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					Report To: Portfolio Holder Sport & Leisure

SEPTEMBER 2009

Subject: Status: Report Ref: Ward(s): Key Decision: Report Of: Contact: Appendices: Papers relied on to produce this report SUMMARY 1 1.1 This Report

Basing House Development Proposals – Release of Capital Funding Open 64/2009 All No Head of Strategy and Innovation Symon Easton, Cultural Investment Manager Tel: (01256) 845597 or email symon.easton@basingstoke.gov.uk Appendix 1 – HCC Request for partnership funding details Appendix 2 – Basing House HCC projected Budget Yrs 1-5

Key Decision Ref: N/A

The purpose of this report is to seek approval to release the 2009/10 contribution to Hampshire County Council of £50,000 from the Sport and Leisure Capital Programme to carry out development and visitor improvement works at Basing House. This is the first of three £50,000 instalments totalling £150,000 over three consecutive years reported for Cabinet approval in January 2009 and formally adopted by full council In February 2009. The project is referenced in the 2009/10 – 2011/12 Approved Capital Programme medium term financial strategy under the Sport & Leisure Portfolio Capital schemes. Recommendation It is recommended that:

1.2

1.3

2

2.1

£50,000 is released from the 2009/10 Sport and Leisure Capital programme as the council’s contribution to Hampshire County Council towards development and visitor improvement works at Basing House.

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PRIORITIES, IMPACTS AND RISKS Contribution to Council Priorities This report accords with the Council’s Budget and Policy Framework Council Plan Ref 2009 - 2012 3-Year Action Plan: 2009 - 2012 Other References: Contribution to Community Strategy Community Strategy 2006 - 16: Impacts Type Impacts for Financial BDBC Personnel Legal Impacts on Wellbeing Equality and Diversity Crime and Disorder Rural / Urban Health Environment Economic Involving Others Communication/Consultation Partners      No significant impacts      Some impacts  Significant impacts H5, L2, P3, E1, E6, A2, A4, A8, A19 SI3.10

Risk Assessment Number of risks identified: Number of risks considered HIGH or Medium: Strategic: Operational: Already identified on Corporate Risk Register? Already identified in Service Plans? 0 0 Yes No Yes No N/A N/A

GLOSSARY OF TERMS HLF HCC Heritage Lottery Fund Hampshire County Council

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DETAIL/MAIN CONSIDERATIONS 3 3.1 Background The Basing House heritage site is managed by the county’s Museums and Archives Service, part of the now Culture, Communities and Rural Affairs Department, at Hampshire County Council (HCC). Basing House is a Scheduled Ancient Monument that includes several listed buildings, contains substantial earthworks of a Norman castle and the remains of a Tudor palace built by William Paulet, one of the one most powerful men of his time. The site is rare nationally since its structures stand as a vivid testimonial of the scars of a major Civil War siege. It is also an accessible relic of a large selfsufficient estate that was frequented by Tudor royalty. Basing House was built in 1535 as a new residence for Sir William Paulet, the first Marquis of Winchester and Treasurer to Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I. With 380 rooms, and 5 storeys high it was the largest private house in the country. When the English Civil War broke out in 1642 Basing House was attacked by Parliamentary troops three times and during the final siege in 1645 a fire destroyed part of the building. Parliament ordered the complete demolition of what remained, and the villagers of Basing were allowed to remove these building materials for their own use, which can be seen today in the houses in Old Basing. Today guided tours are offered to schools and local groups to support the study of the Tudors and the Civil War, but the physical dilapidation of the site, limited access and inadequate interpretation have impoverished the potential of this important historic site to attract visitors to Basingstoke and to engage the local community and schools in their historic past. For this reason Basingstoke does not directly promote visits to Basing House. The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) awarded the County Council a Stage 1 Pass and Development Grant of £53,300 towards the £115,000 cost of developing detailed plans to conserve this important historic site at Old Basing and develop it as a valuable heritage visitor attraction and centre for learning. In September 2008 HCC submitted an application for Stage 2, the implementation phase, which included a full Business Plan, Marketing Plan and Lifelong Learning Plan. The major aims for the project are defined as:      3.7 To carry out appropriate heritage restoration and to protect the site’s most vulnerable features To improve public access and understanding of the site To benefit local users and residents from Basingstoke and beyond To meet local and regional strategic and political objectives To develop an effective and sustainable management plan

