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					A GUIDE TO YOUR COURSE


MA ART AND DESIGN
MA DESIGN FOR ADVERTISING
MA FINE ART
2010-11



CONTENTS

Section 1: Course Specific Information

About this guide
Welcome
About the Course/Course Structure:
    MA Art and Design
    MA Design for Advertising
    MA Fine Art
Course Management
Staff Involved with the Programme
Health and Safety Issues
Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)
Career Opportunities and Future Study
Academic Regulations
Additional Information specific to your course


Section 2: School Specific Information

School Charter for Students
Where to get help with your course
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
Learning, Teaching & Assessment
Academic Misconduct
Ethics
Glossary of terms

Appendix

MA Exhibition Pro-Forma
Module Descriptions




This version is valid for the forthcoming academic year. The University reserves the right to change details in
this guide without notice
                                                       1
                   Section 1: Course Specific Information

About this guide

This Course Guide will help you plan your MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine
Art course. It tells you which modules you must study and pass, and lists the optional ones which
contribute to your award. The Guide also offers you brief descriptions of each module, including
general information about assessment tasks, and an overview of how the Course can be used for
future career choices.

You should read this Course Guide in conjunction with the Postgraduate Student Handbook; the
University’s Principles and Regulations. Together these documents should provide you with all the
basic information that we think you will need for your period of study here.

You are encouraged to read this Course Guide through now. It will be a considerable advantage to
you to be familiar from the outset with the various aspects of your studies that are described. It may
be that the relevance of some of the sections will not be immediately obvious. Keep it somewhere
accessible, so that you can refer to it as needed. The answers to many of the questions that you will
want to ask are contained in it.

Obviously even in a document like this we have not covered every query and problem that you might
have about the course. If you find that there is something you need to know, please do not hesitate to
approach your course leader. You can also consult the University’s Student Support and Guidance
Services as appropriate. We are pleased to hear your views and welcome suggestions for ways of
improving the operation of the Course.

  Please enter the contact details for
  your Personal Tutor for your future
  reference:

                                          MK505
  Your local Academic School Office is:   01902 322213
                                          Monday to Friday 9.00 am – 5.00 pm

                                          ML053
  Your Student Office is:                 01902 321979
                                          Monday to Friday 9.00 am – 5.00 pm


Please note that in order to develop and improve the Course, it may be necessary on occasions to
amend or revise the details given in this Guide.




                                               2
Welcome



The MA Award is offered in both full-time and part-time modes and everybody involved in the MA
programme extends a warm welcome to you. The School hopes your experience here will be
enjoyable and profitable and provide a platform for life long learning and development in your chosen
profession. This Course Guide provides the information you will need to understand the operation of
your chosen MA and to aid you in planning your programme of study.



Don Adamson
MA Programme Manager
d.adamson@wlv.ac.uk
01902 321928




                                              3
About the Course: MA Art and Design

The aim of the Programme is to:

           prepare you for a professional career in one or more areas of art and design practice,
            education, or a related area of employment or self-employment.

           develop your creative, analytic and evaluative skills as an artist, designer or maker.

           expand your knowledge and understanding of the critical discourses and contexts which
            construct meaning and value in art and design.

A career in your chosen profession will make demands of your ability to work independently, to self-
direct your creative activity and to autonomously initiate and respond to tasks. In order to prepare you,
as a postgraduate student, for this way of working the Independent Study modules are structured to
allow you to develop these skills of decision making and, in relation to structure and content, are a
matter for you to determine, in negotiation with your tutor and programme manager, structure and
outcomes specific to your needs (but subject to meeting the generic module learning outcomes).

The programme is designed so that in consultation with your tutors, you can determine the sort of work
you want to produce and the subject area(s) where you will produce it in the Independent Study
modules.


Programme of Study

The four independent study modules involve you determining the sort of practice you will undertake
and which of the School’s specialist subject area(s) you will work in. The name of the specialist subject
area(s) chosen is the one that will appear on your award citation, i.e. MA Art & Design: Animation.

You will have submitted a proposal of study with your application and been accepted on the basis that
in principle it can be done to a level that meets MA requirements in art and design.

This outline proposal will have shown staff:-

           the area of practice, and the visual, theoretical or technical research considered necessary
            to support this.

           what you hope to gain by undertaking an MA and what you hope to be able to do as a
            result of completing it..

And will have identified:-

         whether additional skills are needed, and where needed, can be provided within the time
           scale of your programme without prejudice to the ultimate level aspired to, and within the
           resource base of the specialist area in which your creative development will be take place.

         Whether the specialist area of the School appropriate to the needs of your project has the
           academic and technical staff resource, or studio/workshop, software resource sufficient for
           the needs of your proposal, or, if appropriate, that the identified extra - University resource
           essential to your project has this capability.




                                                 4
Programme Calendar

There is an induction course during the week beginning Monday 13 September 2010: teaching starts on
Monday 20 September 2010.

Semester 1:         Weeks beginning 20 September 2010 – 14 January 2011
Semester 2:         Weeks beginning 24 January 2011 – 13 May 2011
Semester 3:         Weeks beginning 30 May 2011 – 26 August 2011

The MA Degree Show will open on Friday 2 September 2011.

The School strives to be flexible and accommodate the needs of part-time students. As indicated in the
module guides the lecture-based modules are all held on Tuesday or Thursday between 6pm - 9pm. A
studio seminar normally takes place on Monday afternoons starting at 2pm and Tuesday mornings
starting at 10am you are encouraged to attend.

Part time students should normally expect to be able to contribute the equivalent to 6-12 hrs study time
per week to the MA as minimum.

The Wolverhampton Graduate
By the end of your course, the university expects you to be a Wolverhampton Graduate who is
knowledgeable and enterprising, digitally literate and a global citizen.

Digitally Literate
Our graduates will be confident users of advanced technologies; they will lead others, challenging
convention by exploiting the rich sources of connectivity digital working allows.

Knowledgeable and Enterprising
Our graduates will know how to critique analyse and then apply knowledge they acquire in an
enterprising way.

Global citizens
Our graduates will bring informed understandings of their place and ethical responsibilities in the world.
Further information can be found on the University student webpage for Graduate Attributes.


Academic Regulations
This course adheres to the University’s academic regulations for students undertaking a postgraduate
degree. A full version of these regulations can be found on the University web page for Policies and
Regulations. These regulations govern your course and will be binding on you. It is, therefore, important
that you read and become familiar with them.


University Academic Calendar 2010/11
University Academic Calendar for 2010/11 academic year for the delivery of the 20-credit framework.




                                                   5
Course Structure for the MA Art and Design

                                         PG Academic Regulations
        Students will study:
         180 credits full time or 30 credits per semester part time
         Students must study and pass
               o 60 credits for Postgraduate Certificate
               o 120 credits for Postgraduate Diploma
               o 180 credits for MA

              NB: All modules are worth 15 credits unless stated otherwise in brackets.


                            Semester One

                  Core      You must study and pass:
                            AD4032 Independent Study 1
                            AD4039 Creative Enquiry

                  Option    AD4038 History and Theory of the Avant-Garde
                            AD4056 Popular Culture and the Archive


                            Semester Two

                  Core      You must study and pass:
                            AD4029 Creative Methodologies
                            AD4031 Understanding Practice
                            AD4033 Independent Study 2 (30 credits)

                  Option    N/A


                            Semester Three

                  Core      N/A

                  Option    AD4034 Independent Study 3: Planning (30 credits)
                            AD4048 Dissertation (30 credits)
                            AD4059 Independent Study 4



    For part-time methods of study, please consult your course leader




                                                  6
About the Course: MA Design for Advertising

The aim of the Programme is to:

             prepare you for a professional career in one or more areas of art and design practice,
              education, or a related area of employment or self-employment.

             develop your creative, analytic and evaluative skills as an artist, designer or maker.

             expand your knowledge and understanding of the critical discourses and contexts which
              construct meaning and value in art and design.

A career in your chosen profession will make demands of your ability to work independently, to self-
direct your creative activity and to autonomously initiate and respond to tasks. In order to prepare you,
as a postgraduate student, for this way of working the Independent Study modules are structured to
allow you to develop these skills of decision making and, in relation to structure and content, are a
matter for you to determine, in negotiation with your tutor and programme manager, structure and
outcomes specific to your needs (but subject to meeting the generic module learning outcomes).

The programme is designed so that in consultation with your tutors, you can determine the sort of work
you want to produce and the subject area(s) where you will produce it. This is finalised in the
Independent Study modules.

Programme of Study

Marketing modules will be taught at the Business School, Compton Campus (a regular bus service
runs between campuses). The Psychology of the Image module provides the core theoretical
framework to understanding how the image and advertising interact and effect culture – beyond the
simple image or advert. The Dissertation module allows you to develop a deeper analysis on a
specialist topic or can be part of a marketing campaign strategy and providing the cognate
infrastructure for your project in Independent Study Three.


Programme Calendar

There is an induction course during the week beginning Monday 13 September 2010: teaching starts
on Monday 20 September 2010.

Semester 1:         Weeks beginning 20 September 2010 – 14 January 2011
Semester 2:         Weeks beginning 24 January 2011 – 13 May 2011
Semester 3:         Weeks beginning 30 May 2011 – 26 August 2011

The MA Degree Show will open on Friday 2 September 2011.

The School strives to be flexible and accommodate the needs of part-time students. As indicated in the
module guides the lecture-based modules are all held on Tuesday or Thursday between 6pm - 9pm. A
studio seminar normally takes place on Monday afternoons starting at 2pm and Tuesday mornings
starting at 10am you are encouraged to attend.

