Hazards and Hazardous Materials City of Watsonville by ixieshaofang

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									                                                             Manabe-Ow Business Park Specific Plan Draft MEIR
                                                                    Section 3.7: Hazards and Hazardous Materials



3.7          Hazards and Hazardous Materials
This section of the Draft MEIR discusses the potential presence of hazards and hazardous
materials at or within the vicinity of the planning area and analyzes the potential risk of these
conditions in the context of existing and proposed development and future human activities. This
section is based in part on a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) that evaluated
Assessors Parcel Numbers (APNs) 018-711-02 and 018-711-14 (102 and 110 Lee Road), as well
as a review of the City of Watsonville General Plan and the Watsonville Municipal Airport
Master Plan (City of Watsonville 2008) to address any other additional hazardous materials and
potential airport related hazards.

3.7.1        Environmental Setting
Regional Setting
Hazardous Materials
Hazardous materials include substances that are corrosive, poisonous, radioactive, flammable, or
explosive. The City of Watsonville, similar to most cities, has industrial and commercial
activities within and in the vicinity of the City that store, use, and must dispose of hazardous
materials. Hazardous materials can be released into the environment accidentally during normal
business operations or through transportation accidents.

Hazardous materials are transported through the City of Watsonville regularly along major
transportation corridors, including Highway 1, State Route 152, and State Route 129, and several
arterial and local streets within the City provide access to commercial and industrial businesses.
In addition, hazardous materials are also transported by freight rail through the City.

Airport Hazards
The Watsonville Municipal Airport is the only municipal airport in Santa Cruz County. It is
considered a reliever airport for general aviation from the San Francisco Bay Area. In 2000,
approximately 330 corporate and private aircraft were based at the airport. On average, 336 daily
aircraft operations occurred in 2000. By 2020, the number of aircraft based out of the City of
Watsonville is expected to increase to 381 and daily aircraft operations is expected to increase to
395.

The Watsonville Municipal Airport has a good safety record. Between 1973 and 2000, over one
million operations have occurred at the airport. During this time, only 14 accidents were
recorded. None of the accidents involved a serious injury to a civilian or resident not involved
with flying the aircraft.

Safety issues regarding compatibility between airport operations and the surrounding
environment include noise impacts, ground safety, and flight hazards. To address these issues,
the City has prepared the Watsonville Airport Master Plan 2001-2020, which focuses on airport
safety and noise abatement for future airport operations. The Watsonville Municipal Airport
Master Plan is updated every five years to ensure that the airport’s development is carried out in
a manner that maintains an acceptable level of risk for the airport and its surroundings. In
addition, City has an Airport Safety Committee, which meets regularly to address issues of
concern. According to Exhibit 13: Safety Compatibility Zones, Watsonville Municipal Airport,
the proposed project is not located within any designated safety compatibility zones.

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As discussed in Section 3.10: Noise the northern section of the planning area is located within the
55 decibels (dB) Community Noise Equivalent Level (CNEL) 2020 Noise Contour for the
Watsonville Municipal Airport Master Plan. Residential, commercial, manufacturing, and
production uses are allowed uses within the 55dB CNEL contour for the Watsonville Municipal
Airport Master Plan (City of Watsonville 2002).

Wildland Fire Hazards
Wildland fires occasionally break out in the grasslands and dry, chaparral-covered hills near the
City of Watsonville. In May of 2008, the Summit fire, which was located approximately 15 miles
north of the planning area, burned almost 5,000 acres. On June 20, 2008, the Trabing fire burned
over a thousand acres when a fire was accidentally set from a vehicle’s faulty exhaust system,
approximately five miles north of the planning area.

According to the City of Watsonville General Plan, wildland fires are usually contained before
they pose a threat to the urbanized area of the City and adjacent unincorporated area.
Agricultural land, which serves as a buffer between the urbanized area of the City and areas that
are prone to wildland fires, surrounds the majority of the City. This reduces potential risks from
wildland fires.

Emergency Evacuation Routes
According to the City of Watsonville General Plan and the Emergency Preparedness Plan, Beach
Road east of the planning area and Highway 1, south of West Beach is the primary emergency
evacuation route in the project vicinity.