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

The Stage 2 bid was approved in early 2009 and unlocks a further grant of £1,071,000 to conserve the ruins and provide much improved visitor amenities with supported learning programmes for schools. Improvements include a shop, refreshment areas, a learning and community centre, and a new venue for

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functions and events in the 16th Century Grade 1 Listed Great Barn. Car parking and public access to the site will also be improved. 1 3.8 HCC is contributing in excess of £600,000 to the project plus a significant level of resources secured as part of the South East Hub of the Renaissance in the Regions programme (The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council). The project is currently on programme – works are due to commence in September 2009 and the site is scheduled to re-open to the public in summer 2010. A dedicated project manager has been assigned to deliver the project and a Project Board formed by HCC includes two officers representing the borough council. Capital Funding request The project has sufficient funding to undertake core conservation of the ruins and to adapt key existing buildings to provide improved visitor facilities and for a core level of interpretation of the site, but the project had a shortfall of potentially up to £300,000 to achieve all of the project’s objectives. HCC sought additional funding for interpretation to make the visit more exciting and add more interest in order to maximise the impact of the visit from the first day of opening. The Director of Culture, Communities and Rural Affairs approached Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council in May 2008 to request capital funding support to help make good the shortfall. SMT received a short briefing paper on 5 June outlining the project’s aims and the case for support. A member of the council’s senior management team and council officers visited the site on 31 July 2008 to learn about the plans in more detail and see how local residents, school children and visitors to Basingstoke would benefit. In mid September 2008 HCC were able to provide a finalised Business Plan, Marketing Plan and Lifelong Learning Plan to Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council. These plans were part of HCC’s HLF submission, and allowed the robustness of the county’s plans to be scrutinised. Meeting Council Priorities Priority one of the council plan is : To secure and enhance prosperity A2 - Secure sustainable economic growth and overall community prosperity for both town and rural areas of the borough A4 – Improve the image of the borough as a place to live, work, invest, do business and visit.  Continue to support the provision of arts, sports and leisure in recognition of its contribution to the local profile and economic prosperity

3.9

4 4.1

4.2

4.3

5 5.1 5.1.1 5.1.2

11

A separate HLF bid by HCC, working with colleagues at BDBC, for a heritage trail from Basingstoke town centre to Old Basing has also been successful. This walk will bring visitors on foot to Basing House.

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

In partnership with HCC, support improvements to Basing House which will enhance interpretation and awareness of this important local heritage site

5.2 5.2.1 5.3 5.3.1

Priority two of the council plan is : To maintain and enhance local community wellbeing A8 – Improve provision of local leisure, cultural and community facilities, and encourage and facilitate their use by local people and visitors Priority four of the council plan is : To develop and support effective partnerships focused on community priorities A19 – Promote and secure effective commissioning, joint working and delivery of shared services with other organisations including our strategic partners, other local authorities, parish and town councils, the voluntary sector and other partners Financial Implications The current capital programme includes the following budgets within the Sport & Leisure Portfolio to provide financial support for works at Basing House:    £50,000 in 2009/10 £50,000 in 2010/11 £50,000 in 2011/12

6 6.1

6.2 6.3

The Portfolio Holder is requested to release the 2009/10 capital budget in order that the 2009/10 contribution to Hampshire County Council can be made. A report to request release of the future years’ capital budgets will be submitted to the Portfolio Holder when appropriate.