Part time students should normally expect to be able to contribute the equivalent to 6-12 hrs study time
per week to the MA as minimum.
.




                                                  7
Course Structure for the MA Design for Advertising

                                                   PG Academic Regulations
        Students will study:
           180 credits full time or 30 credits per semester part time
           Students must study and pass
                 o      60 credits for Postgraduate Certificate
                 o      120 credits for Postgraduate Diploma
                 o      180 credits for MA

               NB: All modules are worth 15 credits unless stated otherwise in brackets.


                                Semester One

                    Core        You must study and pass:
                                AD4039 Creative Enquiry
                                MK4037 Delivering Customer Value Through
                                Marketing
                                AD4049 Psychology of the Image and Artefact

                    Option      AD4032 Independent Study 1
                                AD4060 Professional Practice


                                Semester Two

                    Core        You must study and pass:
                                AD4050 Advertising and Promotion for the Web

                    Option      AD4035 The Marketing Planning Process
                                AD4033 Independent Study 2 (30 credits)
                                AD4031 Understanding Practice
                                AD4034 Independent Study 3: Planning (30 credits)
                                AD4060 Professional Practice
                                AD4040 Audience and Display


                                Semester Three

                    Core        You must study and pass:
                                AD4059 Independent Study 4 (30 credits)
                                AD4048 Dissertation (30 credits)

                    Option      N/A



    For part-time methods of study, please consult your course leader




                                                          8
About the Course: MA Fine Art

The course is designed so that in consultation with module leaders and MA staff, you can determine
the practical work you want to produce and the techniques, media and context(s) within which you will
produce it.


The MA requires you to develop your practical work alongside the study of the history and theories of
art. The course is primarily practice based, but you are expected to have a concern for the history and
theories of art and be willing to develop ‘literacy’ in articulating your ideas through written and spoken
language.

The History and Theory of the Avant-Garde and Theory in Practice Modules deal with the contexts and
theories relevant to the history of the Avant-Garde and the development of contemporary art practice
and aim to equip you with the skills to evaluate your practice and that of others. The modules follow
conventional models of academic delivery and assessment.

The two modules Creative Enquiry and Audience and Display are both aimed at supporting your
practical work within the Fine Art studio modules.

The studio modules allow you the time and space to develop and define the sort of art practice you will
undertake and the context for your work. This journey will be supported in the 1st and 2nd semesters
by weekly studio seminars. In addition you will be appointed a personal tutor from the Division of Fine
Art and Photography.

Academic staff CV’s are provided on the School web site.


Programme Calendar

There is an induction course during the week beginning Monday 13 September 2010: teaching starts
on Monday 20 September 2010.

Semester 1:        Weeks beginning 20 September 2010 – 14 January 2011
Semester 2:        Weeks beginning 24 January 2011 – 13 May 2011
Semester 3:        Weeks beginning 30 May 2011 – 26 August 2011

The MA Degree Show will open on Friday 2 September 2011.

The School strives to be flexible and accommodate the needs of part-time students. As indicated in the
module guides the lecture-based modules are all held on Tuesday or Thursday between 6pm - 9pm. A
studio seminar normally takes place on Monday afternoons starting at 2pm and Tuesday mornings
starting at 10am you are encouraged to attend.

Part time students should normally expect to be able to contribute the equivalent to 6-12 hrs study time
per week to the MA as minimum.
.




                                                 9
Course Structure for the MA Fine Art


                                                     PG Academic Regulations
          Students will study:
             180 credits full time or 30 credits per semester part time
             Students must study and pass
                   o      60 credits for Postgraduate Certificate
                   o      120 credits for Postgraduate Diploma
                   o      180 credits for MA


                 NB All modules are worth 15 credits unless stated otherwise in brackets.


                                  Semester One

                      Core        You must study and pass:
                                  AD4039 Creative Enquiry
                                  AD4042 Studio Practice 1
                                  AD4043 Studio Practice 2
                                  AD4038 History and Theory of the Avant-Garde

                      Option      N/A


                                  Semester Two

                      Core        You must study and pass:
                                  AD4040 Audience and Display
                                  AD4044 Studio Practice 3
                                  AD4045 Studio Practice 4

                      Option      AD4041 Theory and Contemporary Practice
                                  AD4060 Professional Practice
                                  AD4029 Creative Methodologies


                                  Semester Three

                      Core        You must study and pass:
                                  AD4047 Final Studio Project (30 credits)

                      Option      AD4046 Studio Planning (30 credits)
                                  AD4048 Dissertation (30 credits)



For part-time methods of study, please consult your course leader




                                                            10
Course Management

Postgraduate Programme Manager                  Don Adamson          01902 321928

Course Leader: MA Art and Design,               Lester Meachem       01902 321952
MA Design for Advertising

Course Leader: MA Fine Art                      Dr. Alistair Payne   01902 518542

Admissions and Student Support Officer          Sharon Raybould      01902 518426

Postgraduate, Research and Enterprise           Jo Mills             01902 322213
Administrative Assistant


Staff/Student Liaison

At the beginning of each academic session students will be invited to nominate a student
representative per course per level.

Staff/Student liaison meetings occur once per semester.

Student Council meets twice per year.

Course meetings between staff and students are held twice per year.

Student representatives are invited to School Committees

Student Voice

The involvement of students in the assessment of course quality is an established part of the
University’s procedures. The Students’ Union and your Course leaders will be able to tell you
about the representative roles available to students and the communication processes in the
School. These are important roles that benefit you and other students. Further information
about student representation and the Student Voice is available at the Students’ Union
website: www.wolvesunion.org/




                                           11
Staff Involved with the Course
Seminars and Personal Tutoring Arrangements

You will also have a personal tutor; the amount of time you will need to see your tutor will vary at
different points in the course and you will be able to negotiate the timing and cycle of tutorials so as
to take into account the fluctuating level of need. However many part-time staff and researchers
will only have a limited number of tutorial slots available per year.


Staff teaching on the MA include: -

 Name                 Subject area of expertise           Ext:   Room     E-mail
 Steve Arnott         Animation                           2068   MK510    S.P.Arnott@wlv.ac.uk
 Marc Austin          Visual Communications               1532   MK301a   M.Austin@wlv.ac.uk
 Maggie Ayliffe       Fine Art                            1970   MK703    M.C.Ayliffe@wlv.ac.uk
 Ben Carpenter        Sculpture                           3454   MK707    Ben.Carpenter@wlv.ac.uk
 John Clementson      Visual Communications               1978   MK302    johnclementson@wlv.ac.uk
 Dave Colton          Professional Practice               1977   MK302    D.Colton@wlv.ac.uk
 Dr. Jane Cooksey     Learner Development                 3526   MK404    H.J.Cooksey@wlv.ac.uk
 Rob Cooksey          Product Design                      1957   MK404a   R.Cooksey@wlv.ac.uk
 Pat Dillon           Fashion and Textiles                2656   MK508    P.A.Dillon@wlv.ac.uk
 Su Fahy              Photography                         2690   MK509    S.Fahy@wlv.ac.uk
 Dr. Louise Fenton    Visual Communications               8423   MK301a   Louise.fenton@wlv.ac.uk
 John Fraser          Video, Film, Performance,           2956   MK007    J.L.Fraser@wlv.ac.uk
                      Installation
 Stuart Garfoot       Glass                               1648   MK031    S.Garfoot@wlv.ac.uk
 David Green          Glass                               1956   MK031    David.green2@wlv.ac.uk
 Paul Hale            Digital Media                       2413   MK510    P.Hale@wlv.ac.uk
 Dr. Dew Harrison     Digital Media                       1941   MK505a   Dew.harrison@wlv.ac.uk
 Paul Harrison        Video, Film, Performance,           8544   MK707    P.A.Harrison@wlv.ac.uk
                      Installation
 Gwen Heeney          Ceramics                            1958   MK031    G.Heeney@wlv.ac.uk
 Dave Henley          Product Design                      1947   MK404a   D.W.Henley@wlv.ac.uk
 Claire Jolin         Interior Design                     2614   MK404a   c.a.jolin@wlv.ac.uk
 Dean Kelland         Video, Film, Performance,           1945   MK007    Dean.Kelland@wlv.ac.uk
                      Installation
 Lester Meachem       Visual Communications               1952   MK503    Lester.Meachem@wlv.ac.uk
 Dr. Kristina         Reader in Design and Applied        1550   MK207    K.Niedderer@wlv.ac.uk
 Niedderer            Arts
 Dr. Alistair Payne   Fine Art                            8542   MK703    A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk
 Prof. John Roberts   Critical Theory                     2017   MK704    jcr3@wlv.ac.uk
 Ben Salter           Interior Design                     1969   MK404a   bensalter@wlv.ac.uk
 Paul Scull           Painting and Printmaking            1909   MK705    P.Scull@wlv.ac.uk
 Vicky Shaw           Ceramics                            1958   MK031    V.Shaw@wlv.ac.uk
 Rosemary Terry       Sculpture                           1964   MK705    R.Terry@wlv.ac.uk
 Ross Winning         Animation                           2717   MK502    Ross.Winning@wlv.ac.uk
 Jan Wrigley          Fashion and Textiles                2591   MK102    J.Wrigley@wlv.ac.uk




                                                     12
Other School Staff

 Name                 Job Title                             Ext:   Room     E-mail
 Jim Abernethy        Principal Technician (Print)          1615   MK210    J.A.Abernethy@wlv.ac.uk
 Natasha Bloomfield   Divisional Assistant (Digital         2427   MK501    N.Bloomfield@wlv.ac.uk
                      Media)
 Martin Evans         Principal Technician (IT)             1996   MK201    M.A.Evans@wlv.ac.uk
 Darren Hillman       Superintendent Technician             2549   MK517a   D.N.Hillman@wlv.ac.uk
 Sheila Hind          School Manager                        3399   MK501b   S.Hind@wlv.ac.uk
                      (Administration)
 Marina Gavriel       Divisional Assistant (Fine Art        2446   MK501    M.Gavriel@wlv.ac.uk
                      and Photography)
 Julie Green          Divisional Assistant (Visual          1975   MK501    J.Green4@wlv.ac.uk
                      Communications)
 Rachel Lander        Divisional Assistant (Design          2090   MK501    r.lander@wlv.ac.uk
                      and Applied Arts)
 Suki Sunner          School Finance Officer                1991   MK501    suki@wlv.ac.uk




                                                       13
Additional Information specific to your course

Counselling and Tutoring out of Term-time

During the period from June to September, as an MA student, you will have access to studio space
and some technical support. You do need to be aware that, generally, staff take leave or undertake
research during this period; however you will have become sufficiently independent as a learner and
practitioner by this stage not to require close supervision. Where the need might arise for tutorials
during July and August, arrangements will need to be made well in advance.

