **
             ethical issues of these market solutions;
                                                                                  Microeconomics§               Economics course§ ***
     •       work effectively as an entry-level research or policy econo-                                 §
                                                                                Politics/Sociology course **    Humanities elective*
             mist and/or analyst, and continue lifelong professional
             development;                                                       Two (2) Humanities              ISY 098 Access 2003*
                                                                                  electives*
     •       explain economic decision-making processes used by                                                 Two (2) electives
             consumers and businesses to satisfy material wants with            ISY 097 PowerPoint 2003
             limited resources; and                                               and Office XP
                                                                                  Integration*
     •       describe the political and social environment within
             which the economic policy is designed and implemented              Elective*
             and assess the economic costs and trade-offs of these
             policy options.                                                Year Three
                                                                                Fall                            Spring
     Internship Prerequisites: A minimum of 90 credits with a
                                                                                COM 300 Report Writing*         Economics course§ ***
     cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better and a cumulative GPA of 2.0
     or better in all Economics, Politics, and Sociology courses are            Economics course§ ***           Politics/Sociology course§ **
     required in order to register for the internship (ECO 490).                Politics/Sociology course§ **   Three (3) electives
                                                                                PH 305 Business Ethics*
     Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                                Elective*
         Year One
           Fall                              Spring                         Year Four
           MA 121 Introduction to            ECO 199 Principles of              Fall                            Spring
            Mathematical Problem               Macroeconomics§
                                                                                Economics course§ ***           ECO 490 Internship§
            Solving*                         EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                                Politics/Sociology course§ **   Economics course§ ***
           EN 101 Composition I*             MA 132 Statistical Analysis
                                                                                Humanities elective*            Two (2) electives
           PSY 100 Introduction to the       Humanities elective*
             Social Sciences*                                                   Two (2) electives
                                             ISY 096 Excel 2003 and
           Health elective*                    Windows XP*                  §
                                                                            Requirement for the major
           Science elective*                 Elective*                      *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
           ISY 095 Word 2003 and                                            Recommended Humanities courses include RST 210
             Computer Concepts*                                             Introduction to Religion or RST 211 Religions of the World, TH
           SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                         350 Social Morality: The Catholic Perspective, PH 301 Ethics
                                                                            and Public Policy, PH 309 Ethical Theory, HI 295 Introduction
                                                                            to Public History
                                                                            **Politics and Sociology course requirements: POL 205
                                                                            American Policy Process and POL 210 Western Political
                                                                            Concepts I or POL 211 Western Political Concepts II, SOC 303
                                                                            Development of Social Thought, SOC 350 Social Justice: Ethical
                                                                            Dilemmas in Social Context, one (1) additional Sociology or
                                                                            Politics 300/400-level course. These courses fulfill the Liberal
                                                                            Arts Core requirements for Social Sciences.
                                                                            ***Economics course requirements: ECO 332 Money and Banking
                                                                            or ECO 386 International Economics, ECO 305 Business and
                                                                            Economics of Sports or ECO 330 Managerial Economics, ECO
                                                                            431 Contemporary Issues in Economics, two (2) additional
                                                                            300/400-level Economics courses. These courses fulfill the
                                                                            Liberal Arts Core requirements for Social Sciences.
                                    S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                             97



ECONOMICS (MINOR)                                                     Admission Requirements: The School of Business
                                                                      Administration strongly recommends that candidates have at
Minor Requirements                                                    least two years of work experience before applying.
    ECO 199 Principles of Macroeconomics
                                                                      Degree Requirements
    ECO 210 Principles of Microeconomics
                                                                      36 credits
    Five (5) Economics elective courses approved by an Economics
      faculty advisor                                                     HCM 510 Health Care Management
                                                                          HCM 520 Health Care Reimbursement Systems or HCM 525
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT                                                     Health Care Management — Long-Term Care
                                                                          HCM 535 Health Care Policy and Ethics
HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT (M.S.)                                             HCM 550 Health Care Finance
The program’s mission is to provide the highest quality educa-            HCM 555 Health Care Strategic Planning and Marketing
tion in health care management in order to develop future                 HCM 565 Health Care Cases and Project
leaders who apply their skills in a market-driven health care             LA 540 Health Care Law
system. The program prepares students for a career in health care
                                                                          ECO 590 Health Care Economics
by providing core business skills integrated with specialized
training in the unique characteristics of the health care environ-        HRM 530 Foundations of Human Resource Management
ment. The curriculum focuses on the current and relevant issues           ISY 503 Managing Information Technology
in health care and encompasses the fast-paced and dynamic                 NU 590 Health Care Data Analysis
changes in the health care field. The program is committed to
                                                                          NU 591 Health Care Research
exhibiting the highest professional and ethical standards,
addressing the needs of both individuals and health care organi-
zations, providing health care education to the local community,      HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
and encouraging participation in community services. The              TRACK UNDER THE M.B.A.
program is also dedicated to contributing to the field through        See Business Administration (M.B.A.) beginning on page 94.
publication and scholarly and community activities.
     To accomplish its mission, the program’s goals are:              HUMAN RESOURCES
•     to identify, develop, and educate health care leaders in
      Northern Virginia, the District of Columbia, and the
                                                                      HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (M.A.)
      Maryland suburbs;
                                                                      This program prepares students to excel as specialist or gener-
•     to provide a curriculum that is meaningful and assists
                                                                      alist human resource professionals, managers, and consultants.
      students in developing the critical knowledge and skills to
                                                                      Students acquire competencies in all of the core human
      be effective managers and leaders in the health services
                                                                      resource management functional areas, within a systems
      industry;
                                                                      perspective and relating strategically to overall organization
•     to recruit and retain a faculty that is academically prepared   performance.
      to effectively respond to industry demands of health care             Students completing this program will:
      management and health care institutions;
                                                                      •     design, develop, and implement HR interventions appro-
•     to expand and contribute knowledge of the field through               priate to the issues, problems, and opportunities identified
      scholarly activities such as research and publication; and            through systematic analysis and research methods;
•     to be a valuable resource to the academic and health care       •     analyze performance requirements of individuals, groups,
      communities of Northern Virginia, the District of Columbia,           and organizations; select, design, and implement appropri-
      and the Maryland suburbs.                                             ate change solutions; and evaluate the impact of solutions
The M.S. in Health Care Management program is accredited by                 on performance and results;
the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management              •     operate effectively in a team environment both in a leader-
Education (CAHME).                                                          ship role and in a supportive role;
                                                                      •     manage HR issues in alignment with business strategies,
                                                                            goals, and outcomes and add value to the entire business
                                                                            enterprise;
98                                       S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


     •     develop, manage, and measure HR data through valid           INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN
           qualitative, quantitative, and technological methods; and    (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
     •     implement, continuously monitor, and modify HR initia-       This program prepares students to determine when training
           tives in alignment with personnel law and regulations,       and education solutions are appropriate, determine the
           ethical behavior, and diversity.                             requirements for instructional programs, design and develop
                                                                        instructional programs and supporting materials, and evalu-
     Admission Requirements: The School strongly recommends             ate the results of instructional programs.
     that candidates have at least two years of work experience
     before applying.                                                   Certificate Requirements
                                                                        15 credits
     Degree Requirements
                                                                          OD 521 Organization Development and Change
     36 credits
                                                                          HRM 503 Training and Development
         MGT 511 Business Essentials
                                                                          HRM 505 Research and Evaluation
         MGT 515 Principles and Practices of Group Performance
                                                                          HRM 509 Instructional Design Models and Strategies
         HRM 505 Research and Evaluation
                                                                          Elective
         OD 521 Organization Development and Change
         HRM 533 Strategic Human Resource Management
                                                                        ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT
         HRM 534 Total Pay Perspective                                  (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
         HRM 538 HR Selection and Recruitment                           This program allows students to concentrate on OD applica-
         HRM 539 Performance Management                                 tions and fieldwork.
         LA 535 Personnel Law
                                                                        Certificate Requirements
         Three (3) elective courses
                                                                        18 credits
                                                                          MGT 515 Principles and Practices of Group Performance
     HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
     (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)                                               OD 521 Organization Development and Change

     This program prepares students to practice in the core areas         OD 524 Consulting Skills
     of human resources. The program consists of a set of                 OD 525 Organization Theory and Design or MBA 515
     integrated human resource courses that reflect a systems               Organization Behavior
     perspective and strategic approach to managing human                 HRM 505 Research and Evaluation
     resources.
                                                                          Elective
     Certificate Requirements
     18 credits                                                         INFORMATION SYSTEMS
         HRM 505 Research and Evaluation
         HRM 534 Total Pay Perspective                                  INFORMATION SYSTEMS (B.S.)
         HRM 539 Performance Management                                 The Information Systems major prepares students with the
                                                                        knowledge and skills necessary for a career in today’s informa-
         OD 521 Organization Development and Change
                                                                        tion technology field. It recognizes the changing nature of the
         HRM 538 Human Resource Selection and Recruitment               field and prepares students to understand the principles behind
         HRM 533 Strategic Human Resource Management                    the technology so that they may continue to embrace changes
                                                                        once in the workplace or are prepared to pursue graduate study
     HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT                                          in information systems or a related field. Students take courses
     TRACK UNDER THE M.B.A.                                             in a broad range of information technology topics, including
                                                                        systems analysis and design, computer hardware and software,
     See Business Administration (M.B.A.) beginning on page 94.
                                                                        computer networking, database technology, application
                                                                        programming, and information security. The program recog-
                                                                        nizes the interrelationship of information systems and
                                 S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                           99



business practices, and students take a variety of business and   Year Two
management science courses. Information Systems courses are
                                                                      Fall                             Spring
also valuable electives for students in other majors and are
recommended as a minor field of study.                                ISY 205 Computer                 ISY 225 Systems Analysis
     Students majoring in Information Systems are advised to            Technology§                      and Design§
consider a minor in Business Administration or in Computer            MSC 205 Quantitative             MSC 300 Business Statistics§
Science.                                                               Analysis for IS§                Humanities elective*
                                                                      ISY/CS elective§                 Social Sciences elective*
Internship Prerequisites: A minimum of 90 credits with a
cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better and a cumulative GPA of 2.0           Humanities elective*             Elective*
or better in all courses required in the Information Systems          Science elective*                ISY 098 Access 2003*
major are needed in order to register for the internship (ISY
                                                                      ISY 097 PowerPoint 2003
400).
                                                                        and Office XP*
                                                                        Integration*
Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C- is
required in every course that serves as a prerequisite for a
higher-numbered course in the Information Systems major.          Year Three
                                                                      Fall                             Spring
Residency Requirement: Transfer students must complete 21
of their major credits (ISY/CS courses) at Marymount.                 ISY 310 Database                 ISY 300 Decision Analysis§
                                                                        Technology§                    ISY 330 Computer
Suggested Degree Plan                                                 ISY 370 Advanced                   Networking§
                                                                        Programming Concepts§          ISY/CS 300-level elective§
Year One
                                                                      MGT 304 Organizational           MKT 301 Principles of
  Fall                             Spring
                                                                       Management§                      Marketing§
  ISY 110 Foundations of           ISY 120 Programming
                                                                      ACT 201 Introduction to          Humanities elective*
    Information Systems§             Concepts§
                                                                        Financial Accounting§
  EN 101 Composition I*            MGT 123 The Business
                                                                      Social Sciences elective*
  SOC/POL/PSY 100                   Experience§
    Introduction to the Social     MA 155 Finite                  Year Four
    Sciences*                       Mathematics§ **                   Fall                             Spring
  Mathematics elective             EN 102 Composition II*             ISY 350 Project                  ISY 335 Computer Security§
   (dependent on place-            Humanities elective*                 Management§                    ISY 400 Internship§
   ment)**                                                            MGT 391 Business Writing
                                   ISY 096 Excel 2003 and                                              Social Sciences 300/400-
  ISY 095 Word 2003 and              Windows XP*                       and Speaking§ *                   level elective*
    Computer Concepts*                                                ISY/CS 300-level elective§       Elective*
  Health elective*                                                    Two (2) Humanities
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                              electives*
                                                                  §
                                                                  Requirement for the major
                                                                  *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                  **Students needing preparation for MA 155 Finite Mathematics
                                                                  should plan to complete that preparation during the freshman
                                                                  year. MA 155 fulfills the Liberal Arts Core requirement for
                                                                  mathematics.
100                                        S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


      INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MINOR)                                          •     analyze the trends and developments in the information
      A minor in Information Systems is a valuable complement                    systems field; and
      to many programs, particularly Business Administration, as           •     synthesize the skills and abilities of an information archi-
      computers play an increasingly important role in today’s                   tect and project manager through critical thinking,
      workplace.                                                                 decision making, and communications skills.
                                                                           Admission Requirements: The School of Business
      Minor Requirements
                                                                           Administration strongly recommends that candidates have at
          ISY 110 Foundations of Information Systems                       least two years of work experience before applying.
          ISY 120 Programming Concepts                                     Degree Requirements
          ISY 205 Computer Technology                                      36 credits (39 credits for those choosing a specialization)
          ISY 225 Systems Analysis and Design                                  ISY 501 Information Technology Infrastructure
          Two (2) ISY 300-level elective courses                               ISY 503 Managing Information Technology
                                                                               ISY 510 Enterprise Data and Data Administration
      INFORMATION SYSTEMS (M.S.)
                                                                               ISY 512 Quantitative Analysis for IT Decision Making
      This program is designed for individuals pursuing careers
                                                                               ISY 515 Information Security and Telecommunications
      designing, building, and operating the complex information
      systems central to the infrastructure of business and govern-            ISY 525 Systems Analysis, Design, and Acquisition
      ment agencies today. While providing a thorough grounding in             MGT 561 Ethics in the Information Age
      modern information technology, this program emphasizes the               ISY 565 IT Policy and Strategy
      efficient and effective management of information systems. It
                                                                               ISY 599 Information Systems Project
      is designed to provide the academic foundation for those who
      seek to become a chief information officer (CIO) or attain               Three (3) ISY/MSC elective courses, including MSC 545 Project
      another senior position, such as a consultant, systems integra-            Management for those not choosing a specialization, or a
      tor, or project manager in the field of information systems.               student may choose one specialization and complete the
            Students may choose to specialize in health care informat-           requirements as follows:
      ics, information security, or IS project management.                     Health Care Informatics
            Students completing the Information Systems program                HCM 510 Health Care Management
      are expected to make major contributions in their organiza-
                                                                               HCM 535 Health Care Policy and Ethics
      tions by being able to:
                                                                               ISY 545 Health Care Informatics
      •     manage enterprisewide information systems to ensure
            they meet the needs of the organization in today’s compet-         Any Information Systems 500-level elective or MSC 545 Project
            itive and global business environment;                               Management

      •     synthesize the underlying principles of the field, including       Information Security
            current issues in enterprisewide applications, data                CS 570-571 Computer Security I & II
            management, information security and privacy, and                  ISY 572 Information Assurance and Policy
            project management;
                                                                               ISY 573 Information Security Management
      •     analyze enterprises and functional areas within them to
                                                                               (Students who complete this specialization will also receive a
            understand how information systems can help manage the
                                                                                  graduate certificate in Computer Security and Information
            organization;
                                                                                  Assurance from the Department of Computer Science.)
      •     evaluate the role of data in an organization, including
                                                                               IS Project Management
            transactional applications and data warehousing;
                                                                               MSC 545 Project Management
      •     optimize the relationship between information and
            decision making;                                                   MSC 555 Program Management

      •     apply the relationship of people, process, and technology          MGT 515 Principles and Practices of Group Performance
            to information systems and the creation and operation of           ISY 523 Knowledge Management or ISY 550 Supply Chain
            information systems with ethical awareness;                          Management
                                 S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                        101



INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                             INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROGRAM
TRACK UNDER THE M.B.A.                                          MANAGEMENT (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
See Business Administration (M.B.A.) beginning on page 94.      This certificate is designed to prepare information systems
                                                                professionals to become program managers.
HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS
                                                                Certificate Requirements
(GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
                                                                18 credits
This program is designed for those who wish to pursue an
information systems career in a health care organization.         ISY 503 Managing Information Technology
Students will select courses in consultation with the program     ISY 512 Quantitative Analysis for IT Decision Making
directors of Information Systems and Health Care                  ISY 523 Knowledge Management
Management.
                                                                  MSC 545 Project Management
Certificate Requirements                                          MSC 555 Program Management
18 credits                                                        MGT 515 Principles and Practices of Group Performance
  Six (6) courses from the following: ISY 501 Information
    Technology Infrastructure, ISY 503 Managing Information     LEGAL ADMINISTRATION/
    Technology, ISY 510 Enterprise Data and Data                PARALEGAL STUDIES
    Administration, ISY 515 Information Security and
    Telecommunications, ISY 545 Health Care Informatics, HCM
                                                                PARALEGAL STUDIES
    510 Health Care Management, HCM 520 Health Care
                                                                (UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
    Reimbursement Systems, HCM 535 Health Care Policy and
    Ethics, LA 540 Health Care Law                              This certificate program is approved by the American Bar
                                                                Association (ABA). When a student receives a Paralegal Studies
                                                                certificate from an ABA-approved program, the student is not
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
                                                                licensed to practice law or to give legal advice. To receive the
(GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
                                                                undergraduate paralegal certificate, a student must successfully
This program offers current perspectives on the major issues    complete coursework and 24 hours of approved pro bono legal
facing information systems professionals.                       service to the community.
Certificate Requirements                                        Minimum Grade Requirement: A minimum grade of C- is
18 credits                                                      required in every course that serves as a prerequisite for a
                                                                higher-numbered legal specialty course in the Paralegal Studies
  ISY 501 Information Technology Infrastructure
                                                                certificate program.
  ISY 503 Managing Information Technology
  ISY 510 Enterprise Data and Data Administration               Certificate Requirements
  ISY 512 Quantitative Analysis for IT Decision Making          30 credits
  ISY 515 Information Security and Telecommunications             LA 280 Introduction to the Legal System
  ISY 525 Systems Analysis, Design, and Acquisition               LA 301 Civil Litigation
                                                                  LA 302 Criminal Litigation
                                                                  LA 305-306 General Practice I & II
                                                                  LA 391 Legal Research and Writing
                                                                  LA 408 Real Estate Practices or LA 409 Public Law and
                                                                    Procedure
                                                                  LA 490 Internship
                                                                  LA 491 Computerized Legal Research
                                                                  (LA 248-249 Business Law I & II are recommended, though not
                                                                     required.)
102                                      S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


      LEGAL ADMINISTRATION (M.A.)                                            HRM 530 Foundations of Human Resource Management
      Students in this program may choose from two tracks, depend-           LA 509 Public Law and Administrative Procedures
      ing upon their career goals. These tracks are approved by the          LA 550 Law Office Management
      American Bar Association. Graduates of ABA-approved programs
                                                                             LA 561 Law and the Business Environment
      are not licensed to practice law or to give legal advice.
                                                                             LA 562 Law, Computers, and the Internet
      Admission Requirements: The School of Business                         LA 590 Supervising Legal Research and Writing
      Administration strongly recommends that candidates have at
      least two years of work experience before applying.                    LA 591 Advanced Legal Research and Writing/Computerized
                                                                               Legal Research
      Sequence of classes: Students are encouraged to take LA 590            MGT 504 Management of Organizational Behavior
      and LA 591 early in the course sequence and LA 550 toward the          Two (2) Business 500-level elective courses (must be LA 501 and
      end of their program.                                                    LA 505 if the student seeks a Paralegal Studies certificate)

      Track I – Legal Specialty Training                                   Students enrolled in this track may also qualify to receive a
                                                                           Paralegal Studies certificate if they complete the graduate
      Track I prepares graduate students in master’s-level specialty
                                                                           certificate requirements described as follows.
      law courses to qualify as practicing paralegals or paralegal
      administrators.
                                                                           LEGAL ADMINISTRATION
      Degree Requirements                                                  TRACK UNDER THE M.B.A.
      36 credits                                                           See Business Administration (M.B.A.) beginning on page 94.
        LA 501 Civil and Criminal Procedure
        LA 505 General Legal Procedures                                    PARALEGAL STUDIES (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)

        LA 509 Public Law and Administrative Procedures                    This certificate is offered for those students who have a bache-
                                                                           lor’s degree and who wish to become certified paralegals. This
        LA 550 Law Office Management
                                                                           program is approved by the American Bar Association (ABA).
        LA 561 Law and the Business Environment                            When a student receives a Paralegal Studies certificate from an
        LA 562 Law, Computers, and the Internet                            ABA-approved program, the student is not licensed to practice
        LA 590 Supervising Legal Research and Writing                      law or to give legal advice. To receive the graduate Paralegal
                                                                           Studies certificate, a student must successfully complete
        LA 591 Advanced Legal Research and Writing/Computerized
                                                                           coursework and 24 hours of approved pro bono legal service to
          Legal Research
                                                                           the community.
        MGT 504 Management of Organizational Behavior
        One (1) LA 500-level elective course                               Certificate Requirements
        Two (2) Business 500-level elective courses                        18 credits
      Students enrolled in this track may also qualify to receive a        Students enrolling in this certificate program who have no
      Paralegal Studies certificate if they complete the graduate          prior paralegal or criminal justice experience must complete LA
      certificate requirements described on this page.                     500 Introduction to the Legal System or LA 561 Law and the
                                                                           Business Environment in addition to the following:
      Track II – Paralegals Moving into Paralegal                            LA 501 Civil and Criminal Procedures
      Administration
                                                                             LA 505 General Legal Procedures
      Track II prepares graduate students for administrative respon-
                                                                             LA 509 Public Law and Administrative Procedures
      sibilities as paralegal supervisors or for administering paralegal
      departments within law firms, corporate law departments, or            LA 562 Law, Computers, and the Internet
      law-related agencies.                                                  LA 590 Supervising Legal Research and Writing
                                                                             LA 591 Advanced Legal Research and Writing/Computerized
      Degree Requirements
                                                                               Legal Research
      36 credits
        MBA 516 Managerial Accounting
        FIN 500 Introduction to Financial Management
                                    S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N                                       103



MANAGEMENT                                                           Project Management Track
                                                                     MSC 545 Project Management
MANAGEMENT (M.S.)                                                    MSC 555 Program Management
This program addresses the changing role of managers and             MGT 506 Customer Relationship Management
helps students retool their skill sets to make them more effec-      MGT 510 Functional Processes for Re-engineering Organizations
tive in today’s organizations. Advances in information
                                                                     MGT 551 Negotiation Skills and Mediation
technology have dramatically altered the role of management.
For example, middle managers are no longer the coordinating          OD 526 Advanced Facilitation Skills
layer in a vertical bureaucracy. They are now active partici-
pants in strategy formulation and execution. Middle managers       ADVANCED LEADERSHIP
now trigger continual repositioning of an organization for its     (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
ongoing success.                                                   This program prepares students for the leadership challenges of
     The curriculum provides opportunities for students to         today’s workplace, incorporating courses from the Advanced
build the necessary skill sets in basic business competencies,     Leadership track of the M.S. in Management program.
communications, team building, negotiation, change manage-
ment, and interpersonal skills. The curriculum also builds         Certificate Requirements
competency in project management, an increasingly recognized       18 credits
discipline that is distinct from general management.                 MGT 506 Customer Relationship Management
     Students in the program will choose one of two tracks to
                                                                     MGT 507 Leadership Theory and Development Practices
complete their degree: the Advanced Leadership or Project
Management track.                                                    MGT 510 Functional Processes for Re-engineering Organizations
                                                                     MGT 515 Principles and Practices of Group Performance
Admission Requirements: It is strongly recommended that
candidates have at least two years of managerial experience          MGT 551 Negotiation Skills and Strategies
before applying.                                                     OD 521 Organization Development and Change

Course Waiver Policy: If a student can demonstrate a depth         LEADING AND MANAGING CHANGE
of prior experience and/or education in a required content area,
                                                                   (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
electives may be substituted for required courses.
                                                                   This program helps managers learn how to overcome resist-
Degree Requirements                                                ance to change, seek new alternatives, and connect, in a
                                                                   fundamental way, with the goals of their employees.
36 credits
  MBA 511 Business Essentials                                      Certificate Requirements
  MBA 513 Organizational Communication                             15 credits
  MBA 515 Organizational Behavior                                    MGT 507 Leadership Theory and Development Practices
  MGT 502 Entrepreneurship, Creativity, and the Organization         MGT 510 Functional Processes for Re-engineering Organizations
  MGT 560 Ethical Issues in Business and Society                     OD 521 Organization Development and Change
  LA 561 Law and the Business Environment                            Two (2) elective courses from the following: MGT 502
  18 credits from the selected track as follows:                       Entrepreneurship, Creativity, and Organization; MGT 506
                                                                       Customer Relationship Management; MGT 551 Negotiation
  Advanced Leadership Track
                                                                       Skills and Mediation; MSC 545 Project Management
  MGT 506 Customer Relationship Management
  MGT 507 Leadership Theory and Development Practices
  MGT 510 Functional Processes for Re-engineering Organizations
  MGT 515 Principles and Practices of Group Performance
  MGT 551 Negotiation Skills and Strategies
  OD 521 Organizational Development and Change
104                                    S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S T R AT I O N


      MANAGEMENT STUDIES                                                 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
      (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)                                             (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
      This program is coordinated by Marymount’s Office of               This certificate prepares students for this increasingly recog-
      Corporate Outreach to provide customized education to              nized and valued discipline, incorporating courses from the
      employees of a client corporation or organization. The             Project Management track of the M.S. in Management program.
      University can provide classes on-site at the client’s location.
      The six courses leading to the certificate of Management           Certificate Requirements
      Studies are selected by the corporate or organizational sponsor    18 credits
      from those offered by the School of Business Administration.         MSC 545 Project Management
      These courses would be especially chosen to meet the needs of
                                                                           MSC 555 Program Management
      the individual organization, but must be approved by the dean
      of the School of Business Administration. Students may be            MGT 506 Customer Relationship Management
      eligible to transition to a School of Business Administration        MGT 510 Functional Processes for Re-engineering Organizations
      degree program upon the successful completion of this certifi-       MGT 551 Negotiation Skills and Strategies
      cate program.
                                                                           OD 526 Advanced Facilitation Skills
                             S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                          105




School of Education and                                             •   two letters of recommendation that speak directly to the
                                                                        applicant’s academic and interpersonal skills; and
Human Services                                                      •   a personal statement describing the applicant’s
Dean: Dr. Wayne Lesko                                                   background and motivation for entering the field of study
The core mission of the School of Education and Human                   for which he/she is applying.
Services is to enable students to serve as agents of positive           Deadlines:
change for individuals and in the global community.                     Students are admitted for the fall semester only.
     The School offers baccalaureate degree programs in three           Completed applications must be received by February 15.
major disciplines: Criminal Justice, Psychology, and Sociology.         Applications received after February 15 will be considered
At the undergraduate level, the School also supports teaching           for a future academic year.
licensure programs in various disciplines.
                                                                        After the initial review of an applicant’s preliminary
     For those considering study beyond the undergraduate
                                                                        materials, he or she may be invited to participate in a two-
level, the School offers graduate programs in Counseling,
                                                                        hour interview process designed to assess interpersonal
Education, Forensic Psychology, Pastoral Counseling, and
                                                                        skills. The process includes group and individual inter-
School Counseling.
                                                                        views and an orientation to the program. All application
Minimum Grade Requirements                                              materials must be received in order to be considered for an
                                                                        interview. Each program conducts interviews in March or
Undergraduates: see individual programs
                                                                        April.
Graduate Degree-seeking Students: Unless otherwise indicated, a
minimum grade of C is needed to receive credit for a graduate           Following the interview process, the Counseling faculty
course in the School.                                                   will review the entire application and render a final
Graduate Certificate-seeking Students: All certificate coursework       decision based on an assessment of both academic and
must be completed with a minimum grade of B.                            interpersonal appropriateness for the program and the
                                                                        counseling profession. Applicants will be notified of their
Nondegree Admission: Graduate nondegree admission, in
                                                                        status by the Office of Admissions and are asked not to
programs which permit it, is limited to one semester (12 credits)
                                                                        contact the Counseling Department directly.
in the School of Education and Human Services. See individual
program descriptions for further restrictions or requirements.          See graduate program handbooks for detailed information.

