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FY 2014 Budget Overview - Association of Science - Technology

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FY 2014 Budget Overview - Association of Science - Technology Powered By Docstoc
					                      The FY 2014 Budget Request:
                              An Overview

On April 10—more than two months later than usual—President Barack Obama unveiled a $3.8
trillion Federal Budget Request for fiscal year (FY) 2014, which begins on October 1. Below, you’ll
find a detailed breakdown of how the Federal agencies and programs of most interest to ASTC and
its members fared. Please keep in mind that in some cases, the FY 2013 figures reflect the amount
requested for the fiscal year, rather than the amount actually appropriated. This became necessary
because a six month continuing resolution (CR) that funds the Federal government through the end
of FY 2013 was only agreed to by Congress and signed into law by the president at the end of
March; as a result, a number of agencies are still assessing the impact of the CR—and
sequestration—on the funding they will have available for FY 2013.

PROPOSED CONSOLIDATION OF STEM EDUCATION PROGRAMS
For starters, it should be noted that the Administration has stated that “Given the current fiscal
environment, it is critical that we redouble our efforts to scour the Budget for waste and make
tough decisions about reducing funding for or ending programs that are laudable, but not
essential.” Along these lines, the President is proposing a significant—and unprecedented—
consolidation of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education programs.
The undertaking, described in the Budget Request as “the single biggest consolidation proposed
this year,” would combine 90 STEM (and environmental and health) education programs and
“realign ongoing STEM education activities to improve the delivery, impact, and visibility of these
efforts.” Though details are still emerging, this language from the Department of Education’s
section of the Budget Request offers an overview of what is being proposed:

The Budget proposes a comprehensive reorganization of STEM education programs to increase
the impact of Federal investments in four areas: K-12 instruction; undergraduate education;
graduate fellowships; and education activities that typically take place outside the classroom. The
reorganization will be implemented with a focus on increasing participation and opportunities for
individuals from groups historically underrepresented in these fields. The reorganization involves
a consolidation of 90 programs across 11 different agencies and realignment of ongoing STEM
education activities to improve the delivery, impact, and visibility of STEM efforts. Nearly $180
million will be redirected from consolidated programs towards the Department of Education, the
National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution to implement core initiatives in
these four priority areas. The Department of Education’s role will include developing STEM
Innovation Networks to reform STEM instruction and supporting a corps of Master Teachers who
can serve as a national resource for improving STEM teaching and learning. NSF will focus on
efforts to improve STEM undergraduate education and to reform graduate fellowships so they reach
more students and align with national needs. The Smithsonian Institution will improve the reach of
informal education activities by ensuring they are aligned with State standards and are relevant to
the classroom.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
                     FY 2010           FY 2011          FY 2012         FY 2013          FY 2014
Dept. of Ed.          46,600            45,300           45,300          47,000           48,400
RTTP                     -               698.6             549            850              1,000
i3                       -               149.7            149.4           150               215
STEM Innov.              -                 -                -               -               415
                                                  1
MSP                    180.5             175.1             149.7              -                 -
Promise Neigh.           10               29.9              59.9             100               300
21st CCLC              1,166             1,154             1,152            1,152             1,252
                        (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY13 and FY14 reflect requested amounts)

The Department of Education (ED) would receive $48.4 billion in overall discretionary funding (plus
additional resources for Pell Grant funding) for FY 2014 under the Budget Request, an increase of
$1.4 billion over the amount requested for FY 2013 and an increase of $3.1 billion over the amount
available for FY 2012.

Race to the Top
The Race to the Top (RTTP) program, first authorized by the American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act of 2009 (ARRA), would receive $1 billion in funding for FY 2014 under the Budget Request,
$150 million more than the amount requested for FY 2013 and $451 million more than the amount
available for FY 2012. RTTP was intended to create incentives for comprehensive State and local
reforms and innovations designed to close achievement gaps and produce significant improvements
in student achievement, high school graduation rates, and college enrollment rates for all students.