Project Setting
A large portion of the planning area (APNs 018-711-02, 018-711-03, 018-711-04, and 018-711-
05) is currently in agriculture production. Due in part to wetlands restoration efforts, agriculture
production in currently not occurring on the portion of the planning area east of Ohlone Parkway
(APNs 018-711-12 and 018-711-13). Watsonville Slough travels east-west through the planning
area crossing under Ohlone Parkway. On-site topography ranges from 52 to 8 feet above mean
sea level (msl) and generally slopes from north to south. A series of unimproved dirt roads
traverse the planning area providing access to the agricultural fields and the existing residential
development. There is also an agriculture equipment storage area currently located in the
northern portion of the planning area (APN 018-711-02).

Four single-family residences are located within the planning area. Three residential homes are
located within APN 018-711-14 adjacent to the eastern boundary and west of the Watsonville
Slough. A private paved roadway extends west across the Slough from Kearney Street Extension
providing access to these residences. One additional single family residential home is located
within APN 018-711-02 adjacent to the western boundary.

The planning area encompasses a portion of the 25 acre Upper Watsonville Slough Wetlands
Restoration Project. Restoration efforts within the eastern portion of the planning area (APN
018-711-13) have included the excavation of agricultural lands for the restoration of wetlands,
construction of storm water treatment features, and pedestrian access improvements including a
decomposed granite pedestrian trail from Kearney Street Extension to Ohlone Parkway. Figure


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                                                                       Section 3.7: Hazards and Hazardous Materials


2-3 through Figure 2-5: Photographs of the Planning Area presents photographs of existing
conditions at the project site.

Hazardous Materials
3.7.2        Regulatory Setting
A material is considered hazardous if it has been designated as such by a federal, state, or local
agency, or if it has characteristics defined as hazardous by such an agency. The California Code
of Regulations defines a hazardous material as a substance that, because of physical or chemical
properties, its quantity, concentration, or other characteristics, may either (1) cause an increase in
mortality or an increase in serious, irreversible, or incapacitating illness; or (2) pose a substantial
present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored,
transported or disposed of, or otherwise managed (22 CCR §66260.10 and California Health and
Safety Code [HSC] §25501). Based on this definition, “hazardous materials” include, but are not
limited to, hazardous substances, hazardous waste, and any material that a handler or the
administering agency has a reasonable basis for believing would be injurious to the health and
safety of persons or harmful to the environment if released into the workplace or the environment
(22 CCR §66260.10).

Chemical residuals in soil that are the result of the normal application of fertilizer, plant growth
regulants, and pesticides for agricultural purposes do not constitute a release of hazardous
substances under the California Hazardous Substances Account Act (HSC §25321 (d)).
Similarly, the Federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act
(CERCLA) exempts parties from liability for the application of federally-registered pesticides (42
USC §9607(i)).

Regulation of hazardous materials and hazardous wastes occurs at the federal, state, and local
levels of government. On the federal level, many hazardous materials-related regulations are
promulgated by the EPA. Additional regulations pertaining to work place standards and for
transportation of hazardous materials are enforced by the United States Department of Labor
Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) and the United States Department of
Transportation (DOT).

In 1993, Senate Bill 1082 gave the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) the
authority and responsibility to establish a unified hazardous waste and hazardous materials
management and regulatory program (Unified Program). The purpose of the Unified Program is
to consolidate and coordinate six different hazardous materials and hazardous waste programs,
and to insure that they are consistently implemented throughout the state. The unified program is
overseen by CalEPA with support from the Department of Toxic Substances Control, the State
Water Resources Control Board, the Office of Emergency Services, and the State Fire Marshal.

State law requires county and local agencies to implement the Unified Program. The county and
local agencies in charge of implementing the program are called “Certified Unified Program
Agency” (CUPA). The County of Santa Cruz Environmental Health Services Department is the
designated CUPA within the geographic boundaries of the County (including all four cities within
the County). As such, Environmental Health Services is responsible for enforcing the local
ordinance (Chapter 7.100) and State Laws pertaining to use and storage of hazardous materials.

In addition to the CUPA, other local agencies help to implement the Unified Program. These
agencies are called Participatory Agencies (PA). The Watsonville Fire Department is the PA for
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the City of Watsonville. The Department provides hazardous materials code enforcement, public
education, and emergency response services. It also oversees enforcement of hazardous waste
regulations, underground tank requirements, risk management requirements, and clean up of
hazardous materials spills that occur within the City. In addition, the Department manages the
City’s hazardous materials management plans.