7 7.1

Spend proposals in line with BDBC priorities BDBC has agreed to contribute £150,000 over three years (£50,000 per year from 2009/10) to support the interpretation plan to make the site ‘come alive’ for local audiences. The BDBC spend is targeted at the key audience segments: families, the local community, visitors to Basingstoke, schools and learning and special interest groups. Year 1 : A light and sound presentation is planned for the Great Barn. The next priority is to refresh and update the very tired-looking exhibition in The Lodge to tell the story of Basing House. The direct benefits of this investment are :   Relate the story of Old Basing’s past to Old Basing as it is today To evidence the significance of Old Basing House in the 17 th Century demonstrated by its demolition - this is not evident from the ruins that can be seen today. Change perceptions – focus on historic heritage not a 1960’s modern roundabout town 5 of 19

7.2



 7.3

Improve visitor experience / attendance

Additional priorities for Year 1 are :   Additional Discovery Points (Interpretation) A site model

7.4 7.5

Year 2: The priority for the BDBC grant will be a themed and imaginative children’s play area. Year 3: Identify what outstanding items still need resourcing and prioritise those that add best value to the visit for visitors. BDBC grant spend to be agreed and allocated accordingly once the experience of running the site has been reviewed Summary Borough officers have worked closely with County Council in the preparation and consideration of where the resources would be best targeted in terms of benefiting the local residents and visitors and meeting council priorities.

8 8.1

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Appendix 1 Basing House – request for capital funding from Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council by Hampshire County Council The Basing House story centres on the ruins of the once great Norman and Tudor buildings, but it is much more. The site is a rare Civil War location and its archaeology reveals the story of settlement
in Old Basing across the ages. The site contains attractive gardens and green spaces, a complete

Grade 1 Listed Tudor barn, and a museum building.
HCC hope to secure Heritage Lottery Funding (HLF) for over £1.1m to conserve the ruins and develop the amenities on the Basing House site to make a significantly improved visitor attraction. HCC are contributing in excess of £600,000 to the project plus a significant level of resources secured as part of the SE Hub Renaissance in the Regions programme.

The award will help restore and conserve the ruins, and repair and adapt existing buildings to provide much improved visitor amenities including a shop, refreshment areas, a play area, and a new venue for functions and events in the 16th Century Grade 1 Listed Great Barn. Car parking and public access to the site will be improved. The project aims to benefit residents from Basingstoke,
and the visitor economy by improving access to and understanding of the site‟s unique and rich history. The result of the bid is expected in Dec 2008.

The new and improved Basing House site aims to open in July 2010 with the formal opening due to be held on the August bank holiday. This provides a fantastic opportunity to open with a spectacular Civil War re-enactment event.

HCC have identified a shortfall of potentially up to £300,000 to achieve all of the project‟s objectives, for which they are seeking assistance. They have funding sufficient for a core level of interpretation but are seeking additional funding to make the visit more exciting and add more interest in order to maximise the impact of the visit from the first day of opening. BDBC proposes to contribute £150,000 over three years (£50,000 per year from 2009/10) to support the interpretation plan to make the site „come alive‟ for local audiences. Year 1 : A sound presentation is planned for the Great Barn. The next priority is to refresh and update the exhibition in The Lodge to tell the story of Basing House especially for family audiences. HCC are trying to find money for this from other sources, but if this should fall short then they would want to use at least some of the money from BDBC 1st year grant for this.

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Thus the second tier of priorities for Year 1 are : o o o o o o Additional Discovery Points 2 more viewers a 2nd site model another archaeological pit another tactile trail bag traditional garden games

If the HCC team are successful in funding the Lodge Exhibition from other sources, all of the above are achievable, and will add to the core level of interpretation planned for these items.
Year 2: The priority for the BDBC grant will be a themed and imaginative children‟s play area. Year 3: Review the experience of running the site and identify what outstanding items (see below) still need resourcing. BDBC grant spend to be agreed.

Basing House – Additional items requiring funding

Estimated costs (inc. contingency and fees)

BDBC proposed funding scheme 3 year plan @£50k p.a

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Light & Sound Show in Great Barn Archaeological Pit (children’s activity) Themed benches and pause points Site models Wooden viewing tower Themed play area Discovery Points (graphics, replica objects, interactives ) New footbridge on site of West Gate Traditional garden games New exhibition in Lodge (cases, graphic panels, etc) Costumes for guides/interpreters New guide book Drawbridge-effect entrance over fishponds Covered outdoor seating for refreshments

50,000 5,000 16,000 38,000 50,000 50,000 Year 2 17,000 10,000 2,000 45,000 Year 1 4,000 4,000 5,000 4,000 TOTAL £300,000 Alt.Year 1 Alt.Year 1 Alt.Year 1 Alt.Year 1