In FY 2014, an additional RTTP investment would allow the Department of Education to create:

…a new Race to the Top—College Affordability and Completion competition aimed at catalyzing
State efforts to pursue systemic higher education reforms and promote innovations to improve
college affordability, access, completion, and quality; achieve better student outcomes; and
increase institutional capacity to graduate more students with high-quality credentials. The request
would allow the Department make awards to up to 10 States that can demonstrate a commitment
to reforms in areas such as (1) sustaining fiscal support for higher education while modernizing
funding policies to constrain costs and improve outcomes, (2) removing barriers preventing the
creation of innovative methods of student learning and new degree pathways, (3) empowering
consumer choice through increased transparency, and (4) smoothing transitions into college and
between institutions of higher education.

Investing in Innovation Fund
For FY 2014, ED proposes the continuation of another program that was initially supported through
the ARRA: the Investing in Innovation Fund (i3). The program received $650 million in ARRA funds
in FY 2009 and roughly $149 million in each of the last three fiscal years (the final amount
available for FY 2013 is pending); for FY 2014, the Administration is proposing an additional $66
million, which would bring the funding level to $215 million. i3 has made competitive awards to
develop and expand innovative strategies and practices that have been shown to be effective in
improving educational outcomes for students. According to ED:

The request would support grants under a new ESEA authority based on the existing i3 program,
which helps to improve educational outcomes for students by developing, validating, and scaling up
effective practices. The program’s emphasis on supporting projects with either evidence of
effectiveness or a strong research-based framework increases the likelihood that funded projects
succeed and that we learn more about what works. In addition, the program garners significant
non-Federal investment to support educational innovation; to date, private institutions have made
commitments of nearly $150 million to assist in the implementation of grantee projects. The i3
program continues to see significant demand across the Nation, with the 2012 competition
generating over 700 applications for projects to expand or scale up proven practices and pre-
applications for projects to develop and evaluate promising practices. The funding requested for
2014 would allow the Department to continue to build on the success of the program in fostering
educational innovation, while growing an evidence base in areas of high need and generating
private-sector investment to complement the Federal investment. In addition, the request would
support the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Education (ARPA-ED), a new entity modeled after
similar agencies in the Department of Defense and Department of Energy that would pursue
breakthrough developments in educational technology and tools.

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STEM Innovation
President Obama includes $415 million for a new STEM Innovation initiative in the FY 2104 Budget
Request; it would include ED’s portion of the Math and Science Partnerships, which received $149.7
million in funding for FY 2012 but were not included in the FY 2013 request (as they were to be
replaced by the Effective Teaching and Learning for a Complete Education program). According to
ED:

The STEM Innovation initiative, which is part of a Government-wide realignment that would
consolidate or restructure 114 programs across 13 agencies, would help improve K-12 STEM
instruction and support the President’s goal of generating 100,000 effective STEM teachers over
the next decade.

The proposed STEM Innovation Networks program would provide competitive awards to LEAs in
partnership with institutions of higher education, nonprofit organizations, other public agencies,
and businesses to transform STEM teaching and learning by developing and validating evidenced-
based practices in a set of “platform schools” and implementing them across broader, regional
networks of participating schools following validation of effectiveness. Projects would include a wide
range of activities—dependent on local needs and available regional and Federal resources—in
areas such as the recruitment, preparation, placement, and professional development of effective
STEM educators; the development and testing of teaching and learning models that enable
students to successfully meet STEM-focused college- and career-ready standards; providing
meaningful and engaging student learning opportunities; and supporting broad adoption of
effective STEM innovations and instructional technologies. A key goal of the networks would be to
leverage regional STEM assets—such as research facilities, local nonprofits, regional industry
partners, human capital assets from STEM professional organizations and IHEs, and the rich array
of Federal STEM resources and assets, including information and opportunities generated by the
science mission agencies—to promote effective teaching and learning of STEM subjects.

