slides - CALI by yantingting

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 35

									                  Is It Time for a Legal 
                 Technology Curriculum?

Kenneth J. Hirsh                      Wayne Miller
Director of Computing Services        Director of Educational Technologies
Senior Lecturing Fellow               Duke University School of Law
Duke University School of Law


Brian Donnelly                        Bob Seibel
Director of Educational Technology    Professor of Law
and Lecturer in Law                   CUNY School of Law
Columbia Law School
                   `
  A law school technologist’s view of a
    few key dates in American legal 
               education.
• 1779 Wythe teaches at College of William 
  and Mary
• 1870 Langdell introduces case method at 
  Harvard
• 1961 Clinic movement begins
• 1969 Internet created, though known only to 
  a few
 A law school technologist’s view of a
   few key dates in American legal 
              education.
• 1980 IBM PC introduced
• 1982 Center for Computer-Assisted Legal 
  Education (CALI) founded
• 1993 World Wide Web goes public
In a world dependent on information 
            technology…
• Law firms build extranets.
• Courts require electronic filing.
• Knowledge management organizes institutional 
  memory
• Online legal research is efficient and relatively 
  economical.
• Evidence is presented digitally
In a world where law schools depend 
    on information technology…
• Prospective students fill out applications online.
• More than 95% of students bring a notebook 
  computer.
• E-mail is the predominant means of one-to-one 
  and web sites are the means of mass 
  communication.
• Ethernet and wireless networks become pervasive.
• Schools purchase and require expensive exam 
  administration software.
                      Yet….
• Most law schools give little thought to the 
  integrated use of information technology in their 
  graduates’ practices.
• Many faculty resist the use of technology in the 
  classroom.
• And this is despite the recommendations of the 
  ABA “McCrate Committee Report” in 1992, 
  which listed among fundamental lawyer skills:
Skill § 9:
In order to practice effectively, a lawyer should be familiar with the 
skills and concepts required for efficient management, including:
9.1 Formulating Goals and Principles for Effective Practice 
Management;
9.2 Developing Systems and Procedures to Ensure that
Time, Effort, and Resources Are Allocated Efficiently;
9.3 Developing Systems and Procedures to Ensure that
Work is Performed and Completed at the Appropriate
Time;
9.4 Developing Systems and Procedures for Effectively Working 
with Other People;
9.5 Developing Systems and Procedures for Efficiently
Administering a Law Office
              In response:

• Some schools have developed or expanded 
  skills courses and clinics.
• Some schools have added courses which 
  look at part of the role of technology.
               No Caboose
q“Technology will be 
 important, but legal 
 education will not 
 be the engine 
 driving these 
 changes; it will be 
 the caboose.”
Why not emphasize technology?
qNot “thinking like a lawyer”
qJust a skill
qNon-lawyers can take care of it
qCan’t know which technologies will be 
 important in someone’s career

qIsn’t technology just a tool?
               IT is a meta-tool
qInformation technology is a fundamentally different 
 way to do the same old thing - overcoming time, 
 space and other historical limitations
   – perhaps most accessible analogy is how the apparent 
     motion of static images (showing a series over time) 
     created a whole new category of cultural production
   – the “movie”, television, video, animation, virtual reality
         “movie”
qIt is a tool whose conventions you have to “get” – 
 that takes exposure
qThere are implications to using technology that 
 require a basic understanding of how technology 
 works
 State of Technology Instruction
qRespondent (E-mailed) Survey
qWebsite Survey
qResults –
  – More courses involve technology, broadly 
    defined, than subjectively anticipated
  – Very few examples of widespread institutional 
    commitment
  – Little sense of a coherent standard practice
           Respondent Survey
qAnnounced via various email lists
q51 Responses to a Web-based survey instrument
qTopics most frequently taught:
  –   Legal practice management (20) 
  – Courtroom presentation (18) 
  – Standard office software (18) 
  – Information literacy (18) 
  – Litigation support (15)
            Website Survey
qHow do law schools represent their 
 curricula to the world (wide web)?
qWhat kinds of courses are most likely to 
 represent themselves as integrating 
 instruction about information technology?
qA survey of 187 websites showed a wide 
 variety of detail and orientation, but patterns 
 emerged.
           Website Survey
qLaw Practice – 21 instances with a 
 technology component identified
qTrial Practice – 16
qComputers & the Law – 16
      Comparing the Surveys