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Basing House An Important Part of Our History Visitors to the Houses of Parliament today cannot fail to notice, hanging on the wall in the Peers‟ Corridor, a huge painting depicting the siege of Basing House. The Victorian parliamentarians clearly recognised that this great battle at the peak of the English Civil War was so significant for our parliamentary history it deserved a prominent place on the walls of the home of our national government. Basing House is a Scheduled Ancient Monument that includes several listed buildings, contains substantial earthworks of a Norman castle and the remains of a Tudor palace built by William Paulet, one of the one most powerful men of his time. The earthworks were extended and the palace fortified in the English Civil War, only for it to be destroyed at the end of the major siege by Oliver Cromwell‟s troops. The site has strong associations with some of the most famous names in English history - Cromwell of course, but also William the Conqueror, Henry VIII, Elizabeth 1, and Philip of Spain. The historic value of the site, with its royal connections and dramatic events, deserves much wider recognition. The site is rare nationally since its structures stand as a vivid testimonial of the scars of a major Civil War siege. It is also an accessible relic of a large self-sufficient estate that was frequented by Tudor royalty. After the siege Cromwell‟s Parliament ordered the complete demolition of what structures remained, and the villagers of Basing were allowed to remove building materials for their own use. The defeated Royalist, John Paulet, had his estates confiscated, and was sent to the Tower of London on a charge of high treason, while his sons were taken away to be brought up as Protestants. The charges against Paulet were later dropped, and the site of Basing House returned to him at the Restoration by King Charles II. The site of this great battle is now largely forgotten to a modern public, as is its long history which spans 2,000 years and also features a Norman castle and one of England‟s largest Tudor palaces. Fewer than 8,000 people a year visit Basing House ruins today. VISITING Reasons to visit The site is more than purely a historical site; it is also an attractive green outdoor space, where families can enjoy a fun day out in a safe environment.

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 The primary proposition of the project is that Basing House is a familyfriendly green outdoor venue, with a range of activities and events to keep all the family engaged, an interesting and enjoyable place to visit  The secondary proposition is that it is a site of significant historical significance

Who will visit ?    The majority of the visitors to Basing House will come from a 30 minute drive time 800,000 people live within a 30 minute drive time of Basing House. 208,000 of these people visit a museum or gallery at least twice a year. 41% of these 208,000 are people that ACORN classifies as Wealthy Achievers; they have a propensity to visit sites like Basing House (museums, galleries and archaeological sites) and can afford to do so.   Families make up approx 1/3rd of all households in this area; families will make up a significant
proportion of the visitors to Basing House.

A concerted effort will be made to attract a wider audience that currently visits Basing House; this will concentrate on those with a propensity to visit sites like this, families and schools; hard to reach groups will also be targeted through proven learning programmes and marketing incentives

 

The vast majority of visitors to Basing House will come from the local area A small minority will come from outside of the 30 minute drive time radius

Basing House will be visited mostly by local people and people visiting the local area. Visitors The target is to deliver 25,000 visitors in the first year after reopening, leading up to and exceeding 40,000 visits per annum in the longer term (5+ years). With a potential market of this size the target of 40,000 visitors per annum within the first 5 years of operation is a realistic one. In future Basing House will attract a much wider audience than currently, in particular the family market that have a propensity to visit this type of site. „Hard to reach‟ groups such as low income
families, BMEs, and 14-19 year olds will be targeted through outreach work and incentives.

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How does Basing House compare? Within the 30 minute drive time of Basing House there is extensive cultural provision; however there is nothing directly comparable with Basing House. The Vyne enjoys approximately 81,000 visits per year but this includes entry to the impressive historic house. Finding a closer match to
Basing House means looking slightly further a field, to Cressing Temple (www.cressingtemple.org.uk) a site run by Essex County Council which contains two medieval barns which belonged to the Knights Templar, some pretty outdoor areas and farm buildings, a walled garden and a tea room. Visits to Cressing Temple are approximately 50,000 per year. The site charges £4.50 entry for a full price adult ticket and it is open for most of the day, 6 days a week, all year round.

