Traffic Safety Prom Campaign Contents Campaign Overview by pengxuezhuyes

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									Traffic Safety
Prom Campaign


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Contents
   Campaign Overview

   Chapter Participation Registration Form

   Pre-prom Events and Activities

    Working with Administrators
       o Template: Letter to Students
       o Template: Letter to Parents
       o Template: Student/Parent Acknowledgement
    Working with Peers
       o Know the Facts
       o Know the Laws
       o Pre-Prom Awareness Activities
       o Template: School Announcement PSA Scripts
       o Template: Table Tent
    Working with Media
       o Template: Press Release
       o Template: Local Radio PSA Scripts

   “The Big Night” Activities

    Valet, Please!
    Zero Tolerance
    Operation Call Home
        o Template: Student Information
    Prom PSA
    Other Suggested Activities

   Chapter Participation Reporting Form


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Overview
State Farm Insurance and Indiana SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) are pleased to present
Tomorrow Starts Tonight, a youth traffic safety campaign designed for high schools to use during prom
season. We hope that this campaign will allow students, teachers, administrators, parents and other
community members to create a safer environment – specifically at prom time – in local high schools
throughout the state.

Automobile crashes are the leading cause of death for teens. In Indiana alone, 48,017 young drivers
were involved in a traffic collision in 2009. Many factors – including inexperience, alcohol, speeding, cell
phones and other countless distractions – all contribute to these crashes, with many resulting in death.
Research indicates that driver distractions are the primary cause of fatal collisions. In addition, one of
the greatest risk factors faced by teens is the number of passengers in the vehicle. Studies have
confirmed that with the presence of just one passenger, teens are twice as likely to be involved in a fatal
crash.

The pages that follow will provide detailed guidelines for carrying out many of the campaign tasks you
should aim to accomplish. Please be sure to look at each section carefully before meeting with your
chapter members to discuss this campaign.

Begin by convening a chapter meeting to discuss the campaign’s purpose and goals, and to develop your
plan for carrying out the campaign. Consider forming committees to oversee different responsibilities,
working closely with advisors, administration, teachers, parents, media and law enforcement to make
sure you have the best chance of success. The end goal is to promote safe behavior during this
important time of year, but it is also possible to create awareness that will last much longer than this
spring season.

State Farm and Indiana SADD are here to help. Please contact your local State Farm agents to volunteer
and Indiana SADD to help with any additional questions you may have. Also, note that the top five
SADD chapters or groups with the best overall campaigns will be awarded $500 for their efforts to
keep their peers safe during prom season. For more information about the chance to win cash for your
SADD chapter, refer to the Chapter Participation Reporting Form.




                                                     3
Chapter Registration Form
Please fill out this participation form as a recognition that you will participate in the Tomorrow Starts
Tonight campaign, and submit it to: Indiana SADD, 121 Allen Dr., Union City, IN 47390                     f
Fax: 765.964.7233 Email: jvickery@indianasadd.org

NOTE: Campaign materials (posters, table tents, etc.) can only be guaranteed to the first 25 schools to
register.

School: ______________________________________________________________________________

School Address: _______________________________________________________________________

School Phone: ____________________________ School Fax: __________________________________

SADD Chapter? YES       NO, Other: _______________________________________________________

Adult Advisor: _______________________________ Title: ____________________________________

Advisor Phone: _____________________________ Advisor Email: ______________________________

Youth Contact: ____________________________ Title (if any): _________________________________

Youth Email: __________________________________________________________________________

Does your chapter do something annually for Prom Season? YES          NO

If so, provide a brief description: __________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

What is the date of your prom? __________________________________________________________

If you plan to participate in the “Valet, please!” activity, please estimate how many cars you will have at
prom. _______________________________________________________________________________




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Working with
Administrators




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Working with Administrators
When planning your Tomorrow Starts Tonight campaign, make sure to utilize all important partners,
including administrators. Not only will you need your administrators to support your plans for prom
season, but they can play a vital role in getting the message out to students, parents and community
members.

Consider meeting with your administrators.