Legal practice management  qLaw Practice – 21
(20) 
Courtroom presentation     qTrial Practice – 16
(18) 
Standard office software 
(18)                       qComputers & the Law 
Information literacy (18)   – 16
Litigation support (15)
                   Web Survey
q Law Practice – University of Colorado
Law Practice Management.  LAWS 7609-1.  Studies the 
Topics include the business structure 
  establishment of a solo or small-firm legal practice. Topics 
(PC, LLC, etc.) office systems, 
  include the business structure (PC, LLC, etc.) office 
  systems, marketing and development, staffing, liability 
marketing and development, staffing, 
  insurance, managing time, technology, and billing. (This is 
                              technology
  a practice course that counts toward the 14 credit 
liability insurance, managing time, 
  maximum of practice hours.) Course supported by the 
technology, and billing.
technology
  Section of Law Practice Management of the ABA in 
  memory of Harold A. Feder, CU Law ’59. 
                             Web Survey
q Law Practice – New England School of Law
LAW PRACTICE MANAGEMENT (LP310) - 3 Credits (Elective)
Familiarizes students with law practice as a work environment in a systematic manner. A 
 The various elements of practice to be examined may 
    primary objective is to introduce management tools in law practice. These include the 
    planning process conceived of as a powerful tool, time management, cost/benefit 
 include 1) forming a business plan; 2) 
    analysis, setting benchmarks and guides for testing and comparison as an ongoing 
    process, and decision theory. The course is designed to give academic structure and 
 incorporation/partnership, employment/independent 
    insight to the process of learning from experience, reflection, planning, and testing and 
 contracts; 3) insurance; 4) tax liabilities, annual and other 
    to facilitate learning and developing models of procedure. Ethical considerations and 
    malpractice traps in the context of practice also are featured. The various elements of 
 filings and deposits, IOLTA; 5) space; 6) equipment; 7) 
    practice to be examined may include 1) forming a business plan; 2) 
    incorporation/partnership, employment/independent contracts; 3) insurance; 4) tax 
 management; 8) rainmaking and networking; 9) computer
    liabilities, annual and other filings and deposits, IOLTA; 5) space; 6) equipment; 7) 
    management; 8) rainmaking and networking; 9) computer software; 10) banking: client 
                                                                  software
 software; 10) banking: client funds, trust accounts, 
 software
    funds, trust accounts, operating accounts, conveyancing accounts, IOLTA requirements; 
    and 11) marketing and advertising. Either the instructor or the students may arrange to 
 operating accounts, conveyancing accounts, IOLTA 
    have people in practice attend some sessions to respond to questions about their 
    practices, tax, software, insurance, and rainmaking. Part of the course may involve field 
 requirements; and 11) marketing and advertising.
    interviews of practitioners.
                       Web Survey
qTrial Practice – U of Maryland
Advanced Trial Advocacy: Litigating with Technology (3)
 Technologies presenting interesting and new legal 
 Technologies
This course teaches practical aspects of litigation strategy, emphasizing 
 questions are imaging and database software, web 
   pretrial and courtroom-related technologies. Students will learn to 
   apply concepts and skills in civil procedure, legal research, evidence 
 sources for specialized litigation research, case 
   and advocacy in a course focused on the ethical, procedural, evidentiary 
 mapping, electronic filing, electronic discovery, 
   and systemic effects of technological legal innovations. Technologies 
                                                               Technologies
   presenting interesting and new legal questions are imaging and 
 remote witness testimony, electronic trial 
   database software, web sources for specialized litigation research, case 
 presentation tools (including computer-based 
   mapping, electronic filing, electronic discovery, remote witness 
 evidence display, re-creation, and simulation) and 
   testimony, electronic trial presentation tools (including computer-based 
   evidence display, re-creation, and simulation) and multimedia court 
 multimedia court records.
   records.
                         Web Survey
q Trial Practice – William and Mary
q LAW 720 04  Trial Advocacy - Technology Augmented 3 credits 

Evidence presentation and 
An advanced litigation course intended for those second- or third-year 
   students who have a substantial interest in litigation. The course is 
   designed to develop the student¹s skill as a trial lawyer for both civil 
related technologies will be 
        technologies
   and criminal cases. Trial Advocacy will deal with trial strategy, jury 
   selection, opening statements, presentation of evidence, including the 
   examination of witnesses, closing arguments, and preparation of jury 
fully integrated into all aspects 
   instructions. Evidence presentation and related technologies will be 
                                                      technologies
   fully integrated into all aspects of the course. A trial will be required. 
   This is a pass/fail course. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of 
of the course.
   Legal Skills I, II and Evidence.  
                   Web Survey
qComputers and the Law – U of Conn.
q LAW 981 Computers and the Law 3 units 
 Deals with selected issues involving 
Deals with selected issues involving the general question how 
  the new technology of computers is affecting, and is 
           technology
 the general question how the new 
  affected by, the law and the legal system. Each student 
  undertakes a substantial project on a topic mutually agreed 
 technology of computers is 
 technology
  upon by the instructor and the student, and is required to 
 affecting, and is affected by, the law 
  report on or critique projects prepared by others. These 
  projects may include research papers or the preparation of 
 and the legal system.
  computer-assisted educational materials. Research papers 
  may fulfill the Upperclass Writing Requirement. 
   Our goal at Duke School of Law