Many of the visitors to Milestones Museum and The Willis Museum and Aldershot Military Museum share many of the same attributes and interests as the potential market for Basing House.

Admissions
The site will be open to from February half-term to October half-term and to pre-booked groups (including schools) or for special events during the winter. Standard opening hours will be 10.00am to 5.00pm, six days per week (Tues – Sun). Standard tickets £5 for adults and concessions, valid for 12 months to encourage repeat visits. One-day tickets will be sold for special events at an additional charge. Small scale activities (i.e. those not separately charged for) for families at weekends and in school holiday periods will give an incentive for annual ticket holders to repeat their visits and will encourage regular use of the site as a green space by people living in Old Basing village and Basingstoke, including those walking the Heritage Trail from Basingstoke town centre to Old Basing (another HLF supported project). Booked groups and schools: £3.50 for adult & concessions/children £2.00 but tickets only valid for day of visit.

Marketing promotion The marketing communications plan for year 1 will include : AA signs, Basingstoke town centre billboard posters, newspaper inserts, bus backs, radio competition with Kestrel FM, leaflet and incentive distribution, website development and on-line marketing, on-going press relations campaign targeting print, broadcast media and on-line media. Other actions include:  Hard to reach groups : sales promotions will be used to promote visiting by harder to reach groups. Specific groups will also be targeted on a face-to-face basis through outreach work. Where tailored media is available it be used e.g Unity 101 (“The South's Only Asian and Ethnic Radio Station”) will be used to inform South Hampshire's Asian population about Basing House. 11 of 19



Local Hampshire County Council sites will promote Basing House to visitor‟s e.g Milestones Museum, The Willis Museum and Basingstoke Library. Hampshire County
Council museum, library and country park sites also provide good opportunities for cross promotion and joint incentives to visit



Press relations and specific websites such as Visit Hampshire and Defence of the Realm and local visitor guides Discover Hampshire, Hampshire‟s Countryside and Hampshire Attractions will be used to target the tourism market.



Leaflets will be distributed to local TICs, hotels/B&B‟s and attractions


 

Press releases will target group travel and travel trade publications
HCC publications such as Hampshire Now (delivered to all Hampshire households) will feature BHHP E-broadcasts and e-magazine mailings such as arts & heritage e-magazine Showcase (15,000 contacts) will feature BHHP

Basing House will have an annual marketing budget of over £11,000. The use of direct marketing techniques, both off and on-line, coupled with a high impact outdoor campaign in Year One will ensure an 'explosive' launch campaign. All marketing tactics will be monitored and evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Lifelong learning and Schools The following activities and take-up are planned :
Current activity Guided Tours Battle re-enactments plus Living History Events Community Archaeology Weeks Lectures and talk programme Gifted and talented winter school Young Archaeology Club Family workshop Insect hunt Future activity Family workshops History Makers – Civil War Medieval Diet History Detectives Touching the past Induction training – volunteer stewardship Brownies Badge Work Active adult visually impaired Basing Community Family groups KS3 20 150 50 7/8 workshops – 150 total KS or target group All visitors ; KS2/3 All visitors Age 16 plus –students, societies, Friends, community Community Groups KS3 Ages 8- 14 – one visit per annum pilot KS2 Nos per year planned Pre-booked 400; 300 on the day; 750 pupils 2000 people Small history events 400 40 12 lectures – 300 total 120 24 6 45