                                                                    Admission Requirements for Certificate Programs: See
COUNSELING
                                                                    “Certificate-Seeking Graduate Students” section on page 20.
Marymount offers the M.A. in Community Counseling, Pastoral         Applicants for the Counseling certificate and Certificate of
Counseling, Pastoral and Spiritual Care, and School Counseling.     Advanced Studies in Pastoral Counseling must already hold a
The Community Counseling and School Counseling programs             master’s degree in Counseling or a related field.
are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling            Special permission by the Counseling faculty is required
and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Many courses are         for clinical courses.
also available to students majoring in other fields.
     Marymount also offers a unique dual-degree program, in         Admission Policies: Students admitted to other Marymount
which a student can earn a Master of Arts in Community              graduate programs must meet the Counseling programs admis-
Counseling with licensure eligibility and a Master of Arts in       sions requirements before they transfer into the program.
Forensic Psychology. (For more information about
Marymount’s Forensic Psychology program, see page 121.)                 Nondegree Students: Nondegree students may not regis-
Admission Requirements for Degree Programs: In addition                 ter for the following courses: PS 522, PS 523, PS 560, PS
to all general University graduate admission requirements (see          561, PS 597, PS 599.
page 19), the following are required:
                                                                    Academic Progression: The Counseling faculty will review the
•    a bachelor’s degree and acceptable GPA (an undergraduate
                                                                    academic progress and professional development of students in
     major in Psychology is preferred, however candidates from
                                                                    all graduate programs each semester. Students must demon-
     other fields will be considered);
                                                                    strate appropriate academic and interpersonal skills in order to
•    official transcripts of all postsecondary education;           progress to practicum and internship placement. Details of the
•    acceptable scores on the GRE (including the Analytical         review process and procedures can be found in the graduate
     Writing score), as determined by the Department;               program handbooks.
106                               S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      Internship Prerequisite: In order to be admitted to an intern-       Degree Requirements
      ship, students must have completed the internship application        48 credits
      process, which includes attending a mandatory meeting one
                                                                             PS 500 Research and Evaluation
      semester prior to the placement, a review of student academic
      progress, completion of appropriate paperwork, submission of           PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology
      the $50 required application fee, documentation of student pro-        PS 502 Foundations, Ethics, and Professional Issues in
      fessional liability insurance, and permission of the faculty.            Community Counseling
           Students must complete all prerequisites and 24 credits           PS 503 Advanced Human Growth and Development
      prior to registering for PS 597 Practicum. PS 597 and 30 credit
                                                                             PS 510 Survey of Testing and Assessment
      hours of the program must be completed prior to internship
      placement.                                                             PS 517 Neuropsychological Issues, Treatments, and Assessments
                                                                             PS 520 Theories of Counseling
      Legal Limitations of Practice: The practice of counseling is           PS 522 Counseling for Individuals
      regulated by state laws. Questions concerning licensure in a
                                                                             PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques
      specific state should be directed to that state’s Board of
      Professional Counselors. Before being placed in a practicum or         PS 530 Career Development Counseling
      internship site, agencies may require a national criminal back-        PS 536 Advanced Counseling: Theories and Techniques
      ground check of the student. The cost of the investigation             PS 551 Multicultural Counseling
      (approximately $50) may be borne by the student. Students are
                                                                             PS 597 Practicum
      required to obtain and present proof of liability insurance
      prior to the start of a practicum or internship experience.            PS 599 Internship (6 credits)
                                                                             One (1) Counseling elective, depending on student goals and
      Minimum Grade Requirement: PS 522, PS 523, PS 597, PS 599                interests. Students should consult with their state licensing
      require a minimum grade of B to advance in the program.                  board to determine an appropriate elective. (NOTE: PS 509
                                                                               and PS 524 are required for DC, Maryland, and Virginia licen-
      Research Requirement: All graduate students are required to              sure): PS 505 Advanced Study of Individuals with
      log a minimum of 20 hours of research assistance under the               Exceptionalities, PS 508 Crisis Intervention, PS 509
      guidance of one or more members of the Counseling or                     Substance Abuse Assessment and Intervention, PS 513
      Forensic Psychology faculty. See the student handbook for                Assessment of Personality and Social Functioning, PS 524
      details.                                                                 Theories and Techniques of Family Counseling, PS 529
                                                                               Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence, PS 534
      Residency Requirement: Clinical courses (PS 522, PS 523, PS              Counseling Children and Adolescents
      597, PS 599) must be taken at Marymount.                               With prior approval of faculty, other elective courses can be
                                                                              applied toward the student’s degree.
      Transfer Policies: Students in the Counseling programs
      requesting course substitutions or course transfer from other
                                                                           COUNSELING (POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE)
      institutions may be required to submit paperwork for review
      by the Graduate Counseling Course Review Committee.                  Individuals who already have a master’s degree in Counseling
                                                                           from an accredited institution and who are working toward
                                                                           national certification or licensure as a professional counselor
      COMMUNITY COUNSELING (M.A.)
                                                                           may opt for this program, which consists of a minimum of 18
      This program provides training and skills in counseling theory,      semester credits of graduate coursework. Courses must be
      practice, and research to prepare graduates for work in applied      selected in conjunction with a faculty advisor. Special permis-
      settings where training at the master’s level is appropriate. The    sion of the Counseling faculty is required to take clinical
      program also provides a sound foundation for working toward          courses.
      licensure as well as for doctoral-level study. A focus on training
      in techniques applicable to specific populations provides
      experiences that are transferable to the contemporary
      workplace.
                            S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                          107



COMMUNITY COUNSELING/                                                 PS 584 Psychology of Criminal Behavior or SOC 507 Juvenile
FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (M.A./M.A.)                                         Justice
The combined Community Counseling and Forensic Psychology             PS 585 Forensic Assessment
program provides students with the skills and knowledge               PS 597C Practicum
required to provide ethical and effective evaluation and thera-
                                                                      PS 599C Internship (6 credits)
peutic counseling services in a variety of forensic settings,
including probation and parole, victim assistance, policing, law      SOC 510 Theories of Social Deviance
enforcement and investigation, expert evaluation, dual diagno-        Elective
sis settings, and civil/criminal testimony. To accomplish this
goal, the dual program provides a balance between traditional       PASTORAL AND SPIRITUAL CARE (M.A.)
psychological knowledge and skills and specialized understand-
                                                                    This is a nonlicensure program that seeks to train competent
ing and experience within the civil and criminal justice systems.
                                                                    clinicians who will provide counseling services to individuals
     Graduates of this program will be eligible to sit for the
                                                                    and groups from a faith-based and spiritual perspective in a
National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) examination
                                                                    variety of settings.
and to begin supervised experience necessary for licensure as a
licensed professional counselor. Students must take PS 597C         Service/Research Requirement: All students in the Pastoral
Counseling Practicum and PS 599C Counseling Internship to           Counseling programs are required to log a minimum of 30
meet licensure requirements.                                        hours of service in the community or for the University and 20
     Dual program students will be awarded two Master of Arts       hours of research.
degrees.
                                                                    Degree Requirements
Admission Requirement: Students must meet the admissions
                                                                    48 credits
criteria for both the Forensic Psychology and Community
Counseling programs.                                                  PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology
                                                                      PS 502 Foundations, Ethics, and Professional Issues in
Degree Requirements                                                     Community Counseling
75 credits                                                            PS 503 Advanced Human Growth and Development
  PS 500 Research and Evaluation                                      PS 508 Crisis Intervention
  PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology                                     PS 509 Substance Abuse Assessment and Intervention
  PS 502 Foundations, Ethics, and Professional Issues in              PS 520 Theories of Counseling
    Community Counseling
                                                                      PS 522 Counseling for Individuals
  PS 503 Advanced Human Growth and Development
                                                                      PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques
  PS 507 Applied Social Psychology
                                                                      PS 524 Theories and Techniques of Family Counseling
  PS 509 Substance Abuse Assessment and Intervention
                                                                      PS 540 Contemporary and Historical Religious Perspectives
  PS 510 Survey of Testing and Assessment
                                                                      PS 541 Pastoral Counseling Integration
  PS 517 Neuropsychological Issues, Treatments, and Assessments
                                                                      PS 542 Grief and Loss
  PS 520 Theories of Counseling
                                                                      PS 551 Multicultural Counseling
  PS 522 Counseling for Individuals
                                                                      PS 549 Moral and Spiritual Development and Ethical Issues in
  PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques                                    Counseling
  PS 524 Theories and Techniques of Family Counseling                 PS 597PC Practicum in Pastoral Counseling
  PS 530 Career Development Counseling                                Elective
  PS 536 Advanced Counseling: Theories and Techniques
  PS 551 Multicultural Counseling                                   PASTORAL COUNSELING (M.A.)
  PS 580 Foundations in Forensic Psychology                         This program trains students in theory, research, and practice
  PS 581 Psychology and the Law
                                                                    to provide counseling services to individuals and groups from a
                                                                    faith-based and spiritual perspective in a variety of settings.
  PS 582 Advanced Issues in Forensic Psychology
108                                  S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      Service/Research Requirement: All students in the Pastoral            PS 540 Contemporary and Historical Religious Perspectives
      Counseling programs are required to log a minimum of 30               PS 541 Pastoral Counseling Integration
      hours of service in the community or for the University and 20
                                                                            PS 542 Grief and Loss
      hours of research.
                                                                            PS 549 Moral and Spiritual Development and Ethical Issues in
      Degree Requirements                                                     Counseling
      60 credits
        PS 500 Research and Evaluation                                    SCHOOL COUNSELING (M.A.)
        PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology                                   The School Counseling program provides the education and
                                                                          training necessary to work as a school counselor in an elemen-
        PS 502 Foundations, Ethics, and Professional Issues in
                                                                          tary, middle, or secondary school. Students who successfully
          Community Counseling
                                                                          complete this program will receive endorsement in Virginia as
        PS 503 Advanced Human Growth and Development                      a school counselor (grades PK-12).
        PS 508 Crisis Intervention                                             School Counseling courses may be offered in the morning,
        PS 509 Substance Abuse Assessment and Intervention                afternoon, or evening. Field experience, practicum, and intern-
                                                                          ship hours must be completed when school is in regular
        PS 510 Survey of Testing and Assessment
                                                                          session: September–June, Monday–Friday, 7 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
        PS 520 Theories of Counseling
        PS 522 Counseling for Individuals                                 Degree Requirements
        PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques                                Some of these courses require field experience and have prereq-
                                                                          uisite or corequisite coursework. Please see the course
        PS 524 Theories and Techniques of Family Counseling
                                                                          descriptions for details.
        PS 530 Career Development Counseling
                                                                          51 credits
        PS 540 Contemporary and Historical Religious Perspectives
                                                                            PS 500 Research and Evaluation
        PS 541 Pastoral Counseling Integration
                                                                            PS 503 Advanced Human Growth and Development
        PS 542 Grief and Loss
                                                                            PS 505 Advanced Study of Individuals with Exceptionalities
        PS 549 Moral and Spiritual Development and Ethical Issues in
                                                                            PS 510 Survey of Testing and Assessment
          Counseling
                                                                            PS 520 Theories of Counseling
        PS 551 Multicultural Counseling
                                                                            PS 522 Counseling for Individuals (School Counseling section)
        PS 597PC Practicum in Pastoral Counseling
                                                                            PS 523 Group Counseling Techniques (School Counseling section)
        PS 599PC Internship
                                                                            PS 524 Theories and Techniques of Family Counseling

      PASTORAL COUNSELING                                                   PS 529 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence
      (POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE)                                           PS 530 Career Development Counseling (School Counseling
      This certificate is available for individuals who already possess       section)
      a master’s degree in Counseling or a related field, and wish to       PS 534 Counseling Children and Adolescents
      gain the skills necessary to provide counseling services from a       PS 551 Multicultural Counseling
      faith-based and spiritual perspective in a religious/spiritual
                                                                            PS 560 Foundations, Ethics, and Professional Issues in School
      setting. Special permission of the Counseling faculty is
                                                                              Counseling
      required to take clinical courses.
                                                                            PS 561 Practices of School Counseling
      Certificate Requirements                                              PS 597S School Counseling Practicum
      18 credits                                                            PS 599S Internship (6 credits)
      Alternate courses may be substituted, upon approval, if any of
      the following courses have been successfully completed during
      a master’s program:
        PS 508 Crisis Intervention
        PS 524 Theory and Techniques of Family Counseling
                             S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                                109



CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                       Year Two
                                                                           Fall                               Spring
Internship Prerequisites: When other requirements are suc-                 CJ 300 Writing for Criminal        SOC 250 Deviant Behavior§
cessfully completed in the senior year, the student is placed in an          Justice§ *                       CJ 209 The Criminal Justice
internship (CJ 400) for 280 hours (6 credits). Prerequisites for the                                      §
                                                                           SOC 202 Social Problems              System§
internship are a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better,
a grade of C- or better in all required courses for the major, a           Humanities (English                LA 302 Criminal Litigation§
minimum of 18 credits earned at Marymount, and permission of                Literature) elective*             MA 132 Statistical Analysis*
the internship coordinator. If the student cannot complete the             Social Sciences elective*          Humanities elective (PH 310
prerequisites for the internship, the faculty retains the right to         Elective                            General Ethics recom-
dismiss the student from the program.                                                                          mended)*

Residency Requirement: Transfer students must complete the
                                                                       Year Three
internship and at least 18 credits in Marymount Criminal
Justice courses, including CJ 304, CJ 308, and CJ 495.                     Fall                               Spring
                                                                                                  §
                                                                           SOC 305 Criminology                CJ 312 Criminal Justice
CRIMINAL JUSTICE (B.A.)                                                    CJ 307 Juvenile Justice    §         Management§

The B.A. program is distinctive in its combined emphasis of                CJ 308 Principles of Forensic      CJ 304 Applied Research
introductory professional skills and theoretical foundations.                Science§                           Methods§
Career preparation reinforced by commitment to lifelong learn-             Humanities elective*               CJ 310 Policing in American
ing and advanced education that extends beyond the                                                              Society§
                                                                           Social Sciences 300/400-
baccalaureate level are central to the study of this demanding                                                Humanities elective*
                                                                             level elective*
field of inquiry. Simulations and review of problem-solving
                                                                                                              Major elective§ **
methods from actual cases are used to enhance the student’s
understanding of lectures and materials. By examining
                                                                       Year Four
decision-making processes, including policy analysis and the
day-to-day practical operations of various components of the               Fall                               Spring
criminal justice system, participants learn to value and apply             CJ 311 Correctional                CJ 400 Internship§
“theory to practice.”                                                        Institutions§                    CJ 495 Senior Seminar§
     Exploration of traditional and contemporary models of                 Three (3) Major electives§ **      Major elective§ **
crime prevention, criminal investigation, jurisprudence,
                                                                           Elective                           Two (2) electives*
punishment and rehabilitation, organization and administra-
tive theory help prepare graduates for eventual advancement to         §
                                                                       Requirement for the major
management positions in law enforcement, correctional, and
court (probation and parole) agencies. Graduates of this rapidly       *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
developing field also find positions in corporate security firms       **Major electives: SOC 200 Law and Society, SOC 202 Social
and with government and private research agencies.                     Problems, SOC 303 Development of Social Thought, SOC 322
                                                                       Race and Ethnic Relations, CJ 310 Policing in American Society,
Suggested Degree Plan                                                  CJ 311 Correctional Institutions, CJ 320 Cybercrime and Digital
Year One                                                               Terrorism, PH 301 Ethics and Public Policy, PSY 312 Social
                                                                       Psychology, PSY 332 Psychology of Addictions, PSY 333
   Fall                               Spring
                                                                       Abnormal Child and Adolescent Psychology
   EN 101 Composition I*              EN 102 Composition II*
   ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100                Humanities (History)
     Introduction to the Social        elective*
     Sciences*                        Health elective*
   Humanities                         Social Sciences elective*
    (Theology/Religious
                                      Science elective*
    Studies) elective*
   Two (2) electives
   SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
110                                 S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      CRIMINAL JUSTICE–FORENSIC SCIENCE                                    Year Three
      CONCENTRATION (B.S.)                                                     Fall                               Spring
      This major with a concentration in Forensic Science is designed          CJ 308 Principles of Forensic      CJ 309 Principles of Forensic
      for students seeking basic training in the sciences, law, and              Science I§                         Science II: Advanced
      physical evidence in order to increase specialized orientation to                                             Criminalistics§
                                                                               PSY 250 Biological Bases of
      professional areas of work such as criminal investigation, crime
                                                                                 Behavior§                        CJ 312 Criminal Justice
      scene processing, and crime laboratories. Minimally, this
                                                                               BIO 260 Microbiology       §         Management§
      program introduces students to the application of science to
      law. Investigators in various law enforcement agencies (state            Social Sciences 300/400-           CJ 304 Applied Research
      and local police, FBI, ATF, DEA, Secret Service) at all levels are         level elective*                    Methods§
      expected to process rudimentary knowledge of various lab                 Humanities elective*               BIO 262 Genetics§
      techniques, including serology (DNA testing), hair and fiber                                                Humanities elective*
      analyses, gunshot residue testing, toxicology, and drug analyses.
                                                                           Year Four
      Suggested Degree Plan
                                                                               Fall                               Spring
      Year One
                                                                                                      §
                                                                               SOC 305 Criminology                CJ 400 Internship§
        Fall                               Spring
                                                                               Two (2) Criminal Justice           CJ 495 Senior Seminar§
        EN 101 Composition I*              EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                                 electives                        Elective*
        SOC 100 Introduction to the        Humanities (Philosophy)
                                                                               Elective*
          Social Sciences*                  elective*
        MA 132 Statistics*                 Humanities
        Health elective*                    (Theology/Religious
                                            Studies) elective*             §
                                                                           Requirement for the major
        Humanities (History)
         elective*                         Social Sciences elective*       *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar           Elective
                                                                           CRIMINAL JUSTICE (MINOR)

      Year Two                                                             Minor Requirements
        Fall                               Spring                              Seven (7) courses from the following: CJ 209 The Criminal
                                                                                 Justice System, CJ 300 Writing for Criminal Justice, CJ 307
        SOC 250 Deviant Behavior§          CJ 209 The Criminal Justice
                                                                                 Juvenile Justice, CJ 308 Principles of Forensic Science I, CJ
        BIO 151 General Biology I * §        System§
                                                                                 310 Policing in American Society, CJ 311 Correctional
        CHM 151 Principles of              LA 302 Criminal Litigation§           Institutions, CJ 312 Criminal Justice Management, CJ 320
          Chemistry I§                     BIO 152 General Biology II§           Cybercrime and Digital Terrorism, SOC 131 Principles of
        Social Sciences elective*          CHM 152 Principles of                 Sociology, SOC 200 Law and Society, SOC 202 Social
                                             Chemistry II§                       Problems, SOC 250 Deviant Behavior, SOC 305 Criminology,
        CJ 300 Writing for Criminal
                                                                                 SOC 322 Race and Ethnic Relations
          Justice§ *                       Humanities (English
                                            Literature) elective*
                                                                           CRIMINAL JUSTICE/FORENSIC SCIENCE
                                                                           (UNDERGRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
                                                                           This certificate program is available for individuals desiring an
                                                                           introduction to the crucial role played by forensic science in
                                                                           providing scientific and foundational information for investi-
                                                                           gations and to the courts. There are many forensic science
                                                                           specialty areas (i.e. forensic entomology, forensic computer
                                                                           science, forensic psychology, forensic nursing), but courses
                                                                           required for this certificate will provide a foundation for under-
                                                                           standing the importance of recognition, identification,
                                                                           individualization, and evaluation of physical evidence in legal
                                                                           proceedings through the application of the natural sciences.
                                S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                            111