In planning the final work for Independent Study Three, which you must pass in order to be awarded
the Masters degree – you will need to negotiate the form of presentation for assessment. Work does
not have to be displayed within the School of Art & Design - other alternatives are acceptable such as
a site-specific installation. If this is the case you should discuss your work with your MA Course Leader
in advance of starting your Final Project module. In addition, you will need to work in collaboration with
all graduating MA students in organising your exhibition of final work in September.


Part-Time Study

The University and School of Art and Design, encourages the participation of part-time students.
Accordingly we have designed a flexible two-year part-time route, which aims to accommodate part-
time students fully in the MA Programme.

The contextual, theory and research modules take place on Tuesday or Thursday between 6pm - 9pm
allowing those of you with employment and/or family responsibilities to attend. We recommend that
you set aside at least the same amount of time again for private study.

Tutorials can also be booked at a time convenient for you and the staff. You are expected to devote at
least a day (6 hours) towards practical work, which normally take place outside the School of Art and
Design. In special circumstances, workspace may be allocated subject to availability and approval of
your MA Course Leader.

The 30-credit practice module/s in which you realise your final project(s) for exhibition takes place
during the summer of the second year between July and September and requires you to set aside
approximately 12 hours per week. If you are taking the dissertation module a similar amount of time
should be dedicated to completing your written project.

The School strives to be flexible and accommodate the needs of part-time students. As indicated in the
module guides the lecture-based modules are all held on Tuesday or Thursday between 6pm - 9pm. A
studio seminar normally takes place on Monday afternoons starting at 2pm and Tuesday mornings
starting at 10am you are encouraged to attend.

Part time students should normally expect to be able to contribute the equivalent to 6-12 hrs study time
per week to the MA as minimum.




                                                 14
Semester 1

   Week Beginning                        Semester Programme
   13th September 2010                   Welcome Week/ Start Semester 1
   10th December 2010                    End of Semester 1: Teaching
   TBC                                   Student Study Week
   17th December 2010                    Assessment for Semester 1
   24th December 2010                    Christmas Vacation
   21st January 2011                     Marking Week

Semester 2

   Week Beginning                        Semester Programme
   28th January 2011                     Start of Semester 2 Teaching
   18th March 2011                       End of Term
   25th March 2011                       Student Easter Vacation
   8th April 2011                        Term Starts
   6th may 2011                          End of Semester 2: Teaching
   TBC                                   Student Study Week
   13th May 2011                         Assessment for Semester 2


Semester 3/Final Project Timetable

   Week Beginning                        Programme
   TBC                                   Begin Final Project
   TBC                                   Submit Position Statement
   TBC                                   Final Exhibition completed
   TBC                                   MA Degree Show Opens


Exhibition
On completion of your MA the School will make studio accommodation available for you to stage an
exhibition of assessed work in September of each year. The planning, management and construction
of this exhibition is a matter for you to organise collaboratively with the other MA students.

Part time students may need to make special arrangements with employers to be able make time to
attend show planning meetings, preparation of show space and preparation of their work.

As with the School’s undergraduate exhibition, responsibility for mounting the MA show lies with
students. Technicians in the School are ever helpful, but they have leave entitlements over the
summer and are directed to undertake maintenance and general duties, which limit their availability.
Any technician support you are likely to need should be discussed with your tutor as early as possible:
technician support will need to come from your subject area.

Consumable materials
Obtaining and paying for consumable materials varies between different subject areas. In some areas
you will be invoiced for materials used, in others you will find that a store is operated where most
materials associated with the subject can be bought at cost. You should check with your tutor which of
theses will apply in your case (it might be both).

Communications
In addition to face-to-face contact, we will need to contact you in writing from time to time, through
email and your postal address. Please make sure the University Registry and the School of Art &
Design have your up to date term-time contact details (and home address where these are not the
same).




                                                 15
Listening to You
In addition to personal tutoring and academic counselling you can make your views known on how
good or otherwise your experience of any particular module has been by completing a module
evaluation questionnaire. These are issued in week 13 of each module, are anonymous and staff have
to respond to matters raised in annual monitoring reports.

On wider matters relating to your experience in the School of Art and Design, or other areas of the
University, these can be raised through the MA representative on the School’s Quality Committee (this
meets monthly) and/or through the student representatives on the School Board (this meets once each
term). The MA Programme Manager arranges one open liaison meeting with MA students in each
semester and will arrange additional meetings if requested.

Other Provision
The MA functions as part of the School’s research community. CADRE research lectures are held
jointly with PhD Students (look for posters and information on the current research seminars which
usually run on a Wednesday evening throughout the year). The school makes every effort to make the
MA a wholly constructive, educative and enjoyable experience for all its students. To this end, it is
constantly looking to introduce new programmes or facilities, which are not necessarily part of the
formal network but can be provided when facilities and resources allow.

English language support
If your first language is not English, although you have met the University’s English language score for
admission, because of the specialised vocabulary employed in art and design you may experience
difficulty from time to time. To help with this the School runs support sessions.

.




                                                16
                 Section 2: School Specific Information


School of Art and Design – Prize List

The Caparo Prize for Creative Enterprise
The Craftline Award for Excellence in Ceramics
Daler Rowley Prize for Excellence in Graphic Communication
Daler Rowley Prize for Excellence in Painting
The Dean’s Prize for Excellence in Design & Applied Arts
The Dean’s Prize for Excellence in Digital Media
The Dean’s Prize for Excellence in Fine Art & Photography
The Dean’s Prize for Excellence in Visual Communications
The Express & Star Award for Excellence in Journalism & Editorial Design
Keith Cummings Award for Excellence in Kiln Glass Casting
The Light House Photographic Award for best Documentary in Collaboration with the University of
Wolverhampton
MDTi Prize for Excellence in Commercial Video Production
The Optimise Consultancy Award for Interaction Design
The Potclay Award for Outstanding Work in Clay
The RotoVision Award for Excellence in Editorial Graphic Communication
The Sandvik Prize for Excellence in Photography
The Sandvik Prize for Excellence in Sculpture
Simon Bruntnell Award for Best Glass Work in Show
Toppots Award for Achievement in Ceramics
The Valentines Studentship Prize for Ceramics
The Ed Bird Memorial Award
The Powercell Batteries Prize for Outstanding Work on Live Commissions in Graphic Communications
WoW! Stuff Product Innovation Award 2010


School of Art and Design Shop

The School of Art and Design have a shop which is located on the ground floor of MK
building. The shop is normally open from 9.30 am to 4.30 pm and sells a wide variety of
materials at reasonable prices.




                                            17
                                    Health & Safety Issues

     YOU MUST NOT USE MACHINERY UNTIL INDUCTED IN THE SAFE WORKING
                       PRACTICES FOR YOUR AREA.

Undergraduate students will receive the appropriate health and safety induction for their
specific subject areas as part of their curriculum.

Postgraduate students should discuss with the Postgraduate Programme Manager their
specific needs for health and safety induction. It is important that this takes place as soon as
possible after registration.

ROOM DESIGNATIONS:              A       Students may work unsupervised
                                B       Occasional checks by supervisors required
                                C       Supervision is required
                                D       Supervision at all times

THROUGHOUT THE SCHOOL:
    Eating and Drinking Only in designated areas. This is because of the inherent risk of
    fire and ingestion of harmful materials
    Smoking is not allowed anywhere on University property.

VENTILATIONS & EXTRACTION: Must be turned on at all times

ELECTRICAL APPLICANCES AND MACHINERY:
    Turn off when you have finished using them. Turn off if you are the last to leave.

LEAVE THE AREA YOUR ARE WORKING IN SAFE:
    When leaving insecure or risky work unattended always put a sign to warn others.

CLEAN UP SPILLS: Dispose of in the correct manner.

DO NO MAINTENANCE TO MACHINERY: See a member of staff – do not do it yourself.

REPORT ANY ADVERSE CONDITION: When using chemicals, powders or thinners etc.

NOTE POSITIONS OF FIRST AID BOXES, FIRE EXTINGUISHERS AND FIRE EXITS:
    Do not obstruct fire exits and remove any obstacles you find from the path of an exit.

ALWAYS OBEY FIRE ALARM:
   The staff are not given prior warning for any fire drill. It is imperative that you know the
   assembly point for your building. Alarm bell testing is carried out, you will be notified
   when this occurs and you will not have to leave the building.