• A comprehensive survey course on the use 
  of technology in legal practice.
• Taught by law school faculty-technologists 
  and guests including practitioners, law firm 
  CIOs, accountants.
        Fundamental Rationale
As technology transforms legal practice, legal education 
has not kept pace. Curricula do not integrally reflect the
ways in which information technologies are being used,
and could be used, to change the practice of law in the
United States. While law schools have embraced online 
publication databases many other transformations in legal 
"best practices" remain outside the scope of today's law 
school: large-scale document management; the discovery 
process in an electronic arena; information presentation 
and simulations in the courtroom; and the evaluation of 
electronic resources outside the narrow confines of the 
legal document databases.
                  Course Proposal
• Full semester course, two credits, pass/fail
• Subjects to include
      • Office Practice - Administrative Tools
        Timekeeping and Billing Systems, Client and Conflicts 
        Management, electronic filing
      • Large Case Management
        Document management, including data mining, electronic 
        discovery, indexing and retrieval of information
      • Knowledge Management
        Systems for organizing and sustaining the intellectual capital 
        of a law practice: indexing and retrieving information 
        contained in brief banks, memos, e-mails, and other firm 
        internal documents.
•Client Communications
Effective use of E-mail, web sites and other electronic 
communications.  Professional responsibility perspectives 
of conducting the business of the legal profession with e-
mail.  Consideration of security and privacy issues.
•Trial Practice
Evidence and document management.  Presentation of 
evidence.  Simulations and video documentation.  The 
state-of-the-art courtroom
•The Internet Beyond Legal Research
The place of the Internet in today’s law office: practical 
tools and tips for applying the Internet to solving your 
client’s problems.
•Information Literacy
Criteria for evaluating information sources of all kinds, from 
electronic databases purporting to be the equivalent of paper 
sources, to interpreting search results from electronic discovery
 Why must law schools integrate this 
      into the curriculum?
    While there has been great stability in legal 
education, there have also been profound changes, such 
as the introduction of clinical and practice skills courses, 
and the integration of electronic resources into legal 
research. The ways in which technology will change
the practice of law are as fundamental as any the
profession has faced, and cannot be assumed away
from the curriculum as matters for non-lawyers and
technology specialists. Thinking like a lawyer is no 
longer enough; a lawyer must also think like an 
information handler in an information age.
Lawyering in the Digital Age 
          Clinic                            
       at Columbia Law School
           Brian Donnelly
 Director of Educational Technology 
         and Lecturer in Law
   Evolution of the LDA Clinic
qFair Housing Clinic as predecessor
qFHC was primarily a litigation clinic
qIntegrated tech (starting in 1995) into:
  – Teaching materials
  – Practice
qFound time constraints in teaching both tech 
 and fair housing (tech was marginalized)
    Developed new curriculum 
             (2000)
qBasic ideas:
  –  Put technology skills at the center of the 
    curriculum (not at the margins)
  – Make a connection between traditional skills 
    and contemporary skills
  – Apply student’s enthusiasm for and knowledge 
    of  tech to help public interest causes
            LDA Paradigm
qAll lawyering tasks involve an information 
 component
qLawyering can be broken down into 3 basic 
 functions:
  – Gathering
  – Managing
  – Presenting
         Traditional Skills
qGathering information qInterviewing
qManaging information qCase planning
qPresenting information qDrafting
        Contemporary Skills
Gather info      Interviewing    Electronic fact-
                                 gathering

Manage info      Case planning   Knowledge 
                                 Management

Presenting info  Drafting        Courtroom tech,
                                 Web design
             Student Fieldwork 
qWork one on one with Atty’s in legal aid legal 
 services
   – Harlem Legal Aid, Community Law Offices, SRO 
     project,  MFY Legal Services
qSoftware/web content development
   – NYC Housing Court (automated answer)
   – Probono.net (several projects including 9/11)
   – Supreme Court (public web site)
qPublic interest support 
   – Center for Social Justice (redistricting project)
   – Assoc. Bar City of New York (hotline)
 What Should Students Know 
About Technology and Learning 
          the Law?

Bob Seibel
Professor of Law 
CUNY School of Law
718-340-4206 
seibel@mail.law.cuny.edu

								
To top