Residency Requirement: Students must complete the fol-                  and K-12 levels. Undergraduates major in an appropriate liberal
lowing courses at Marymount University: CJ 209, CJ 308, CJ              arts or science and complete their teacher licensure program
309, CJ 495, BIO 151, and CHM 151.                                      requirements as outlined in the degree plan. All programs are
                                                                        designed to prepare graduates to enter the job market as begin-
Certificate Requirements                                                ning professionals in their respective disciplines. Available
23 credits                                                              teaching licensure disciplines are noted beginning on page 112.
    BIO 151 General Biology I                                                Graduate programs leading to a Master of Education and
                                                                        initial licensure are: Elementary Education (grades PK-6);
    CHM 151 Principles of Chemistry I
                                                                        Secondary Education (grades 6-12 in Biology, Chemistry,
    CJ 209 The Criminal Justice System                                  Computer Science, Earth and Space Science, English, History
    CJ 308 Principles of Forensic Science I                             and Social Science, Mathematics, and Physics); English as a
    CJ 309 Principles of Forensic Science II: Advanced Criminalistics   Second Language (grades K-12); and Learning Disabilities
                                                                        (grades K-12). A licensure program leading to a Master of Arts in
    LA 302 Criminal Litigation
                                                                        School Counseling (elementary, middle, or secondary) is also
    PSY 250 Biological Bases of Behavior                                available through the Department of Counseling. Information
                                                                        about the School Counseling program can be found on page
FORENSIC COMPUTING (UNDERGRADUATE                                       108.
MINOR OR POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE)                                     The School also offers two nonlicensure programs at the
                                                                        graduate level: a Master of Education in Catholic School
This undergraduate minor and post-baccalaureate certificate
                                                                        Leadership and a Master of Education in Professional Studies.
program is offered jointly by the Department of Mathematics
                                                                             Detailed information about all graduate Education
and Computer Science in the School of Arts and Sciences and
                                                                        programs begins on page 112.
the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice in the
                                                                             All Marymount University teacher education programs are
School of Education and Human Services. For further informa-
                                                                        approved by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher
tion about the minor, see page 63; information about the
                                                                        Education (NCATE) and the Virginia Department of Education.
post-baccalaureate certificate can be found on page 65.
                                                                        Program requirements are subject to revision based on changes
                                                                        in the Commonwealth of Virginia licensure requirements. More
EDUCATION                                                               than 30 states share reciprocity with Virginia.
The mission of the Department of Education is to provide
effective and affective educational leaders for global learning         Legal Limitations of Practice: The practice of teaching is reg-
communities.                                                            ulated by state laws. Questions concerning licensure in a specif-
     Marymount students, both undergraduate and graduate,               ic state should be directed to that state’s Board of Education.
are prepared to be:                                                     Students may be required to submit a national criminal back-
                                                                        ground check before being placed as a student-teacher. The cost
•     critical thinkers who understand and analyze content,
                                                                        of the investigation (approximately $50) may be borne by the
      behavior, and data for instructional decision making, who
                                                                        student.
      reflect on the context of the classroom and the outcomes
      of their students, and who use strategic problem solving          The Student-Teaching Experience
      to support the development of all learners;
                                                                        Students seeking teaching licensure reserve one semester for
•     effective practitioners who demonstrate a thorough                the student-teaching experience. Student teaching is the culmi-
      knowledge of content, human development, and pedagogy             nation of the Marymount teacher-education program and
      and who use the communication, technology, manage-                reflects the degree to which a student will be effective as a
      ment, and pedagogical skills necessary to help all learners       classroom teacher. Complete information about application
      develop and achieve; and                                          procedures for student teaching can be found on page 115.
•     caring professionals who exhibit high ethical standards, a
      respectful attitude, and a dedication to teaching and learn-      Teacher Licensure Pass Rates
      ing as they work and interact with diverse populations of         In October 1998, the U.S. Congress enacted amendments to the
      children, their families, and their communities.                  Higher Education Act (HEA). As amended, Title II of the HEA
Through a variety of programs, Marymount undergraduate                  addressed the issue of the quality of teacher preparation by
students may earn Virginia licensure at elementary, secondary,          including new accountability measures including reporting
                                                                        requirements for institutions and states on teacher preparation
112                               S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      and licensing. As required by the Act, the results of those who   Elementary Education (PK-6) Licensure (B.A. in Liberal
      completed the Marymount University Education program              Studies)—See Liberal Studies (page 82) under School of Arts
      during the 2004-05 academic year (graduated in December           and Sciences for a degree plan.
      2004, spring 2005, and summer 2005) are listed on page 118.
                                                                        English with Secondary-level Teaching Licensure (B.A. in
      UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION                               English)—See English (page 67) under School of Arts and
                                                                        Sciences for a degree plan.
      Admission Requirements: In addition to the
                                                                        English as a Second Language with K-12 Teaching Licensure
      Universitywide admission requirements (see page 15), appli-
                                                                        (B.A. in English)—See English (page 68) under School of Arts
      cants to the undergraduate teaching licensure programs
                                                                        and Sciences for a degree plan.
      must fulfill the following to be considered for acceptance
      into the teacher education program:                               History/Social Science with Secondary-level Teaching
                                                                        Licensure (B.A. in History)—See History (page 75) under
      •   notify their major advisor of intent to pursue licensure
                                                                        School of Arts and Sciences for a degree plan.
          during the freshman year;
                                                                        Learning Disabilities with K-12 Teaching Licensure (B.A. in
      •   complete ED 245E Exploring Teaching or ED 245S
                                                                        Psychology)—See Psychology (page 120) under School of
          Educational Foundations for Secondary Teachers during
                                                                        Education and Human Services for a degree plan.
          the sophomore year with a grade of C or better;
                                                                        Mathematics with Secondary-level Teaching Licensure (B.S.
      •   submit an application for the teacher licensure program
                                                                        in Mathematics)—See Mathematics (page 85) under School of
          upon completion of ED 245E or ED 245S. (See “The Student
                                                                        Arts and Sciences for a degree plan.
          Teaching Experience” on page 115 for further details.) At
          the time of application students must have passing scores,    Undergraduate Add-on Endorsements
          as set by the Virginia Department of Education, for the
                                                                            English as a Second Language—Available for English majors
          Praxis I exam or the SAT. (See the department chair for
                                                                            who seek an additional licensure in ESL. See English (page
          SAT scoring criteria.) The Praxis I exam must be taken
                                                                            69) for requirements.
          while students are enrolled in ED 245E or ED 245S.
                                                                            Journalism—See Communications major (page 62) for
          Praxis I      Passing Score*
                                                                            requirements.
          Mathematics 178
          Reading       178                                                 Speech Communication—See Communications major (page
          Writing       176                                                 62) for requirements.
          *or a composite score of 532
                                                                        Minimum Grade Requirements: A minimum grade of C in ED
      •   minimum of 2.5 GPA overall; and
                                                                        245E and ED 245S. A minimum grade of C- in all other required
      •   minimum of 3.0 GPA in the major for secondary programs        Professional Studies (Education) courses is needed for program
                                                                        completion.
      Residency Requirement: Transfer students must be enrolled
      in ED 245E or ED 245S before applying to the program.
                                                                        GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION
      Undergraduate Licensure Programs                                  Admission Requirements for Degree Programs: Formal
      The program of studies for each teaching licensure program is     application for admission to the teacher education programs is
      described in the major discipline section of this catalog.        required. In addition to the Universitywide graduate admission
      Students in the following programs will fulfill the curriculum    requirements (see page 19), applicants to the M.Ed. program
      requirements of the respective discipline — earning a degree in   must fulfill the following to be considered for acceptance:
      that field — and complete all Professional Studies requirements   •   submit proof of a bachelor’s degree with a minimum 2.5
      needed for Virginia licensure, including field experience and         GPA;
      student teaching:
                                                                        •   interview with a faculty advisor in Education;
      Art with K-12 Teaching Licensure (B.A. in Art)—See Art (page
                                                                        •   submit two recommendations;
      56) under School of Arts and Sciences for a degree plan.
                                                                        •   submit an undergraduate transcript to an academic
      Biology with Secondary-level Teaching Licensure (B.S. in
                                                                            advisor to determine adequacy of undergraduate general
      Biology)—See Biology (page 60) under School of Arts and
                                                                            education for licensure requirements;
      Sciences for a degree plan.
                                                                        •   present acceptable Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or Graduate
                                                                            Record Exam (GRE) scores (see note on page 113); and
                            S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                          113



•   present passing scores, as set by the Virginia Department        Graduate Licensure Programs
    of Education, for the Praxis I exam or the SAT. (See the
    department chair for SAT scoring criteria.)                      ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, PK-6 (M.ED.)
    Praxis I       Passing Score*                                    This program is designed for those who have a strong liberal
    Mathematics 178                                                  arts undergraduate or graduate degree, who wish to teach in
    Reading        178                                               the elementary setting (grades PK-6). Individuals must provide
    Writing        176                                               evidence of a wide range of general studies competencies.
    *or a composite score of 532
    (Praxis I scores are not required for acceptance to the          Degree Requirements
    Catholic School Leadership or Professional Studies               39 credits
    programs.)                                                       Many courses require field experience. See course descriptions
NOTE: All scores should reflect testing within the last five years   for details.
or be subject to review by the Admission, Progression, and           (ED 502 and ED 503 are required as the first courses in this
Graduation Committee. Applicants who have previously                 program since they provide the foundation for all other
completed admission requirements and hold a master’s degree          courses.)
from an accredited institution need not take the required MAT
                                                                       ED 502 Foundations of Education
or GRE admissions exams.
                                                                       ED 503 Curriculum: Theory and Practice
Admission Requirements for Certificate Programs:                       ED 504 Child Development and Exceptionalities
Applicants for the Alternative Teacher Licensure program must
submit proof of provisional licensure.                                 ED 555 Reading and Language Arts: Grades PK-3
                                                                       ED 556 Reading and Language Arts: Grades 4-6
Academic Progression Requirements: Education students                  ED 557 Social Studies/Literature: Grades PK-6
must achieve satisfactory progress each semester. Failure to
meet requirements for progression to any course or portion of          ED 558 Elementary Math Methods
the program will result in review by the Admission,                    ED 559 Elementary Science Methods
Progression, and Graduation Committee and may result in dis-           ED 535 Assessing and Guiding Students in Elementary Settings
missal from the program.
                                                                       ED 554 Computers and Technology in the Classroom
Program Completion Requirements: The Education programs                ED 550 Research Methods
require completion of all methods coursework and a presenta-           ED 570A Student Teaching
tion of a professional portfolio. A successful student-teaching
experience as well as passing scores on all licensure examina-
tions required by the Virginia Department of Education are           TEACHING LICENSURE
also necessary for all licensure programs.                           ADDITIONAL ENDORSEMENT
     The University does not accept credit on standardized tests
                                                                     Elementary Education
such as the CLEP toward coursework required for any graduate
Education program.
                                                                     Students in the English as a Second Language or Learning
     Upon completion of all licensure requirements, students         Disabilities programs who seek the add-on endorsement in
submit an Application for Initial Virginia Licensure to the          Elementary Education must complete all PK-6 general studies
School of Education and Human Services and are recom-                requirements for licensure and the following Professional
mended by the faculty to the Commonwealth of Virginia for            Studies courses:
endorsement.                                                         Students in the English as a Second Language program
NOTE: Once admitted to a master’s program, a maximum of                ED 556 Reading and Language Arts: Grades 4-6
five years is allowed for completion.
                                                                       ED 557 Social Studies/Literature: Grades PK-6
                                                                       ED 558 Elementary Math Methods
                                                                       ED 559 Elementary Science Methods
114                               S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      Students in the Learning Disabilities program                        *Students in the Secondary Education program who are solely
        ED 555 Reading and Language Arts: Grades PK-3                      interested in licensure may apply for a Virginia teaching license
                                                                           after successfully completing all of these courses.
        ED 556 Reading and Language Arts: Grades 4-6
        ED 557 Social Studies/Literature: Grades PK-6
                                                                           ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, K-12 (M.ED.)
        ED 558 Elementary Math Methods
                                                                           The English as a Second Language (ESL) program is designed
        ED 559 Elementary Science Methods                                  for those who wish to teach students in grades K-12 who are
                                                                           learning English as a second language. Six credits of a modern
      SECONDARY EDUCATION, 6-12 (M.ED.)                                    foreign language and a course in human growth and develop-
      This program is designed for persons who already have a B.A.         ment are required for licensure in addition to the graduate
      or B.S. in any of the following content areas: Biology,              program requirements. This program is designed to meet initial
      Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth and Space Science, English,       licensure requirements in Virginia for teaching ESL in grades
      General Science, Mathematics, Physics, or Social Studies.            K-12.
           In order to maintain currency in the content area, students
                                                                           Additional Endorsement Option: Available in Elementary
      seeking a teaching license at the secondary level (grades 6-12)
                                                                           Education for students in this program. See information on
      must have satisfactorily completed a course in their licensure       page 113 for requirements.
      endorsement area within five years prior to applying for a
      Virginia teaching license through Marymount.                         Degree Requirements
      Degree Requirements                                                  39 credits
      39 credits                                                           Many courses require field experience. See course descriptions
                                                                           for details.
      Many courses require field experience. See course descriptions
      for details.                                                         (ED 502 and ED 503 are required as the first courses in this
                                                                           program since they provide the foundation for all other
      (ED 502 and ED 503 are required as the first courses in this
                                                                           courses.)
      program since they provide the foundation for all other
      courses.)                                                              ED 502 Foundations of Education

        ED 502 Foundations of Education*                                     ED 503 Curriculum: Theory and Practice

        ED 503 Curriculum: Theory and Practice*                              ED 522 Reading, Language Development, and Remedial
                                                                               Strategies
        ED 537 Reading Across the Curriculum: Secondary*
                                                                             ED 543 Fundamentals of Language Arts or EN 550 General
        ED 538 Secondary Teaching Methods*
                                                                               Linguistics
        ED 554 Computers and Technology in the Classroom*
                                                                             ED 553 Teaching English as a Second Language
        PS 505 Advanced Study of Individuals with Exceptionalities*
                                                                             ED 563 ESL/ESP: Curricula, Materials, and Tests
        PS 516 Adolescent Psychology*
                                                                             ED 565 Cross-cultural Education and the Language Arts or
        ED 526 Cross-cultural/International Curricula or                       ED 526 Cross-cultural/International Curricula
          ED 565 Cross-cultural Education and the Language Arts
                                                                             ED 570D Student Teaching: ESOL Students
        ED 550 Research Methods
                                                                             PS 505 Advanced Study of Individuals with Exceptionalities or
        ED 568 Teaching English and Social Studies in Middle/                  ED 504 Child Development and Exceptionalities
          Secondary School or ED 569 Teaching Science, Mathematics,
                                                                             ED 554 Computers and Technology in the Classroom
          and Computer Science in Middle/Secondary School*
                                                                             Graduate (500/600-level) elective, approved by advisor
        Graduate (500/600-level) elective (It is highly recommended that
          this course be in the content area taken either at Marymount       Three (3) credits in applied linguistics: ED 561 Teaching
          or through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington          Language Pragmatics, EN 552 Applied Phonology, EN 554
          Metropolitan Area. The elective must be approved by an               Applied Grammar: Syntactic Structures, or EN 558 History of
          academic advisor.)                                                   the English Language

        ED 570B Student Teaching: Secondary*
                            S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                         115



LEARNING DISABILITIES, K-12 (M.ED.)                                The Student-Teaching Experience
This program is designed for those who wish to teach children      Students seeking licensure complete their studies with a
with learning disabilities in grades K-12. Three credit hours in   student-teaching experience. Students register for student
human growth and development are required for licensure in         teaching through Marymount University regardless of the
addition to the graduate program requirements.                     geographic location of the placement site.
                                                                        Student-teachers are supervised by a faculty member in
Additional Endorsement Options: An additional endorsement          the School of Education and Human Services and by an on-site
in Emotional Disturbance is available to students in this pro-     cooperating teacher. Students should consult the Marymount
gram. Students must complete ED 512A Strategies for Teaching
                                                                   University Student-Teaching Handbook for full information on
Students with Emotional Disturbances and PS 515 Techniques
                                                                   student teaching.
for Behavioral Diagnosis and Intervention.
                                                                        Placement is available in public schools in the greater
An additional endorsement in Elementary Education is also          Washington metropolitan area, the Diocese of Arlington, the
available to students in this program. See information on pages    Archdiocese of Washington, and in accredited private schools.
113-114 for requirements.                                          Placement is made in conjunction with the local school
                                                                   districts and no particular placement can be guaranteed.
Degree Requirements                                                Transportation to and from the cooperating school is the
39 credits                                                         responsibility of the student. If student teaching out of the
                                                                   local area is necessary, the student must meet the written
Many courses require field experience. See course descriptions
                                                                   requirements available from the coordinator of Clinical
for details.
                                                                   Experiences. While student teaching, all students assume the
(ED 502 and ED 503 are required as the first courses in this       role of guest in the host school and must abide by the policies
program since they provide the foundation for all other            and regulations of the host school.
courses.)                                                               Placement for student teaching is dependent upon the
  ED 502 Foundations of Education                                  School’s and faculty’s judgment regarding the student’s
  ED 503 Curriculum: Theory and Practice                           performance in both coursework and field placement.
                                                                        Applications for student teaching must be received by the
  ED 505 Characteristics of Students with Learning Disabilities
                                                                   Office of Clinical Experiences by September 15 for spring
  ED 512 Strategies for Teaching Students with Learning            student teaching and by January 30 for fall student teaching.
    Disabilities                                                   Information and directions for completion are available in the
  ED 519 Current Research, Trends, and Legal Issues in Special     School of Education and Human Services and can also be
    Education                                                      found on the Department of Education Web page.
  ED 522 Reading, Language Development, and Remedial               Applying for Student Teaching: To be considered for place-
    Strategies                                                     ment, a student must fulfill the following requirements:
  ED 545 Transition and Family Issues for Individuals with
    Disabilities                                                   For the undergraduate PK-6 licensure program...
  ED 554 Computers and Technology in the Classroom                 •    gain full admission into the teacher licensure program;
  PS 511 Psychoeducational Assessment and Instructional            •    submit a student-teaching application packet (see
    Programming                                                         deadlines previously noted);
  One (1) from the following: ED 538 Secondary Teaching Methods,   •    submit a passing score on the Praxis II exam —
    ED 558 Elementary Math Methods, or ED 559 Elementary                Elementary Education: Content Knowledge #10014 — with
    Science Methods                                                     the student-teaching application;
  One (1) from the following: ED 537 Reading Across the            •    submit passing scores on the Virginia Reading Assessment
    Curriculum, ED 555 Reading and Language Arts: Grades PK-3,          (VRA) and the Virginia Communication and Literacy
    or ED 556 Reading and Language Arts: Grades 4-6                     Assessment (VCLA);
  ED 530 Student Teaching of Students with LD                      •    complete all licensure and Professional Studies require-
                                                                        ments;
                                                                   •    earn a minimum 3.0 GPA in Education courses; and
                                                                   •    gain the approval of the Undergraduate Teacher Licensure
                                                                        Committee.
116                                 S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      For undergraduate Art Education, English as a Second Language,       Nonlicensure Programs
      Learning Disabilities, and all Secondary Education licensure pro-
      grams...                                                             CATHOLIC SCHOOL LEADERSHIP (M.ED.)
      •    gain full admission into the teacher licensure program;         This program is designed to provide aspiring Catholic school
      •    submit a student-teaching application packet (see               administrators with the Catholic values and perspectives essen-
           deadlines previously noted);                                    tial to fostering Catholic unity and identity within a school
      •    submit a passing score on the Praxis II exam — Specialty        community. In addition to developing competencies in educa-
           Area Test for secondary students — with the student-teach-      tional leadership, the program focuses on the Church’s history,
           ing application;                                                teaching, and moral perspectives while encouraging partici-
                                                                           pants’ own faith and spiritual growth. A unique feature of the
      •    submit a passing score on the Virginia Communication
                                                                           program is that most of the courses are offered online.
           and Literacy Assessment (VCLA);
      •    complete at least 27 credits in the major and all               Degree Requirements
           Professional Studies requirements;                              36 credits
      •    earn a minimum 3.0 GPA in the student’s major; and                ED 582 Building a Faith Community
      •    gain the approval of the Undergraduate Teacher Licensure          ED 581 History and Mission of American Catholic Schools
           Committee.
                                                                             ED 583 Administration of Catholic Schools
      For graduate licensure programs (Elementary, Secondary, English as     ED 584 Advanced Curriculum and Instruction for Educational
      a Second Language, and Learning Disabilities)...                         Leadership
      •    gain full admission into a licensure program;                     ED 586 Issues in Catholic Education
      •    submit a student-teaching application packet (see                 ED 587 School Law
           deadlines previously noted);                                      ED 588 Catholic Educational Leadership and Supervision
      •    complete all stipulated methods coursework;                       ED 589 Fostering Moral and Ethical Development
      •    submit with the student-teaching application evidence of          ED 591 Catholic School Finance and Development
           passing scores on the Praxis II exam Specialty Area Test
                                                                             ED 592 Administrative Issues in Special Education
           for secondary endorsement area or Elementary Education:
           Content Knowledge for PK-6;                                       ED 593 Project, Thesis, or Internship

      •    for students in the Elementary Education and Learning
           Disabilities programs, submit passing scores on the             CATHOLIC SCHOOL LEADERSHIP
           Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA);                              (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
      •    submit a passing score on the Virginia Communication            Candidates with previous graduate coursework may earn this
           and Literacy Assessment (VCLA); and                             certificate by completing an individualized program of study
                                                                           with a minimum of 15 credits.
      •    gain the approval of the Graduate Teacher Education
           Committee.
                                                                           PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (M.ED.)
      SCHOOL COUNSELING (M.A.)                                             This program is designed for those students who are not
                                                                           seeking a Virginia teaching license. Along with completing a
      Offered by the Counseling Department, this program prepares
                                                                           core of professional courses intended to develop the knowledge,
      students for licensure as school counselors at elementary,
                                                                           skills, and dispositions basic to the field of education, students
      middle, and secondary levels. A Master of Arts degree is
                                                                           will complete an emphasis area and professional project
      awarded upon completion of the required graduate credits. See
                                                                           designed to meet the individual needs, interests, and goals of
      the Counseling section (page 108) for more information.
                                                                           the student. Students in this program may be practicing teach-
                                                                           ers, education professionals who are not working in a
                                                                           classroom setting, or students who intend to teach in interna-
                                                                           tional or private schools.
                            S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                           117



Degree Requirements                                                  ESOL and International
36 credits                                                           EN 550 General Linguistics or ED 543 Fundamentals of
21 credit hours from:                                                  Language Arts

  ED 502 Foundations of Education*                                   ED 522 Reading, Language Development, and Remedial
                                                                       Strategies
  ED 503 Curriculum: Theory and Practice or ED 584 Advanced
    Curriculum and Instruction                                       ED 553 Teaching English as a Second Language

  ED 504 Child Development and Exceptionalities*                     ED 561 Teaching Language Pragmatics

  ED 526 Cross-cultural/International Curriculum or ED 565           ED 563 ESL/ESP: Curricula, Materials and Tests
    Cross-Cultural Education and Language Arts                       EN 552 Applied Phonology
  ED 550 Research Methods                                            EN 554 Applied Grammar: Syntactic Structures
  ED 554 Computers and Technology in the Classroom or ED 574         Other courses may be selected with the consent of an advisor.
    Advanced Educational Technology                                *Students with an undergraduate education equivalent may
  ED 540 Project                                                   waive the content of ED 502 and ED 504 and replace with
  One of three professional emphasis areas must also be selected   additional elective hours.
    and 15 credits chosen from the following 3-credit classes:
  Teaching and Learning                                            ALTERNATIVE TEACHER LICENSURE
                                                                   (GRADUATE CERTIFICATE)
  ED 537 Reading Across the Curriculum
                                                                   An alternative initial licensure certificate program is intended
  ED 538 Secondary Teaching Methods
                                                                   for individuals teaching with a provisional license who need to
  ED 535 Guiding and Assessing Students in Elementary Settings     complete their Professional Studies coursework. The courses
  ED 555 Reading and Language Arts: Grades PK-3                    are available to fulfill Virginia’s professional studies require-
  ED 556 Reading and Language Arts: Grades 4-6                     ments in the areas of curriculum and instruction, human
                                                                   growth and development, foundations of education, reading
  ED 558 Elementary Math Methods
                                                                   and language acquisition, and additional professional require-
  ED 559 Elementary Science Methods                                ments set for each licensure area. Individuals will not apply for
  ED 557 Social Studies and Literature                             their Virginia teaching license through Marymount University.
  PS 505 Advanced Study of Individuals with Exceptionalities            Completing the Professional Studies courses is only one
                                                                   step toward the teacher licensure process in Virginia.
  Other courses may be selected with the consent of an advisor.
                                                                   Individuals seeking a Virginia teaching license must pass all
  Exceptional Populations                                          licensure examinations, provide evidence of coursework to
  ED 505 Characteristics of Students with LD                       meet specific competencies and endorsement requirements,
  ED 512 Strategies for Teaching Students with LD                  complete one year of successful full-time teaching experience in
                                                                   the endorsement area in any accredited public or nonpublic
  ED 519 Current Research, Trends, and Legal Issues in Special
                                                                   school on a provisional license, and submit an application to
    Education
                                                                   the state. The school system that issues the provisional license
  ED 522 Reading, Language Development, and Remedial               for the one year of full-time teaching experience facilitates the
    Strategies                                                     licensing application. More information may be found on the
  ED 545 Transition and Family Issues for Individuals with         Virginia Department of Education Web site:
    Learning Disabilities                                          www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/newvdoe/licroute.htm.
  PS 516 Adolescent Psychology                                          Students enrolled in the alternative licensure program will
                                                                   only be allowed to take a maximum of 18 credit hours without
  PS 511 Psychoeducational Assessment and Instructional
                                                                   approval. A formal application process is required to move
    Programming
                                                                   from any certificate program to the Master of Education
  Other courses may be selected with the consent of an advisor.    program. Students who wish to move to the M.Ed. program
                                                                   should contact the Office of Graduate Admissions.
118                                  S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      Title II, Higher Education Act Reporting Requirements
      In October 1998, the U.S. Congress enacted amendments to the Higher Education Act (HEA). As amended, Title II of the HEA
      addressed the issue of the quality of teacher preparation by including new accountability measures including reporting require-
      ments for institutions and states on teacher preparation and licensing. As required by the Act, the results of those who completed
      the Marymount University Education program during the 2004-05 academic year (graduated in December 2004, spring 2005, and
      summer 2005) are as follows:
      Type of Assessment                 # MU Students # MU Students      MU Pass          Statewide
                                           Taking Test   Passing Test      Rate            Pass Rate

      BASIC SKILLS
      PPST reading                            20              19             95%              90%
      PPST writing                            24              19             79%              82%
      PPST mathematics                        22             20              91%              85%
      Computerized PPST reading               69             63              91%              89%
      Computerized PPST writing               64             50              78%              79%
      Computerized PPST mathematics           67              61             91%              85%

      ACADEMIC CONTENT AREAS
      Elementary Education
       Content Knowledge                      67              67            100%             100%

      AGGREGATE
      Basic skills                            93             90              97%              99%
      Academic Content Areas
      (Mathematics, English, etc.)            75              75            100%              99%

      SUMMARY
      Individual
      Assessments                             102             99             97%              98%
      Scores of assessments with fewer than ten individuals are not reported as required by Title II reporting requirements.
                            S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                             119



PROGRAM OPTIONS                                                    PSYCHOLOGY

Fairfax County Public Schools’
Professional Development School Partnership                        PSYCHOLOGY (B.A.)