FIRE SAFE ‘REFUGE’ AREAS:
     These are on each floor and are situated directly adjacent to the life under the viewing
     windows. They are intended primarily for wheelchair users but any casualty should be
     placed here. Reassure them, then make your own way down the stairs and inform the
     Fire Co-ordinator as to exactly which floor the person is on.

EMERGENCY INTERCOMS:
   These are found on the landing adjacent to the lift. They alert SAD security. Misuse
   will lead to disciplinary action.




                                            18
REPORT ALL ACCIDENTS:
No matter how small as it may need to go into the accident book.
Accidents should be reported via the University’s Accident Report Form which is available on-
line from the Department of Risk, Health and Safety:
http://asp.wlv.ac.uk/Level3.asp?Level3=2136

Additional information which may not directly to certain subjects.

HASAWA:          Health and Safety At Work Act. The University is bound to provide a safe
                 and suitable place of work. This is a EU directive to Parliament. The
                 University is breaking the law if it does not comply with the HSAWA. As
                 such, the School’s technical staff, under the guidance of SAD Safety
                 Committee, and the SAD Safety Advisor, have to do a great deal of
                 preparatory background work to conform to the HASAWA. This is done on
                 your behalf and for your wellbeing:

CODES OF         These are Health and Safety policy statements that emanate from the
PRACTICE:        Vice Chancellor down to the various Health and Safety management groups.

MANUAL           Learn how to bend and stand correctly when lifting heavy objects that are
HANDLING:        deemed to be within your capabilities, and to assess when to use lifting
                 equipment, or seek help as necessary.

COSHH:           Control of Substances Hazardous to Health. All materials have to be verified to
                 see how safe they are to handle and use, before we purchase them.

RISK        Evaluate all risks and exposures, with materials, machinery and the working
ASSESSMENT: environment.

WORKING    Are step-by-step actions and operations that are ascertained from doing the
PROCEDURES:COSHH and RISK ASSESSMENTS. They take into account the
           aforementioned regulations to ensure safe working practices. Therefore, all
           of the precautions that we implement must be adhered to, or you will not be
           allowed to work. This is particularly pertinent with the wearing of Personal
           Protective Equipment (PPE), i.e. eye, face, ear, hand, feet and body
           protection. All are to British Standards.


All of this information is available to staff and students and is kept in the relevant Subject
Technician’s Office. Copies are also kept in the Superintendent Technician’s Office,
MK501a.




                                              19
Employability & Your Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)                                        Comment [JM]: JM to check with Sheila

What is ‘Employability’?

‘Employability’ is concerned with the development of skills aimed at enhancing your
employment prospects throughout your time here at the University of Wolverhampton.
Developing specialist subject and academic knowledge is important for employers but they
also want to employ individuals who are able to:
    Communicate effectively,
    Work in a team and have good interpersonal skills.
    Solve problems
    Work on their own using their own initiative and are able to adapt to changing situations
    Be self-confident


How Will You Develop Your Employment Skills?

At the School of Art and Design we aim to provide you with the opportunity to develop these
through the modules you will be studying. The assessments you do for your modules are
designed to help you develop Subject specific skills through the research you undertake for
the assignments. In addition, they are also designed to help you develop other key skills
such as your written communication skills. Where you have formal presentations, this will
build your self-confidence in addition to helping you develop your skills of verbal
communication. Working as part of a team will develop vital group-work skills. Attending your
classes regularly will further ensure that you have the opportunity to develop other skills.

Throughout your time at the University, you will develop and be able to demonstrate a
number of skills, some of which are listed below:

    Working as part of a group
    Demonstrating teamwork skills and leadership skills
    Effective communication
    Written (via reports etc.)
    Oral (through formal presentations)
    Problem-solving
    IT skills (which include use of basic packages for word processing, spreadsheets, use
     of email etc.)
    Time management
    Attending classes on time
    Handing in your assignments by the deadline date

You may also be working part-time. The experience you gain within a work environment is a
very worthwhile one and also helps you to develop key skills. Dave Colton is the School of
Art and Design Student Placement Co-ordinator and he has a WOLF topic – Employment
and Placements for SAD. This is another good way of developing skills which are valued by
employers.

Career opportunities and Future Study

Careers Advice Unit                    Simon Brandwood              01902 321279
SAD Student Placements                 David Colton                 01902 321977

Future Study:
Research opportunities:
MPhil and PhDs in Art and Design (interdisciplinary combinations available)
All research enquiries to Dr. Dew Harrison (Dew.Harrison@wlv.ac.uk)

                                           20
CHARTER FOR STUDENTS STUDYING IN THE SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN

                  The School of Art & Design is a working partnership between its students and staff.
Students of the School of Art & Design are expected to have high aspirations. Studying in this supportive environment
offers you the opportunity to develop new knowledge, skills and behaviours that will enhance your career opportunities.




In order to help you achieve your objectives we shall endeavour to provide

        A stimulating and well-planned learning opportunity
        Appropriate resources, including books and computers/software
        Well-defined and appropriate programmes of study
        Opportunities to plan and review your progress
        Access to learning support
        Qualified, experienced and approachable technical and academic staff



We shall ensure that

            Written and verbal feedback will be provided on all assessments within 2-3 working weeks
            There are opportunities for you to comment on and influence your University and School experience, e.g.,
             via student forums, student-staff liaison meetings, module questionnaires and student representation on
             School committees
            You will have access to information that you need to progress on the course, e.g., through module guides
             and award/pathway guides
            All staff treat you with courtesy and respect
            Equal opportunities is promoted
            We deal promptly and fairly with issues of concern raised by you


We expect you to:

              Review your progress
              Show courtesy and respect to staff and other students
              Attend all learning sessions, including tutorials, and act appropriately at all times
              Understand the requirements of your programme of study
              Understand the requirements of each module you are studying on (sessions to attend, assessment
               procedures etc)
              Respect and abide by the University regulations, e.g., Equal Opportunities Policy, ID Cards, quiet areas,
               no smoking, plagiarism, student conduct etc
              Bring all necessary equipment to studios and workshops
              Abide by health and safety procedures, including wearing personal protective clothing when required
              Hand in assessments on time and in line with assessment procedures
              Switch off mobile phones when in class
              Behave considerately in lectures and participate in group activities
              Keep your tutor informed if you have personal problems that affect your work. If any problem makes it
               necessary for you to seek an extension on the date on which your assessment should have been
               submitted, then do so before the deadline date.
              Seek approval for any change in your programme and submit the record to your tutor/lecturer within the
               deadlines. It is your responsibility to submit the form to your student registry
              Inform the Registry Administrator if your address/personal details/sponsor changes/or other contact details
               change
              Notify your personal tutor/module leader of any sickness or absence
              Support your student representative in their work on your behalf


                                                             21
Where to get help with your course                                                                      Comment [JM]: JM to check with SH

General Enquiries
Divisional Assistant at the University - School of Art and Design office in room MK501

Module Related
Module Tutor/Leader
SAD Postgraduate Programme Manager

Programme/Academic Related
Personal Academic Tutor
Course Leader
Divisional Leader

Extensions/Mitigating Circumstances/Course Transfer
Admissions and Student Support Officer
SAD Postgraduate Programme Manager
Forms can be downloaded from e-vision (www.wlv.ac.uk/evision).

Study Issues and Support
Study Skills Advisor Learning Resource Centre
wlv.ac.uk/skills

Students with additional support needs
SAD: Dr Jane Cooksey 323407
University: Tony Bate 323958

Personal Issues
Personal Tutor
Student Gateway 322572

Student Gateway
University Careers and Employment Services 321414

Complaints/Suggestions
University Reception desks, School Offices or on line at: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/ind_compl_proc.pdf

Getting involved
Have your say!
There are many activities you can get involved in by:
    Becoming a student representative
    Helping out at Open Days
    Helping out with school activities




                                                22
Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

The contacts for APL consideration within the School of Art and Design is Don Adamson.

Courses are based on the principle of accumulating sufficient ‘credits’ at appropriate levels. The usual
means of gaining an postgraduate degree is to complete and achieve the level 7 credit requirement. In
order to obtain the required credits for your targeted award you need to study (and pass) a set of modules.
Each award specifies the modules (the ‘core’ or ‘core option’ modules) which must be studied as part of
this set of modules. A single module is normally worth 15 credits. However, it is not uncommon for
students to have gained the knowledge and skills developed in some of our modules through previous
study at another institution, by virtue of their normal work experience or via some other interest or activity.
Clearly, where this is the case, it would not be sensible or desirable for you to repeat this learning
experience during your student for one of our awards. Where we can clearly substantiate a student claim
to already have the relevant knowledge and skills to have satisfied the Learning Outcomes for one of our
modules, it is possible to accredit that achievement and thereby possibly shorten the period of student
required for the target award.

APL (Accreditation of Prior Learning) is a process for recognising and assessing students’ prior learning.
This recognition may give the learning a credit-value in a credit-based structure and enable it to be
counted towards the completion of a programme of study and the award(s) or qualifications associated
with it. APL includes:
         APEL- accreditation of experiential learning normally learning for which the student does not
           have a formal certificate from a recognised body, or
         APCL - accreditation of prior certificated learning normally previously assessed and certificated
           learning recognised for academic purposes.
Normally students will request consideration for APL prior to starting their course. Retrospective claims
are considered but may not be successful.

University information and guidance on APL can be found at:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=6932



Learning, Teaching & Assessment: What Can You Expect?
Learning and Teaching
In the studio modules you will undertake your own work, which may be speculative and experimental. You
will be encouraged to combine different methodological and material skills and explore news ways of
thinking. The principal learning method within these modules are studio based seminar discussions, in
which you are expected to reflect and evaluate on your art practice and plan the development of your art
practice. The last of this series is Studio Final Project; work produced on this module will normally
culminate in an exhibition or some other agreed form of presentation, being the final module of your MA.