The STEM Teacher Pathways proposal would lay the groundwork for producing 100,000 new
effective and highly effective STEM teachers over the next 10 years, providing competitive grants
to create or expand high-quality pathways to teacher certification and other innovative approaches
for recruiting, training, and placing talented recent college graduates and mid-career professionals
in the STEM fields in high-need schools.

The request also includes $35 million to establish the first cohort of the STEM Master Teacher
Corps, which would identify, recognize, and reward some of the Nation’s most talented STEM
teachers, enlisting them in a national network to assist in building local and regional communities
of practice that would help transform STEM teaching and learning while raising the profile of the
STEM teaching profession.

Finally, the Administration’s ESEA reauthorization proposal would create an Effective Teaching and
Learning: STEM program that would build on the experience of the current Mathematics and
Science Partnerships program, making awards to SEAs, alone or in partnership with other entities,
to implement a comprehensive strategy for the provision of high-quality STEM instruction and
support to students. States would be permitted to reserve up to 20 percent of grant funds for
State-level activities to support the development and implementation of a coherent approach to
providing high-quality, evidence-based STEM instruction in high-need schools.

Promise Neighborhoods
$300 million in FY 2014 funding is proposed for the Department’s Promise Neighborhoods initiative,
which received $59.9 million for FY 2012 and a $100 million request in FY 2013; the FY 2014
Budget Request reflects an increase of $40.1 million over the former and $200 million over the
latter. According to the agency:

The request provides a significant increase, as part of the Administration’s Ladders of Opportunity
initiative, for the development and implementation of comprehensive, neighborhood-based plans
for meeting the cradle-to-career educational, health, and social service needs of children in high-
                                                  3
poverty communities. The core belief behind Promise Neighborhoods is that providing both
effective, achievement-oriented schools and strong systems of support to children and youth in
poverty will offer them the best hope for overcoming poverty and building a better life. In
coordination with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Department
would reserve a portion of 2014 funds for planning grants to communities that intend to apply for
funding under both the Promise Neighborhoods and HUD’s Choice Neighborhoods programs. The
request will also target a portion of funds to newly designated Promise Zones—communities with
highly concentrated poverty in which Federal agencies will partner with local leaders to break down
barriers and coordinate the resources and expertise they need to create jobs, leverage private
investment, increase economic activity, reduce violence, and improve educational opportunities.

21st Century Community Learning Centers
The 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) afterschool program would receive
$1.25 billion in funding under the FY 2014 request, $100 million more than the amount requested
for FY 2013 and available for FY 2012. The Obama Administration states that its proposal for 21 st
CCLC would:

…support State and local efforts to implement in-school and out-of-school strategies for providing
students (and, where appropriate, teachers and family members), particularly those in high-need
schools, the additional time, support, and enrichment activities needed to improve student
achievement. The Administration’s reauthorization proposal would continue to allow funds to be
used for before- and after-school programs, summer enrichment programs, and summer school
programs, and would also permit States and eligible local entities to use funds to support
expanded-learning-time programs as well as full-service community schools. Projects could also
provide teachers the time they need to collaborate, plan, and engage in professional development
within and across grades and subjects. The increased funding requested for fiscal year 2014 would
enable grantees to support this expanded menu of programs and strategies and to provide high-
quality programming for students and their families.

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
                     FY 2010           FY 2011           FY 2012          FY 2013           FY 2014
Dept. of Energy       26,406            26,692            26,320           27,004            28,416
ARPA-E                   -               179.6              275              277               379
EERE                   2,216             1,772             1,780            1,821             2,776
                                 (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY14 reflects requested amount)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is slated to receive $28.42 billion for FY 2014 under the Budget
Request, $1.4 billion more than the amount available for FY 2013.

Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy
$379 million of DOE’s total funding is proposed for the agency’s Advanced Research Projects
Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), which received $277 million for FY 2013; this reflects an increase of
$104 million. According to the Budget Request:

The ARPA-E mission is to support early-stage energy technology innovations that will enhance the
economic and energy security of the United States through the development of transformational
technologies that reduce America’s dependence on foreign energy imports; reduce U.S. energy
related emissions, including greenhouse gases; improve energy efficiency across all sectors of the
U.S. economy; and ensure the U.S. maintains a technological lead in the development and
deployment of advanced energy technologies. ARPA-E achieves this mission by identifying and
promoting advances in fundamental and applied sciences; translating scientific discoveries and
cutting-edge inventions into technological innovations; and accelerating transformational
technological advances in areas that industry by itself is not likely to undertake because of
technical and financial uncertainty. ARPA-E demands a credible path to commercialization when
launching projects and has a dedicated technology-to-market team to assist its performers. ARPA-E

                                                  4
performers have experienced several notable technological successes and formed strong
partnerships in both the public and private sector, including: doubling the world record energy
density for a rechargeable lithium-ion battery (to 400 Whr/kg); developing a 1 megawatt silicon
carbide transistor the size of a fingernail; engineering microbes that use hydrogen and carbon
dioxide to make liquid transportation fuel; pioneering a near-isothermal compressed air energy
storage system; partnering with the U.S. Navy to advance research on heating and air conditioning
efficiency; launching new companies in grid scale batteries, biofuels, and efficient thermo devices;
and garnering over $450 million in follow-on private-sector funding.

ARPA-E selects potential investment areas by considering the science and technology landscape,
the market landscape, and the regulatory landscape. ARPA-E will invest only in instances where
circumstances in these areas are aligned to enable transformative, breakthrough discoveries that
have the potential to be brought to market scale. The FY 2014 Budget Request supports the
President’s goals of accelerating transformation of America’s energy system, securing U.S.
leadership in clean energy technology and investing in science and innovation as the cornerstone of
our nation’s economic prosperity.

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Of the total funding amount proposed for DOE for FY 2014, the agency’s Office of Energy Efficiency
and Renewable Energy (EERE)—an office ASTC and a number of members have worked with over
the past two years—would receive $2.76 billion, an increase of $995 million over the FY 2013 level.
According to the Budget Request:

EERE seeks to ensure American leadership in the transition to a global clean energy economy.
EERE supports research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) through
partnerships with some of America’s most innovative businesses and research institutions with the
explicit goal of making a wide array of clean energy technologies directly cost-competitive,
without subsidies, with the conventional energy technologies the Nation uses today. To achieve
this, EERE focuses its RDD&D investments on high-impact activities in the areas of sustainable
transportation, renewable electricity, and end-use energy efficiency in buildings and factories.

EERE is positioned to achieve its goals through the FY 2014 Budget Request by developing and
accelerating the adoption of new energy generation technologies—technologies that will make our
buildings, factories, power plants, and vehicles cleaner, safer and more efficient and productive.
EERE’s work helps ensure that U.S. manufacturers and U.S. workers lead the race for and secure
the benefits of a clean, domestically powered energy system as a foundation for a prosperous
American future.

INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES
                       FY 2010            FY 2011           FY 2012         FY 2013          FY 2014
IMLS                   282,251            237,393           231,954         219,821          225,813
Library Grants         213,523            189,035           184,704         175,044          177,069
Museum Grants           33,727             30,140            29,449          27,909           31,513
Mus. for America        19,176             18,453            18,030          19,564           22,708
NLG                      7,981              6,050             5,911           7,468            7,880
Native/Hawaii             975                947               926             877              926
African Am. Hist.        1,485              1,443             1,410           1,336            1,410
                                 (in thousands of dollars; numbers rounded; FY14 reflects requested amount)

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) would receive an increase in funding under
the FY 2014 Budget Request; the $225.8 million proposed for the agency overall is nearly $6
million more than the amount available for FY 2103, though still less than the amount available for
FY 2012. Overall funding for both library grants and museums grants would also rise.