This partnership is a collaborative PK-6 licensure program         Students earning an undergraduate degree in Psychology will
offered in conjunction with Fairfax County Public Schools. It      gain the knowledge and skills necessary for entry-level profes-
is available to selected M.Ed. candidates. Interns spend a full    sional responsibilities in a variety of settings and a firm
school year in Fairfax County elementary schools. Students         foundation for graduate study. Psychology graduates work in a
may elect to complete initial licensure for both the PK-6 licen-   wide variety of community, business, government, and educa-
sure program or a dual Learning Disabilities/PK-6 licensure        tional settings. They may teach, consult, counsel, or conduct
program. All field and clinical experiences, as well as student    research. Graduate training is required for advanced work in the
teaching, are supervised and take place at the schools.            field.
                                                                         The Psychology major consists of a core of required
Arlington Public Schools’                                          courses plus completion of coursework chosen by students to
Professional Development School Partnership                        reflect their interests and career aspirations.
This partnership is a collaborative program offered in conjunc-          Students in Psychology can choose from courses that
tion with Arlington Public Schools (APS). It is available to       help them focus on careers in human resources, marketing,
selected teacher candidates on both the elementary and second-     human development across the life span, education, the
ary levels. Students in the elementary program spend a full        health sciences, and roles related to the influence of the
school year in APS elementary schools. Secondary teacher           social setting on the behaviors of individuals. Psychology
candidates spend a full semester in a cohort at Washington-Lee     graduates interested in working in mental health-related
High School. All field and clinical experiences, as well as        professions might find employment in substance abuse
student teaching, are supervised and take place at the schools.    programs, family and child services, crisis counseling centers,
                                                                   and welfare agencies. Those majoring in this field can also
International Student Teaching                                     choose courses that help prepare them for graduate study in
Undergraduate Students                                             Psychology and Counseling. Marymount offers graduate
                                                                   programs in Counseling and Forensic Psychology. More infor-
Eligible Marymount undergraduates may apply to participate
                                                                   mation about the Counseling programs is available beginning
in Marymount’s Study Abroad program and complete student
                                                                   on page 105; information about the Forensic Psychology
teaching in London, England. (See page 51 for more informa-
                                                                   program begins on page 121.
tion.)
                                                                         Psychology majors may elect to complete a specialization
Graduate Students                                                  leading to a license to teach individuals with learning disabili-
Marymount University teacher candidates may apply to our           ties in grades K-12. Students interested in this option should
International Student Teaching program. Candidates have the        see an academic advisor in the Education Department.
opportunity to student teach in a variety of English-speaking
schools, including Marymount International Schools in Paris,       Admission Requirements: All undergraduate Psychology stu-
London, and Rome. Qualified on-site and University supervi-        dents must follow general University admission requirements
sors observe and evaluate the candidates. Seven weeks of           (page 15).
student teaching in Washington area schools is required prior           In addition, students pursuing eligibility for teaching licen-
to student teaching in an international setting. Tuition for the   sure in Education (Learning Disabilities) must meet the
international experience remains the same. Candidates are          admission requirements of, and apply for, student teaching. See
responsible for transportation and housing expenses.               Education section (page 112) for admission requirements and
                                                                   procedures.
Other Partnerships
Opportunities for graduate students to work in year-long           Internship Prerequisites: When other requirements are suc-
internships are also available with Falls Church City Schools      cessfully completed in the senior year, the student is placed in
and The Potomac School in McLean, Virginia. Contact an             an internship (PSY 400) or Student Teaching (ED 360) for 240
academic advisor or the Office of Graduate Admissions for          hours (6 credits). Prerequisites for the internship are a cumula-
further information.                                               tive grade point average of 2.0 or better, a grade of C- or better
                                                                   in all courses required in the major, senior academic standing,
                                                                   a minimum of 12 credits earned at Marymount, and completion
                                                                   of the required prerequisite courses.
120                                S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      Minimum Grade Requirements: Grade of C- or better in all              Year Four
      courses required for the major. Students pursuing teaching
                                                                                Fall                             Spring
      licensure should also see “Minimum Grade Requirements” on
                                                                                                   §
      page 112.                                                                 PSY 400 Internship               PSY 497 Senior Seminar§
                                                                                Psychology 300/400-level         Four (4) electives
      Suggested Degree Plan                                                       elective§
      Year One                                                                  Humanities (Philosophy
                                                                                 300-level) elective*
        Fall                                Spring
                                        §                                       Elective
        PSY 101 General Psychology          PSY 201 Statistics for the
        EN 101 Composition I*                 Social Sciences§              §
                                                                            Requirement for the major
        ECO/POL/SOC 100                     PSY 210 Human Growth and
                                                                            *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
          Introduction to the Social          Development§ *
          Sciences*                         EN 102 Composition II*          Education (Learning Disabilities)
        Mathematics elective*               Humanities (Religious           This may be selected by students interested in teaching learn-
        Humanities (History)                 Studies/Theology)              ing disabled (LD) students in grades K-12. Completion of the
         elective*                           elective*                      required courses leads to licensure eligibility to teach LD
                                            Social Sciences elective (SOC   students.
        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
                                              131 Principles of                  Students should begin working with an Education advisor
                                              Sociology recommended)*       in the beginning of their freshman year in order to complete
                                                                            this program in a timely manner.

      Year Two                                                              Admission Requirements: Students in this licensure program
                                                                            must seek admission to the teacher licensure program and
        Fall                                Spring
                                                                            apply for student teaching. See Education section (page 112) for
        PSY 200 Careers in                  PSY 230 Abnormal                admission requirements and procedures.
          Psychology§                         Psychology§ or PSY 240
                                                                            Degree Planning: Students in this licensure program must
        PSY 202 Research Methods              Personality Theories§
                                                                            take courses specified in the degree plan to ensure fulfillment
          for the Social Sciences§          PSY 260 Introduction to         of state licensure requirements. See an Education advisor in
        PSY 220 Social Psychology   §         Learning and Cognition§       the School of Education and Human Services for further
        PSY 300 Research and                Science elective (Biology       information.
          Writing for the Social              recommended)*
                                                                            Suggested Degree Plan
          Sciences§ *                       Health elective*
        Humanities elective*                Non-Psychology elective*        Year One
        Social Sciences (Economics                                              Fall                             Spring
                                                                                                             §
          or Politics) elective*                                                PSY 101 General Psychology       PSY 201 Statistics for the
                                                                                EN 101 Composition I*              Social Sciences§
      Year Three                                                                ECO/POL/SOC 100                  PSY 210 Human Growth and
        Fall                                Spring                                Introduction to the Social       Development§ *

        PSY 250 Biological Bases of         Three (3) Psychology                  Sciences*                      EN 102 Composition II*
          Behavior§                           300/400-level electives§          Mathematics elective*            Humanities (Religious
        PSY 370 Tests and                   Humanities (English                 Humanities (History)              Studies) elective*
          Measurements§                      Literature 300-level)               elective*                       Social Sciences elective (SOC
        Humanities elective*                 elective*                          SEM 101 Freshman Seminar           131 Principles of
                                            Elective                                                               Sociology recommended)*
        Non-Psychology elective*
        Elective
                             S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                         121



                                                                 §
Year Two                                                             Requirement for the major
  Fall                             Spring                        *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
  PSY 200 Careers in               PSY 230 Abnormal              #Students interested in teaching at the elementary level (grades
    Psychology§                      Psychology§                 K-6) should see an Education advisor during their freshman year.
  PSY 202 Research Methods         PSY 260 Introduction to
    for the Social Sciences§         Learning and Cognition§     PSYCHOLOGY (MINOR)
  Social Sciences (Economics       ED 245S Educational           Minor Requirements
    or Politics) elective*           Foundations for
                                                                      PSY 101 General Psychology
  PSY 220 Social Psychology§         Secondary Teachers#
                                                                      Four (4) courses from the following: PSY 210 Human Growth
  PSY 300 Research and             ED 219 Current Research,
                                                                        and Development, PSY 220 Social Psychology, PSY 230
    Writing for the Social           Trends, and Legal Issues
                                                                        Abnormal Psychology, PSY 240 Personality Theories, PSY 250
    Sciences§ *                      in Learning Disabilities
                                                                        Biological Bases of Behavior, PSY 260 Introduction to
  ED 205 Issues in Educating       Science (Biology) elective*          Learning and Cognition
    Students with Learning                                            Two (2) Psychology 300+-level electives
    Disabilities

                                                                 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (M.A.)
Year Three
                                                                 This program provides graduates with the skills and knowledge
  Fall                             Spring
                                                                 they need to provide effective, high quality services in a variety
  PSY 250 Biological Bases of      PSY 312 Adolescent            of forensic settings. These include probation and parole, victim
    Behavior§                        Psychology§                 assistance, law enforcement, evaluation, and testimony in civil
  PSY 370 Tests and                PSY 333 Abnormal Child and    and criminal matters. To accomplish this goal, the program
    Measurements§                    Adolescent Psychology§      balances traditional psychological knowledge and skills with a
  ED 300 Reading, Writing,         ED 312 Teaching in Content    specialized understanding of the criminal justice and legal
    and Language                     Areas for Students with     systems. The Forensic Psychology program has ongoing
    Acquisition§                     Learning Disabilities       research with the Behavioral Science Unit of the FBI, Quantico,
                                                                 Virginia. The Forensic Psychology program also periodically
  ED 327S Curriculum Design:       Humanities (English
                                                                 offers short-term study opportunities in London, England.
    Secondary Education#            Literature 300-level)
  ED 341 Transition, Family,        elective*                    Admission Requirements: In addition to Universitywide
    and Community Services         Health elective*              requirements for graduate admission (see page 19), the follow-
    for Individuals with                                         ing are required:
    Disabilities                                                 •      a bachelor’s degree and acceptable GPA (an undergraduate
                                                                        major in Psychology is preferred, however candidates from
Year Four                                                               other fields will be considered);
  Fall                             Spring                        •      official transcripts of all postsecondary education;
                                                             §
  PSY 310 Psychoeducational        ED 360 Student Teaching       •      acceptable scores on the GRE (including the Analytical
    Assessment and                 Humanities elective*                 Writing score), as determined by the Department;
    Diagnostic Practices                                         •      two letters of recommendation that speak directly to the
                                   Elective*
  PSY 311 Early Childhood                                               applicant’s academic and interpersonal skills; and
    Development                                                  •      a personal statement describing the applicant’s
  PSY 497 Senior Seminar§                                               background and motivation for entering the field of study
  Humanities (Philosophy                                                for which he/she is applying.
   300-level) elective*                                                 Deadlines:
  Humanities elective*                                                  Students are admitted for the fall semester only.
                                                                        Applications must be received by February 15. Applications
                                                                        received after February 15 will be considered for a future
                                                                        academic year.
122                                S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      Internship Prerequisite: In order to be admitted to an intern-         COMMUNITY COUNSELING/
      ship, students must have completed the internship application          FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (M.A./M.A.)
      process, which includes a review of academic progress, comple-         This dual-degree program is offered by the Department of
      tion of appropriate paperwork, submission of the $50 required          Counseling and the Department of Forensic Psychology.
      application fee, and permission of the faculty.                        Students in this program earn two master’s degrees and are
                                                                             eligible to seek licensure as a professional counselor (LPC). See
      Research Requirement: All graduate students are required to
      log a minimum of 20 hours of research assistance under the             information beginning on page 107.
      guidance of one or more members of the Forensic Psychology
      faculty. See the student handbook for details.                         SOCIOLOGY

      Transfer Policies: Students in the program requesting course
      substitutions or course transfer from other institutions may be        SOCIOLOGY (B.A.)
      required to submit paperwork for review by the Forensic                The field is concerned with the social location of people — their
      Psychology faculty.                                                    culture, social class, gender, age, and education; the relation-
                                                                             ships between groups; and external influences that are
      Degree Requirements                                                    internalized, becoming part of an individual’s identity and
      39 credits                                                             behavior.
        PS 500 Research and Evaluation                                            Increasingly, employers are looking for people with the
                                                                             analytical skills that a Sociology major provides. The investiga-
        PS 501 Bases of Psychopathology
                                                                             tive skills emphasized in the major, along with the focus on
        PS 507 Applied Social Psychology                                     working with diverse groups prove valuable to students pursu-
        PS 517 Neuropsychological Issues, Treatments, and Assessments        ing careers in journalism, public relations, business, and public
        PS 580 Foundations of Forensic Psychology                            administration. Sociology also provides a strong base for later
                                                                             professional training in law, education, and social work.
        PS 581 Psychology and the Law
                                                                                  An undergraduate major in Sociology provides a strong
        PS 582 Advanced Issues in Forensic Psychology                        liberal arts preparation for entry-level positions in business,
        PS 584 Psychology of Criminal Behavior or SOC 507 Juvenile           social service, and governmental sectors.
          Justice                                                            Internship Prerequisite: When all other requirements are
        PS 585 Forensic Assessment                                           successfully completed, in the senior year the student is placed
        PS 599F Internship (3 credits)                                       for 240 hours (6 credits) in an internship (SOC 400) that
                                                                             complements his/her selected focus. Prerequisites for the
        SOC 510 Theories of Social Deviance
                                                                             internship are a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or
        Two (2) courses from the following: PS 508 Crisis Intervention;      higher, a grade of C- or higher in all required courses for the
          PS 509 Substance Abuse Assessment and Intervention; PS 519         major, a minimum of 18 credits earned at Marymount, and
          Personality Theories; PS 529 Psychopathology of Childhood          permission of the internship coordinator.
          and Adolescence; PS 551 Multicultural Counseling; PS 586
          Field Experience in Criminal Court; PS 587 Psychology, Social      Residency Requirement: Transfer students must complete the
          Policy, and Law; PS 588 Police Psychology; PS 589 Behavioral       internship and at least 18 credits in Marymount Sociology
          Criminology; PS 590 Issues in Criminal Assessment and              courses.
          Investigation; PS 592 Foundation of Political Psychology; PS
          598 Project; CJ 501 Victims of Interpersonal Violence; CJ 508
          Principles of Forensic Science I; CJ 509 Principles of Forensic
          Science II: Advanced Criminalistics; LA 500 Introduction to
          the Legal System; LA 590 Supervising Legal Research and
          Writing; LA 591 Advanced Legal Research and
          Writing/Computerized Legal Research
        With prior approval of faculty, graduate credit for other elective
          courses can be applied toward the student’s degree.
                             S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S                                            123



Suggested Degree Plan                                                Year Four
Year One                                                                 Fall                             Spring
                                                                                              §
  Fall                             Spring                                SOC 400 Internship               SOC 495 or CJ 495 Senior
                                                                         Sociology elective§ **             Seminar§
  ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100              SOC 131 Principles of
    Introduction to the Social       Sociology§                          Social Sciences 300/400-         Sociology elective§ **
    Sciences*                      EN 102 Composition II*                  level elective*                Humanities elective*
  EN 101 Composition I*            Health elective*                      Elective                         Two (2) electives*
  Humanities                       Humanities (History)              §
   (Theology/Religious                                               Requirement for the major
                                    elective*
   Studies) elective*                                                *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                   Science elective*
  Two (2) electives                                                  **Sociology electives: CJ 209 The Criminal Justice System, CJ 310
  SEM 101 Freshman Seminar                                           Policing in American Society, CJ 311 Correctional Institutions,
                                                                     CJ 320 Cybercrime and Digital Terrorism, SOC 200 Law and
                                                                     Society, SOC 250 Deviant Behavior, SOC 305 Criminology,
Year Two                                                             SOC/CJ 307 Juvenile Justice, SOC 350 Social Justice: Ethical
  Fall                             Spring                            Dilemmas in Social Context, SOC 351 Addressing Injustice:
  SOC 201 Cultural                 IS 200 Approaches to              Activism and Advocacy, and include no more than three from
    Anthropology§                    Gender and Society§             the following: PSY 210 Human Growth and Development, PSY
                                                                     220 Social Psychology, PSY 230 Abnormal Psychology, PSY 311
  SOC 202 Social Problems§         PSY 220 Social Psychology§
                                                                     Early Childhood Development, PSY 312 Adolescent Psychology,
  CJ 300 Writing for Criminal      PH 309 Ethical Theory*            PSY 313 Adulthood and Aging, PSY 321 Psychology of Gender,
    Justice, COM 300 Report        Two (2) Social Sciences           PSY 331 Human Service Agencies, PSY 332 Psychology of
    Writing, EN 301 The              electives*                      Addictions, PSY 341 Psychology of Individuals with
    Writing Process: Theory                                          Exceptionalities
    and Practice, or PSY 300
    Research and Writing for
                                                                     SOCIOLOGY (MINOR)
    the Social Sciences*
  Humanities (English                                                Minor Requirements
   Literature) elective*                                                 Seven (7) courses from the following: SOC 131 Principles of
  Elective                                                                 Sociology, SOC 201 Cultural Anthropology, SOC 200 Law and
                                                                           Society, SOC 202 Social Problems or SOC 250 Deviant
                                                                           Behavior, SOC 303 Development of Social Thought, SOC/CJ
Year Three
                                                                           304 Applied Research Methods, SOC 306 Social Class in
  Fall                             Spring                                  American Society, SOC/CJ 307 Juvenile Justice, SOC 322 Race
  SOC 303 Development of           SOC 304 Applied Research                and Ethnic Relations, SOC 350 Social Justice: Ethical
    Social Thought§                  Methods§                              Dilemmas in Social Context, SOC 351 Addressing Injustice:
  SOC 306 Social Class in          SOC 322 Race and Ethnic                 Activism and Advocacy, SOC 495 Senior Seminar
    American Society§                Relations§
  MA 132 Statistical Analysis*     Two (2) Sociology electives§ **
  Sociology elective§ **           Elective
  Humanities elective*
124                               S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S


      SOCIAL JUSTICE (MINOR)
      This minor is open to students in any major. It allows students
      to analyze those groups most in need of justice. By analyzing
      the consequences of inequality, these students examine ways
      of empowering the marginalized and voiceless to work effec-
      tively on their own behalf by developing community strategies
      that enable change.
           This minor provides a strong liberal arts preparation for
      entry-level positions as lobbyists, legislative advocates, fund-
      raisers, and nonprofit directors and for work in government
      agencies. This minor encourages students to develop their own
      framework for addressing social justice issues that interest
      them. The Social Justice minor also provides a strong base for
      later professional training in law, education, and social work.

      Minor Requirements
        SOC 131 Principles of Sociology
        SOC 200 Law and Society
        SOC 202 Social Problems
        SOC 304 Applied Research Methods
        SOC 350 Social Justice: Ethical Dilemmas in Social Context
        SOC 351 Addressing Injustice
        Independent Study (SOC 421 Project or Service Learning or SOC
          433 Research)
                                       S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                 125




School of Health Professions                                          Health Promotion emphasis
                                                                      This emphasis area is based upon recommendations of the
Dean: Dr. Theresa Cappello                                            American College of Sports Medicine.

The School aims to support the mission of Marymount                   Internship Prerequisites: A cumulative grade point average of
University to foster the individual development of each student       2.0 or better; a grade of C- or better in HPR 202, HPR 260, HPR
and enable students to become competent health professionals.
                                                                      302, HPR 304, and HPR 410; and a minimum of 12 credits
The School of Health Professions seeks to promote:
                                                                      earned at Marymount are needed to register for the internship.
•   a scholarly climate that fosters critical thinking, creativity,
    ethical decision making, and self-directed lifelong learning      Internship Requirements: When other requirements are com-
    in an environment where knowledge and research are
                                                                      pleted, and minimum grade requirements are met, the student
    valued;
                                                                      is placed in a 150-hour, 3-credit internship.
•   a prominent presence in the community by providing
    health care, health education and promotion, and continu-         Minimum Grade Requirement: A minimum cumulative grade
    ing education offerings;
                                                                      point average of 2.0 and a minimum grade of C- in HPR 202,
•   graduates who are competent health professionals                  HPR 260, HPR 302, HPR 304, HPR 410, and HPR 415.
    prepared to contribute and respond to society’s changing
    health needs; and                                                 Suggested Degree Plan
•   respect for life, human development, and individual               Year One
    differences.
                                                                        Fall                             Spring
Nondegree Admission: Graduate nondegree admission in the
                                                                        HPR 108 Weight Training   §
                                                                                                         BIO 152 General Biology II§
School of Health Professions allows students to enroll only in
Health Promotion Management classes, Nursing core classes               HPR 201 Introduction to          EN 102 Composition II*
(NU 501, NU 512, NU 590, NU 591), and Nursing electives.                 Health & Exercise Science§      POL/ECO 100 Introduction
Nondegree students may not enroll in courses in the clinical            BIO 151 General Biology I§ *       to the Social Sciences*
majors.                                                                 EN 101 Composition I*            Humanities (Philosophy)
     Graduate nondegree admission is limited to a total of 12                                             elective*
                                                                        Mathematics elective (MA
credits.
                                                                         121 or higher)*                 Elective*
                                                                        SEM 101 Freshman Seminar
HEALTH SCIENCES AND
HEALTH PROMOTION
                                                                      Year Two
                                                                        Fall                             Spring
HEALTH SCIENCES (B.S.)
                                                                        HPR 260 Introduction to          HPR 300 Essentials of
Two undergraduate programs are offered, providing students
                                                                         Sports Medicine§                 Personal Training§
resources for developing professional skills in exercise testing,
physical activity leadership, and health promotion. Graduates           HPR 225 Health                   HPR 202 Exercise
are prepared for beginning administrative, supervisory, and              Psychology§ *                    Physiology§
leadership positions in commercial and community health and             PSY 210 Human Growth &           HPR 230 Community
athletic clubs, in corporate fitness and wellness programs, and           Development*                    Health§
for graduate study in Health, Exercise Science, or Physical             BIO 161 Anatomy &                BIO 162 Anatomy &
Therapy. In addition, qualified students may apply for an accel-          Physiology I§                    Physiology II§
erated B.S. to M.S. program in Health Promotion Management.
                                                                        Humanities (Religious            Humanities (History)
     Students will choose from two emphasis areas: Health
                                                                         Studies) elective*               elective*
Promotion or Pre-Physical Therapy.
     Students completing the baccalaureate degree in
Marymount’s Health Sciences programs are qualified to apply
for health fitness instructor certification by the American
College of Sports Medicine.
126                                          S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S


      Year Three                                                         Suggested Degree Plan
          Fall                             Spring                        Year One
          HPR 301 Health/Fitness           HPR 304 Developing              Fall                           Spring
           Program Management§              Physical Training
                                                                           HPR 201 Introduction to        HPR 230 Community
          HPR 302 Fitness & Health          Programs§
                                                                            Health & Exercise Science§     Health§
           Assessment§                     NU 305 Alternative/
                                                                           EN 101 Composition I*          BIO 152 General Biology II§
          HPR 308 Transcultural             Complementary Medicine§
                                                                           BIO 151 General Biology I§ *   EN 102 Composition II*
           Concepts in Health &            COM 300 Report Writing*
           Illness§                                                        Humanities (Religious          POL/ECO 100 Introduction
                                           Social Sciences (Sociology)
                                                                            Studies) elective*              to the Social Sciences*
          Humanities elective*               elective*
                                                                           SEM 101 Freshman Seminar       Humanities (History)
          Elective                         Elective
                                                                                                           elective*

      Year Four                                                          Year Two
          Fall                             Spring                          Fall                           Spring
                                                                §
          HPR 340 Nutrition for            HPR 400 Internship              HPR 225 Health                 HPR 202 Exercise
           Optimal Health§                 HPR 406 Stress                   Psychology§ *                  Physiology§
          HPR 410 Anatomical                Management§ *                  HPR 260 Introduction to        PSY 210 Human Growth &
           Kinesiology &                   HPR 415 Applications in          Sports Medicine§                Development§ *
           Cardiovascular                   Human Performance§             HPR 308 Transcultural          BIO 162 Anatomy &
           Physiology§                                                      Concepts in Health and          Physiology II§
                                           Two (2) electives*
          Humanities (English                                               Illness§                      Humanities (English
           Literature) elective*                                           BIO 161 Anatomy &               Literature) elective*
          Humanities elective*                                               Physiology I§                MA 132 Statistical Analysis*
          Elective*                                                        Humanities elective*
      §
      Requirement for the major
                                                                         Year Three
      *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                           Fall                           Spring
      Pre-Physical Therapy emphasis                                        HPR 301 Health/Fitness         HPR 300 Essentials of
      This emphasis area is intended for those interested in pursuing       Program Management§            Personal Training§
      a doctoral degree in Physical Therapy and includes coursework        HPR 302 Fitness & Health       HPR 304 Developing
      in biology and the physical sciences.                                 Assessment§                    Physical Training
                                                                           MA 181 Calculus                 Programs§
      Internship Prerequisites: A cumulative grade point average of
                                                                           CHM 151 Principles of          HPR 406 Stress
      2.0 or better; a grade of C- or better in HPR 202, HPR 260, HPR
                                                                             Chemistry I§                  Management§ *
      302, HPR 304, and HPR 410; and a minimum of 12 credits
      earned at Marymount are needed to register for the internship.       COM 300 Report Writing*        CHM 152 Principles of
                                                                                                            Chemistry II§
      Internship Requirements: When other requirements are com-                                           Humanities (Philosophy)
      pleted, and minimum grade requirements are met, the student                                          elective*
      is placed in a 150-hour, 3-credit internship.