Hazardous materials can often be associated with the use of pesticides and other chemicals lands
used for agricultural purposes. To address the potential residual effect of these chemicals, the
Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) division of the CalEPA has issued the Interim
Guidance for Sampling Agricultural Properties (August 2008). These guidelines provide a
uniform approach for evaluating former agricultural properties where pesticides have been
applied. They are used to assist environmental assessors in designing initial investigations or
developing a Preliminary Endangerment Assessment (PEA) for properties with agricultural uses.
The analytical data obtained are incorporated into a risk analysis and PEA report performed in
accordance with the guidance in the PEA manual.

Local
City of Watsonville General Plan
The following policies in the 2005 City of Watsonville General Plan are applicable to hazards and
hazardous materials at the project site.

Goal 12.5, Hazardous Materials. Reduce the potential danger related to the use, storage,
transport, and disposal of hazardous materials to an acceptable level of risk for city residents.

Goal 12.1, Land Use Safety. Plan for and regulate the uses of land in order to provide a pattern
of urban development which will minimize exposure to hazards from either natural or human-
related causes.
Policy 12.A, Environmental and Public Safety. The City shall plan for and maintain
development standards that minimize risks to human lives and property resulting from
environmental and man-caused hazards.
The City shall protect neighboring residential development from the immediate threats of
potentially hazardous materials and airport hazards through careful land use planning.

3.7.3        Relevant Project Characteristics
The proposed project involves the development of a Specific Plan for future improvements of the
planning area, which has been identified as the City’s future employment generating area for the
last 15 years. The Specific Plan identifies a business park and other facilities including up to one
million sf of light industrial and office flex space uses, up to 30,000 sf of support retail, and up to
100 workforce residential dwelling units, at a density of 14 units per acre. The proposed project
also involves the preparation of a Development Agreement that outlines phasing improvement
and financing details of the Specific Plan. The proposed project also includes enhancement and
maintenance of 25 acres of the Watsonville Slough. Buildout of the proposed project may take
between 10 and 25 years to complete depending on market conditions and ability to finance and
construct infrastructure. The Specific Plan is required for implementation of the proposed project
by the City of Watsonville.


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                                                                            Section 3.7: Hazards and Hazardous Materials


As noted in Table 3-4: Permitted Uses in the Specific Plan, automobile repair and services, would
be allowed with approval of a Special Use Permit (SUP) and commercial laundry and dry
cleaning and gasoline sales would be allowed with an Administrative Use Permit (AUP) in the
Retail Overlay (RO) district portion of the Specific Plan. Within the Business Park (BP) district,
printing or publishing establishments, biotechnology manufacturing, electric and non-electric
machinery equipment and supplies, general light manufacturing, manufacturing (general, housing
and mechanical), transportation equipment manufacturing, utility service facility, and sewer lift
station would be permitted uses within this district. In addition, commercial laundry and dry
cleaning, fabricated metal products would be allowed with approval of AUP and micro breweries,
food and agricultural processing, warehouse and distribution centers, and telecommunications
sites and/or facilities would be allowed with a SUP. As the proposed project would be developed
over time, specific uses within the proposed business park are not known at this time.

3.7.4        Impacts and Mitigation Measures
Methodology
This section is based in part on a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) that evaluated
Assessors Parcel Numbers (APNs) 018-392-01 and 052-104-40 (102 and 110 Lee Road), as well
as a review of the City of Watsonville General Plan and the Watsonville Municipal Airport
Master Plan (City of Watsonville 2008) to address any other additional hazardous materials and
potential airport related hazards.

Criteria for Determining Significance
In accordance with CEQA, State CEQA Guidelines, agency and professional standards, a project
impact would be considered significant if the project would:

      •      Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through the routine transport,
             use, or disposal of hazardous materials;
      •      Create a significant hazard to the public or the environment through reasonably
             foreseeable upset and accident conditions involving the release of hazardous materials
             into the environment;
      •      Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous or acutely hazardous materials,
             substances, or waste within 0.25 mile of an existing or proposed school;
      •      Be located on a site that is included on a list of hazardous materials sites compiled
             pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result, would create a significant
             hazard to the public or the environment;
      •      For a project located within an airport land use plan or, where such a plan has not been
             adopted, within 2 miles of a public airport or public use airport, result in a safety hazard
             for people residing or working in the project area;
      •      For a project within the vicinity of a private airstrip, result in a safety hazard for people
             residing or working in the project area; and/or
      •      Impair implementation of or physically interfere with an adopted emergency response
             plan or emergency evacuation plan.