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Key stage 2 and key stage 3 The English Civil War and the Tudors are now included in the National Curriculum A KS2 Session will be a facilitated visit to Basing House such as „Hidden Tudors – Sewers, Cellars and Servants at Basing House.‟ Using a range of sources on information, including ICT, music, drama, artefacts, historic sites and archaeology pupils will investigate and discover the hidden Tudors and their lives at Basing House. A KS3 Session will be a facilitated visit to Basing House such as „History Makers - The Civil War at Basing House‟. Using an enquiry-based approach this presents opportunities to explore the way in which the past has helped shape identities, shared cultures, values and attitudes today. Pupils will use ICT to research information about the past, process historical data, and select categorise, organise and present their findings, use real and replica objects/documents to gain an understanding of the historic site of Basing House and reasons for its downfall, conduct an onsite investigation - to appreciate and evaluate, through a site visit, the role of museums, archives and historic sites in preserving, presenting and influencing people‟s attitudes to the past and investigate aspects of a local site and set them in a broader national context of the Civil War A new education officer will be recruited with a ICT subject specialism. A CD Rom will be created and developed as part of the resources for KS 3 Pupils. Volunteers Volunteers will support the delivery of the schools programmes Hard to reach groups
The HCC Museums Service has a track record of appealing to and working with non users of the service. Working with colleagues from the Family Learning Unit funded by the Learning and Skills Council, the service has successfully worked with community groups developing basic literacy and numeracy skills. The Big Lottery Project called „Beyond Horizons‟ uses cultural resources to raise the aspirations and achievements of these family groups.

Milestones Museum is used as indicator for the museums service SE Hub visitor survey work. Its half term programme draws in a good cross section of the local population. Joint programmes across Basingstoke and Deane, linking and promoting all Milestones, the Willis Museum and BHDP are envisaged.

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In Gosport, through a project called ‟Inspiring Science‟ year 6 pupils and their families come and work together. This has led to repeat visits and take up of services from under-represented post code area. It is envisaged that this model could also be delivered in Basingstoke.

These measures, combined with the tactics in the Marketing Plan, will ensure that a representative profile of the population of Basingstoke and Deane use Basing House.

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Appendix 2 - Basing House – summary of Business Plan (Sept 09)

1. Overall projected budget in Years 1 – 5
Category Income Earned Income Total – Earned Income Expenditure Staffing Manager Curator Marketing & Commercial Manager (0.2) Education Officer (0.7) Gardener/Ranger Museum Assistant 1 (0.6) Museum Assistant 2 (0.6) Total-Staffing Premises Building Maintenance Grounds Maintenance Equipment Maintenance Utilities (Electricity & Gas) Water & Sewerage Services Cleaning & Hygiene Services Refuse Collection Total - Premises Transport Hire of Transport Staff Travel Expenses Total - Transport Supplies & Services Equipment Protective Clothing & Uniforms Marketing Printing & Stationery IT Costs Postages Event & Exhibition Costs Shop & Catering Purchases Total - Supplies & Services Total Expenditure Surplus / (Deficit) 400 400 11,300 1,000 10,300 200 9,000 8,800 41,400 241,600 (135,700) 400 400 11,600 1,000 10,600 200 9,200 11,700 45,100 258,200 (80,700) 400 400 11,900 1,000 10,900 200 9,400 15,000 49,200 266,700 (70,900) 400 400 12,200 1,000 11,200 200 9,600 18,700 53,700 277,200 (62,300) 400 400 12,500 1,000 11,500 200 9,800 19,500 55,300 284,200 (67,900) 500 1,500 2,000 500 1,500 2,000 500 1,500 2,000 500 1,500 2,000 500 1,500 2,000 12,000 1,000 1,000 13,000 700 2,400 1,100 31,200 12,300 1,000 1,000 13,300 700 2,500 1,100 31,900 12,600 1,000 1,000 13,600 700 2,600 1,100 32,600 12,900 1,000 1,000 13,900 700 2,700 1,100 33,300 13,200 1,000 1,000 14,200 700 2,800 1,100 34,000 43,400 43,100 8,700 23,900 27,500 10,200 10,200 167,000 45,500 45,200 9,100 25,200 29,200 12,500 12,500 179,200 46,600 46,300 9,300 25,800 29,900 12,800 12,800 183,500 47,800 47,500 9,600 26,500 30,600 13,100 13,100 188,200 49,000 48,700 9,800 27,200 31,400 13,400 13,400 192,900 105,900 105,900 177,500 177,500 195,800 195,800 214,900 214,900 216,300 216,300 2010/11 £ 2011/12 £ 2012/13 £ 2013/14 £ 2014/15 £