      Minimum Grade Requirement: A minimum cumulative grade
      point average of 2.0 and a minimum grade of C- in HPR 202,
      HPR 260, HPR 302, HPR 304, HPR 410, and HPR 415.
                                         S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                127



    Year Four                                                         •       a minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0;
      Fall                              Spring                        •       a minimum GPA in the major of 3.5; and
      HPR 340 Nutrition of              HPR 400 Internship   §        •       two recommendation letters (one of which must be from a
       Optimal Health§                                                        Health and Human Performance advisor).
                                        HPR 415 Applications in
      HPR 410 Anatomical                 Human Performance§           Qualified students will take graduate Health Promotion
       Kinesiology &                                                  Management courses during their senior year. These students
                                        HPR 500 Exercise
       Cardiovascular                                                 are automatically admitted to the M.S. program at the end of
                                         Physiology§
       Physiology§                                                    their senior year, typically after completing a total of 120
                                        PHYS 172 General              undergraduate and graduate credits while maintaining the
      PHYS 171 General Physics I§         Physics II§                 required GPAs. The GRE and interview are waived. Students
      Humanities elective*                                            complete 36 graduate credits in their fourth and fifth years of
      Social Sciences (Sociology)                                     study to complete the M.S. in Health Promotion Management.
        elective*
                                                                      Suggested Degree Plan
§
    Requirement for the major
                                                                          Year One
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                            Fall                           Spring
                                                                                                      §
HEALTH SCIENCES (MINOR)                                                     HPR 108 Weight Training        HPR 202 Exercise
                                                                            HPR 201 Introduction to         Physiology§
Admission Requirement: Students whose cumulative GPA is
                                                                             Health & Exercise Science§    BIO 152 General Biology II§
1.8 or better at the end of the freshman year may declare a
minor in Health Sciences, Health Promotion emphasis.                        BIO 151 General Biology I§ *   EN 102 Composition II*
                                                                            EN 101 Composition I*          POL/ECO 100 Introduction
Minimum Grade Requirements: A GPA of 2.0 or better is                                                        to the Social Sciences*
                                                                            Mathematics elective (MA
required in all courses applied to the minor.
                                                                             121 or higher)*               Humanities (Philosophy)
                                                                            SEM 101 Freshman Seminar        elective*
Minor Requirements
     HPR 202 Exercise Physiology
                                                                          Year Two
     HPR 302 Fitness and Health Assessment
                                                                            Fall                           Spring
     HPR 304 Developing Physical Training Programs
                                                                            HPR 260 Introduction to        HPR 300 Essentials of
     HPR 340 Nutrition for Optimal Health
                                                                             Sports Medicine§               Personal Training§
     Six (6) credits in HPR electives
                                                                            PSY 210 Human Growth &         BIO 162 Anatomy &
                                                                              Development*                   Physiology II§
THE COMBINED B.S./M.S. PROGRAM IN
                                                                            BIO 161 Anatomy &              Humanities (History)
HEALTH PROMOTION MANAGEMENT
                                                                              Physiology I§                 elective*
This dual program allows advanced students to complete a B.S.
                                                                            Humanities (Religious          Humanities (English
in Health Sciences and an M.S. in Health Promotion
                                                                             Studies) elective*             Literature) elective*
Management in five years.
                                                                            Elective*                      Elective
Admission Requirements: In addition to meeting
Universitywide undergraduate admission requirements (see
page 15), undergraduate students with a major in Health
Sciences must have the following prerequisites to apply:
•       93 undergraduate credits completed (typically at the end of
        the junior year);
•       completion of all undergraduate Health Sciences course
        requirements for the major (28 credits) except HPR 340,
        HPR 406, HPR 410, and HPR 415;
128                                          S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S


      Year Three                                                         HEALTH PROMOTION MANAGEMENT (M.S.)
          Fall                             Spring                        This program prepares new and current health promotion
          HPR 225 Health                   HPR 304 Developing
                                                                         practitioners to plan, implement, and evaluate health promo-
           Psychology§ *                    Physical Training
                                                                         tion and wellness programs in a variety of settings: hospitals,
                                            Programs§
                                                                         corporations, health maintenance organizations, community
          HPR 302 Fitness & Health
                                                                         health agencies, health clubs, government agencies, and
           Assessment§                     NU 305 Alternative/
                                                                         academic campuses. Coursework provides students with the
          HPR 308 Transcultural             Complementary Medicine§
                                                                         opportunity to acquire knowledge and skill in:
           Concepts in Health &            COM 300 Report Writing*
                                                                         •     designing and evaluating health promotion programs;
           Illness§                        Social Sciences (Sociology)
                                                                         •     behavior change;
          Humanities elective*               elective*
                                                                         •     program management; and
          Elective                         Humanities elective*
                                                                         •     specific health content areas, such as fitness assessment,
                                           Summer                              program design, nutrition, weight control, and stress
                                           Elective*                           management.

                                                                         Admission Requirements: In addition to the Universitywide
      Year Four
                                                                         requirements for graduate admission (see page 19), applicants
          Fall                             Spring                        must also:
          HPR 340 Nutrition for            HPR 406 Stress                •     present acceptable scores from either the Miller Analogies
           Optimal Health§                  Management§ *                      Test (MAT) or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (see
          HPR 410 Anatomical               HPR 415 Applications in             note on page 19); and
           Kinesiology &                    Human Performance§           •     interview with the department chair.
           Cardiovascular                  HPR 520 Epidemiology    §
                                                                         NOTE: The testing requirement is waived for students who
           Physiology§
                                           HPR 550 Management of         have earned a master’s degree from an accredited college or
          HPR 501 Foundations of            Health Promotion             university. Students with significant professional experience
           Health Education and             Programs§                    and a record of outstanding undergraduate or graduate
           Promotion§                                                    performance may petition the chair for a waiver of the
                                           Summer
          HPR 540 Designing and                                          standardized test requirement.
                                           HPR 502 Introduction to
           Evaluating Health
                                            Public Health and            Minimum Grade Requirement: A grade of B- or better is
           Promotion Programs§
                                            Preventive Medicine§         needed to pass core courses.
                                           HPR 500 Exercise
                                            Physiology§                  Degree Requirements
                                                                         36 credits
      Year Five                                                              HPR 501 Foundations of Health Education and Health
          Fall                             Spring                             Promotion
          NU 591 Health Care               HPR 534 Topics in Nutrition       HPR 502 Introduction to Public Health and Preventive Medicine
           Research§                        and Weight Management§           HPR 520 Epidemiology of Injury and Disease
          Two (2) electives                HPR 598 Internship§               HPR 534 Topics in Nutrition and Weight Management or
                                           Elective                           HPR 500 Exercise Physiology
                                                                             HPR 540 Designing and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs
      §
      Requirement for the major or degree
                                                                             HPR 550 Management of Health Promotion Programs
      *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                             HPR 598 Internship
                                                                             NU 591 Health Care Research
                                                                             Six (6) credits in HPR electives
                                                                             Six (6) additional credits from Business, Health Care
                                                                               Management, Human Resource Management, or Psychology
                                                                               graduate courses
                                       S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                 129



NURSING                                                             •   written verification of the following immunizations:
                                                                        Hepatitis B, MMR, Chicken Pox, Tetanus/Diphtheria, and
Marymount offers Nursing programs at the bachelor’s and
                                                                        Influenza;
master’s degree levels. Information about graduate programs
begins on page 131.                                                 •   written verification of accident and health insurance
     Marymount’s Nursing programs are accredited by the                 coverage;
National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission                •   written verification of CPR certification from the
(NLNAC) and the State Board of Nursing of the Commonwealth              American Heart Association (BLS for Healthcare Provider)
of Virginia. The NLNAC is located at 61 Broadway, 33rd Floor,           or the American Red Cross (Professional Rescuer), required
New York, NY 10006 (212) 363-5555, ext. 153. These programs             prior to registration for the first clinical Nursing course
are also accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing             (current CPR certification must be provided each semester);
Education (CCNE), One Dupont Circle, Suite 530, Washington,         •   a criminal background check, which is a federal require-
DC 20036.                                                               ment for all persons working with vulnerable populations; and
                                                                    •   additional requirements as stated by specific clinical
Legal Limitations of Licensure: The practice of nursing is reg-
                                                                        agencies.
ulated by state laws. Questions concerning licensure in a specif-
ic state should be directed to that state’s Board of Nursing.       Students will not be permitted to register for classes until all
Applicants for nursing licensure in Virginia are required to        requirements are met.
notify the State Board of Nursing if they have:                         Students who fail to attend all clinical days are in
                                                                    jeopardy of failing the clinical course. Two excused absences
•   been convicted of (or pled nolo contendere to) a violation of
                                                                    from clinicals may result in a grade of “Incomplete” in the
    any federal or state law;
                                                                    course and interrupted progression in the Nursing program.
•   been hospitalized or received treatment for chemical
    dependence during the two years preceding application to        Clinical-Experience Transportation: Students provide their
    complete the licensing examination; or                          own transportation to and from clinical experiences. The
•   a mental or physical condition that could interfere with        University’s free shuttle service connects the Main Campus, the
    their ability to practice.                                      Ballston Center, and the Ballston-MU Metro station.


UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN NURSING                                   Minimum Grade and Academic Progression Requirements:
                                                                    Undergraduate Nursing students must achieve satisfactory per-
Marymount offers several approaches to an undergraduate
                                                                    formance each semester and satisfactory progress toward grad-
Nursing degree:
                                                                    uation. Failure to meet the following requirements will result
•   a four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)             in review by the Admission, Progression, and Graduation
    program. After successfully completing four years of            Committee and may result in academic dismissal. To maintain
    coursework, the B.S.N. student takes state board examina-       satisfactory progress toward degree completion, students must
    tions (NCLEX-RN) to work as a registered nurse.                 also attend all clinical days as described in the aforementioned
•   an online and on-campus R.N. to B.S.N. program, an oppor-       “Clinical Requirements.”
    tunity to complete a Bachelor of Science in Nursing for              Undergraduate Nursing students must receive a grade
    the registered nurse who already holds a diploma or             point average of 2.0 or better, a minimum grade of C+ in all
    associate degree in Nursing.                                    Nursing courses, and a minimum grade of C in sciences.
•   an accelerated B.S.N. program for students with a previous           Satisfactory progress toward graduation is defined as
    bachelor’s degree in another field.                             successful regular matriculation unless sufficient requirements
                                                                    have been fulfilled by acceptance of transfer credit. No Nursing
Admission Requirements: See individual programs.                    course may be repeated more than once. Failure of 9 credits in
                                                                    Nursing courses results in automatic dismissal from the
Clinical Requirements: A copy of each student’s medical             Nursing program.
examination record is required upon admission.                           Students should maintain continuous enrollment in
     Additionally, undergraduate Nursing students must              Nursing courses. If enrollment is interrupted, skill competency
provide to the clinical agency coordinator the following prior      testing may be required prior to enrollment in the subsequent
to registering for classes:                                         Nursing course.
•   written verification of testing for tuberculosis or screening        Passing scores on Nursing comprehensive examinations are
    if PPD is positive (required annually);                         required for graduation from the B.S.N. program.
130                                         S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S


      NURSING–ACCELERATED PROGRAM (B.S.N.)                                Year Two
      The accelerated B.S.N. may be completed in four semesters by            Fall or Spring
      students who have earned a non-Nursing bachelor’s degree.               NU 400 Community Health
                                                                               Nursing§
      Admission Requirements: Students are admitted to this pro-
                                                                              NU 412 Nursing Leadership,
      gram in the fall and the spring. Admission to this program is
                                                                               Management, and
      competitive. To be eligible to be reviewed for admission, stu-
                                                                               Sociopolitical Advocacy§
      dents must have an earned non-Nursing bachelor’s degree and
      must achieve a competitive score on the ATI Preadmission                NU 425 Nursing Capstone§
      Examination or be exempted from the exam. Exemption is                  NU 490 Nursing Internship§
      automatically granted for students having a bachelor’s degree
                                                                          §
      from a U.S.-accredited college or university with a GPA of 2.8 or   Requirement for the major
      greater. The determination to waive the exam will be made by        *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
      the Nursing Admissions Committee upon receipt of all official
      transcripts.                                                        NURSING (B.S.N.)
                                                                          The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program prepares students
      Program prerequisites: These courses or their equivalents
                                                                          to practice as professional nurses. The program is ideal for
      must be completed prior to starting the accelerated program:
                                                                          entering freshmen and students with general education trans-
      SOC 131 Principles of Sociology, PSY 101 General Psychology,
                                                                          fer credits in non-Nursing fields. A minimum GPA of 2.5; a
      BIO 161-162 Anatomy & Physiology I & II with lab (8 credits),
                                                                          minimum grade of C in CHM 125, BIO 161, and BIO 162; or
      BIO 260 Microbiology (4 credits), Chemistry, and Statistics.
                                                                          permission of the chair are required prior to registering for
      Suggested Degree Plan                                               courses numbered NU 331 or higher.
                                                                               Transfer students may be able to complete the program in
      Year One                                                            fewer than eight semesters.
        Fall or Spring                    Spring or Summer
                                                                          Suggested Degree Plan
        NU 230 Theoretical                NU 302 Health Assessment§
         Foundations of                   NU 332 Clinical Nursing II:     Year One
         Professional Nursing§             Adult Health§                      Fall                             Spring
        NU 231 Principles and             NU 333 Clinical Nursing III:        CHM 125 Life Chemistry   §
                                                                                                               BIO 161 Anatomy &
         Applications of Nursing           Family Health I§                                                      Physiology I§ *
                                                                              EN 101 Composition I*
         Technologies§
                                          NU 360 Advanced                     Humanities                       EN 102 Composition II*
        NU 234 Health Across the           Therapeutics§                       (Theology/Religious             PSY 210 Human Growth &
         Life Span§
                                          Summer or Fall                       Studies) elective*                Development*
        NU 331 Clinical Nursing I:
                                          NU 403 Research and                 ECO/POL 100 Introduction         SOC 131 Principles of
         Adult Health§
                                           Critical Inquiry§                    to the Social Sciences*          Sociology*
        NU 362 Pathophysiology§
                                          NU 430 Clinical Nursing IV:         SEM 101 Freshman Seminar         Humanities (History)
                                           Psychiatric-Mental                                                   elective*
                                           Health§
                                          NU 432 Clinical Nursing V:      Year Two
                                           Family Health II§                  Fall                             Spring
                                          PH 309 Ethical Theory*              NU 230 Foundations of            NU 231 Nursing
                                                                               Nursing§                         Technologies§
                                                                              HPR 340 Nutrition§               NU 234 Health Across the
                                                                              BIO 162 Anatomy &                 Life Span§
                                                                                Physiology II§ *               NU 362 Pathophysiology§
                                                                              PH 309 Ethical Theory*           BIO 260 Microbiology§
                                                                              Humanities (English              Humanities elective*
                                                                               Literature) elective*
                                           S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                       131



    Year Three                                                             •       have a GPA of 2.5 or better or permission of the chair
                                                                                   prior to registering for the first Nursing course.
      Fall                               Spring
                                   §                                       NOTE: Marymount University students who enter this program
      NU 302 Health Assessment           NU 332 Clinical Nursing II:
                                                                           immediately following completion of the Marymount A.A.S.
      NU 331 Clinical Nursing I:          Adult Health§
                                                                           degree (offered through fall 2005) do not need to fill out an
       Adult Health§                     NU 333 Clinical Nursing III:      additional application. These students must, however, complete
      NU 360 Advanced                     Family Health I§                 a Change of Academic Program form.
       Therapeutics§                     NU 403 Research & Critical        Residency Requirement: Students must complete 36 credits
      MA 132 Statistics*                  Inquiry§                         at Marymount University to earn a degree.
                                         Science elective§
                                                                           Suggested Degree Plan
    Year Four
      Fall                               Spring                                Year One (Year Three for those
      NU 430 Clinical Nursing IV:        NU 400 Community Health       §       continuing from A.A.S.)            Spring
       Psychiatric-Mental                NU 412 Nursing Leadership,
                                                                                 Fall                             NU 360 Advanced
       Health§                            Management, and                        NU 302 Health                     Therapeutics§
      NU 432 Clinical Nursing V:          Sociopolitical Advocacy§                Assessment§ **                  NU 362 Pathophysiology§
       Family Health II§                 NU 425 Nursing Capstone§                NU 310 The Nurse, Client, &      MA 132 Statistics*
      Elective (Foreign Language                                   §              Health Care System§
                                         NU 490 Senior Practicum                                                  Social Sciences (Economics
         recommended)*                                                           CHM 125 Life Chemistry§            or Political Science)
                                         Elective*
                                                                                 Humanities (History)               elective*
§
    Requirement for the major                                                     elective*                       Science elective*
*See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
                                                                               Year Two (Year Four for those
NURSING–R.N. TO B.S.N. PROGRAM                                                 continuing from A.A.S.)            Spring
This online or on-campus program is designed for the entering                    Fall                             Nursing elective or NU 490
student who is already a registered nurse with diploma or                        NU 400 Community Health            Nursing Internship§
associate degree credentials. Students who graduated from a                       Nursing§ **                     Humanities elective*
diploma program or a program that is not NLN accredited, but
                                                                                 NU 403 Research & Critical       Humanities (Ethics) elective*
have R.N. licensure in the U.S., are eligible to receive 30 trans-
                                                                                  Inquiry§
fer credits in Nursing that will be placed in an escrow account.                                                  Elective*
These credits will be granted upon successful completion of all                  NU 412 Nursing Leadership,
                                                                                                                  Comprehensive exam
300-level Nursing courses.                                                        Management, and
     Students who do not have an associate degree may also                        Sociopolitical Advocacy§
establish Liberal Arts Core credits by passing validation exami-                 Elective*
nations. Students who wish to take Liberal Arts Core validation
                                                                           §
examinations may register for them in the Learning Resource                    Requirement for the major
Center, which also administers these exams. Study guides can               *See Liberal Arts Core requirements (page 49) for details.
be purchased in the Learning Resource Center as well.
                                                                           **These courses require some clinical or laboratory time in
     Students who have less than 1,200 hours of work experi-
                                                                           addition to online coursework.
ence as an R.N. must take NU 490 Nursing Internship.
Admission Requirements: Students are admitted in the fall                  GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN NURSING
semester only. Applicants to this program do not need to
take the ATI Preadmission Examination. In addition to                      Marymount offers the Master of Science in Nursing program
Universitywide undergraduate admission requirements (see                   with three concentrations:
page 15), students must:                                                   •       Family Nurse Practitioner
•       hold an A.A.S. or diploma in Nursing;                              •       Nursing Administration
•       hold R.N. licensure (required for all clinical courses); and       •       Nursing Education
132                                         S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S


      Admission Requirements for Degree Programs: In addition             Graduation Requirements: All graduate Nursing students
      to Universitywide graduate admission requirements (see              must take and pass a comprehensive examination in the semes-
      page 19), applicants must:                                          ter of graduation.

      •   have graduated from an accredited B.S.N. program;               Minimum Grade Requirements: Successful completion of a
      •   have a minimum 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale;                          graduate Nursing course requires a grade of B or better.
      •   hold R.N. licensure in Virginia and DC prior to placement
          in clinical courses;                                            FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER (M.S.N.)
      •   hold liability/malpractice insurance;                           This program prepares nurse practitioners to provide primary
                                                                          care to the family. An in-depth study is made of health, as well
      •   interview with the Graduate Nursing chair;
                                                                          as common acute and chronic illnesses throughout the life
      •   submit a current résumé; and                                    cycle. Laboratory and clinical experiences are provided to
      •   Family Nurse Practitioner program applicants must have          develop competence in the diagnosis and treatment of common
          two years of full-time experience                               illnesses. The program prepares graduates to sit for nationally
                                                                          recognized certification examinations offered by the American
      Admission Requirements for Certificate Programs: In addi-           Association of Nurse Practitioners and the American Nurses
      tion to Universitywide graduate admission requirements              Credentialing Committee.
      for certificate programs (see page 20), applicants must:
      •   interview with a School faculty member; and                     Degree Requirements
      •   hold an M.S.N. degree                                           40 credits
          Residency Requirements for Certificate Students:                  NU 501 Theoretical and Ethical Foundations of Advanced
          Certificate-seeking students must complete two-thirds of           Nursing Practice
          the required credits at Marymount University.                     NU 512 Nursing and Health Care Systems and Organizations

      Clinical Requirements: All graduate Nursing students must             NU 550-551 Advanced Pathophysiology I & II
      submit evidence of a recent health examination and required           NU 552 Advanced Pharmacology
      immunizations upon entering the University.                           NU 590 Health Care Data Analysis
          Students must provide evidence of the following before
                                                                            NU 591 Health Care Research
      entering each practicum course:
                                                                            NU 503 Advanced Assessment and Health Screening
      •   TB testing or screening if PPD is positive (required
          annually);                                                        NUF 503-504 Primary Care of the Family I & II
      •   written verification of CPR certification from the                Elective
          American Heart Association (BLS for Healthcare Provider)
          or the American Red Cross (Professional Rescuer), required      FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER
          prior to registration for the first clinical Nursing course     (POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE)
          (current CPR certification must be provided each semester);
                                                                          Certificate Requirements
      •   current health insurance coverage;
                                                                          25 credits
      •   documentation of malpractice insurance;
                                                                            NU 503 Advanced Assessment and Health Screening
      •   a criminal background check, which is a federal require-
          ment for all persons working with vulnerable populations; and     NU 550-551 Advanced Pathophysiology I & II

      •   additional requirements as stated by specific health care         NU 552 Advanced Pharmacology
          agencies.                                                         NUF 503-504 Primary Care of the Family I & II
      Students enrolled in clinical courses are not guaranteed their
      choice of placement site.                                           NURSING ADMINISTRATION (M.S.N.)
      Clinical-Experience Transportation: Students provide their          This program prepares nurses to excel as leaders and managers
      own transportation to and from clinical experiences. The            in a broad spectrum of managerial positions within the health
      University’s free shuttle service connects the Main Campus, the     care delivery system and in related organizations. The curricu-
      Ballston Center, and the Ballston-MU Metro station.                 lum integrates content in health care policy, law, and finance
                                       S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                133



with content in organizations and systems, theory applications,     strategies, syllabus development, and test construction.
and research-based administrative practice appropriate for          Educational practicums include experiences in both classroom
executive-level nurses. Clinical practicums in a variety of         and clinical settings, and provide opportunities to apply
health care and health policy settings provide opportunities to     acquired theoretical and practice-based knowledge to teaching.
enhance clinical management knowledge and integrate it with
health care law, policy, and finance. The program prepares          Degree Requirements
graduates to take nationally recognized nursing administration      40 credits
certification examinations and to pursue certification in health      NU 501 Theoretical and Ethical Foundations of Advanced
care management from the American College of Health Care               Nursing Practice
Executives.
                                                                      NU 503 Advanced Assessment and Health Screening
Degree Requirements                                                   NU 512 Nursing and Health Care Systems and Organizations
36 credits                                                            NU 550-551 Advanced Pathophysiology I & II
   NU 501 Theoretical and Ethical Foundations of Advanced             NU 552 Advanced Pharmacology
    Nursing Practice                                                  NU 590 Health Care Data Analysis
   NU 512 Nursing and Health Care Systems and Organizations           NU 591 Health Care Research
   NU/HCM 590 Health Care Data Analysis                               NUE 503-505 Nursing Education I, II, & III
   NU/HCM 591 Health Care Research                                    NUE 590 Nursing Education Practicum
   NUA 503-504 Nursing Administration I & II                          Elective
   NUA/HCM 535 Health Care Policy and Ethics
   NUA/LA 540 Health Care Law                                       NURSING EDUCATION
   NUA/HCM 550 Health Care Finance                                  (POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE)
   NUA 590-591 Nursing Administration Practicum I & II              Certificate Requirements
   Elective                                                         22 credits
                                                                      NU 503 Advanced Assessment and Health Screening
NURSING ADMINISTRATION
                                                                      NU 550-551 Advanced Pathophysiology I & II
(POST-MASTER’S CERTIFICATE)
                                                                      NUE 503-505 Nursing Education I, II, & III
Certificate Requirements                                              NUE 590 Nursing Education Practicum
21 credits
   NUA 503-504 Nursing Administration I & II                        R.N. TO M.S.N. PROGRAM
   NUA/HCM 535 Health Care Policy and Ethics                        This program provides an opportunity for nurses with an
   NUA/HCM 550 Health Care Finance                                  associate degree in Nursing to earn a master’s degree in
                                                                    Nursing. Students who have not earned a bachelor’s degree
   NUA/LA 540 Health Care Law
                                                                    must complete the equivalent of the 48 credits that comprise
   NUA 590-591 Nursing Administration Practicum I & II              the University’s Liberal Arts Core. Transfer credit may be
                                                                    granted for courses completed before beginning the R.N. to
NURSING EDUCATION (M.S.N.)                                          M.S.N. program.
This program prepares nurses for successful careers as nurse             All students must complete nine (9) credits in transitional
educators in a variety of academic and service settings. The        Nursing courses:
curriculum emphasizes acquisition and enhancement of the              NU 400 Community Health
knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for success as a nurse     NU 412 Nursing Leadership, Management, and Sociopolitical
educator. Foundational content in areas such as the organiza-          Advocacy
tion and administration of educational programs,
adult-focused teaching and learning theories, educational           Admission Requirements: Applicants must have one to two
research and evaluation, and curriculum development is              years of recent nursing experience, and must interview
complemented by practice-based topics including teaching            with the chair of the M.S.N. program.
134                                         S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S


      PHYSICAL THERAPY                                                  Decisions regarding general undergraduate admission to the
                                                                        University and admission to the PT Scholars Program are done
                                                                        separately. Qualified applicants interested in the PT Scholars
      PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
                                                                        Program should contact the Office of Admissions for specific
      Marymount University offers opportunities to prepare for          application instructions. The application deadline for the PT
      entry to Marymount’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program. The      Scholars Program is March 1. Applications received after March 1
      pre-professional requirements for this program can be met         will be considered on a space-available basis.
      through a variety of undergraduate fields. The School of
      Health Professions outlines one option, through its Health
                                                                        PHYSICAL THERAPY (D.P.T.)
      Sciences major/Pre-Physical Therapy emphasis. (See page 125.)
      However, students should consider majoring in the subject         This program prepares generalist practitioners for professional
      area in which they have the strongest aptitude and interest. An   roles consistent with contemporary physical therapy practice in
      academic advisor can help students interested in preparing for    the United States. The program’s goals are to:
      entry to a Physical Therapy graduate program.                     •   graduate scholarly practitioners who have sound clinical
           A Pre-Physical Therapy plan of study is rigorous, and            decision-making skills and are well prepared for general
      substantial academic discipline is needed to complete the             practice;
      coursework consistent with stated program prerequisites.          •   nurture self-responsibility, active learning, intellectual
                                                                            curiosity, and self-efficacy in lifelong learning;
      Physical Therapy Scholars Program
                                                                        •   prepare students for the various professional roles of the
      This competitive program, open to first-time college students,
                                                                            physical therapist practitioner (e.g., clinician, manager,
      guarantees admission into the Physical Therapy (PT) graduate
                                                                            educator, advocate, researcher, consultant); and
      program to a select group of well-qualified incoming freshmen.
      These students, chosen by the PT Admissions Committee, must       •   produce well-informed ethical decision makers who
      meet stringent acceptance and continuation requirements.              embrace cultural diversity and aspire toward service to
           To be accepted into the program, students must have:             others and contributions to broader social welfare.