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Transport, Use, Disposal, and Release of Hazardous Materials During Construction
Impact 3.7-1:      Development of the proposed project would involve the short-term use and disposal
                   of hazardous materials. This would be considered a less than significant impact.

Implementation of the proposed project may result in the routine transport of hazardous materials
during construction. Handling measures of the City of Watsonville are required through all phases
of the proposed project. These measures include standards and regulations regarding the storage,
handling, and use of these materials. In addition, in order to comply with the National Pollution
Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) requirements for construction of site storm water
discharges, projects involving construction on sites that are one acre or more are required to
prepare an implement a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) that specifies how the
discharger will protect water quality during construction activities. As part of the City of
Watsonville Stormwater Management Program, all building plans are evaluated to assess the
implementation of the City’s standards including stormwater best management practices (BMPs).
According to the City’s Stormwater Management Program adopted by the Regional Water
Quality Control Board, Central Coast Region on April 3, 2009, “Runoff from new developments
and redeveloped property can significantly affect receiving water bodies if left unmanaged. The
objective of the post-construction stormwater development standards which would be required of
new development projects within the planning area. Compliance with the appropriate hazardous
materials handling measures and acquisition of the NPDES General Permit for construction
activities as required by mitigation measure MM 3.8-1 would ensure that potential hazardous
materials impacts during short-term construction activities associated with the proposed project
would be less than significant.

Transport, Use, Disposal, and Release of Hazardous Materials During Operation
Impact 3.7-2:       Development of the proposed project would involve the use of hazardous materials
                   including cleaning solvents, fertilizers, pesticides and other hazardous materials
                   typical of residential uses. This would be considered a less than significant impact.

The proposed project is not anticipated to result in significant hazards to the public or
environment with occupancy of the residential, park, and open space uses associated with the
proposed project. On-site use of hazardous materials may include cleaning solvents, fertilizers,
pesticides, and other materials used in the regular maintenance of residential communities and
park uses. With proper use and disposal, these chemicals are not expected to result in hazardous
or unhealthful conditions for patrons of the park uses or on-site residential uses. Therefore, the
proposed project would not result in the transport, disposal, and release of hazardous materials
and would be considered a less than significant impact.

As noted in Table 3-4: Permitted Uses in the Specific Plan, automobile repair and services, would
be allowed with approval of a Special Use Permit (SUP) and commercial laundry and dry
cleaning and gasoline sales would be allowed with an Administrative Use Permit (AUP) in the
Retail Overlay (RO) district portion of the Specific Plan. Within the Business Park (BP) district,
printing or publishing establishments, biotechnology manufacturing, electric and non-electric
machinery equipment and supplies, general light manufacturing, manufacturing (general, housing
and mechanical), transportation equipment manufacturing, utility service facility, and sewer lift
station would be permitted uses within this district. In addition, commercial laundry and dry
cleaning, fabricated metal products would be allowed with approval of AUP and micro breweries,

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                                                                    Section 3.7: Hazards and Hazardous Materials


food and agricultural processing, warehouse and distribution centers, and telecommunications
sites and/or facilities would be allowed with a SUP.

The tenant mix of the proposed project is not known at this time. Because potential businesses
within the Business Park district and Retail Overlay district may utilize hazardous materials as
part of their daily operations, it is not possible to predict each possible chemical or combination
of chemicals or hazardous substances that may be used within the planning area. Workers,
visitors, or nearby receptors could be exposed to hazardous materials if such substances are used
on conjunction with these uses. The proposed project establishes regulations that restrict the
placement of businesses with hazardous materials adjacent to Sea View Ranch. The City of
Watsonville requires preparation of a hazardous materials plan for those uses that exceed specific
thresholds. These plans would be subject to review and approval by the County of Santa Cruz
Health Department and the City of Watsonville Fire Department. Handling and/or storage of
hazardous materials associated with these future uses would also be subject to the requirements of
the California Department of Toxic Substances and Control (DTSC). In addition, proposed uses
which may generate emissions of toxic air contaminants (TAC) would be subject to Monterey
Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District rules, regulations, and permitting requirements.
Potential generators of TAC would be required to implement measures designed to ensure that
potential health risks to nearby receptors do not exceed established standards. As future uses
within the Business Park district and the Retail Overlay district would potentially result in the
emission of hazardous materials, which would be considered a potentially significant impact.
The following mitigation measure would reduce this impact to a less than significant level by
ensuring that each new business within the planning area that uses, stores, or manufactures
hazardous materials prepare a hazardous materials plan

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-2         Each new business within the planning area that uses, stores, or manufactures
                 hazardous materials as defined by the State of California Department of Toxic
                 Substances and Control shall be required to prepare a hazardous materials plan
                 that will outline how those materials will be handled and disposed of safely. The
                 hazardous materials plan shall be subject to review and approval by the County
                 of Santa Cruz Environmental Health Department and the City of Watsonville
                 Fire Department prior to occupancy of each specific use. A Special Use Permit
                 (SPU) is required for all projects with Hazardous Materials Plans.