In addition there are a series of modules aimed at increasing your knowledge and understanding of the
history and theory of art and its public reception: In the first semester; History & Theory of the Avant-Garde
and Creative Enquiry, and in the second semester; Theory and Contemporary Practice and Audience and
Display.

Staff will also direct you to the specialist book, DVD and magazine collections within the University’s
Learning Centres. There are several important museums and collections locally including the New Art
Gallery Walsall, IKON gallery Birmingham and Initial-Access on the outskirts of Wolverhampton. In addition
there are a number of organised field trips, which all MA students are expected to participate in.

Learning & Teaching Resources
There is a wide range of resources available for your learning, including on-line materials, web-based
information and, importantly, the online resources provided by the Learning Centres. Module information
will direct you to specific information sources, but there is an expectation that you will research your own
sources in order to enhance your achievement of the learning outcomes for the programme. In order to
locate resources relevant to Art and Design directly, visit the Learning Centre’s home page at
www.wlv.ac.uk/lib, select ‘Subject Starting Point’ from the left hand menu and use the links to navigate
through e-books, e-journals, databases and information on the web. If you require further subject-specific
help with resources, contact SAD Librarian, Tom Hicks.

                                                     23
WOLF/PebblePad
The University uses an Online Learning Environment known as WOLF and the School of Art and Design
also uses e-portfolio/PebblePad. You will be introduced to both systems during your studies and they are
accessible through the link from the University’s home page www.wlv.ac.uk.

You will have access to PebblePAD and WOLF through the computing facilities available across the
School and the University, apart from remote access via the Internet. The Centre for Learner Support in
the School, offer access to computers networked to a projector and can be used it for group
work/discussion. There is also a dedicated PC (height-adjustable) and lockers for wheel chair users.

Key websites are listed within MA Module Guides and assignment briefs, which enable you to access
helpful sites, such as BUBL, which offer’s an electronic resource for researching online for specific subject
areas including fine art and photography.

When working within Eportfolio - PebblePad you will be able to forward visual material and written texts
into staff gateways, for comment and feedback, there is also the opportunity to post web portfolios.

During the induction you will receive an induction into Eportfolio - PebblePad and working online.

Assessment

Types of assessment
The main source of information about assessment tasks are the module guide and assessment task brief.
The module tutor will provide a detailed briefing for each assignment. There is a wide range of
assessment tasks (further details can be found in the Undergraduate Student Guide), including:

             Project work
             Presentations
             Reports
             Team work exercises
             Work placement
             Written assignments

Marking of Assessments
The marking and grading of your work is a comprehensive exercise involving first-marking by tutors,
moderation by other tutors and the submission of assessments to independent external examiners who
monitor and advise, thereby ensuring quality and standards.

The normal return period for feedback on your marked (summative) work is three weeks after the date of
submission. You will receive a grade achieved and comments on whether and how you have achieved the
learning outcomes.

The processing of grades is outlined in the Postgraduate Student Guide.

Marking Criteria
In order to pass a module you will need to meet the criteria indicated on the assignment brief. These
criteria will be selected from the School of Art and Design assessment criteria which is listed below:

Level 7 (Postgraduate) Criteria
The Module Guide will identify the specific criteria which will apply from the following:

A     Knowledge and Understanding
A1    Make/Design              exploit process and media to a professional level of competence
A2    Evaluate                 define specific content; then, explore, examine and verify the criteria for
                               specific value
A3    Present and Relate       present challenging theories and/or practice in a professional manner
A4    Research and Analysis    studious enquiry with the intent to synthesise complex ideas in
                               relationship with professional production

B     Subject Specific Skills
B1    Originate creative ideas within an understanding of subject context
B2    Refine technique: the processes, materials, software or other expressive media employed to fit
          creative intent.
B3    Conviction in one’s ability to learn new media, where required by creative intent.
                                                      24
B4    Produce practical work in one or more areas of art and design practice in sufficient numbers to allow
         comparative evaluation; or in carefully defined limited numbers, where explicit criteria for
         evaluation can be identified early in the process.

C     Intellectual Skills
C1    Analysis
C2    Synthesis
C3    Evaluation
C4    Hypothesis Development

D     Key Skills
D1    Communication
D2    Application of Number
D3    Information Technology
D4    Working with others
D5    Improving on learning
D6    Problem solving


For all modules, and for assessed components and elements within modules, grades are awarded as
follows: A5, B4, C3, D2, E1, F0.The generic assessment criteria for each of these grades is as follows:-

A5 PASS WITH DISTINCTION
Work that demonstrates outstanding levels of individual, self motivated development in the creative,
cognitive, manipulative, contextual and methodological outcomes of the module. In practice led modules
there is clear evidence of an in depth understanding of how the work relates to issues in contemporary
practice within the particular discipline and evidence of high levels of synthesis between theoretical,
critical, and professional issues in the field. In theory led modules students demonstrate an in depth
understanding of the issues raised and methodological / theoretical strategies adopted, enabling the
student to present a well reasoned argument which challenges or enhances current thinking. Work should
demonstrate that the student is an independently motivated, reflective learner.

B 4 PASS
Work that meets, to a very high level, the creative, cognitive, manipulative, contextual and methodological
outcomes of the module. In practice led modules the student demonstrates the ability to fully evaluate
their own and others practice employing a very wide range of theoretical and critical positions in a given
professional context. In theory led modules students are capable of structuring an argument which
presents a well-reasoned understanding of the issues raised and methodological / theoretical strategies
adopted. Work should demonstrate a significant amount of independent decision-making and self-
reflection in its planning and execution.

C3 PASS
Work that satisfactorily meets, the creative, manipulative, contextual and methodological outcomes of the
module. In practice led modules the student demonstrates the ability to evaluate their own and others
practice employing theoretical and critical positions directly associated with a given professional context.
In theory led modules students demonstrate they are capable of structuring an argument. Work produced
demonstrates elements of independent decision-making and self-reflection in its planning and execution

D2 PASS
Work that meets the basic creative, contextual and methodological outcomes of the module. In practice
led modules the student demonstrates they are able to evaluate their own and others practice employing
critical positions directly associated with a given professional context. In theory led modules students
demonstrate they are capable of organising their thoughts and justifying their judgements. Work produced
demonstrates some of independent decision-making and reflection in its planning and execution

E1    RETRIEVABLE FAIL
The work presents some of the requisite knowledge, skills and application required for the successful
completion of module outcomes but there is evidence of limited or superficial engagement with learning.
Work only partially demonstrates informed and independent judgement or appropriate critical, creative
methodological or professional practice related approaches to learning.

FO FAIL
Work presents little or no evidence of knowledge, skills, or application required for the successful
completion of module outcomes. There are fundamental problems with the outcomes and the standards
required of the module
                                                    25
In order to pass a module with distinction (A5 grade), you have to achieve an A5 grade for all of the
assessment components in the module in question. In order to be awarded an MA with Distinction you
have to achieve an A5 in 120 of the 180 credits you study and of these 120 credits, 60 must come from the
Independent Study 3: MA Project Module.

Academic Misconduct
The University considers seriously all acts of academic misconduct, which by definition are
dishonest and in direct opposition to the values of a learning community. Academic misconduct, if
not challenged, will ultimately devalue academic standards and honest effort on the part of
students.

Defining Academic Misconduct

Cheating
Cheating is defined as any attempt to gain unfair advantage in an assessment by dishonest means, and
includes, for example, all breaches of examination room rules, impersonating another student, falsifying
data, and obtaining an examination paper in advance of its authorised release.

This is not an exhaustive list and other common examples of cheating would include –
   Being in possession of “crib notes” during an examination
   Copying from the work of another student
   Prohibited communication during an examination
   Acts of plagiarism or collusion as defined below

Collusion
Collusion is when two or more people combine to produce a piece of work for assessment that is passed
off as the work of one student alone. The work may be so alike in content, wording and structure that the
similarity goes beyond what might have been coincidence. For example – where one student has copied
the work of another, or where a joint effort has taken place in producing what should have been an
individual effort.

Collusion should not be confused with the normal situation in which students learn from one another,
sharing ideas and group work to complete assignments (where this is specifically authorised).

Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else’s work and passing it off as your own. This includes
incorporating either unattributed direct quotation(s) or substantial paraphrasing from the work of
another/others. It is important to cite all sources whose work has been drawn on and reference them fully
in accordance with the referencing standard used in each academic school.

The most common forms of plagiarism are –
   Cut or copied and pasted materials from websites
   Copying the work of another student (past or present) including essays available through “essay
     bank” websites – or other data.
   Copying material from a text book or journal

Students may go to great lengths to disguise the source reference they have been consulting in
contributing to an assignment – without understanding that with proper referencing this is entirely
acceptable.

Support for Students
The University, through its academic staff, will be both sympathetic and supportive in preventing plagiarism
and other forms of academic misconduct, particularly in the first year of undergraduate study.

A variety of support mechanisms are in place to help students succeed and avoid academic misconduct.
   Visit our study skills support website at www.wlv.ac.uk/skills See the section on tackling academic
      misconduct.
   Download the Students' Union guide to Avoiding Academic Misconduct ("Read, Write, Pass") -
      available from the same webpages.
   Book an appointment to see a study skills advisor - through the Learning Centres.
   Speak to your personal tutor or module leader.