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Museums for America
The FY 2014 Budget Request calls for $22.7 million in funding for Museums for America (MFA), the
agency’s largest grant program for museums. This amount is $3.1 million more than the amount
available for FY 2013. According to IMLS:

Museums for America grants reach museums of all kinds and sizes, providing diverse populations
throughout the nation with enriching and educational exhibits, school services, public programs,
and lifelong learning experiences. In FY2014, IMLS will reach even greater numbers of museums by
introducing “no match” grant opportunities. Small museums have identified the match rule as one
reason that they are unable to compete for grants. IMLS will commit $3 million to support
individual museum grant awards of $25,000 or less, which will not require a match of any kind.
IMLS is also developing a strategy to encourage applications from regions of the country where
museum applications are low in number or application success rates are less than 25 percent.

Note that the Conservation Project Support program was combined with Museums for America in
2013 to strengthen funding for more comprehensive projects involving collections care and
conservation; as a result, it no longer appears as a line item in the Institute’s Budget Request.

National Leadership Grants: Museums
The FY 2014 Budget Request includes $7.8 million for National Leaderships Grants: Museums,
$412,114 more than the amount available for FY 2103. According to IMLS:

National Leadership Grants for museums provide funding for projects that improve and advance
professional practices for the nation’s 17,500 museums. Grants support research and development,
professional development, and national models.

Note that the 21st Century Museums Professionals Grants program was absorbed by the National
Leadership Grants: Museums program in 2013 in an effort to offer a streamlined application
process for applicants; as a result, it no longer appears as a line item in the Institute’s Budget
Request.

STEM Learning Skills
It bears mentioning that the IMLS Budget Request establishes the improvement of STEM learning
skills for children and young adults as an agency priority for FY 2014. IMLS indicates that it intends
to create a “funding priority” for projects that develop new programming models to teach STEM
skills to at-risk youth, establishing that:

Libraries and museums are emerging as community technology hubs where out-of-school STEM
learning efforts include development of “maker spaces,” where teens and adults can creatively
apply STEM concepts to create their own inventions; hosting community science fairs, and STEM-
focused exhibits and public programs.

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
                      FY 2010           FY 2011           FY 2012          FY 2013           FY 2014
NASA                   18,724            18,448            17,770           17,893            17,715
Education               183               145.4             136.1            136.9             94.2
STEM Ed. & Act.           -                46.5              80               TBD              61.2
Sci. Mus. Grants         7                  -                 -                -                 -
                                  (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY14 reflects requested amount)

For the second year in a row, the President’s Budget Request includes a decrease in overall funding
for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). If enacted, the agency would
receive $17.71 billion for FY 2014, $178 million less than the amount available for FY 2013.



                                                   6
Education and STEM Education and Accountability
Under the Budget Request, the NASA education account would see a large, $42.7 million reduction,
from $136.9 million in FY 2013 to $94.2 million in the upcoming fiscal year. Furthermore, funding
for the STEM Education and Accountability program would also be reduced in FY 2014; $61.2
million is proposed, $18.8 million less than the $80 million available for FY 2013. According to the
Budget Request:

In support of the Administration’s FY 2014 STEM Education plan, the Agency’s education efforts will
be fundamentally restructured into a consolidated education program funded through the Office of
Education. The Office of Education will coordinate closely with the Department of Education, the
National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution to achieve the Administration’s STEM
goals under its wider consolidation strategy. This approach will utilize NASA’s expertise and
resources to shape the Nation’s STEM education portfolio…NASA Education's vision is to advance
high quality STEM education using NASA’s unique capabilities. NASA's education programs will
continue to be deliberate in developing and executing strategic partnerships with
intergovernmental, academic, industrial, entrepreneurial, and international communities to ensure
NASA's education mission and vision are properly addressed. NASA Education activities will define
specific benefits and outcomes from each partnership, develop a method to systematically manage
partnerships, and leverage each organization's resources appropriately.