Preparation and approval of a hazardous materials plan, compliance with applicable rules,
regulations, and permitting requirements for proposed uses within the Business Park district and
the Retail Overlay district within the planning area would reduce impacts from the generation,
storage and handling of hazardous chemicals and substances to a less than significant level.

Hazardous Materials Sites

Impact 3.7-3: The potential for hazardous materials to be located within the planning area is low
              based on a site inspection and review of environmental records at the local, state
              and federal level. In addition, the planning area is not located on a hazardous
              material site pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5. Therefore, this would
              be considered a less than significant impact.



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As part of the Phase I ESA that was prepared within the planning area, the regulatory agency
database report provided by EDR was reviewed for information regarding reported releases of
hazardous substances and petroleum products on or near the planning area.

Based on the distance, topography, assumed groundwater gradient, current regulatory status,
and/or the absence of reported releases, none of the sites in the federal agency databases are
considered to represent a likely past, present, or material threat of release within the planning
area. The following businesses within the vicinity of the planning area have known and/or a
significant potential for release of hazardous materials within the planning area including: Selby
Petroleum, Statewide Properties, Laura Scudders, Inc., Couch Distributing Company, Unocal
Bulk Plant, Former Chevron Plant, and Selby Petroleum. Based on the distance, topography,
assumed groundwater gradient, current regulatory status, and/or the absence of reported releases,
none of these sites that are listed on the state regulatory databases were found to represent a likely
past, present, or material threat of release within or in the vicinity of the planning area. For local
regulatory agency findings, files were reviewed at the Santa Cruz County Environmental Health
Department. According to the reviewed files, the permit for the septic tank system within the
planning area with a seepage pit was issued in 1964 and a permit to repair or upgrade the existing
1500-gallon concrete septic system with a 92-foot long leach field was applied for in 1999. There
was also an application approved in 1975 – 1976 to use the property for a commercial hog
feeding lot. There were no hazardous materials or release investigation files for the parcels
investigated at the Santa Cruz County Environmental Health Department.

Based on a review of the files at the Santa Cruz County, there are no regulatory sites located
within the boundaries of the planning area and no corrective action, restoration, or remediation
has been planned, is currently taking place, or has been completed within the planning area. The
planning area has not been under investigation for violation of any environmental laws,
regulations, or standards. Therefore, the planning area is not located on any hazardous materials
sites compiled pursuant to Government Code Section 65962.5 and therefore would not create a
significant hazard to the public or the environment and would be considered a less than
significant impact.

Hazardous Materials During Demolition Activities
Impact 3.7-4: The proposed project may result in the demolition of four residential homes and
              associated structures on Assessors Parcel Numbers 018-711-02 and 018-711-14,
              which may contain asbestos containing material (ACM) and/or lead based paint
              (LBPs). This would be considered a potentially significant impact.

Four single-family residences and various structures used for farming practices were identified
within the planning area on Assessors Parcel Numbers 018-711-02 and 018-711-14. Three
residential homes are located within APN 018-711-14 adjacent to the eastern boundary of the
planning area and west of the Watsonville Slough and one single family residential home is
located within APN 018-711-02 adjacent to the western boundary of the planning area. Property
records obtained from the County of Santa Cruz Assessors Office noted that structures within the
planning area were constructed more than 50 years ago. Therefore, ACMs may be associated
with these structures. However, the interior of the on-site residential structures was not observed
or tested for the presence of ACMs or LBPs. Therefore, the potential release of ACMs and/or
LBPs during demolition activities is considered a potentially significant impact.
Implementation of the following mitigation measures would ensure that this impact is reduced to

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a less than significant impact by ensuring that each structure is inspected by a qualified
environmental specialist.