                                                     26
     There is help available if you need it. The University caught and prosecuted 500 cases of Academic
      Misconduct last year - it is better to do the work than think you can get away with cheating - the
      penalties are severe...

Penalties
Where an offence is admitted, or a panel decides that cheating, plagiarism or collusion has occurred, a
penalty will be imposed. The severity of the penalty will vary according to the nature of the offence and the
level of study. Penalties will range from failure of the assignment under investigation to a restriction of the
award a student may ultimately achieve or a requirement to leave the University.

Full details about the University's policy on Academic Misconduct and regulations and procedures for the
investigation of academic misconduct are available at our website: www.wlv.ac.uk/polsregs

Assessment Deadlines
Module Guides will indicate when and where work has to be submitted for assessment. If you are ill
during the semester, need to support a close member of your family through illness or if you experience
other forms of difficulty leading to you not being able to submit work for assessment by the due date, you
will need to apply for an extension – if you need up to one week to complete work, or – extenuating
circumstances if you need more than one week.

To apply for an extension you will need to complete form POG33 before the deadline, to get an extension
agreed by the MA Programme Manager, and then get a new submission date agreed with the module
leader (to a maximum of 7 days from original assessment date).

If you have lost more than one week of study you will need to use form POG34 to apply for extenuating
circumstances. Your completed form will be put forward to the Extenuating Circumstance Board and if
agreed, it will mean your assessment will be deferred and a new assessment point will be given. You
should be apply for extenuating circumstances through the Programme Manager at the time you encounter
difficulty – please do not wait until the assessment deadline.

For an extension you may self-certify for up to one week, but it will help your case if you are able to
supply supporting material from a doctor, counsellor or other independent professional person.
For Extenuating Circumstances (sometimes referred to as mitigation or mitigating circumstances)
you must provide documentary evidence from one or other of the persons listed above, or a crime
reference number if the reason you cannot meet a deadline is because you have been the victim of
a crime.

Please note that the penalty for late submission of work without good reason (extension or extenuating
circumstances) is the award of a fail grade for the component or module in question.

What feedback can you expect?
You are entitled to receive feedback from staff within three weeks of an assessment. Where the assessed
item is an essay or other form of script, this will be annotated and returned together with a feedback pro-
forma completed by the members staff who marked and moderated the work. Feedback in the practical
modules will be given orally with a pro-forma logging the points made issued subsequently.

What can you expect from your tutors whilst you are preparing your work?
           Normally tutors will advise you, as a group, on the assessment at or near the start of the
            module.
           In many modules, tutorials will be arranged over the course of the module. These may be in
            a group or on a one-to-one basis.




                                                     27
What should you not expect from your tutors?
It is not the role of a tutor to look at or read drafts of your work and correct them with a view to your
obtaining a ‘good mark’. An assignment should reflect your effort and input, and the role of the tutor is to
guide and advise. It is then your responsibility to assess this advice and guidance and use it accordingly.
Tutors provide this in good faith, but its use - or lack of it - by you is not an automatic route to a good or a
poor grade. Other factors, particularly those pertaining to your skills and efforts, will play a vital role in your
achievement.

How You Can Comment on Learning & Teaching and Assessment
We greatly value your feedback; students’ views are collectively influential in how we deliver Learning and
Teaching and are gathered through staff-student meetings and via questionnaires, particularly the Module
Evaluation Questionnaires (MEQs) that you are asked to complete towards the end of a module. Such
feedback is analysed for annual monitoring of modules, subjects and courses.

External Examiners
External examiners are assigned to modules, for which they see a representative sample of student work.
Their job is to ensure that modules, assessment procedures and marking standards are fair and on a par
with other degree awarding institutions; and to ensure that individual students are awarded grades that are
a fair reflection of their performance. External examiners may request to meet with students and are
required to produce an annual report which is considered by the University’s Quality and Enhancement
Committee.


Ethical Monitoring

Why are ethical considerations important when researching for your modules, projects or
assignments?
Research is an essential and vital part of learning and teaching. Most research uses existing material, that
is publicly and legally available e.g. books, journals, periodicals, and web-based material for which formal
approval is not normally required.
However some research may involve interaction with people or organisations. You should ensure that you
do NOT conduct any research that could be intrusive or sensitive or could cause psychological harm or
suffering to others.

Ethical Monitoring of Modules, Projects and Assignments
For many modules, projects or assignments you will be using literature based research, for which formal
approval is not normally required. However when your research brings you into contact with people or
organisations (e.g. Email contact, interviews, questionnaires, photographing or video or audio taping) then
you need to be fully aware of and rigorously and consistently apply the School of Art Ethical Monitoring
Procedures. In such cases you will need to discuss your intentions with your module tutor who will need to
approve what you are doing before you make any contact.

If your research or project involves any of the following you will have to get written permission from the
School of Art and Design, Learning, Teaching & Ethics Sub Committee. Your tutor will discuss the
research with you and complete the relevant Ethical Monitoring Form and forward it for the approval of this
Committee.

Written permission is needed from the SAD Learning Teaching & Ethics Sub Committee for research or
project work that,
           involves covert procedures
           uses any procedures that may be considered likely to be physically or psychologically
               harmful
           may be offensive or produces material that may be offensive
           is contentious and may bring the University into disrepute
           requires access to, or creates data about individuals of a highly confidential nature
           involves participants who are considered vulnerable
           requires the administration of substances (legal or otherwise)
           requires the approval of another Professional Ethics Committee




                                                       28
  Procedures for the Ethical Scrutiny of Empirical Work within the University of Wolverhampton
  The principle of open ethical consideration and scrutiny of research at the University of Wolverhampton
  has at its heart an active engagement and thereby understanding of the ethical issues and values of that
  research by both researchers and the supervisors of other’s research. This engagement with the ethical
  debate surrounding research is essential due to the changing environment in which research is
  undertaken. Examples of such change as the impact of new technologies and the internet and the
  development of more international working all present a changing landscape of ethical issues. For this
  reason the following policy is proposed.

  The ethical scrutiny of empirical work is the responsibility of the host School of which the staff and students
  are members. All ethical scrutiny will take place at that local level with reporting on an annual basis to the
  University Ethics Committee whose function is to review performance and develop and modify policy.

      1.    All research, including undergraduate research projects, is required to have undergone ethical
            scrutiny by all parties involved and where necessary passed for scrutiny to the appropriate
            Ethics Committee for approval. Please note this will now apply to any work which collects
            primary data from or about human participants and so may include some kinds of in-module
            research.
      2.    It is required that the research is in full compliance with the law including Health and Safety, IT
            and data policies and legislation.
      3.    All research carried out with human participants is done so with informed consent.
      4.    In collaborative work, all parties must be involved in the process of ethical consideration and all
            research must be approved by the ethical structures of each organisation. In addition, when
            dealing with projects requiring NHS ethical scrutiny through the LRECs, the project must have
            received prior ethical scrutiny at School level before being passed to the LREC.
      5.    No data should be collected before adequate ethical consideration and approval has been given
            from an appropriate authority.
      6.    In international research the ethical values and standards pertaining to the UK shall prevail.
      7.    The process of ethical filtering and scrutiny that will take place in the University will follow the
            procedures laid out in Annexe A.
      8.    Where research work is carried out within Research Institutes it is the responsibility of the
            researcher, in conjunction with the Director of the Research Institutes, to make sure that
            appropriate ethical scrutiny of all projects has taken place and that the School Ethics
            Committees have been informed of this.

CATEGORY A & CATEGORY 0
    Category A projects usually involve the participation of people, rather than secondary data sources
    such as published memoirs etc., but are not deemed hazardous to the physical or psychological
    welfare of the participant or the investigator. They do not employ vulnerable individuals, in the context
    of the specific research, or investigate issues likely to give grounds for offence. If a project appears to
    be a borderline case of category B it should be deemed to be category B in the first instance. A school
    ethics committee may subsequently determine it to be category A if it is required in pursuit of a
    professional qualification and carried out under suitable close supervision. Category A projects may be
    carried out by undergraduates and students, with appropriate training, on other courses below degree
    level but a first degree in an appropriate subject, or other relevant professional recognition, is a
    minimum requirement for carrying out category B projects. Category 0 projects are non-hazardous; do
    not employ participants and use only existing material publicly and legally available in the UK. They do
    not meet the criteria for Category A or B.


CATEGORY B projects involve any of the following
     Any research involving covert procedures.
     The use of any procedure that may be considered likely to be physically or psychologically harmful
      unless the procedure is widely used in practice and potential hazards have been minimized. For
      example, blood sampling and collection of other bodily fluids may be category A procedures
      provided there is strict adherence to established safety protocols and appropriate supervision.
     Research that may be offensive. Also, research that is contentious in the sense that it may bring
      the university into disrepute.
     Research that requires access to, or creates, data about individuals of a highly confidential nature.
     Research involving participants who, within the context of the study to be undertaken, are
      considered to be vulnerable. Projects with vulnerable individuals may be designated category A if
      it is clear that the vulnerability of the individual is likely to be unaffected by participation in the
      study.
     Research that requires the administration of certain substances.

                                                       29
   Research that requires the approval of another ethics committee, for example an LREC, will
    usually be designated category B. Similarly, research requiring data collection abroad, especially if
    the supervisor remains in the UK, will usually require scrutiny by a school ethics committee.




                                                30
                                                                                            APPENDIX

Glossary of terms

Assignment: an item of coursework which is to be assessed,

Award: a final or intermediate qualification for which you register and for which you are considered by
the Examinations Board. The awards available are; Postgraduate Certificate; Postgraduate Diploma
and Master of Arts.

Core: compulsory modules.