In addition to the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (Space Grant),
Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and Minority University
Research and Education Project (MUREP), NASA will consolidate the education functions, assets and
efforts of the mission directorates, offices and Centers, for example GLOBE, into a single
coordinated STEM Education and Accountability Project. The assets are critical and unique
components that NASA can make available to the National Science Foundation, Smithsonian
Institution, and Department of Education as they facilitate Federal STEM education activities.

The Competitive Program for Science Museums, Planetariums, and NASA Visitor Centers Plus Other
Opportunities (CP4SMP+) program, which saw roughly $7 million in annual funding in recent fiscal
years, was not included in the FY 2014 Budget Request.

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
                     FY 2010          FY 2011            FY 2012          FY 2013           FY 2014
NIH                   31,010           30,926             30,860           31,057            31,331
OD                     1,177            1,454              1,457            1,466             1,473
SEPA                    18.3             18.9               20.3             20.3               -
OSE                     4.04             4.17               3.98             3.98               -
                                 (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY14 reflects requested amount)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) would receive $31.3 billion in funding for FY 2014 under the
President’s proposal, $274 million more than the FY 2013 level. Of that total amount, NIH’s Office
of the Director (OD)—which has overseen the Science Education Partnership Awards (SEPA)
program since the dissolution of the National Center for Research Resources—is slated to receive
$1.47 billion, $7 million more than the amount available for FY 2013.

Science Education Partnership Awards
The SEPA program, unfortunately, is included in the Administration’s plan to eliminate/consolidate
Federal STEM education programs. As a result, no funding is included for SEPA in the FY 2014
Budget Request. The program—along with Office of Science Education (OSE) K-12 program and the
National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA’s) Science Education Drug Abuse Partnership Award
program—appears on a list of NIH offerings that are proposed for termination. According to the
agency’s request:

As part of the Administration’s government-wide reorganization of the STEM education programs,

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nine NIH STEM programs will be eliminated in FY 2014…Termination of these STEM programs will
allow the program areas and Institutes and program areas to redirect the funding, previously used
to support STEM initiatives, to other areas aligned within their mission.

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION
                      FY 2010           FY 2011           FY 2012          FY 2013           FY 2014
NOAA                   4,748             4,597             4,907            5,061             5,400
Education               53.8               25               25.1             25.2              16.3
ELG                      12               5.8                5               5.1                -
B-WET                   9.7               7.2               5.5              5.5                -
                                  (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY14 reflects requested amount)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) would receive $5.4 billion under the
President’s FY 2014 Budget Request, an increase of $339 million over the amount requested for FY
2013 and $493 million over the amount available for FY 2012.

Education Program and Competitive Education Grants
Both the Environmental Literacy Grants (ELG) program and the Bay Watershed Education and
Training (B-WET) program are among those slated for consolidation/termination. As a result,
neither receives support in the President’s FY 2014 Budget Request after customary allocations in
the $5 million range in recent fiscal years. The NOAA Office of Education would see $16.3 million in
funding for FY 2014, $9.1 million less than the amount available for FY 2013. Familiar language
from the Budget Request:

The Administration is proposing a comprehensive reorganization to facilitate a cohesive national
strategy of STEM education programs to increase the impact of Federal investments in four areas:
K-12 instruction; undergraduate education; graduate fellowships; and education activities that
typically take place outside the classroom. The reorganization involves consolidating or
restructuring 90 programs across 11 agencies and improving the delivery, impact, and visibility
of STEM efforts. Nearly $180 million will be redirected from consolidated programs to the
Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution to
implement initiatives in the four core reform areas. The Administration will ensure that all science
mission agencies have input into the development and implementation of these initiatives so that
they align with agency goals while improving STEM education at all levels in a streamlined way.

The Department of Education will lead an initiative to improve K-12 STEM instruction by supporting
partnerships between school districts and universities, science agencies, businesses, or other
educational entities to transform teaching and learning. NSF will focus on improving the delivery of
undergraduate STEM education through evidence-based approaches and reforming graduate
fellowships so they reach more students and address national workforce needs. The Smithsonian
Institution, which already has strong partnerships with several mission agencies, will improve the
reach of federally-supported informal education activities, and help align those activities with State
standards so that they are relevant to what students are learning in the classroom.