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-4a        Pursuant to Cal OSHA regulations, project applicants shall have each structure
                 within Assessor Parcel Numbers: 018-711-02 and 018-711-14 inspected by a
                 qualified environmental specialist for the presence of ACMs and LBPs prior to
                 obtaining a demolition permit from the City of Watsonville Community
                 Development Department.          If ACMs and LBPs are found during the
                 investigations, project applicants within the planning area shall develop a
                 remediation program to ensure that these materials are removed and disposed of
                 by a licensed contractor in accordance with all federal, state and local laws and
                 regulations, subject to approval by the MBUAPCD, City of Watsonville, and the
                 Santa Cruz County Environmental Health Department, as applicable. Any
                 hazardous materials that are removed from the structures shall be disposed of at
                 an approved landfill facility in accordance with federal, state and local laws and
                 regulations.

MM 3.7-4b        Project applicants within the planning area shall have the interior of all on-site
                 structures within Assessor Parcel Numbers: 018-711-02 and 018-711-14 visually
                 inspected by a qualified environmental specialist to determine the presence of
                 hazardous materials prior to obtaining a demolition permit from the City of
                 Watsonville Community Development Department. Should any hazardous
                 materials be encountered within any of the structures, the material shall be tested
                 and properly disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local regulatory
                 requirements. Any stained soils or surfaces underneath the removed materials
                 shall be sampled. Subsequent testing shall indicate the appropriate level of
                 remediation necessary and a work plan shall be prepared in order to remediate
                 the soil in accordance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations prior
                 to issuance of a grading permit.

Implementation of mitigation measures MM 3.7-3a and MM 3.7-3b would ensure that each
residential home and associated structures within the planning area is inspected by a qualified
environmental specialist to determine the presence of ACMs, LBPs, and hazardous materials
prior to demolition and construction. If any hazardous materials are encountered in the on-site
structures, the materials shall be tested and properly disposed of in accordance with State and
Federal regulatory requirements. Implementation of these measures would reduce this impact to
a less than significant level.

Emit Hazardous Emissions in Proximity to a School
Impact 3.7-5: Landmark Elementary school is located approximately 2,800 feet north of the
              planning area. The proposed project may result in the routine transport of a minor
              amount of hazardous materials during construction, as well as during operation of
              the proposed project if future users store and/or transport hazardous materials
              associated with a specific use. This is considered a potentially significant impact.

Landmark Elementary School is located approximately 2,800 feet north of the planning area.
Future short-term construction activities within the planning area may result in the routine
transport of hazardous materials during construction (i.e., ACMs, LBPs, and/or contaminated
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soils, etc.) and operation of the proposed project may result in the storage and/or transport of
hazardous materials. Measures are required by the City of Watsonville Fire Department and the
County of Santa Cruz Environmental Health Department, as well as the Monterey Bay Unified
Air Quality Management District that would minimize these impacts to a less than significant
level. These measures include standards and regulations regarding the handling and transport of
these materials. In addition, the following mitigation measure would require preparation and
approval of a hazardous materials plan, which would reduce impacts from the generation, storage
and handling of hazardous chemicals and substances to a less than significant level.

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-5             Each new business within the planning area that uses, stores, or manufactures
                     hazardous materials as defined by the State of California Department of Toxic
                     Substances and Control (DTSC) shall be required to prepare a hazardous
                     materials plan that will outline how those materials will be handled and disposed
                     of safely. The hazardous materials plan shall be subject to review and approval
                     by the County of Santa Cruz Environmental Health Department and the City of
                     Watsonville Fire Department prior to occupancy of each specific use.

Implementation of mitigation measure MM 3.7-1 would ensure that each new business within the
planning area that uses, stores or manufactures hazardous materials as defined by DTSC prepare a
hazardous materials plan to ensure that hazardous materials are disposed of safely
Implementation of these measures would reduce this impact to a less than significant level.

Abandoned Septic Systems
Impact 3.7-6:      Implementation of the proposed project may expose people or property to
                   hazardous materials associated with the abandonment of septic systems within the
                   planning area. This would be considered a potentially significant impact.

Septic tank systems may be located at the residential uses not currently served by City services on
Assessors Parcel Numbers 018-711-02 and 018-711-14 within the planning area. Septic tanks
could be considered a source of residual contamination within the planning area if they are not
removed prior to development of the proposed project as contaminants could leach into the soil,
which may result in a potentially significant impact to safety and public health. Implementation
of the following mitigation measure would reduce this impact to a less than significant level.