      •   a score of 1100 or above on SATs;                             The Physical Therapy program is accredited by the Commission
                                                                        on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education.
      •   a high school grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or above;
      •   a high school mathematics and science GPA of 3.3 or           Admission Requirements and Eligibility: Since the Physical
          above, or its equivalent;                                     Therapy (PT) program is a three-year, full-time program, appli-
      •   3 years of high school science (chemistry, biology, and       cants have a separate admissions process and a notification of
          physics preferred);                                           admission status shortly after the required interview. Entry
      •   3 years of high school mathematics;                           into the program is in the fall semester only. Class size is limit-
                                                                        ed to 25 students. Students should submit a complete Physical
      •   4 years of high school English; and
                                                                        Therapy application to the Graduate Admissions Office by
      •   completed the essay portion of the Marymount University       December 15. Applications submitted after December 15 will be
          undergraduate admissions application.                         considered on a space-available basis.
      To continue in the program, students must:                             Applicants need the following:
      •   maintain an overall GPA of 3.3;                               •   a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
      •   maintain a science GPA of 3.3 (A science GPA is defined as        prior to entry into the Physical Therapy program;
          the grades received in the prerequisite science courses);     •   a 3.0 or higher cumulative GPA for all college and univer-
      •   demonstrate active involvement in the greater Marymount           sity coursework;
          community;                                                    •   a 3.0 or higher cumulative GPA for all prerequisite science
      •   complete 40 hours of observation or volunteer service             and mathematics coursework; and
          work in a physical therapy clinical setting, verified by a    •   completion of 40 hours of observation or volunteer service
          physical therapist from the clinical setting. These hours         work in a physical therapy clinical setting, verified by a
          may be completed at more than one clinical facility; and          physical therapist from the clinical setting. These hours
      •   obtain a letter of recommendation from a faculty member           may be completed at more than one clinical facility. These
          in your academic major.                                           hours must be completed before the application deadline.
                                       S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                 135



Application materials are available on the University Web site     for these courses (if applicable) must be submitted to the PT
or from the Graduate Admissions Office. A complete applica-        office by mid-August.
tion includes:
                                                                       CHM 151-152 Principles of Chemistry I & II
•   the University application form for the Physical Therapy
                                                                       BIO 151-152 General Biology I & II
    program;
                                                                       BIO 161-162 Anatomy and Physiology I & II
•   an autobiographical essay, as described in the application
    packet, that outlines the applicant’s interest in physical         PHYS 171-172 General Physics I & II
    therapy and educational and career goals;                          College-level mathematics and MA 132 Statistical Analysis
•   official transcripts for all college and university course-        PSY 101 General Psychology
    work;                                                              Psychology elective
•   verification of completing 40 hours of clinical observation
    or work in a physical therapy setting under the supervi-       International students for whom English is a second lan-
                                                                   guage, please see Test of English as a Foreign Language
    sion of a licensed physical therapist;
                                                                   score requirements on page 19.
•   two letters of recommendation (using the form provided
    in the application packet) from faculty, academic advisors,    Provisional Admission Policy: Occasionally, an applicant
    or employers addressing the applicant’s ability, motivation,   who does not fully meet Physical Therapy admission require-
    and interest in pursuing graduate studies in Physical          ments may be admitted as a provisional student. Candidates
    Therapy; and                                                   for provisional admission are evaluated by the Department of
                                                                   Physical Therapy, and documents supporting a request for pro-
•   scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
                                                                   visional admission are forwarded to the dean for approval.
The Physical Therapy program’s Admissions Committee                Provisional students must complete the first semester of gradu-
reviews all applications. Initial evaluation of applicants         ate study with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Failure to meet this con-
includes assessment of overall GPA, prerequisite science and       dition or withdrawal from required first-semester courses will
mathematics GPA, GRE scores, applicant’s written statement,        result in dismissal from the program. After successful comple-
community activities, and recommendations.                         tion of the first semester of the Physical Therapy program, a
     Special consideration is given to current Marymount           provisional student will be moved to active status.
students who have completed at least two full-time semesters
at Marymount prior to applying, Marymount University gradu-        Clinical Requirements: A copy of each PT student’s medical
ates, and persons from minority groups that are                    examination record is required upon admission.
underrepresented in the profession.                                    Physical Therapy Students must also provide:
     Applicants are selected based upon their qualifications and   •   written verification of testing for tuberculosis or screening
potential to contribute to the profession and their community,         if PPD is positive (required annually) prior to registering
and who represent a broad diversity of backgrounds.                    for classes;
     Applicants are invited to campus to participate in            •   written verification of the following immunizations:
Interview Day. Interview Day consists of a personal interview,         Hepatitis B, MMR, Chicken Pox, Tetanus/Diphtheria, and
group activity, and facility tour. Please check the University         Influenza prior to registering for classes;
Web site or call the Office of Graduate Admissions to deter-
                                                                   •   written verification of accident and health insurance
mine the dates of Interview Day for the upcoming year.
                                                                       coverage, submitted to the clinical agency coordinator;
Admission decisions are announced to applicants within 30
days following their scheduled interview. All accepted students    •   written verification of CPR certification (adult, child, and
must confirm acceptance within three weeks of notification.            infant), prior to registration for the first clinical Physical
                                                                       Therapy course (current CPR certification must be
Prerequisite Coursework: The following courses, or their               provided to the clinical agency coordinator each semester);
equivalent, must be completed with a grade of C or better (C- is   •   a criminal background check, which is a federal require-
not acceptable) prior to beginning the Physical Therapy pro-           ment for all persons working with vulnerable populations; and
gram; however, please note that a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or bet-    •   additional requirements as stated by specific health care
ter in all PT prerequisite coursework is required for admission.       agencies.
No more than 12 credits from this group of courses may
                                                                   Students will not be permitted to register for classes until all
remain incomplete at the time of application to the program.
                                                                   requirements are met.
For those students admitted to the program, final transcripts
136                                             S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S


      Clinical-Experience Transportation: Students provide their                Year Two
      own transportation to and from clinical experiences. The
                                                                                  Fall                             Spring
      University’s free shuttle service connects the Main Campus, the
      Ballston Center, and the Ballston-MU Metro station.                         PT 720 Evaluation and            PT 730 Evaluation and
                                                                                    Management of Patients           Management of Patients
      Minimum Grade and Academic Progression Requirements:                          with Peripheral                  in Acute Care
      In addition to meeting the University’s academic standards for                Musculoskeletal Disorders      PT 731 Clinical Application
      graduate students, Physical Therapy students MUST successful-               PT 721 Evaluation and              of PT Management of
      ly complete all required PT courses with a minimum grade of
                                                                                    Management of Patients           Patients in Acute Care
      B-. A grade of C+ or below indicates unsatisfactory perform-
                                                                                    with Spinal                    PT 732 The PT as a Manager
      ance. When a course grade is unsatisfactory, the student MUST
      repeat the course and receive a minimum grade of B. Upon                      Musculoskeletal Disorders
                                                                                                                   PT 733 Evidence-Based
      receiving an unsatisfactory final grade in any PT course, the               PT 722 Physical Agents and         Clinical Practice
      student should immediately contact the PT department chair                    Electrotherapeutics
                                                                                                                   PT 734 Thesis Seminar I
      to examine remediation/continuation options. Contingent                     PT 723 Research Principles
      upon availability of space in the class the following year, the                                              Summer
                                                                                    and Design
      student will be given one opportunity to repeat the course in                                                PT 800 Clinical Practicum I
      which an unsatisfactory grade is received. A student can be dis-
      missed from the PT program if he/she demonstrates unsatisfac-             Year Three
      tory performance in three or more required PT courses.
           Provisional students who do not complete the first                     Fall                             Spring
      semester of graduate study with a GPA of 3.0 or better will                 PT 740 Evaluation and            PT 801B Clinical
      be dismissed from the program.                                                Management of Patients           Practicum II
                                                                                    with Neurological              Elective*
      The Thesis: All candidates are required to complete a written                 Disorders
      thesis as part of a small-group research project that spans the                                              PT 754 Capstone Seminar
      three-year curriculum and culminates in a professional presen-              PT 741 Clinical Applications
                                                                                                                   Summer
      tation of the scientific findings during the final year of the program.       of PT Management of
                                                                                    Patients with                  PT 802 Clinical
                                                                                    Neurological Disorders           Practicum III
      The Comprehensive Examination: Each student must pass a
      comprehensive written examination after completion of all                   PT 742 Special Populations       PT 803 Clinical Case Reports
      coursework. All Physical Therapy program faculty members                      in Physical Therapy
      contribute questions to the exam.
                                                                                  PT 743 Thesis Seminar II
      Degree Requirements                                                         PT 801A Clinical Practicum II
      95 credits
                                                                                *Elective — Choose from: PT 750 Sport Physical Therapy, PT 751
      Year One                                                                  Geriatric Physical Therapy, PT 752 Neurological Physical
         Fall                                 Spring                            Therapy, PT 753 Pediatric Physical Therapy
         PT 700 Clinical                      HPR 500 Exercise
           Neuroscience                        Physiology                       PHYSICAL THERAPY –
                                                                                TRANSITIONAL D.P.T. PROGRAM
         PT 701 Applied                       PT 710 Gross Anatomy
           Pathophysiology                                                      This program of study offers licensed physical therapists who
                                              PT 711 Foundations of PT
                                                                                hold a master’s degree in Physical Therapy the opportunity to
         PT 702 Health Care Delivery            Examination, Evaluation,
                                                                                earn the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree. The focus of the
           and Contemporary                     and Diagnosis
                                                                                program is to bridge the gap between current Doctor of
           Society                            PT 712 Critical Assessment        Physical Therapy and master’s degree entry-level expectations.
                                                of Information                  The program is delivered primarily in a distance-education
                                                                                format. Students are required to come to campus one weekend
                                                                                only, for a two-day seminar in concepts of professionalism in
                                                                                an autonomous profession. This seminar takes place each
                                                                                summer.
                                         S C H O O L O F H E A LT H P R O F E S S I O N S                                                          137



     The mission of this program is to provide an affordable,            PT 774 Clinical Decision Making: Guide to PT Practice
practical, and career-enhancing plan of study that allows                PT 775 Business and Marketing
master’s-prepared physical therapists to transition their current
                                                                         PT 776 Coding and Reimbursement
entry-level professional degree to the Doctor of Physical
Therapy degree.                                                          PT 777 Professionalism: The Doctoring Profession
                                                                         PT 778 Critical Assessment and Application of Best Evidence
Admission Requirements                                                     (Marymount University Class of 2004 exempted from this
Marymount M.S.P.T. graduates                                               course)
Applicants must do the following:                                      (For graduates of other M.S.P.T. programs)
•     provide evidence of being currently licensed to practice         30-31 credits (includes 12 credits of coursework transferred from another
      physical therapy in a state or jurisdiction of the United        institution)
      States; and                                                        PT 770 Screening for Medical Disorders
•     complete a Marymount graduate admission application                PT 771 Medical Imaging and Rehabilitation
Non-Marymount University-educated physical therapists                    PT 772 Pharmacology in Rehabilitation
Applicants must be a graduate of a Physical Therapy program              PT 773 Legal and Ethical Issues for PTs: Considerations in Risk
accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical                  Management
Therapy Education (CAPTE). Applicants must also:
                                                                         PT 774 Clinical Decision Making: Guide to PT Practice
•     hold a master’s degree in Physical Therapy;
                                                                         PT 775 Business and Marketing
•     hold a license to practice physical therapy in a state or
                                                                         PT 776 Coding and Reimbursement
      jurisdiction of the United States;
                                                                         PT 777 Professionalism: The Doctoring Profession
•     complete a Marymount application for admission into the
      Transitional DPT (tDPT) program;                                   PT 778 Critical Assessment and Application of Best Evidence

•     provide two letters of recommendation; and                         PT 780 Capstone Project Proposal

•     provide evidence of at least three (3) credits of professional     PT 781 Capstone Project
      coursework in each of the following areas:                         PT 782 Capstone Project Completion (may be required to
      •      scientific inquiry                                            complete case report)

      •      ethics
      •      business/organizational management
      •      health care systems

Minimum Grade and Academic Progression Requirements:
Students must receive a minimum grade of B in all
Transitional DPT courses. Students who receive a grade of B- or
lower must repeat the course to achieve a grade of B or better
before the course is considered “passed.” A student who receives
a grade of B- or less in three or more required Transitional DPT
courses will be dismissed from the Transitional DPT program.

Degree Requirements
(For graduates of Marymount’s M.S.P.T. program)
14 credits
    PT 770 Screening for Medical Disorders
    PT 771 Medical Imaging and Rehabilitation
    PT 772 Pharmacology in Rehabilitation
    PT 773 Legal and Ethical Issues for PTs: Considerations in Risk
      Management
138                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS



      Course Descriptions                                                        ACT 410 Auditing
                                                                                 An introduction to the independent accountant’s role and
      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of               responsibilities in business. Topics include generally accepted
      computers.                                                                 auditing standards, internal controls, substantive testing, and
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral             the auditor’s report. See department chair for course offering
      presentations.                                                             schedule. Prerequisite: ACT 304. (3)

                                                                                 ACT 420 Advanced Accounting Topics
      ACCOUNTING                                                                 Examines advanced financial accounting theory with emphasis
                                                                                 on accounting concepts, current reporting problems, prepara-
      Undergraduate Courses
                                                                                 tion of consolidated financial statements, and government and
                                                                                 not-for-profit accounting. See department chair for course offer-
      ACT 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting
                                                                                 ing schedule. Prerequisite: ACT 304. (3)
      An introduction to the basic concepts of financial analysis and
      recording. Introduction to the entire accounting cycle through             Graduate Courses
      preparation of worksheets and financial statements, special
      journals, and subsidiary ledgers. Prerequisite: ISY 096 or equiv-          ACT 504 Tax Accounting
      alent. (3)                                                                 Addresses federal income tax laws and regulations for corpora-
                                                                                 tions and individuals, tax planning, tax research, and tax
      ACT 202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting                              practice. Offered in spring semester, even-numbered years, only.
      A continuation of the concepts and practices introduced in ACT             Prerequisite: MBA 516. (3)
      201. Introduction to partnership and corporate accounting and
      financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACT 201. (3)                   ACT 520 Accounting Information Systems
                                                                                 Survey of the principles and techniques of auditing and control
      ACT 303 Intermediate Accounting I                                          of information systems. The course covers auditing concepts,
      The study of generally accepted accounting principles associ-              concerns, and objectives; information systems controls and
      ated with asset and liability measurement and the related                  tests; privacy, integrity, and security; and legal aspects of infor-
      effect on net income. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisites:           mation systems. Offered spring semester, odd-numbered years,
      ACT 201 and ACT 202 with a grade of C or better. (3)                       only. Prerequisites: MBA 516, ISY 501, and ISY 503. (Also listed
      ACT 304 Intermediate Accounting II                                         as ISY 520.) (3)
      A continuation of the study of generally accepted accounting               ACT 521 Internal Auditing I
      principles focusing on stockholders’ equity, income recognition,           Provides a broad understanding of responsibilities, tasks, and
      and other special reporting topics. Offered spring semester                concepts of internal auditing. Primary emphasis on the inter-
      only. Prerequisite: ACT 303 with a grade of C or better. (3)               nal auditor’s role as an agent of top management for gathering,
      ACT 306 Cost Accounting                                                    evaluating, and reporting information concerning controls and
      Topics include the study of cost accumulations in a manufac-               performance. Offered fall semester, even-numbered years, only.
      turing environment, inventory valuation, income                            Prerequisite: MBA 516. (3)
      determination, and the reporting of internal accounting data.              ACT 525 Fraud Auditing and Forensic Accounting
      See department chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisite:           Provides an in-depth study of financial statement fraud (i.e.,
      ACT 201 with a grade of C or better. (3)                                   fraudulent reporting by owners or top management to outside
      ACT 406 Tax Accounting                                                     users of financial statements), internal fraud (i.e., fraud schemes
      The federal income tax for corporations and individuals is                 perpetuated by employees), forensic accounting, and the
      studied. Tax regulations, tax planning, research, and practice             relationship and application of financial facts to legal
      are included. See department chair for course offering schedule.           problems. Offered fall semester, odd-numbered years, only.
      Prerequisite: ACT 201. (3)                                                 Prerequisite: MBA 516. (3)




      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                      139



APPLIED ARTS                                                        AA 350 Apparel Design I
                                                                    Execution of fashion designs through the flat pattern method.
Undergraduate Courses                                               The course teaches the rudiments of draping. Prerequisites: AA
                                                                    250 and AA 270, or the equivalents. (3)
AA 151 Textiles
A study of fibers and fabric of both natural and synthetic          AA 361 Survey of Fashion
origins. The course includes an analysis of the use and care of     An analysis of fashion: its function, history, and relation to
textiles, design applications, and finishing. Emphasis on the       modern economy. The course covers the principles of fashion
use of textiles for fashion. (3)                                    change, fashion terminology, and the development of fashions
                                                                    and accessories from ancient Egypt to the present. (3)
AA 250 Clothing Construction
A study and application of the principles of garment construc-      AA 365 Fashion Illustration II
tion. The course emphasizes application techniques for various      An advanced study of fashion drawing and design using a
available fabrics and production methods for basic styles. (3)      variety of color media. Prerequisite: AA 265 or permission of
                                                                    the instructor. (3)
AA 265 Fashion Illustration I
An analysis and application of techniques for drawing the           AA 370 Tailored Garment Structures
fashion figure and related apparel. The course includes projects    A studio in the methods of tailoring. Projects are assigned to
designed to develop technical drawings and illustrations            develop skills in fitting, shaping, lining, and underlining of
suitable for presentation purposes. Prerequisite: FA 105 or         garments. Prerequisites: AA 250 and AA 270, or permission of
permission of the instructor. (3)                                   the instructor. (3)

AA 270 Clothing Analysis                                            AA 372 Textile Design II
Focuses on the evaluation of garment quality from construc-         A continuation of AA 272 with concentration on color, the
tion and sewing standards to appropriate textile choice, mass       markets, industry specifications, and computer-aided design.
production processes, and pricing. Prerequisite: AA 250. (3)        Prerequisite: AA 272 or permission of the instructor. (3)

AA 272 Textile Design I                                             AA 381 Buying Fashion Apparel
Introduces fabric crafts and principles related to surface design   Examination and analysis of the theory, mathematics, and
for printing on textiles. Studio projects develop skills in the     practice of buying and selling apparel. Prerequisite: MKT 308. (3)
design of textiles and computer-aided design. Prerequisite: FA
                                                                    AA 385 Apparel Design II
105 or permission of the instructor. (3) ■
                                                                    Exploration of advanced flat pattern techniques and computer-
AA 273 Visual Merchandising                                         aided design. Teaches design students the theory of drafting
A study and application of merchandising principles for good        clothing patterns based on sets of body measurements and
store design. The course also examines the aesthetic elements       grading patterns. Prerequisites: AA 250, AA 270, and AA 350. (3)
used in merchandise presentation. (3)
                                                                    AA 390 Principles of Costume and Theater
AA 274 The Fashion Industry and Its Promotion                       Examines the principles and processes of designing costumes
Students identify global and domestic fashion markets and           for the stage. Emphasis on methods used to illuminate ideas,
obtain an historic overview of the fashion industry. Course         themes, characters, and action found in a script. (3)
develops an analysis of sources and market trends and assigns
                                                                    AA 400 Internship
exercises in the coordination of special events. Students assist
                                                                    A senior student may register for 3-6 credits in a field experi-
in the production of a dramatized fashion show at the
                                                                    ence in the Washington metropolitan area. Appropriate settings
University. (3)
                                                                    include manufacturers and specialty and department stores.
AA 320 Fashion Research and Communication                           The internship is monitored by a faculty member. Prerequisite:
Teaches students to identify fashion trends through research,       permission of the dean of Arts and Sciences. (3-6)
then communicate and promote those trends to the trade and
to the consumer. Students will examine the role of public
relations in the fashion industry. Prerequisites: EN 101 and EN
102, or permission of instructor. (3)
140                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      AA 405 Fashion in the Global Marketplace                                   AA 420 Advanced Problems in Fashion Design II
      This course provides an understanding of the textile and                   A continuation of the advanced projects started in AA 418.
      apparel industries in the world economy. Emphasis is on U.S.               Students create a line of garments suited to a specific market.
      importing and exporting and on global trends in the produc-                Prerequisites: AA 250, AA 270, AA 350, AA 385, AA 415, and AA
      tion and consumption of textiles and apparel. Prerequisite: ECO            418. (3)
      210. (3)
                                                                                 AA 421 Project
      AA 407 Product Development                                                 An investigation of a selected topic in the major emphasis area
      Investigation of the process by which an apparel product is                under the direction of a faculty advisor. The project is intended
      launched in the marketplace from the design and merchandis-                to develop independent research capabilities and presentation
      ing perspectives, including research, testing, financial planning,         techniques for fashion design or fashion merchandising.
      and marketing. Prerequisite: AA 151, AA 270, and open only to              Prerequisite: permission of the dean of Arts and Sciences. (3-6)
      juniors and seniors majoring in Fashion Design or
      Merchandising. (3)                                                         AA 422 Senior Seminar in Fashion Merchandising
                                                                                 The capstone course in Fashion Merchandising. Presents
      AA 410 Clothing Selection and Behavior                                     current practices, trends, and problems in the field. Students
      A study of fashion as it relates to clothing selection. Emphasis           learn to analyze contemporary problems by using the case
      on clothing behavior, consumer practices, wardrobe planning,               study method and by presenting a written and oral case analy-
      and color. Analysis of fringe consumer groups. (3)                         sis at the end of the course. Prerequisite: senior status. (3)

      AA 412 The Great Designers                                                 AA 423 Senior Fashion Design Portfolio
      An examination of the origin of haute couture and the contri-              Design for different markets is integrated with fashion presen-
      butions of noted fashion designers since 1850. The course                  tations. Students create a portfolio for entry into the industry.
      considers social and economic influences on the designer and               Prerequisites: AA 265, AA 365, and senior status. (3)
      consumer in each period. (3)
                                                                                 AA 433 Research
      AA 414 Fashion Show Production                                             A student in this course will conduct collaborative research
      The development of advanced planning required for a drama-                 (scholarly work leading to new knowledge) under the direction
      tized fashion show. Students will develop strategies for                   of a faculty member. Refer to the Marymount Academic
      advertising and publicity, budgeting, floor plans, stage and               Research Initiative (MARI) guidelines on page 51. Prerequisite:
      program designs, and targeting an appropriate market.                      application and approval of department chair. (1-6)
      Students plan lighting and sound, choreograph routines, and
      produce the fashion show. Prerequisite: AA 274 or permission               ASTRONOMY
      of the instructor. (3)                                                     NOTE: This 4-credit course requires a laboratory.
      AA 415 Apparel Design III                                                  Undergraduate Course
      Advanced study in the use of the draping method. Design
      concepts are developed to final, well-constructed original                 ASTR 101 Astronomy
      creations. Prerequisites: AA 250, AA 270, AA 350, and AA 385. (3)          A descriptive course in astronomy. Historical concepts of the
                                                                                 universe are related to our current ideas, followed by a detailed
      AA 418 Advanced Problems in Fashion Design I
                                                                                 study of the solar system. The birth, life, and death of stars are
      Examines fashion design as both process and product. Students
                                                                                 analyzed: how they generate their energy and their ultimate
      learn to integrate the elements of visual design, methods of
                                                                                 fate. Course concludes with a journey to the galaxies to explore
      pattern making, and the use of special fabrics. The course
                                                                                 the possible origin of the universe, to examine some current
      continues the application of computer-aided design to pattern
                                                                                 ideas, and to speculate about the future. (4)
      making. Prerequisites: AA 250, AA 270, AA 350, AA 385, AA 415,
      and senior status. (3) ■




      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                          COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                                   141