In accordance with the Administration’s STEM education initiative, the Competitive Education
Grants will be terminated from NOAA; however, due to the multi-year nature of prior year awards,
NOAA will still support teacher development, and formal and informal education initiatives through
the existing grant periods (3-5 years).

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
                     FY 2010          FY 2011            FY 2012           FY 2013           FY 2014
NSF                   6,873            6,912              7,033             7,373             7,626
EHR                    873              861                829               876               880
DRL                    261              322                273               310               278
                                                   8
AISL                  65.9              64.2               62.4              47.8             47.8
MSP                   57.9              57.1               57.1              57.1               -
STEM-C                  -                 -                57.1              57.1             57.1
CCE                    10               5.43                5.5               4.8               -
CAUSE                   -                 -                  -                 -               97
                        (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY13 and FY14 reflect requested amounts)

Generally speaking, the National Science Foundation (NSF) did well overall under the President’s
Budget Request for FY 2014; the agency is slated to receive $7.626 billion, $253 million more than
the FY 2013 requested level and $592.69 million more than the FY 2012 enacted level. The
Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) and the Division of Research on Learning in
Formal and Informal Settings (DRL), too, would see increases over both the FY 2012 enacted level
and the FY 2013 requested level. According to the Budget Request, in FY 2014 DRL will:

…continue to support the development of innovative resources, models, and tools for K-12 STEM
education; fundamental research on STEM learning; experiences that enable lifelong STEM learning
inside and outside of school; teacher learning; research on national STEM education priorities; and
evaluation studies and activities.

Advancing Informal STEM Learning
Unlike the agency, directorate, and division that oversee it, however, the Advancing Informal STEM
Learning (AISL) program (formerly known as Informal Science Education) is once again slated for a
significant—and deeply troubling—cut for FY 2014. Under the Budget Request, AISL would receive
only $47.8 million, the same as the amount requested for FY 2013 but $13.6 million less than the
estimated amount for FY 2012 (which ASTC also believes is comparable to what the program will
have available for FY 2013). The Budget Request includes the following description of the activities
AISL will undertake in FY 2014:

AISL will focus on research, model-building, and development activities to better understand
effective means and innovative models for engaging today’s young people and adults in learning
science outside of school settings, including museums, science centers, and other informal learning
venues.

Math and Science Partnerships
No funding is provided for the Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program for FY 2014 under the
Budget Request; the program had been slated to receive $57.08 million for FY 2013, which was the
same amount as the FY 2012 estimate. The FY 2013 Budget Request shifted funding and oversight
responsibility for the MSP program from EHR’s Division for Undergraduate Education (DUE) to DRL;
this year, according to the Budget Request:

DRL will formalize a collaboration with the Computer and Information Science and Engineering
(CISE) directorate to combine the former MSP program and the Computing Education for the 21 st
Century (CE21) program into the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, including
Computer Partnerships (STEM-C Partnerships) programs. Through STEM-C Partnerships, EHR will
continue investing in activities that are designed to further understanding of the preparation and
continuing education of STEM teachers and will build upon opportunities provided by new
technologies that enable innovative STEM teaching and learning.

Climate Change Education
NSF’s Climate Change Education (CCE) program would not receive funding for FY 2014 after
receiving $5.5 million for FY 2012 and a FY 2013 request of slightly less than that. The Budget
Request indicates that CCE resources will be redirected to a newly-proposed program, Catalyzing
Advances in Undergraduate STEM Education (CAUSE), which will be run by the Division of
Undergraduate Education (DUE).