Option: a module that you must take alongside a given module. You will receive credit for both
modules taken.

Coursework: the total assignments that you undertake within a module, semester or programme of
study.

Credits: the units of value that you accumulate in order to qualify for an award. Each credit reflects a
quantity of study time, i.e. 1 credit = 10 study hours, and therefore 15 credits = 150 study hours.

Examinations Board: the body made up of internal and external examiners that is responsible for
making decisions about your progress and award.

Methods: the ways in which you consistently conduct your practice as a designer, craftsperson or
artist. Your methods may be systematic or intuitive but your studies require you to critically consider
and develop your methods and methodology.

Methodology: the study of methods. The term is widely misused as a synonym for methods.

Master's Regulations: There is a set of Masters Regulations to which the MA Art & Design Network
Regulations conform. Copies of these regulations can be obtained from the Learning Centres.

Module: the normal unit of study. Each module has its own aims and range statement expressed in
learning outcomes terms, and is assessed. MA modules come with credit tariffs of in 15, 30, and 60
credits.

Module Leader: the member of staff responsible for the delivery of a given module.

Pre-requisite: a module or other form of learning with the same learning or experiential outcome as the
prerequisite that has to be previously studied in order to take a given module.

Process Outcomes: what you learn during a project in terms of how you do things.

Product Outcomes: what you make or produce during a project.

Programme Manager: senior member of academic staff responsible for an award programme.
Sometimes referred to as Award Co-ordinator, Award Leader.

Programme of Study: a number of modules that you take in order to accumulate sufficient credit for an
MA. All programmes must be agreed with the Validation and Registration Committee.

Project: a specified task that you negotiate to undertake.

Re-assessment: the requirement by an Examination Board that a part or all of a failed module be
retaken for the purpose of a further assessment.

Regulations: the rules governing the operation of the Network. These conform to the University wide
Academic regulations.

Semester: a period of fifteen weeks during which a number of modules are studied. The summer
period of fourteen weeks is regarded within the MA as equivalent to a semester – Semester Three.



                                                 31
Supervisor: also referred to as personal tutor on the MA, the member of staff responsible for helping
you to negotiate your programme of study and for overseeing your academic development. Your first
port of call with problems or enquiries is normally a person with the same subject specialism as
yourself.

Student (module) Registration and Amendment Forms: the means for registering your programme of
studies and any amendments to it. Failure to register correctly could affect your progress or your
award.

Study Time: the total amount of time that you spend in learning. This includes contact time and private
study.

Subject Leader: the member of staff responsible for organising a specialist subject in the School.

Tutorial: a timetabled meeting with your personal tutor to discuss monitor your work, discuss its
progress and as first point for any pastoral support which might be needed. A full time student will
normally have eight tutorials over one year and a part time student will normally have twelve tutorials
over two years.




                                                32
UNIVERSITY OF WOLVERHAMPTON
SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN

MA EXHIBITION PRO-FORMA


Please indicate requirements below

Student Name                                                  Student Number
Subject area
Statement of kind of work intending to exhibit:




Needed                                                                       Please tick      Number/area
Wall space
Floor space
Boards
Electrical connections: spotlights*
Electrical connections: other
Display Cases
Plinths
Computer
Data projector
Dark space
Special fabrications (brackets, hooks etc.
other
other
other

*Please note that it is students’ responsibility to locate and fix spotlights in position. An electrical contractor will be hired
by the School to wire spotlights and any other electrical equipment.




                                                                33
Module Descriptions


    AD4029 Creative Methodologies
     Credit value               15
     Pre-requisites             None
     Co-requisites              None
     Prohibited                 None
     combinations
     Module Leader              Dr. Louise Fenton
     Telephone                  01902 518423
     Email                      louise.fenton@wlv.ac.uk

    Module description
    This module aims to extend your understanding of the ideas and theories associated with the
    production, interpretation and reception of works in the various fields of art and design practice and to
    develop your ability to research, analyse and express cogently through the written word. When you
    have successfully completed this module you will be able to;

     Complete a research assignment using a variety of methods to locate texts and other forms of
      information
     Critically evaluate and compare competing ideas and theories associated with the production,
      interpretation and reception of works of art and design
     Structure a systematic, written, exposition of research outcomes following academic conventions

    Assessment
         Description                                                                        Weighting
         1        Essay (2,500 words)                                                      100%


    AD4031 Understanding Practice
     Credit value               15
     Pre-requisites             None
     Co-requisites              None
     Prohibited                 None
     combinations
     Module Leader              To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
     Telephone                  To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
     Email                      To be confirmed, please see Course Leader

    Module description
    The module aims to develop the students subject specific skills together with their knowledge and
    understanding of the ideas which form and define subject area(s) in question.

    At the completion of the module, the student is expected to be able to demonstrate:

     Demonstrate an awareness of the broader creative possibilities the technical resource might offer in
      relation their aims.
     Manage their own technical and creative activity within the context of an organisational framework.

    Assessment
         Description                                                                        Weighting
         1        Display a record of exploratory work undertaken                          50%
         2        Verbally evaluate this activity and identify best options in relation    50%
                  to personal creative objectives .




                                                     34
AD4032 Independent Study 1
 Credit value                    15
 Pre-requisites                  None
 Co-requisites                   None
 Prohibited                      None
 combinations
 Module Leader                   Lester Meachem
 Telephone                       01902 321952
 Email                           Lester.Meachem@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to further develop a personal practice,
informed by current activity and the state of knowledge, in an area, or conjoined areas, of art and
design to an advanced level.

Assessment
     Description                                                                    Weighting
     1        Portfolio review                                                     75%
     2        Reflective Diary                                                     25%
     3        Viva Voce                                                            0%



AD4033 Independent Study 2
 Credit value                    30
 Pre-requisites                  None
 Co-requisites                   None
 Prohibited                      None
 combinations
 Module Leader                   Lester Meachem
 Telephone                       01902 321952
 Email                           Lester.Meachem@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to begin synthesising the diverse elements
of exploratory creative study into a resolved personal practice.

Assessment
     Description                                                                    Weighting
     1        Portfolio Review                                                     75%
     2        Reflective Diary                                                     25%
     3        Viva Voce                                                            0%




                                               35
AD4034 Independent Study 3: Planning
 Credit value               30
 Pre-requisites             None
 Co-requisites              None
 Prohibited                 None
 combinations
 Module Leader              Lester Meachem
 Telephone                  01902 321952
 Email                      Lester.Meachem@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to begin synthesising the diverse elements
of exploratory creative study into a resolved personal practice.

Assessment
     Description                                                                      Weighting
     1        Complete work and present in exhibition, or other appropriate form     75%
     2        Viva voce                                                              25%


AD4038 History and Theory of the Avant-Garde
 Credit value                 15
 Pre-requisites               None
 Co-requisites                None
 Prohibited                   None
 combinations
 Module Leader                Professor John Roberts
 Telephone                    01902 322017
 Email                        Jcr3@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to equip the student with a thorough understanding of the concept of the avant-garde
and the neo-avant-garde from 1900 to the 1960s. This will introduce the student to the complexities of
20th Century art and theory.

Assessment
     Description                                                                      Weighting
     1        Research presentation                                                  25%
     2        3,000 word essay                                                       75%


AD4039 Creative Enquiry
 Credit value                  15
 Pre-requisites                None
 Co-requisites                 None
 Prohibited                    None
 combinations
 Module Leader                 Dr Dew Harrison
 Telephone                     01902 321941
 Email                         Dew.harrison@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to clarify the students understanding of research and creative enquiry within the arts.
Specific aims include clarifying the context of their own work, the development of meaningful questions
and making decisions about the analytical methods and studio techniques they use in the pursuit of
their questions.

Assessment
     Description                                                                      Weighting
     1        2,000 word statement                                                   50%
     2        Seminar Presentation                                                   50%


                                               36
AD4040 Audience and Display
 Credit value                   15
 Pre-requisites                 None
 Co-requisites                  None
 Prohibited                     None
 combinations
 Module Leader                  Ben Carpenter
 Telephone                      01902 323454
 Email                          Ben.carpenter@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module introduces students to various strategies and contexts for displaying art works including
gallery spaces, public places and residency environments. The module will cover both the critical and
practical issues needed to curate an exhibition, project or event.

Key texts in relation to the history and development of audience and display will be discussed in both
formal lectures and group seminars.

This module is designed to enable student to successfully plan their work in relation to its display and
reception. This learning is directly relevant to the final MA Fine Art exhibition.

Assessment
     Description                                                                        Weighting
     1        Present comprehensive proposal and exhibition plan for display of        100%
              final MA work.


AD4041 Theory and Contemporary Practice
 Credit value             15
 Pre-requisites           None
 Co-requisites            None
 Prohibited               None
 combinations
 Module Leader            Professor John Roberts
 Telephone                01902 322017
 Email                    Jcr3@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to equip the student with a thorough understanding of art after Conceptual art. This
knowledge will give the student the critical tools and confidence to complete a programme of
intellectually focused study.

Assessment
     Description                                                                        Weighting
     1        5,000 word essay                                                         100%




                                                 37
AD4042 Studio Practice 1
 Credit value                  15
 Pre-requisites                None
 Co-requisites                 None
 Prohibited                    None
 combinations
 Module Leader                 Dr. Alistair Payne
 Telephone                     01902 518542
 Email                         A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to begin synthesising the diverse elements
of exploratory creative study into a resolved personal practice.