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-6           Subject to review by the County of Santa Cruz Environmental Health Department,
                   the project applicants shall map the specific location of all septic tanks located on
                   Assessors Parcel Numbers 018-711-02 and 018-711-14 on a survey of the planning
                   area. Once located, the septic tanks shall be removed and properly disposed of at
                   an approved landfill facility. Once the tanks are removed, a visual inspection of
                   the areas beneath and around the removed tanks shall be performed. Any stained
                   soils observed underneath the septic tanks shall be sampled. Results of the
                   sampling (if necessary) shall indicate the level or remediation efforts that may be
                   required. In the event that subsequent testing indicates the presence of any
                   hazardous materials beyond acceptable thresholds, a work plan shall be prepared
                   subject to review and approval by the County of Santa Cruz Environmental Health

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                Department in order to remediate the soil in accordance with all applicable federal,
                state, and local regulations prior to issuance of a grading permit.

Implementation of the above mitigation measure would ensure that prior to ground disturbance
activities, the specific location of the septic tanks are located, removed, and property disposed of
at an approved landfill facility. Once the septic tanks are removed, a visual inspection of the
areas observed underneath the septic tanks shall determine if any contamination is found, whether
any remediation would be required and that any necessary remediation will occur in accordance
with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations.

Agricultural Wells
Impact 3.7-7: Implementation of the proposed project may expose people or property to hazardous
              materials associated with groundwater contamination due to abandonment of
              agricultural water wells within the planning area. This is considered a potentially
              significant impact.

Water wells are located within the planning area may serve as a conduit for groundwater
contamination .unless the existing wells are properly destroyed in accordance with all state,
federal, and local regulations, the groundwater wells could be a source of contamination within
the planning area. This would be considered a potentially significant impact. Implementation
of the following mitigation measure would reduce this impact to a less than significant level.

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-7             The City of Watsonville Community Development Department and the County
                     of Santa Cruz Environmental Health Department shall ensure that project
                     applicants properly close and abandon all groundwater wells within the planning
                     area pursuant to applicable federal, state, and local regulations prior to grading
                     activities. Soils located within the vicinity of the water wells shall be inspected.
                     If any stained soils are observed surrounding the water wells shall be sampled
                     and in the event that subsequent testing indicates the presence of pesticide
                     residues beyond acceptable thresholds, the potential health risks shall be
                     evaluated and a work plan shall be prepare in order to remediate the soil in
                     accordance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations prior to
                     issuance of a grading permit.

Implementation of this mitigation measure would ensure that all groundwater wells are properly
abandoned within the planning area prior to grading activities and shall ensure that the area
surrounding the well is inspected prior to ensure that hazardous

Abandoned Septic Tanks
Impact 3.7-8: Implementation of the proposed project may expose people or property to hazardous
              materials associated with groundwater contamination due to abandonment of septic
              tank leach fields within the planning area associated with the rural residential uses
              within the planning area. This is considered a potentially significant impact.

Three residential homes are located within APN 018-711-14 adjacent to the eastern boundary of
the planning area and west of the Watsonville Slough. One additional single family residential
home is located within APN 018-711-02 adjacent to the western boundary of the planning area.

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Section 3.7: Hazards and Hazardous Materials



A septic system was observed within APN 018-711-02 and may be located within APN 018-711-
14 associated with existing rural residential uses. According to the Phase 1 ESA, permits
reviewed at the Santa Cruz County Environmental Health Department indicate that the septic
system that was originally installed in 1964 on APN 018-711-02 and may have been upgraded in
1999. Based on the nature of the present and historical site operations, the septic tank does not
represent a recognized environmental condition within the planning area. However, if septic
tanks are not removed prior to development within the planning area, they could leach
contaminants into the soil, which may result in a potentially significant impact to safety and
public health. Implementation of the following mitigation measure would reduce this impact to a
less than significant level.

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-8           Prior to issuance of a grading permit, project applicants shall map the specific
                   location of all septic tanks located within APN 052-104-40 and the remainder of
                   the planning area. Once located, the septic tanks shall be removed and properly
                   disposed of at an approved landfill facility. Once the tanks are removed, a visual
                   inspection of the areas beneath and around the removed tanks shall be performed.
                   Any stained soils observed underneath the septic tanks shall be sampled. Results
                   of the sampling (if necessary) shall indicate the level or remediation efforts that
                   may be required. In the event that subsequent testing indicates the presence of any
                   hazardous materials beyond acceptable thresholds, a work plan shall be prepared
                   subject to review and approval by the City of Watsonville Community
                   Development Department and the County of Santa Cruz Environmental Health
                   Department in order to remediate the soil in accordance with all applicable federal,
                   state, and local regulations prior to issuance of a grading permit.