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2. Visitors and Earned Income
Visitor figures have been revised downwards and are now projected to start at 25,000 in year 1 and grow to 40,000 by year 4, when they are expected to plateau. 15% of visitors will be children in school groups.
Year1 (2010/11)
1.Wealthy Achievers 2.Urban Prosperity 3.Comfortably Off 4.Moderate Means 5. Hard Pressed 6. Schools 7. Total 10,764 (43%) 5,532 (22%) 2,688 (11%) 754 (3%) 901 (3.6%) 4,360 (17.4%) 25,000 12,454 (41.5%) 6,401 (23.3%) 3,110 (10.4%) 873 (2.9%) 1,042 (3.5%) 6,120 (20.4%) 30,000 15,061 (43%) 7,741 (22%) 3,762 (11%) 1,055 (3%) 1,260 (3.6%) 6,120 (17.4%) 35,000 17,669 (44.1%) 9,081 (22.7%) 4413 (11.1%) 1,238 (3.1%) 1,479 (3.7%) 6,120 (15.3%) 40,000 17,669 (44.1%) 9,081 (22.7%) 4413 (11.1%) 1,238 (3.1%) 1,479 (3.7%) 6,120 (15.3%) 40,000

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

The premise for this estimate is that 800,000 people live within a 30 minute drive of Basing House. These people live in an area that covers the majority of central Hampshire and southern Berkshire and Surrey. 208,000 of the people that live in this area are known to visit a museum or gallery at least twice a year. Almost half of these 208,000 are people that ACORN classifies as „Wealthy Achievers‟. In the 30 minute drive-time catchment area families make up approximately a third of all the households.

Admissions
The site will be open to from February half-term to October half-term and to pre-booked groups (including schools) or for special events during the winter. Standard opening hours will be 10.00am to 5.00pm, six days per week (Tues – Sun). Standard tickets: £5 for adults and concessions valid for 12 months to encourage repeat visits. One-day tickets will be sold for special events at an additional charge. Small scale activities (i.e. those not separately charged for)for families at weekends and in school holiday periods will give an incentive for annual ticket holders to repeat their visits and will encourage regular use of the site as a green space by people living in Old Basing village and Basingstoke, including those walking the Heritage Trail from Basingstoke town centre to Old Basing (another HLF supported project). Booked groups: £3.50 for adult & concessions/£2.00 children but tickets only valid for day of visit. A prediction of the makeup of tickets sales for Basing House has been drawn up based on the breakdown of visitor numbers by ticket type from Milestones Museum : Adult Milestones - 18,489 07/08 Basing Hse: Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 5,331 6,397 7,463 2,061 2,473 2,885 3,080 3,697 4,313 3,699 4,439 5,179 1,448 1,738 2,028 9,381 11,257 13,133 25,000 30,000 35,000 Child 7,147 Family 10,684 Conc‟ns 12,829 5 + under 5,023 Other
inc. schs

Total 86,707

32,535

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Year 4 Year 5

8,529 8,529

3,297 3,297

4,929 4,929

5,918 5,918

2,317 2,317

15,009 15,009

40,000 40,000

Based on evidence from Milestones it is assumed that 20% of standard annual ticket holders will return at least once within 12 months.

Sale of refreshments
Shop sales and refreshments will be offered at both the Little Barn visitor entry point and in The Bothy (Basing House). Year 1 2 3 4 5 Predicted visitor numbers 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 40,000 Predicted spend per head 40p 45p 50p 55p 55p Predicted annual sales £10,000 £13,500 £17,500 £22,000 £22,000

Shop sales
Shop sales projections are based on achieving the predicted visitor numbers and the spend-per-head figures of our other Museum shops, as well as similar attractions elsewhere. The following calculations have been made on the assumption that only 73% of visitors to Basing House are likely to be able to make purchases. Year 1 2 3 4 5 Predicted 73% of visitor numbers visitors 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 40,000 18,250 21,900 25,550 29,200 29,200 Predicted spend per head 50p 55p 60p 65p 70p Predicted annual sales £9,125 £12,045 £15,330 £18,980 £20,440