Assessment
     Description                                                                    Weighting
     1        Collect research material and record the development of art work     100%


AD4043 Studio Practice 2
 Credit value                  15
 Pre-requisites                None
 Co-requisites                 None
 Prohibited                    None
 combinations
 Module Leader                 Dr. Alistair Payne
 Telephone                     01902 518542
 Email                         A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to begin synthesising the diverse elements
of exploratory creative study into a resolved personal practice.

Assessment
     Description                                                                    Weighting
     1        Produce and present artwork                                          100%


AD4044 Studio Practice 3
 Credit value                  15
 Pre-requisites                None
 Co-requisites                 None
 Prohibited                    None
 combinations
 Module Leader                 Dr. Alistair Payne
 Telephone                     01902 518542
 Email                         A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to begin synthesising the diverse elements
of exploratory creative study into a resolved personal practice.

Assessment
     Description                                                                    Weighting
     1        Collect research material and record the development of art work     100%




                                               38
AD4045 Studio Practice 4
 Credit value                   15
 Pre-requisites                 None
 Co-requisites                  None
 Prohibited                     None
 combinations
 Module Leader                  Dr. Alistair Payne
 Telephone                      01902 518542
 Email                          A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
This module aims to help students develop and secure their practice. It should be viewed as
preparation for the 30 credit Fine Art project modules and will involve a level of independent production
and learning. Its purpose is to further develop the students’ personal practice and integrate ideas and
learning from other modules. The weekly studio seminars will debate contemporary ideas and art
practice.

Assessment
     Description                                                                       Weighting
     1        Produce and present art work                                            100%


AD4046 Studio Planning
 Credit value                   30
 Pre-requisites                 None
 Co-requisites                  None
 Prohibited                     None
 combinations
 Module Leader                  Dr. Alistair Payne
 Telephone                      01902 518542
 Email                          A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to develop as an artist through a period of
extended practice and reflection. Over the period of this module the student will develop a body of
work, which should be informed by contemporary ideas and debates. The student is supported by
seminars and individual tutorials.

Assessment
     Description                                                                       Weighting
     1        Produce art work and documentation for staff review                     100%




                                                39
AD4047 Final Studio Project
 Credit value                    30
 Pre-requisites                  None
 Co-requisites                   None
 Prohibited                      None
 combinations
 Module Leader                   Dr. Alistair Payne
 Telephone                       01902 518542
 Email                           A.Payne2@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The module aims to provide an opportunity for the student to develop as an practitioner through
extended practice and reflection. Over the extended period of this module the student will complete a
body of work for exhibition. This work should continue to be informed by contemporary ideas and
debates in the realm of game design. In this module the student is required to function as an
independent initiator, originator and exhibitor of their own work.

Assessment
     Description                                                                          Weighting
     1        Produce final art work                                                     75%
     2        Oral assessment                                                            25%


AD4048 Dissertation
 Credit value                    30
 Pre-requisites                  None
 Co-requisites                   None
 Prohibited                      None
 combinations
 Module Leader                   Louise Fenton
 Telephone                       01902 518423
 Email                           louise.fenton@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The dissertation allows the student to engage in a substantial and rigorous investigation of a
negotiated subject.

The module aims to provide students with:
The opportunity to develop their research skills in an area of investigation relevant to their discipline.
Students will develop skills in critical thinking, data analysis, report writing and the management of a
substantive research project.

Assessment
     Description                                                                          Weighting
     1        Dissertation 5000 to 7000 words                                            100%




                                                  40
AD4049 Psychology of the Image and Artefact
 Credit value               15
 Pre-requisites             None
 Co-requisites              None
 Prohibited                 None
 combinations
 Module Leader              To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Telephone                  To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Email                      To be confirmed, please see Course Leader

Module description
The image and the artefact are pivotal to how we understand the world. This module investigates the
role of the image and the artefact in how we create and understand the world: calling upon art and
design history, anthropology and psychology to analyse the two.

Assessment
     Description                                                                          Weighting
     1        A written Review of 500 and 750 words                                      25%
     2        Essay assignment 2000-3000 words                                           75%


AD4050 Advertising and Promotion for the Web
 Credit value               15
 Pre-requisites             None
 Co-requisites              None
 Prohibited                 None
 combinations
 Module Leader              Dave Colton
 Telephone                  01902 321977
 Email                      D.Colton@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The Internet is the fastest growing area in the advertising and design industry – it is a mix of traditional
design methods and technological skill. This module will look at key methods on how to interpret and
investigate the WWW as a platform for advertising and, provide workshops and seminars to introduce
the main software used in creating websites and advertising animations/banners.

Through a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops the module will introduce you to the skills to
synthesis marketing strategy, design aesthetics and technical know-how.

Assessment
     Description                                                                          Weighting
     1        A written Review 500/750 words of a website which informs your             30%
              practice (week 3) followed by a critical report (in week 6) of an
              advertising campaign for the internet (the site/campaign should be
              relevant to your own practice)– 500/750 words
     2        Design Project (relevant to your practice)                                 70%




                                                  41
AD4056 Popular Culture and the Archive
 Credit value                15
 Pre-requisites              None
 Co-requisites               None
 Prohibited                  None
 combinations
 Module Leader               To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Telephone                   To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Email                       To be confirmed, please see Course Leader

Module description
This module will look at the role of popular culture and how we understand and interpret visual
histories by looking at the archive as a repository of visual and material artefacts. The archive has
become an important resource for practitioners, advertising agencies and academics in research and
creative output.. This module will provide the skills to investigate popular culture through the archive.
Using the unique advantage of having the ‘Land of Lost Content’ archive based in the SAD, the
module will take this archive as the springboard for investigating the archive and popular culture.
Specifically, the module will look at how the archive can be used to support and inform creative
thinking and visual enquiry.

Assessment
     Description                                                                         Weighting
     1        A written Review of 500/750 words                                         25%
     2        Essay assignment 5000 words                                               75%


AD4059 Independent Study 4
 Credit value                    30
 Pre-requisites                  None
 Co-requisites                   None
 Prohibited                      None
 combinations
 Module Leader                   Lester Meachem
 Telephone                       01902 321952
 Email                           Lester.Meachem@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
The aim of this module is to provide an opportunity for you to fully develop as a creative practitioner
through extended practice and reflection. In completing the preceding module (AD4033) your practice
will have developed a distinctive identity: over the extended period of this module you will complete a
body of work for exhibition. This work should continue to be informed by current activity and the state
of knowledge in the area you are working in. You will work in the subject area, or areas, you have
identified in your Proposal of Study when you joined the programme (you should look at this again if
you have not referred to it for some time). In this module you will function as an independent initiator,
originator, completer and exhibitor/presenter of your own work in much the same way as you would in
the professional field appropriate to your subject area. This module provides the means for you to
advance your professional career and investment in achieving its learning outcomes to the highest
possible standards will bring personal, professional and academic reward.

Assessment
     Description                                                                         Weighting
     1        Complete work and present in exhibition, or other appropriate form        75%
     2        Reflective Diary                                                          25%
     3        Viva voce                                                                 0%




                                                 42
AD4060 Professional Practice
 Credit value                    15
 Pre-requisites                  None
 Co-requisites                   None
 Prohibited                      None
 combinations
 Module Leader                   Pat Dillon
 Telephone                       01902 322656
 Email                           P.A.Dillon@wlv.ac.uk

Module description
This module will provide an opportunity for you to fully develop professional skills needed in presenting
your work and engage with the professional sphere. The module will give students the opportunity to
gain studio based or industrial experience in an area related to their studio practice. Students will self-
negotiate a placement or live project of their choice. This can include portfolio review, writing a
teaching programme, workshops, planning a public exhibition or delivery of practice in any other
professional context. Students will be encouraged to collaborate/negotiate with professionals to gain
industrial experience.

Assessment
     Description                                                                         Weighting
     1        Produce a research file that will inform & support career                 75%
              development
      2         Diary/Learning Log                                                      25%
      3         Viva Voce                                                               Pass/fail


MK4035 The Marketing Planning Process
 Credit value               15
 Pre-requisites             None
 Co-requisites              None
 Prohibited                 None
 combinations
 Module Leader              To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Telephone                  To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Email                      To be confirmed, please see Course Leader

Module description
Today’s business environment requires an appreciation of the dynamics of the external
environment/organisation interface and the ability to develop solutions to different marketing issues by
the development of clear objectives and marketing plans.

This module provides the knowledge, understanding and skills to create use and manage marketing
plans. It pays particular attention to the variations of both internal and external marketing contexts
which require appropriate variations to the segmentation, targeting, positioning and marketing mix
elements.

Assessment
     Description                                                                         Weighting
     1        Case study                                                                100%




                                                 43
MK4037 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing
 Credit value              15
 Pre-requisites            None
 Co-requisites             None
 Prohibited                None
 combinations
 Module Leader             To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Telephone                 To be confirmed, please see Course Leader
 Email                     To be confirmed, please see Course Leader

Module description
The module’s primary focus is the development and execution of marketing activities that have been
designed to achieve customer satisfaction and meet organisational objectives, through effective
marketing mix strategies which deliver stakeholder value.

The module includes the development of the product portfolio, managing marketing channels,
managing the communications mix and managing the service expectations of customers.

The module examines the use of the marketing mix to achieve an organisation’s corporate and
marketing objectives, and to deliver marketing activities which reflect the desired positioning of the
organisation’s products and services in addition to its brand values.

By the end of the module, students should be able to apply the marketing mix and determine strategies
that deliver highly effective and competitive marketing activities that meet customer needs and
organisational objectives, in different organisational contexts and sectors. Students should be aware
that the unit addresses marketing in the context of both domestic and international activities.

Assessment
     Description                                                                         Weighting
     1        Individual project report                                                 100%




                                                 44

				
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