Implementation of this mitigation measure would ensure that all the specific location of all septic
tanks are located and removed prior to grading activities and that if any contamination is
discovered during the discovery process that the area is remediated in accordance with all
applicable federal, state, and location regulations.

Historical Agricultural Pesticide Hazards
Impact 3.7-9: The planning area has historically been used for agricultural purposes for several
              decades and may contain pesticide residues on the soil. Pesticide residues within
              the planning area may pose a significant long-term chronic health threat to human
              health and the environment for proposed uses within the planning area. This is
              considered a potentially significant impact.

The planning area has been historically been used for agricultural production over the past
century. Therefore, a combination of several commonly used pesticides (DDD, DDT, DDE),
which are now banned, may have been used throughout the planning area. The historical use of
agricultural pesticides may have resulted in pesticide residues of certain persistence in the soil at
concentrations that are considered hazardous according to established Federal regulatory levels.
The primary concern with historical pesticide residues is human health risk from inadvertent
ingestion of contaminated soil, particularly by children. The presence of moderately elevated
pesticides residuals in the soil present potential health concerns.



Page 3.7-12                                                                                   April 2010
                                                               Manabe-Ow Business Park Specific Plan Draft MEIR
                                                                      Section 3.7: Hazards and Hazardous Materials


A Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) was prepared for 102 and 110 Lee Road to
evaluate past hazardous activities within these parcels. The ESA was conducted in accordance
with ASTM Standards Practice E 1527 and included an evaluation of the physical setting of the
properties through a review of referenced sources such as topographic maps and geologic, soils,
and hydrologic reports; history of the uses of the property, adjoining properties and surrounding
area through a review of referenced sources such as land title records, fire insurance maps, city
directories, aerial photographs, prior reports, and interviews; current property uses and conditions
including observations and interviews regarding the likelihood of known or suspected releases of
hazardous substances of petroleum products to migrate from the parcels. These two parcels have
been used for agricultural production since 1882 with most recent use of the property since 1981
for the production of strawberries. Based on a review of these items, the Phase I ESA did not
discover any environmental conditions, historical recognized environmental conditions within the
planning area.

However, due to the historical agricultural use within the planning area, development of the
residential uses associated with the proposed project would be considered potentially significant.
Implementation of the following mitigation measure would reduce this impact to a less than
significant level by ensuring that investigation and proper testing, evaluation and remediation of
potential pesticide residues associated with historical agricultural use within Assessors Parcel
Number 018-711-14 of the planning area, which is proposed for workforce residential uses, shall
be conducted if necessary.

Mitigation Measure
MM 3.7-9         Prior to issuance of a grading permit for future development within Assessors
                 Parcel Number 018-711-14, the project applicant(s) shall demonstrate to the City
                 of Watsonville compliance with the Department of Toxic Substances and Control
                 (DTSC) Interim Guidance of Sampling Agricultural Properties (Third Revision),
                 dated August 7, 2008 (or more recent if applicable). The most recent chemical
                 use documentation (e.g. local Agricultural Commission Pesticide Application
                 Permits) regarding the quantity and types of agricultural chemical used on the
                 subject property should be used as part of the compliance analysis.

                 In the event that subsequent testing indicates the presence of pesticide residues
                 beyond acceptable thresholds, the potential health risks shall be evaluated and a
                 work plan prepared to remediate the soil in accordance with all applicable
                 federal, state, and local regulations. All subsequent testing and remediation
                 activities are subject to review and approval by the City of Watsonville prior to
                 issuance of a grading permit.

Implementation of mitigation measure MM 3.7-9 would reduce potential impacts associated with
residual pesticides to a less than significant level.

Conflict with an Emergency Evacuation Routes
According to the City of Watsonville General Plan and the Emergency Preparedness Plan, Beach
Road east of the planning area and Highway 1, south of West Beach is the primary emergency
evacuation route in the project vicinity. The proposed project would result in an increase in traffic
on local roadways; however the increase in traffic would not impair implementation of or
physically interfere with an adopted emergency response plan or emergency evacuation plan.
Therefore, the proposed project would have no impact on an emergency evacuation route.
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