BIOLOGY                                                                           BIO 152 General Biology II for Majors
                                                                                  A continuation of the study begun in BIO 151. Topics focus on
NOTE: All 4-credit courses require a laboratory. A minimum
                                                                                  animal systems and address the diverse organ complexity and
grade of C- is required in any course that serves as a prerequi-
                                                                                  physiological functions. The course also extends the introduc-
site for a higher-numbered course.
                                                                                  tion of the rapidly evolving knowledge of molecular biology,
Undergraduate Courses                                                             gene structure, and regulation of expression. The Kingdoms
                                                                                  will be introduced. Kingdom Animalia will be discussed in
BIO 110 Introduction to Environmental Science                                     greater depth. Students will also be introduced to ecology.
An introduction to the study of the Earth’s natural systems and                   Students may enroll in this course only if it is a specific requirement for
the forces that can affect them. Students will explore the                        their major. Prerequisite: BIO 151 or equivalent. (4)
Earth’s natural environments, the interactions of organisms
                                                                                  BIO 161-162 Anatomy and Physiology I & II
with each other as well as their physical surroundings, and the
                                                                                  A two-semester study of the structure and function of the
sources and effects of stress on natural environments. Topics
                                                                                  human body with emphasis upon the interdependencies at the
include nutrient cycling; the hydrologic cycle; trophic struc-
                                                                                  microscopic and cellular levels. Laboratory work includes
tures and interactions; human populations; soil, water, and air
                                                                                  dissection experiments related to physiological processes,
pollution; and the relationship of science to policy making.
                                                                                  microscopic observation of cell types, biochemical tests, and
(4) ■
                                                                                  some diagnostic laboratory procedures. (4)(4) ■
BIO 111 Human Genetics for Nonmajors
                                                                                  BIO 212 Biology of Aging
This course is for nonscience majors, and introduces the princi-
                                                                                  Introduces the student to the aging process at the cellular and
ples of genetics as applied to humans. Recent advances in areas
                                                                                  subcellular levels. Surveys processes from single-cell organisms
such as using DNA evidence, gene therapy, amniocentesis, in
                                                                                  to the human organism. Prerequisite: one semester of Biology.
vitro fertilization, and learning and psychiatric disabilities are
                                                                                  (3)
considered. Social, cultural, and ethical implications are
reviewed. Laboratory will include experiences with DNA,                           BIO 224 Endocrinology
karyotyping, pedigree analysis, etc. (4)                                          Encompasses the study of hormones within plants, inverte-
                                                                                  brates, and vertebrates. A study will be made of their chemical
BIO 120 Introduction to the Biological World
                                                                                  classification and intracellular mechanisms, and the pathology
Introduces nonmajors to the biological world around them.
                                                                                  noted when they are absent. Research methods used by
Energy production, storage, and conversion are explored. A
                                                                                  endocrinologists are introduced. Prerequisites: BIO 152 and
survey of life leads from single-celled organisms to chordates.
                                                                                  CHM 152. (3)
The basic functioning of the systems of the human body are
examined. (4)                                                                     BIO 250 General Botany
                                                                                  An in-depth survey of the Plant Kingdom, including nonvascu-
BIO 151 General Biology I for Majors
                                                                                  lar as well as vascular plants. Some members of the Kingdoms
A course for the Biology major and a prerequisite for all subse-
                                                                                  Fungi and Protista will also be covered. Topics covered will
quent courses for the major. This course is also required for
                                                                                  include: photosynthesis, life cycles, growth and propagation,
certain other majors. The course addresses the chemical and
                                                                                  plant and hormone effects, classification and identification,
physiological aspects common to organisms, such as cell struc-
                                                                                  and herbarium techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 151 or equivalent.
ture, metabolism, and biosynthesis of molecules. Basic
                                                                                  (4)
principles of molecular biology will be introduced. Students may
enroll in this course only if it is a specific requirement for their major. (4)   BIO 260 Microbiology
                                                                                  An analysis of the general principles of microbiology. The
                                                                                  course includes the study of microbial growth and the relation
                                                                                  of bacteria and viruses to infection, disease, and immunity. The
                                                                                  role of pathogenic microbes and parasitic agents in the cause
                                                                                  of disease is studied along with the role of various combative
                                                                                  chemicals. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or BIO 162. (4)
142                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      BIO 262 Genetics for Majors                                                BIO 366 Animal Virology
      This course is for majors, and is a study of the basic principles          Examines the principles of animal virus structure and replica-
      of inheritance from the classical studies of Mendel to current             tion with an emphasis on viruses that pose a significant health
      developments in molecular genetics. Students study the appli-              risk to humans. Mechanisms of disease production are
      cations of genetic technologies to microorganisms, plants, and             explored. Prerequisite: BIO 363. (3)
      animals. The potential benefits of engineering and related
      ethical issues are discussed. Prerequisite: BIO 260. (4)                   BIO 368 Advanced Research Methods
                                                                                 This is a laboratory-intensive course that will provide the
      BIO 272 Parasitology                                                       student a working knowledge of current laboratory techniques
      The study of the biochemistry, physiology, nutrition, immunol-             common to many scientific disciplines including cell biology,
      ogy, life cycles, epidemiology, control, and chemotherapy of               immunology, and virology. Students will learn to use standard
      parasitic protozoans, helminths, and arthropod vectors.                    and state-of-the-art laboratory equipment. The course also will
      Emphasis is on parasites of man. Prerequisites: BIO 152 and                explore the application of each technique to different scientific
      CHM 152. (4)                                                               questions. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 363. (3)

      BIO 300 Writing for Science                                                BIO 369 Advanced Molecular Biology
      A discipline-specific approach to writing for Biology majors,              The majority of this class is spent in the laboratory since it
      this course will acquaint the student with the range of writing            emphasizes hands-on exploration of the techniques currently
      styles in science. Students will apply their knowledge in the              employed in research, forensic, and diagnostic laboratories.
      sciences to both the critique and writing of research abstracts,           Prerequisite: BIO 363. (4)
      literature summaries, and pieces to be read by the nonscientific
      audience. Prerequisite: EN 102. (3)                                        BIO 385 Approaches to Teaching Secondary
                                                                                 Biology
      BIO 312 Physiological Ecology                                              Prepares the student to teach Biology at the secondary level by
      Explores the way living organisms adjust to the adversities of             integrating content mastery with effective pedagogical strate-
      their environment. Understanding how organisms obtain infor-               gies. A field experience (20 hours) is required. Prerequisites: ED
      mation about the environment through their senses. Students                245S, ED 327S, and PSY 312. (3)
      will learn to use the principles of physiology to predict, as well
      as model, the behavior of animals. Students will be able to                BIO 400 Internship
      discuss the interplay of many physiological variables on the               Senior students may register for an internship with a cooperat-
      overall function of the body. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or equiva-             ing employer in the Washington metropolitan area. The
      lent. (3)                                                                  internship is monitored by a supervising professor and a repre-
                                                                                 sentative of the employing firm. Prerequisite: senior status.
      BIO 361 Biochemistry                                                       (3-6)
      A study of the structures and functions of biomolecules (carbo-
      hydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) found in living             BIO 410 Seminar
      systems. An introduction to bioenergetics and kinetics as                  Provides an opportunity for an in-depth study of a topic of
      applied to those systems. Prerequisites: BIO 363 and CHM 222               current interest selected annually. Discussion and research of
      or equivalents. (3)                                                        the literature is encouraged as a means for examining both
                                                                                 scientific aspects of the topic and the relationship of science to
      BIO 363 Cellular Biology                                                   societal, legislative, and economic issues. Prerequisite: senior
      Examination of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and               status or permission of instructor. (2)
      function. Emphasis on metabolism, regulation of cellular
      events, and basic genetic processes. The course provides an                BIO 421 Project
      introduction to control of gene expression. Prerequisites: BIO             Investigation of a selected topic in Biology in collaboration
      262 and CHM 152. (3)                                                       with or under the direction of a faculty advisor. The project is
                                                                                 intended to demonstrate the ability to conduct and report
      BIO 364 Immunology                                                         independent research. Prerequisite: approval of department
      Explores the immune response through investigation of                      chair. (1-3)
      relevant organ systems, cell types, and regulatory interactions.
      An introduction to aberrant immune responses is also
      provided. Prerequisite: BIO 363. (3)

      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                    143



BIO 433 Research                                                    MBA 518 Managerial Economics
A student in this course will conduct collaborative research        A rigorous treatment of microeconomic theory and its applica-
(scholarly work leading to new knowledge) under the direction       tions. Examines quantitative techniques appropriate to
of a faculty member. Refer to the Marymount Academic                demand forecasting, price determination, market share strate-
Research Initiative (MARI) guidelines on page 51. Prerequisite:     gies, and resource planning. Offered fall semester only.
application and approval of department chair. (1-6)                 Prerequisite: MBA 512 or MBA 516. (3)

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION                                             MBA 519 Managing Information Technology
                                                                    Covers conceptual foundations of information management.
Graduate Courses                                                    Includes aspects of management, decision making, cognitive
                                                                    sciences, systems, concepts of information management, and
MBA 512 Financial Accounting                                        information systems requirements and planning. (3)
Examines the accounting cycle, as well as the preparation and
                                                                    MBA 520 Macroeconomics
understanding of financial statements as decision-making
                                                                    Treats the scope of national income accounting, the Keynesian
tools. (3)
                                                                    and post-Keynesian models, consumption, savings, the multi-
MBA 513 Organizational Communications                               plier, investment and public sector spending, money and
Focuses on the skills managers must have to communicate             interest, and the general equilibrium model. Considers
effectively at work. Emphasizes clear writing, as well as clear     questions of economic growth and relevant public policy.
and engaging presentation preparation. Requires successful          Offered spring semester only. Prerequisite: MBA 512 or MBA
demonstration in the use of today’s technology to communi-          516. (3)
cate with a variety of business audiences. Includes projects
                                                                    MBA 522 Corporate Finance
requiring teamwork and an understanding of vertical and
                                                                    The primary purpose of this course is to present a wide range
horizontal communication patterns. (3)
                                                                    of important issues in managerial finance, including such
MBA 514 Quantitative Methods for Management                         topics as the role of finance in organizations, principles of
Provides students with a basic understanding of the concepts        financial analysis and control, capital budgeting techniques,
and applications of quantitative methods and models to              investment decisions under uncertainty, financial structure and
support managerial decision-making processes throughout the         cost of capital, sources of long- and short-term financing,
organization. Commonly available spreadsheet software will be       working capital management, and the multinational aspect of
used. A basic knowledge of statistics and spreadsheets is           financial management. Prerequisite: MBA 512 or MBA 516. (3)
assumed. (3)
                                                                    MBA 524 Strategic Marketing Management
MBA 515 Organizational Behavior                                     Identifies and analyzes marketing problems in business and
Addresses the best contemporary management and organiza-            public institutions. Weighs the effects of environment, compe-
tional theories and their roots. This critical analysis will        tition, society, the economy, and the media on marketing
examine the influence of individual, group, and organizational      objectives and strategies. Emphasizes the total marketing
processes on behavior in organizations. The purpose of the          package, including market segmentation, promotion, advertis-
course is to familiarize students with principles that can be       ing, pricing, packaging, and distribution. Prerequisites: MBA
applied to manage human resources, enhance individual and           514, MBA 518 or MBA 520, and MBA 522. (3)
group performance, and increase organizational effectiveness. (3)
                                                                    MBA 526 Strategic Management Seminar
MBA 516 Managerial Accounting                                       This is the capstone course in the M.B.A. program. Using the
Examines management control systems and their impact on             perspective of top management of an enterprise, the course
management decision making and control. Topics include activ-       considers operational situations, policy issues, and policy and
ity-based costing, break-even analysis, standard costs and          strategy response. Employs case methods to provide the
variances, and the budget process. Prerequisite: MBA 514. (3)       student with the opportunity to make decisions under condi-
                                                                    tions of uncertainty. Students are encouraged to take this class
                                                                    in the last semester. Prerequisites: the completion of 24 gradu-
                                                                    ate credit hours, including MBA 516, MBA 522, and MBA 524. (3)
144                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      CHEMISTRY                                                                  CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
                                                                                 This course is part of the chemistry sequence for Biology
      NOTE: All 4-credit courses require a laboratory. A minimum
                                                                                 majors. A continuation of CHM 221, this course covers the
      grade of C- is required in any course that serves as a prerequi-
                                                                                 chemistry of carbonyl containing compounds, aromatics,
      site for a higher-numbered course.
                                                                                 polyenes, amines, and carbohydrates. Also covered are UV-
      Undergraduate Courses                                                      visible and mass spectroscopy. An emphasis is placed on
                                                                                 organic synthesis and mechanisms. The laboratory applies
      CHM 125 Life Chemistry                                                     techniques learned in CHM 221 to synthesize a variety of
      An introduction to the fundamental principles and theories of              organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 221. (4)
      chemistry. It includes the study of atomic structure and
                                                                                 CHM 421 Project
      bonding, kinetic molecular theory, nomenclature, periodic
                                                                                 An investigation of a selected topic in physical science in
      classification of elements, chemical equilibrium, and oxidation-
                                                                                 collaboration with or under the direction of a faculty advisor.
      reduction reactions. The course stresses the structure of
                                                                                 The project is intended to demonstrate the ability to conduct
      organic molecules and functional groups and their characteris-
                                                                                 and report independent research. Prerequisite: approval of the
      tic reactions. Basic metabolic reactions of the cell are studied
                                                                                 department chair. (1-3)
      including enzyme inhibition, kinetics, and feedback mecha-
      nisms. Laboratory work includes quantitative and qualitative               CHM 433 Research
      analysis and reactions of functional groups and enzymes.                   Collaborative research under the direction of a full-time faculty
      This course does not meet chemistry requirements for Health                member. Refer to the Marymount Academic Research Initiative
      Sciences (Pre-Physical Therapy emphasis) majors. This course               (MARI) guidelines on page 51. Prerequisite: application and
      should also not be taken by Psychology majors with an interest             approval of department chair. (1-6)
      in health-related fields. (4)
                                                                                 COMMUNICATIONS
      CHM 151 Principles of Chemistry I
      This course is part of the chemistry sequence for Biology
                                                                                 Undergraduate Courses
      majors. The course covers inorganic nomenclature, oxidation-
      reduction reactions, elementary thermodynamics, atomic and
                                                                                 COM 100 Media Communications
      molecular structure, Lewis dot structures, the shapes of
                                                                                 An introduction to communications and the function of the
      molecules, and ideal gases. The laboratory also covers introduc-
                                                                                 media therein. Investigation of the historical, legal, theoretical,
      tory visible spectroscopy. Prerequisite: placement into MA 142.
                                                                                 and ethical dimensions in communications. Lecture material is
      (4)
                                                                                 supplemented with presentations of audio and visual material
      CHM 152 Principles of Chemistry II                                         illustrating how the media function. (3)
      This course is part of the chemistry sequence for Biology
                                                                                 COM 101 Public Speaking
      majors. The course covers intermolecular interactions, struc-
                                                                                 Analysis of the elements of oral communication and the devel-
      ture of crystals, properties of solution, kinetics, equilibrium,
                                                                                 opment of communication skills through their disciplined use.
      acid-base chemistry, precipitation equilibrium, thermodynam-
                                                                                 The course explores public and personal communications
      ics, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: CHM 151. (4)
                                                                                 values in both theory and practice. (3) ●
      CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
                                                                                 COM 200 Desktop Publishing
      This course is part of the chemistry sequence for Biology
                                                                                 An introduction to the fundamentals of desktop publishing
      majors. It covers the nomenclature, structure, reactions, and
                                                                                 using QuarkXPress, Macromedia FreeHand, and Adobe
      synthesis of organic compounds. The course is mainly devoted
                                                                                 Photoshop software. Students integrate type and images to
      to aliphatic and cycloaliphatic compounds, and covers infrared
                                                                                 produce camera-ready work. (Also listed as GD 200.) (3)
      and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The laboratory
      emphasizes the techniques of distillations, recrystallization,             COM 201 Communication History
      extraction, and spectroscopic identification. Prerequisite: CHM            Examines how modern communication systems developed and
      152. (4)                                                                   places them in cultural and historical context. Students learn
                                                                                 why the communication media function as they do. Topics
                                                                                 include information flow before printing, the link between
                                                                                 printing and literacy, the development of free expression, and
                                                                                 media coverage of important events. (3)
      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                     145



COM 203 Photography: Digital Imaging                                COM 302 Public Relations Techniques
An introduction to the working relationship between design          Teaches the applications of public relations theory and princi-
and photography with an emphasis on digital imaging.                ples. Students learn the requirements of different media such
Prerequisite: GD 101 or prior experience with Photoshop             as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and cable. They
software recommended. (Also listed as GD 203.) (3)                  develop basic skills in publicity, promotion, campaign
                                                                    planning, and audience identification. Prerequisite: COM 206.
COM 204 Oral Interpretation                                         (3)
A laboratory experience in vocal development and control. The
course explores forms of literature and the techniques involved     COM 303 Video Production
in oral communication of literature. Focus is on the develop-       An overview of video history, theory, and equipment as well as
ment of interpretative skills and persuasiveness with               hands-on experience in preproduction, production, and postpro-
independent ideas. (3) ●                                            duction techniques. Students plan and execute their own
                                                                    videotaped presentations, which may be kept for portfolio
COM 206 Introduction to Public Relations                            purposes. (Also listed as GD 303.) (3)
This is the introductory course in the public relations
sequence. The theory and history behind the practice of public      COM 304 Video Production II
relations are explored. Also covered are the general types of       An overview of the history, theory, and equipment of television
public relations practices including corporate, institutional,      studio production. Students will learn all phases of studio
nonprofit, government, and political. (3)                           production through readings and hands-on experience.
                                                                    Students will plan and execute their own studio production. All
COM 209 Introduction to Journalism                                  productions will be taped for portfolio use. Prerequisite:
A basic writing course emphasizing development of reporting         COM/GD 303. (Also listed as GD 304.) (3)
and interviewing skills through lab work and class assign-
ments. The course includes extensive writing practice under         COM 305 Journalism II
deadline pressure as well as an assessment of ethical problems      A continuation of COM 209 with emphasis upon complex news
in the field and career opportunities. Minimal typing skills        and feature stories, responsibilities of the press with reference
required. (3) ■                                                     to ethics and libel, and an introduction to makeup and layout.
                                                                    Lab work will include video display terminals. Prerequisites:
COM 211 Principles of Language                                      proficiency in elementary word processing, COM 209. (3) ■
An introductory investigation of basic constructs and subsys-
tems of English structure as described by grammarians of            COM 307 Broadcast Delivery
various theoretical persuasions. (3)                                A laboratory experience in writing and delivering copy for
                                                                    radio and television. The course includes audio and video
COM 212 Introduction to the Technique of Acting                     tapings of students delivering newscasts, commercials, inter-
The goal of this course is to make a student aware of the trans-    views, and public service announcements. Both content and
formation process whereby drama is turned into theater              performance are evaluated. (3) ●
through the language of the theater, i.e. sets, lights, costumes,
makeup, music, and/or the actor. Secondly, the course aims to       COM 308 Web Design
make the student aware of the importance of textual analysis,       An introduction to the fundamentals of Web design using
which is the foundation for acting. (3)                             Dreamweaver, Photoshop, and Flash software. Students
                                                                    integrate type and images to produce Web sites for use on the
COM 300 Report Writing                                              Internet. Prerequisites: GD 101 and GD 104, or prior experience
An advanced course in technical writing aimed at the logical        with course software. (3)
and orderly presentation of materials, development of ideas,
and effective communication of secondary materials from             COM 309 Web Multimedia Design
professional fields. Prerequisite: EN 102. (3)                      An introduction to the integration of text, visual imagery,
                                                                    sound, animation, and video using Flash and Photoshop
COM 301 Intercultural Communication                                 software. Students create a multimedia presentation.
A study of the influences of cultural variability within the        Prerequisites: GD 101, GD 103, and COM 308, or prior experience
communication process. Particular emphasis will be given to         with course software. (Also listed as GD 309.) (3)
intercultural theories, cultural adaptation, interpersonal effec-
tiveness and relationships, and ethnolinguistic identities. (3)
146                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      COM 310 Presentational Communication                                       COM 421 Project
      Provides guided experiences that develop career-related oral               An investigation of a selected topic in the major discipline. The
      communication skills such as listening, interviewing, commu-               project is intended to demonstrate ability to conduct independ-
      nicating in small groups, and persuasion. Students practice                ent research and present the results in writing of commendable
      these skills in classroom exercises and explore how the skills             quality. Prerequisite: permission of the dean of Arts and
      are applicable in professional environments. Prerequisites:                Sciences. (3)
      COM 100, COM 101, COM 206, and COM 209. (3) ●
                                                                                 COM 425 Senior Seminar in Communications
      COM 315 Writing for the New Media                                          The capstone course in Communications, designed to present
      Focuses on writing skills required in professional fields, includ-         current practices, trends, and problems of the field in a manner
      ing the Internet. Applications include exercises in linear and             that develops both oral and written communication skills.
      nonlinear writing along with a review of the analytic and                  Students are required to write a major research paper in their
      research skills used in the professions. Prerequisite: COM 209             area of concentration. Prerequisite: senior standing. (3)
      or equivalent experience. (3)
                                                                                 COM 433 Research
      COM 316 Broadcast Journalism                                               A student in this course will conduct collaborative research
      Focuses on gathering, writing, and preparing news for radio                (scholarly work leading to new knowledge) under the direction
      and television. Includes extensive practice in writing news for            of a faculty member. Refer to the Marymount Academic
      broadcast and handling taped material effectively. Prerequisite:           Research Initiative (MARI) guidelines on page 51. Prerequisite:
      COM 209. (3)                                                               application and approval of department chair. (1-6)

      COM 317 Editing and the Editorial Process                                  COMPUTER SCIENCE
      Focuses on the editing process and the role of the editor in today’s
      print media. It includes extensive practice in editing, headline           Undergraduate Courses
      writing, and layout, as well as discussions of ethical standards
      and practice in the print media. Prerequisite: COM 209. (3) ■              CS 106 Programming on the Web in Java Script
                                                                                 This course provides an introduction to programming on the
      COM 318 Public Relations Case Studies
                                                                                 Web, focusing on client-side programming using JavaScript and
      Examines solutions to public relations problems through an
                                                                                 on server-side CGI programming such as Perl scripts. Offered in
      analysis of actual corporate and association cases. The focus
                                                                                 fall semester, odd-numbered years, only. (3) ■
      will emphasize successful public relations management and
      practice through the systematic application of defining,                   CS 110 Programming I in Java
      planning and programming, acting and communicating, and                    This is a first course in learning how to write programs for
      evaluating results. Prerequisites: COM 206 and COM 302. (3)                computers. Provides an introduction to techniques of problem
                                                                                 solving, algorithm development, and object-oriented software
      COM 320 Organizational Communication
                                                                                 development in Java. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisite:
      A study of communication research and its application to
                                                                                 algebra skill competency. (4) ■
      industrial and organizational systems. Particular emphasis will
      be given to organizational communication theory, leadership,               CS 111 Programming II in Java
      climate and structure, motivation, message-processing,                     A continuation of CS 110. Topics include advanced object-
      channels of communication, and the communication audit. (3)                oriented programming, UML, and data structures such as
                                                                                 linked lists, stacks, queues, and trees. Offered spring semester
      COM 322 Principles of Communications Law
                                                                                 only. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in CS 110. (4) ■
      Examines the historical development of First Amendment law,
      its ethical underpinnings, and its evolution through appellate-            CS 120 Personal Security in the Digital Age
      court decisions. (3)                                                       This introductory course provides background for further
                                                                                 studies in computer science and criminal justice. Students will
      COM 400 Internship
                                                                                 be prepared to understand how to protect computers from
      Senior students may register for an internship in a cooperating
                                                                                 outside threats and how to investigate computer crimes.
      research or media communications agency in the Washington
                                                                                 Offered spring semester only. (3) ■
      metropolitan area under the supervision of an instructor.
      Prerequisite: permission of the dean of Arts and Sciences. (3-6)

      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                     147



CS 150 The UNIX Operating System                                     CS 325 Networking
Offers a thorough study of the UNIX operating system. The            An examination of how data gets from one computer to
course examines UNIX tools, the UNIX file system, shell              another. Networks are discussed in light of the seven-layer
programming, text editing, filters, pipes, macro processing, data    network model, from the physical connection up through the
analysis, text processing, and document maintenance. Offered         protocols required for two computer applications to under-
in fall semester, even-numbered years, only. Prerequisite: a         stand each other. Networking software is examined to
grade of C- or better in CS 110 or ISY 120. (3) ■                    illustrate the principles of the course. Offered fall semester
                                                                     only. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in CS 111. (3) ■ ●
CS 180 Programming in C++
An introduction to the C++ language using the UNIX operating         CS 350 Operating Systems
system. The course emphasizes special features of C++ and their      A study of the major features of operating systems such as real
influence on program development. See department chair for           and virtual memory, concurrent processing, disk storage
course offering schedule. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in   techniques, resolving deadlocks, and protection. Offered spring
CS 110 or consent of instructor. (3) ■                               semester only. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in CS 230 or
                                                                     consent of instructor. (3) ■ ●
CS 210 The Structure of Programming Languages
An introductory study of language development and a survey           CS 360 Intelligent and Agent-based Systems
of the major programming paradigms. Attention is paid to             A survey of artificial intelligence algorithms including search
variable types, sequence control, recursive subprograms,             heuristics for problem solving and game playing, logic, knowl-
concurrent execution, parameter passing and scope, and               edge representation and reasoning, planning and navigation,
storage management. Offered in spring semester, even-                machine learning, neural networks, natural language process-
numbered years, only. Prerequisites: a grade of C- or better in      ing, robotics. Offered spring semester, even-numbered years,
CS 111 and MA 150, or consent of instructor. (3) ■                   only. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in CS 220 or consent
                                                                     of instructor. (3) ■ ●
CS 220 Data Structures and Algorithms
An introduction to effective data structures and algorithms.         CS 370 Computer Forensics
Testing and evaluating data manipulation algorithms with             This is a capstone course in the Forensic Computing minor and
respect to memory needs, complexity, and speed are empha-            the post-baccalaureate certificate. This course calls on the
sized. Offered fall semester only. Prerequisites: a grade of C- or   knowledge gained in the other minor/certificate courses and
better in CS 111 and MA 150 and placement in MA 181, or              provides a final coverage of topics required for the
consent of instructor. (4) ■                                         International Society of Forensic Computer Examiners’
                                                                     Certified Computer Examiner exam. Offered spring semesters
CS 230 Computer Organization                                         beginning in 2009. Prerequisite: CS 120. Corequisites: CS 230
A course exploring how computers work, answering questions           and CS 325. (3) ■ ●
such as, “Why do computers use 0s and 1s?” and “What is
inside that case and what do all those pieces do?” Offered           CS 391A Topics in Computational Mathematics:
spring semester only. Prerequisites: a grade of C- or better in CS   Combinatorics
110. (3) ■                                                           This course will present a survey of modern combinatorics, a
                                                                     field that has grown rapidly in the last few years and which
CS 310 Software Engineering                                          has extensive applications in Computer Science. Students will
The study of software analysis, design, evaluation, and mainte-      be expected to state and prove results about counting princi-
nance techniques using UML and Java. Offered fall semester,          ples, equivalence relations and partitions, inclusion and
even-numbered years, only. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better     exclusion, recurrence relations, generating functions, Latin
in CS 220 or consent of instructor. (3) ■ ●                          squares, block designs, affine and projective planes, and the
                                                                     relationship between linear codes and designs. See department
CS 320 Database Systems
                                                                     chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisite: permission of
A study of design of relational databases using ER data model-
                                                                     instructor. (Also listed as MA 391A.) (3) ■
ing. Includes an exploration of modern database systems such
as Oracle, and programming database applications using Java
JDBC and tools such as Cold Fusion. Offered fall semester, odd-
numbered years, only. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in CS
220 or consent of instructor. (3) ■ ●
148                                                       COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      CS 391B Topics in Mathematics: Numerical                                   CS 501A Java Certification
      Analysis                                                                   Provides an advanced-level introduction to programming in Java
      Introduces numerical methods for solving applied problems in               to prepare students who have a solid expertise in structured
      analysis. Students will develop solutions (or approximate                  programming and some knowledge of object-oriented design for
      solutions) of mathematical equations that model real-world                 the Sun Java Programmer Certification exam. Prerequisite: CS 111
      phenomena. The numerical routines will be implemented using                or equivalent. (2)
      Maple. Offered fall semester, odd-numbered years, only.
      Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (Also listed as MA 391B.) (3) ■    CS 501B C++
                                                                                 Provides an advanced-level introduction to programming in C++
      CS 391C Topics in Mathematics: Graph Theory                                for students who have a solid expertise in structured program-
      This is an introduction to elementary graph theory and its                 ming and some knowledge of object-oriented design. Students
      applications in a wide variety of areas. Students should                   will design C++ software systems using object-oriented
      develop facility with mathematical proof, show how graphs are              concepts. Prerequisite: CS 111 or equivalent. (1)
      applicable to a wide variety of subjects, and solve applied
      problems. See department chair for course offering schedule.               CS 501C Perl
      Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (Also listed as MA 391C.) (3) ■    Perl is a language in which programmers can develop software
                                                                                 to do common tasks that are typically too heavy or portability-
      CS 391D Topics in Computational Mathematics:                               sensitive for the shell programming, and yet too weird,
      Theory of Computation                                                      short-lived, or complicated to code in C or some other UNIX
      A study of the models of computation, formal languages, and                glue language. This course provides an advanced-level introduc-
      measures of complexity. See department chair for course offer-             tion to Perl for students having a sound knowledge of UNIX
      ing schedule. Prerequisites: a grade of C- or better in CS 111 and         and operating systems concepts. The common features of Perl
      MA 150, or consent of instructor. (Also listed as MA 391D.) (3) ■          will be discussed, as well as the use of Perl for simple
                                                                                 client/server applications. (1)
      CS 400 Internship
      Advanced students may register for a field experience in the               CS 501D Java Swing
      metropolitan area. The internship is monitored by a faculty                Provides an advanced-level introduction to the Java Swing
      member. Prerequisite: permission of the dean of Arts and                   library for building GUIs for students who are intermediate or
      Sciences. (3-6) ■                                                          advanced Java programmers. (1)