Catalyzing Advances in Undergraduate STEM Education
With regard to the CAUSE program, the FY 2014 Budget Request describes it as follows:
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DUE will lead the Foundation in initiating a major program, CAUSE, and will promote
implementation of evidence-based practices while stimulating research related to the innovative
models seeking to enlarge that evidence base. CAUSE will integrate and leverage the investments
of EHR’s STEM Talent Expansion Program (STEP), Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM
(TUES) program, Widening Implementation and Demonstration of Evidence-based Reforms
(WIDER) program, and other NSF undergraduate programs funded through the Research and
Related Activities (R&RA) account. CAUSE will combine the resources of the former programs for
greater impact on implementation of and research about evidence-based instructional activities;
design, implementation, and study of academic and community efforts to promote student
persistence in STEM majors; and systemic transformation in higher-education practice in curricular
and co-curricular student support.

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
                      FY 2010           FY 2011           FY 2012           FY 2013          FY 2014
Smithsonian            761.4             761.2              810               857              869
Salaries & Exp.        636.2             636.2             635.5             660.3            711.2
Facilities              125               125              174.7             196.5             158
                         (in millions of dollars; numbers rounded; FY13 and FY14 reflect requested amounts)

The Smithsonian Institution (SI) would receive $869 million in funding under President Obama’s FY
2014 Budget Request, $12 million more than the amount requested for FY 2013 and $59 million
more than the amount available for FY 2012. Of that total, $711.2 million is proposed for Salaries
and Expenses, an increase of $50.9 million over the FY 2013 requested level and $75.7 million over
the FY 2012 level. In addition, $158 million is proposed for Facilities Capital, $38.5 million less than
the level proposed for FY 2013 and $16.7 million below the FY 2012 level.

The SI Budget Request makes the following reference to the oft-mentioned proposal to consolidate
Federal STEM education programs:

To meet future workforce needs, and to leverage their expertise and unique assets in support of
STEM education, federal agencies have developed a range of education programs. In the absence
of a single guiding plan, these efforts have proliferated over many years to include over 220
programs across 13 different agencies at an annual federal investment of almost $3 billion. Many of
these initiatives are not effectively aligned either to the needs of students or to national priorities,
and this fragmented approach to investment has made it difficult to reform and improve Federal
STEM education efforts. The Administration is proposing a comprehensive reorganization of STEM
programs across the government to facilitate a cohesive national strategy of STEM education
programs to increase the impact of Federal investments in four areas: K-12 instruction;
undergraduate education; graduate fellowships; and education activities that typically take place
outside the classroom.

The reorganization involves consolidating or restructuring 114 programs across 11 agencies and
improving the delivery, impact, and visibility of STEM efforts. Nearly $180 million will be redirected
from consolidated programs to the Department of Education, the National Science Foundation
(NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution to implement initiatives in the four core reform areas. The
Administration will ensure that all science mission agencies have input into the development and
implementation of these initiatives so that they align with agency goals while improving STEM
education at all levels in a streamlined way.

As part of this reorganization, the Smithsonian is requesting +$25 million and will serve as a
conduit between federal mission agencies, Smithsonian units, other non-profit organizations
(including the Smithsonian’s 170 Affiliate museums), the Department of Education, and school
districts. We will work collaboratively to create informal STEM engagement resources and
experiences that advance agencies’ unique assets, support the creation of complementary

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materials, avoid duplication of effort, share a centralized portal for the broad dissemination of
engagement offerings and create opportunities for the cross-referencing of content on agency
sites. Informal STEM engagement resources include: curriculum development, professional
development, as well as inspirational and out-of-classroom educational experiences that are
aligned with State standards so that they are relevant to what students are learning in the
classroom.

The Smithsonian will manage this collaborative initiative by creating a centralized group that will
coordinate the efforts of STEM engagement providers and increase the capabilities of our technical
team. We will also work with education specialists at each site and increase the capacity of all
participants to create, disseminate and evaluate STEM education resources and experiences.




Association of Science-Technology Centers, 818 Connecticut Avenue, NW, 7th Floor, Washington, DC 20006, USA
                     Phone: 202/783-7200 Fax: 202/783-7207 Website: www.astc.org

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