Income from events and activities
2010 -11 Big event, eg. Civil war re-enactment: 2000 visitors @ average cost of £7 Autumn Wedding Fair: 30 exhibitors @ £100 Picnic Concert: 1000 @ average £7 Themed banquet: 100 @ £50 TOTAL 2011 - 12 and subsequent years 2 Big events: 4000 visitors @ average cost of £7 1 smaller event (eg Family Fun Day): 1000 @ £6 2 Wedding Fairs (Spring & Autumn): 30 28,000 6,000 Income (£) 14,000 3,000 7,000 5,000 29,000

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exhibitors @ £100 3 weddings: 100 guests @ £100 Picnic Concert: 1000 @ average £7 Themed banquet: 100 @ £50 TOTAL

6,000 30,000 7,000 5,000 82,000

Income from venue hire (corporate and private
20010-11 Learning/CommunitySpace: - 2 hires @ £50 Great Barn: 2 hires @ £200 TOTAL 2011-12 and subsequent years Learning/CommunitySpace: - 6 hires @ £50 Great Barn: 4 hires @ £250 TOTAL 300 400 1,300 Income (£) 100 400 500

3. Expenditure – Staffing
Basing House Staffing: Expenditure Profile Year 1 – Year 5 (£’s) Notes:
1. Operations Manager to be appointed 01/01/2010 2. Marketing & Commercial Manager (already in post at Milestones) joins team 01/01/2010 3. Education Officer to be appointed 01/09/2009 4. Museum Assistants to be appointed 01/06/2010

2014/15 2010/11 Current Staff Curator Gardener/Ranger Museum Assistant (0.4) Total – Current Staff Additional Staff Manager Marketing & Commercial Manager (0.2) Education Officer (0.7) Museum Assistant 1 (0.2) Museum Assistant 2 (0.6) 43,400 8,700 23,900 3,400 10,200 45,500 9,100 25,200 4,400 12,500 46,600 9,300 25,800 4,500 12,800 47,800 9,600 26,500 4,600 13,100 49,000 9,800 27,200 4,700 13,400 43,100 27,500 6,800 77,4 00 45,200 29,200 8,100 82,500 46,300 29,900 8,300 84,500 47,500 30,600 8,500 86,700 48,700 31,400 8,700 88,800 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14

5. The posts of Manager, Total - Additional Staff 89,600 96,700 99,000 101,600 104,100 Marketing & Commercial Manager and Total Staffing 167,000 179,200 183,500 188,200 192,900 Education Manager, costing £76,000 in Year 1 and rising to £86,000 in Year 5, will be funded from the Museums Service‟s allocation of money from the SE Region Renaissance Hub but underwritten by HCC should Hub funding decrease in future years.

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4. Sensitivity analysis
20010/11 Projected Visitor Numbers Income Admissions Refreshments Shop Sales Total +5% +10% -5% -10% 25,000 £ 54,800 10,000 9,100 73,900 77,600 81,300 70,200 66,500 2011/12 30,000 £ 65,700 13,500 12,000 91,200 95,800 100,300 86,600 82,100 2012/13 35,000 £ 76,700 17,500 15,300 109,500 115,000 120,500 104,000 98,600 2013/14 40,000 £ 87,600 22,000 19,000 128,600 135,000 141,500 122,200 115,700 2014/15 40,000 £ 87,600 22,000 20,400 130,000 136,500 143,000 123,500 117,000

Assumptions
Only earned income directly affected by visitor numbers has been used. No increase in prices is assumed, only visitor numbers. Therefore all figures are at 2008/09 prices. In the scenarios presented, all income streams are assumed to increase in direct correlation to the corresponding increase or decrease in visitor numbers. If either of the positive scenarios applies then two outcomes are possible: a) HCC's deficit contribution reduces. This would reduce the pressure on the overall budget. b)The surplus generated from the additional visitors is paid in to a development fund for future site investment. If either of the negative scenarios applies then three outcomes are possible: a) The savings required would be made from existing expenditure budgets. b) Additional contributions from sponsorship or grant aid would be sought c) Ultimately any deficit will be under-written by Hampshire County Council.

5. Capital Expenditure
It should be noted that HCC makes a substantial capital contribution to Basing House each year, for repairs and maintenance. In the last five years this has amounted to £316,400. The county council is committed to continuing the allocation of a proportion of its capital repairs and maintenance budgets towards the preservation of the site.

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