      CS 421 Project                                                             CS 501E Java Server Pages
      This course is for the independent study of a particular area of           Provides an advanced-level introduction to Java Server Pages
      Computer Science under the direction of a faculty member.                  (JSP) for programming on the Web for students who are inter-
      Prerequisite: approval of department chair. (1-3)                          mediate or advanced Java programmers. (1)

      CS 433 Research                                                            CS 501F C#
      A student in this course will conduct collaborative research               Provides an advanced-level introduction to the programming
      (scholarly work leading to new knowledge) in computer science              language C# for students who are intermediate or advanced
      under the direction of a faculty member. Refer to the                      Java programmers. (1)
      Marymount Academic Research Initiative (MARI) guidelines on
      page 51. Prerequisite: application and approval of department              CS 501G ASP: Active Server Pages
      chair. (1-6)                                                               Provides an advanced-level introduction to Active Server Pages
                                                                                 for programming on the Web for students who are intermedi-
      Graduate Courses                                                           ate or advanced programmers in any high-level programming
                                                                                 language. (1)
      CS 500 Language Design
      Introduction to concepts of fundamental programming                        CS 501H Cold Fusion
      languages. Survey of the major programming paradigms and                   Provides an advanced-level introduction to Cold Fusion to
      issues that are involved in the design and implementation of               build three-tier database Web applications for students who are
      programming languages. Prerequisite: CS 210 or equivalent                  intermediate or advanced programmers in any high-level
      (3)                                                                        programming language and who have expertise with
                                                                                 databases. (1)

      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                     149



CS 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms                            CS 555 Theory and Applications of Artificial
Introduction to basic methods of design and analysis of             Intelligence
algorithms. Topics covered include measures of time and space       A survey of artificial intelligence algorithms including search
complexity, NP-complete problems, and determination of              heuristics for problem solving and game playing, logic, knowl-
efficient algorithms for sorting and searching. Prerequisites: CS   edge representation and reasoning, planning and navigation,
220, MA 150, and MA 181 or equivalent. (3)                          machine learning, neural networks, natural language process-
                                                                    ing, and robotics. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in CS 220
CS 515 Advanced Computer Architecture                               or consent of instructor. (3)
A survey of new developments in advanced computer architec-
ture. After a brief review of the concepts underlying current       CS 565 Data Management Systems
architecture, a variety of approaches and techniques used in        A study of the design of relational databases using ER data
the design of advanced computer systems is examined.                modeling. This course also explores modern database systems,
Prerequisite: CS 230 or equivalent. (3)                             such as Oracle, and programming database applications using
                                                                    Java JDBC and tools like Cold Fusion. Prerequisite: a grade of
CS 520 Data Communications                                          C- or better in CS 220 or consent of instructor. (3)
A survey of the complex technology surrounding data commu-
nications. The student selects appropriate communication            CS 570 Computer Security I
lines, equipment, and software in constructing data communi-        A survey of topics in computer security, including computer
cation systems. Prerequisite: CS 230 or equivalent. (3)             security goals, security and privacy policies, network security,
                                                                    database security, wireless network security, physical security,
CS 525 Computer Networking                                          risk assessment and management, cryptography, and introduc-
Provides an introduction to issues in network architecture,         tory information policy and intellectual property law. This
particularly design of network protocols, analysis of their         course integrates the teaching of computer security topics with
efficiency, and popular network standards. In addition, this        an analysis of their ethical dimensions and laboratory demon-
course provides an introduction to network programming. It is       strations. Prerequisite: CS 525 or ISY 515. (3)
recommended that students possess a knowledge of statistics,
elementary differential calculus, and a structured programming      CS 571 Computer Security II
language before attempting this course. Prerequisites: CS 220       A more advanced study of computer security, including the
and CS 230, or equivalents. (3)                                     topics of authentication mechanisms; authorization mecha-
                                                                    nisms; security models; trusted computing; machine
CS 530 Software Engineering                                         architecture security; operating system security; application
An overview of system and software engineering, software            security; inference and aggregation; network security protocols,
project planning, problem specification and analysis, system        such as IPSEC and SSL; and Web security. This course
design techniques, UML programming languages and coding,            integrates the teaching of computer security topics with an
system testing and maintenance, and software quality assur-         analysis of their ethical dimensions and laboratory demonstra-
ance. Prerequisite: CS 220 or equivalent. (3)                       tions. Prerequisite: CS 570. (3)

CS 535 Human Engineering Issues in Computer                         CS 600 Compiler Design and Implementation
System Design                                                       Analysis of the concepts of compiler design and the steps
Emphasizes the importance of human engineering issues in            involved in compiler writing. Prerequisite: CS 220 or equiva-
implementing successful computer-based systems. Prerequisite:       lent. (3)
CS 530. (3)
                                                                    CS 610 Graduate Research Seminar in Computer
CS 550 Principles of Operating Systems                              Science
Introduction to the major features of operating systems, such       Preparation for the Master’s Thesis/Project and presentations.
as concurrent processing, CPU scheduling, deadlocks, memory         Exposure to current research in computer science and the
management, real and virtual memory, secondary storage              professional means of communicating the results of research.
management, and file management. Prerequisite: CS 220 or            Prerequisite: permission of advisor. (3)
equivalent. (3)
150                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      CS 620 Distributed Computing                                               CJ 300 Writing for Criminal Justice
      The primary focus of this course is client/server and distrib-             The purpose of this course is to teach undergraduate students
      uted architectures and distributed programming in Java. The                to communicate facts, information, arguments, analysis, and
      course covers how heterogeneous components of a client/server              ideas effectively in a simple, clear, and logical manner using
      system work together in various models. Prerequisites: CS 220              various types of criminal justice reports and research papers.
      and CS 230 or equivalent. (3)                                              Students will practice note taking, résumé writing, report
                                                                                 writing, written legal analysis, research-document writing, as
      CS 625 Cryptography                                                        well as presentation of testimony in court. (3)
      Presents an introduction to symmetric and asymmetric
      cryptography. It includes a discussion of the history of cryptog-          CJ 304 Applied Research Methods
      raphy and cryptanalysis as well as the mathematical basis of,              An examination of the techniques and resources of applied
      and algorithms for, modern ciphers such as AES, DES, RSA, and              social research. Emphasis is placed on quantitative research
      RC4. The topics of key exchange and management, digital                    techniques, survey research, program evaluation, and the ways
      signatures, secure hashes, and steganography are covered.                  in which research informs social and public policy.
      Prerequisites: MA 182, CS 505, and CS 571. (3)                             Prerequisites: SOC 131 and MA 132 or equivalent, or PSY 201 or
                                                                                 equivalent, or permission of instructor. (Also listed as SOC 304.)
      CS 670 Computer Network Defense                                            (3)
      Provides a hands-on introduction to defending computer
      networks against attacks such as viruses, worms, Trojan horses,            CJ 307 Juvenile Justice
      denial-of-service attacks, password cracking, key loggers, buffer          A systematic study of the history and purpose of the juvenile
      overflow attacks, and reconnaissance, such as sniffing, DNS,               justice system that includes examination of the role of the U.S.
      SNMP, scanning, fingerprinting, and war driving. This course               Supreme Court. The course also evaluates the extent and
      integrates the teaching of computer security topics with an                nature of juvenile delinquency and addresses the physical,
      analysis of their ethical dimensions and laboratory demonstra-             emotional, and societal problems faced by juveniles today.
      tions. Prerequisite: CS 571. (3)                                           Other topics covered are the treatment and punishment of
                                                                                 juvenile offenders, modern juvenile subcultures, and controver-
      CS 698 Master’s Project                                                    sial issues in juvenile justice. (Also listed at SOC 307.) (3)
      Application of newly acquired knowledge to a significant practi-
      cal problem in computer science. The results are communicated in           CJ 308 Principles of Forensic Science I
      writing and are critiqued by the faculty. Prerequisite: CS 610.            An examination of investigative and laboratory techniques
      (3-6)                                                                      used in the investigation of criminal offenses. Also examined
                                                                                 are methods for searching crime scenes, analysis of firearm
      CS 699 Master’s Thesis                                                     evidence, fingerprints, serology (including DNA), toxicology,
      This capstone course offers the student an opportunity to                  questioned documents, and drugs. Major crimes, death investi-
      conduct original research into a topic of choice and draw on               gation, and pathology are also explored. Prerequisites: CJ 209
      various aspects of previous studies. The results are communi-              and CJ 310, or permission of the instructor. (3)
      cated in writing and are critiqued by the faculty. Prerequisite:
      CS 610. (3-6)                                                              CJ 309 Principles of Forensic Science II: Advanced
                                                                                 Criminalistics
      CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                           A continuation of the introduction to investigative and labora-
                                                                                 tory techniques used in the forensic analysis of criminal
      (See also Sociology)
                                                                                 offenses. Examined are forensic pathology, anthropology, and
      Undergraduate Courses                                                      toxicology; firearm, toolmark, trace material, questioned
                                                                                 document, drug, arson, and bombing evidence. Major emphasis
      CJ 209 The Criminal Justice System                                         is placed on the legal aspects of evidence, including investiga-
      An overview of the formal mechanisms of social control as                  tor and examiner documentation and reporting, and courtroom
      manifested by the components of the criminal justice system                process and testimony. Prerequisites: CJ 308 or permission of
      (legislatures, law enforcement, courts, and corrections). Also             the instructor. (3)
      examined are alternatives to formal processing including diver-
      sion, pretrial screening, and dispute settlement programs. (3)



      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                                COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                     151



CJ 310 Policing in American Society                                 CJ 495 Senior Seminar
A survey of the history, development, environment, organiza-        This capstone course provides an in-depth examination of
tion, and sociology of American law enforcement with an             current issues and social challenges that impact both the crimi-
emphasis on state and local police agencies. Topics examined        nal justice system and society as a whole. For students nearing
include police as service agency, police as government entity,      the completion of their coursework in Criminal Justice and
and police as component of the national criminal justice            Sociology, this course builds on the knowledge and skills they
system. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 131. (3)                       acquired earlier in their academic careers. Prerequisites: SOC
                                                                    304, SOC 305, senior standing; and permission of the instruc-
CJ 311 Correctional Institutions                                    tor. (3)
An overview of the theories, history, and functions of punish-
ment and corrections in America. Topics examined include the        Graduate Courses
origin and development of prisons and jails, prison administra-
tion, community-based corrections, legal rights of offenders,       CJ 501 Victims of Interpersonal Violence
sentencing, parole, and capital punishment. Prerequisite: SOC       An examination of victimology as it applies to victims of
100 or SOC 131. (3)                                                 violence. Special areas of inquiry include spouse, child, and
                                                                    elder assault; sexual violence; homicides; and hate-type crimes.
CJ 312 Criminal Justice Management                                  Particular attention is given to relevant criminal and constitu-
A behavioral-systems approach to traditional and contempo-          tional law, as well as to law enforcement investigative practices
rary management models as they relate to criminal justice           regarding these crimes. Research concerning the dynamics of
agencies. Emphasis is placed on administrative problem              victim/offender relationships is explored in depth. Attorneys,
solving, organization and management theory, planning and           police investigators, victim assistance professionals, and
research, social science, and psychology and sociology as they      advocates will supplement classroom instruction. (3)
relate to communication and supervision. Case studies are used
to facilitate learning. Prerequisite: CJ 310 or permission of the   CJ 507 Juvenile Justice
instructor. (3)                                                     An advanced examination of the history and purpose of the
                                                                    juvenile justice system that includes the role of the U.S.
CJ 320 Cybercrime and Digital Terrorism                             Supreme Court. The course also evaluates the extent and
This course provides an overview of the actors, motives, and        nature of juvenile delinquency in contemporary America;
methods used in the commission of computer-related crimes,          examines theoretical explanations of juvenile delinquency; and
and describes the methods used by organizations to prevent,         addresses the physical, emotional, and societal problems faced
detect, and respond to these crimes. The course will also focus     by juveniles today. Students will also study the treatment and
on different types of crimes and the nature of crimes that are      punishment of juvenile offenders using cutting-edge research.
committed using computers. (3)                                      (Also listed as SOC 507.) (3)

CJ 400 Internship                                                   CJ 508 Principles of Forensic Science I
Practical experience in an applied criminal justice or social       An examination of investigative and laboratory techniques
service setting. Field experience is supervised and course is       used in the investigation of criminal offenses. Also examined
open only to senior Criminal Justice majors. Prerequisite:          are methods for searching crime scenes, analysis of firearm
permission of internship coordinator. (6)                           evidence, fingerprints, serology (including DNA), toxicology,
                                                                    questioned documents, and drugs. Major crimes, death investi-
CJ 421 Project
                                                                    gation, and pathology are also explored. Prerequisite: graduate
Research of an original topic in criminal justice in collabora-
                                                                    or undergraduate credits in Criminal Justice, Forensic Science,
tion with or under the direction of a faculty advisor. The
                                                                    or permission of instructor. (3)
project is intended to demonstrate ability to conduct and
report independent research. (1-3)

CJ 433 Research
A student in this course will conduct collaborative research
(scholarly work leading to new knowledge) under the direction
of a faculty member. Refer to the Marymount Academic
Research Initiative (MARI) guidelines on page 51. Prerequisite:
application and approval of department chair. (1-6)
152                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      CJ 509 Principles of Forensic Science II: Advanced                         ECO 305 Business and Economics of Sports
      Criminalistics                                                             Uses microeconomic principles to explore the decisions of
      A continuation of the introduction to investigative and labora-            owners and business managers in the sports industry. Topics
      tory techniques used in the forensic analysis of criminal                  include players’ salaries and union contract negotiations, ticket
      offenses. Examined are forensic pathology, anthropology, and               sales, the market for broadcast rights, and stadium financing.
      toxicology; firearm, toolmark, trace material, questioned                  The course also examines the economics of collegiate sports
      document, drug, arson, and bombing evidence. Major emphasis                and the expanding international markets in broadcast rights,
      is placed on the legal aspects of evidence, including investiga-           athletes’ contracts, and team paraphernalia. See department
      tor and examiner documentation and reporting, and courtroom                chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisite: ECO 210 or
      process and testimony. Prerequisite: CJ 508 or permission of               permission of the instructor. (3)
      the instructor. (3)
                                                                                 ECO 330 Managerial Economics
                                                                                 An application of microeconomics. Topics include estimation
      ECONOMICS
                                                                                 of demand, production and cost functions, and optimal pricing
      Undergraduate Courses                                                      and output decisions under various market structures. See
                                                                                 department chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisites:
      ECO 100 Introduction to the Social Sciences                                ECO 210 and MSC 300. (3)
      This course examines the social sciences in their historical
                                                                                 ECO 332 Money and Banking
      context, and their relationship to the individual and the group.
                                                                                 An analysis of the American banking system, monetary
      It provides a fundamental understanding of the dynamics of
                                                                                 theories, and monetary policies with emphasis on the
      individual and group behavior as well as a sense of how
                                                                                 economic importance of the Federal Reserve System. Offered
      economic, political, and social systems function. (Also listed as
                                                                                 fall semester only. Prerequisite: ECO 199. (3)
      POL 100, PSY 100, and SOC 100.) (3)
                                                                                 ECO 401 Economics of Regulation
      ECO 199 Principles of Macroeconomics
                                                                                 An exploration of the theories of the regulation of economic
      Measurement and determination of aggregate levels of income
                                                                                 activity, its applications, and its implications. Topics will
      and output, employment, and prices. The role of the central
                                                                                 include why and how the government regulates some types of
      bank and the impact of government spending and taxation are
                                                                                 economic activity (antitrust, industrial, and social policies) and
      examined as well. (3)
                                                                                 how to economically design and assess the regulation policy.
      ECO 210 Principles of Microeconomics                                       See department chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisite:
      The market mechanism, with a detailed examination of supply                ECO 210. (3)
      and demand and applications to monopoly power, externalities,
                                                                                 ECO 431 Contemporary Issues in Economics
      resource markets, and instruments of social action. (3)
                                                                                 A selected group of substantive issues explored in-depth, using
      ECO 304 Environmental Economics                                            the most recent methods of finding and utilizing information
      Explores the application of economic analysis to issues of                 and the application of basic economic analysis. See department
      natural resources and the environment. Topics include environ-             chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisites: ECO 199 and
      mental externalities, the evaluation of economic costs and                 ECO 210. (3)
      benefits, common property resources, alternative pollution
                                                                                 ECO 433 Research
      control mechanisms, and limits to economic growth. This
                                                                                 A student in this course will conduct collaborative research
      course is suitable for non-Business majors and may be used to
                                                                                 (scholarly work leading to new knowledge) under the direction
      meet Liberal Arts Core requirements. Prerequisite:
                                                                                 of a faculty member. Refer to the Marymount Academic
      ECO/POL/PSY/SOC 100. (3)
                                                                                 Research Initiative (MARI) guidelines on page 51. Prerequisite:
                                                                                 application and approval of department chair. (1-6)

                                                                                 ECO 451 Senior Seminar in Economics
                                                                                 An opportunity for assisted, self-directed study of a topic of inter-
                                                                                 est. The study will culminate in a paper and oral presentation.
                                                                                 See department chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisites:
                                                                                 12 credits in ECO courses numbered above 300. (3) ●

      ■ This course contains a significant component in the use of computers.
      ● This course contains a significant amount of speech and oral presentations.
                                               COURSE DESCRIPTIONS                                                                      153



ECO 485 International Economics                                     EDUCATION
An introduction to the theory of international trade and
finance with an emphasis on exchange markets, trade policies,       Undergraduate Courses
factor movements, and the interrelationship of the domestic
and international economy. Offered spring semester only.            ED 205 Issues in Educating Students with
Prerequisites: ECO 199 and ECO 210. (3)                             Exceptionalities
                                                                    Introduces students to the academic, cognitive, and social
ECO 490 Internship                                                  characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities. The focus
Senior students may register for field experience in cooperating    of this course will be on identification, diagnostic, and
Washington metropolitan area business firms. The internship         planning processes, as well as educational service delivery
is monitored by the director of internships and a representative    models. The use of multiple intelligences and diverse
of the cooperating company. Prerequisites: permission of direc-     approaches based on behavioral, cognitive, and social theory as
tor of internships for the School of Business Administration,       a means of servicing the needs of students will be addressed.
senior status, minimum of 90 credit hours with a cumulative         Field experience: 20 hours. (3)
GPA of 2.0 or better, and a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in
all Business courses. (3-6)                                         ED 219 Current Research, Trends, and Legal
                                                                    Issues in Special Education
Graduate Courses                                                    Designed to provide students with the opportunity to use refer-
                                                                    ence materials to explore the current research and legal issues
ECO 585 International Trade and Global Markets                      that impact special education policy and practice. The topics to
Introduces the business student to the concepts of international    be discussed include: the legal basis for special education,
markets for goods, services, and assets and the role of govern-     issues related to the identification and evaluation of special
ment policy on trade, investment, and stabilization in an open      education students, the concepts of free and appropriate public
economy. General topics include comparative advantage, terms        education (FAPE) and least restrictive environment (LRE), disci-
of trade, exchange rate regimes, the balance of payments, inter-    pline and special education students, the impact of school
nal and external balances, and international investment. Offered    reform movements on special education, funding for special
fall semester only. Prerequisite: MBA 518 or MBA 520. (3)           education, recent litigation outcomes, and the reauthorization
                                                                    of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
ECO 590 Health Care Economics                                       Prerequisite: sophomore status. (3)
Emphasizes the significance and relevance of economics, finan-
cial information, and financial management in the health care       ED 245E Exploring Teaching
industry. The course provides an understanding of the financial     This is the first course in the undergraduate Elementary
and economic implications of decision making in health care         Education (PK-6) teaching licensure professional preparation
and of the process of achieving effective resource utilization as   program and is designed to explore education and teaching as
a basic element of proper management. Offered spring semes-         a profession. The philosophical, historical, and societal aspects
ter only. (3)                                                       of education in the United States will be stressed as well as a
                                                                    look at the contemporary issues that affect the elementary
ECO 599 Special Topics in Economics                                 school student and elementary schools. Rudimentary curricu-
This course explores contemporary topics in economics. See          lum design, including lesson planning, will also be addressed.
department chair for course offering schedule. Prerequisite:        Field experience: 10 hours. Prerequisite: sophomore status. (3)
MBA 518 or MBA 520. (3)
                                                                    ED 245S Educational Foundations for Secondary
                                                                    Teachers
                                                                    An exploration of the historical, philosophical, curricular, and
                                                                    sociological foundations of current educational theory and
                                                                    practice with emphasis at the secondary level. This course is a
                                                                    prerequisite for all junior- and senior-level Education classes.
                                                                    Field experience: 10 hours. (3)
154                                                      COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


      ED 300 Reading, Writing, and Language                                      ED 312 Teaching in Content Areas for Students
      Acquisition                                                                with Learning Disabilities
      Examines the complex nature of reading, writing, and language              Designed to provide experiences in selecting appropriate teach-
      acquisition including phonemic awareness, sound/symbol                     ing strategies and techniques to meet the academic, social,
      relationships, phonics instruction, decoding skills, and a knowl-          emotional, and behavioral needs of individuals with disabili-
      edge of how phonics, syntax, and semantics interact. Schema                ties. Emphasis will be placed on development, implementation,
      theory and comprehension strategies are emphasized as students             and monitoring of individualized programs and the adapta-
      examine a variety of children’s literature for reading instruction         tions and modification of materials and strategies to address
      and independent reading with diverse populations. The Virginia             specific learning needs in the content area. Students will learn
      Standards of Learning are used as the framework for this course.           strategies to create a positive classroom environment where
      Field experience: 30 hours. Prerequisite: ED 245E. (6)                     conduct and behavior are conducive to learning. Field experi-
                                                                                 ence: 20 hours. Prerequisites: ED 245E, ED 310, and ED 311. (3)
      ED 301 Foundation of Literacy Development
      Designed to provide an understanding of how children develop               ED 320 Assessing and Guiding Students in
      language and grow into literacy. The nature of reading, writing,           Elementary Settings
      and language acquisition is emphasized and an examination of               This course focuses on assessment strategies and the principles
      second language learners and cultural diversity are included.              of effective classroom management in elementary classrooms.
      Field experience: 20 hours. (3)                                            Students will engage in reflective practice as they explore and
                                                                                 consider the variety of assessments and management practices.
      ED 310 Reading and Language Arts: Grades PK-2                              This course must be taken prior to, or during, the student-
      Reading, writing, listening, speaking, thinking, and viewing are           teaching experience. Prerequisites: ED 245E, ED 301, ED 310,
      studied in th