       Discuss the following questions with your chapter members prior to meeting with your
        administrators. Think about these questions and brainstorm any additional questions that you
        might want addressed at the meeting.
            o   What is your school’s drug and alcohol policy?
            o   Is the existing policy adequate?
            o   Do all members of your school community (administration, teachers, coaches, students
                and parents) understand the policy and consequences of violating the policy?
            o   Is your policy taken seriously?
            o   Is your school policy uniformly, fairly and consistently enforced?
            o   How does your school interact with local law enforcement when alcohol or drug use is
                discovered?
            o   Can you work more closely with law enforcement to ensure a safe and drug-free prom
                season?

       Work with your SADD advisor to develop a list of administrators and others you would like to
        see at the meeting.
            o   Here are some people to consider:

                School Principal                         Student Council Representative   Class President
                Head of Guidance                         School Nurse                     PTA Representative
                SRO/Other Law Enforcement                Peer Leaders                     Parents
                Teachers involved in Prom Planning       Prom Planning Committee          State Farm Agents


   Have your SADD advisor check with the school to find an appropriate date for your meeting, and send an
    invitation to each person on your list.

   Seek out a copy of the school’s most current alcohol and drug use policy from a student handbook or other
    document.
                                                    6
Working with Administrators
    Decide what you would like to discuss in your meeting and plan an agenda for your meeting.

         o   SAMPLE AGENDA:

                    Introductions
                    Purpose of Meeting:
                            Promote a safe prom season
                            Reinforce the school’s drug and alcohol policy
                            Present other plans for prom season
                    Discuss school drug and alcohol policy and how it pertains to prom events.
                    Devise a strategy for sharing the important information with the entire school community
                     (see POLICY EDUCATION STRATEGIES below).
                    Address any other prom plans that might be relevant to the entire group – specifically any
                     already-approved plans in which you will need volunteers.
    Thank all attendees for being present. If a follow-up meeting is being scheduled, try to select a date, time
     and location.

    POLICY EDUCATION STRATEGIES

         o   Print school rules in a school newspaper.

         o   Draft a letter for students and/ or parents to be mailed out during the weeks before prom (see
             template letters included for examples).

         o   Require parents and students to sign written statements, acknowledging that they have received,
             read and understand the school policy (see template student/parent acknowledgement included for
             an example).

         o   Make posters of the school rules, placing them around the school during prom season.

         o   Read PSAs during announcements to remind students of expectations.

         o   Consider a formal meeting for parents of those students planning to attend prom.
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Template: Letter from School Administrators to
Students
Dear Juniors and Seniors:

As an administration, we celebrate with you this exciting time of year. Prom season at [ENTER SCHOOL NAME]
brings about great anticipation. For seniors, it is your last prom – bringing you one step closer to graduation. For
juniors, it marks that moment of realization that finally next year will be your year. These are memorable times, and
[ENTER SCHOOL NAME] is committed to making this special time for you as safe as possible.
Working together with students, parents and community members, we will be doing everything within our power to
encourage you to enjoy and celebrate this prom season safely and responsibly – without the use of alcohol or drugs.
There are a lot of dangers and consequences that come with illegal underage drinking and drug use.
[INSERT SCHOOL POLICY AND CONSEQUENCES HERE]
In addition to making wise choices concerning drugs and alcohol use, we also want to reiterate that automobile
crashes are the leading cause of death for teens. In Indiana alone, 48,017 young drivers were involved in a traffic
collision in 2009. Many factors – including inexperience, alcohol, speeding, cell phones and other countless
distractions – all contribute to this number of fatalities. Research indicates that driver distractions are the primary
cause of fatal collisions. One of the greatest risk factors faced by teens is the number of passengers in the vehicle.
Studies have confirmed that with the presence of just one passenger, teens are twice as likely to be involved in a
fatal crash. We ask that you use caution this prom season, making wise choices as you get into your car or someone
else’s.
Below are some tips to consider while preparing for prom season. We want each of you to be safe so you all can
enjoy this exciting and memorable time.

Sincerely,

[INSERT NAME]

TIPS:

       Discuss plans with your friends and date ahead of time. Find out what your curfew is, and tell your date
        and/ or friends before prom night.
       Know your agenda and make sure your parents have the same information.
       Consider what you will say or do if offered alcohol or other illegal drugs. “No thanks,” “Sorry, can’t risk
        scholarships,” or “Actually, I’d rather have a soda. Do you have one?” are all options. Teens respect their
        peers’ choice not to take part more often than you think.
       Know your date before you go. If your date is someone you don’t know well, spend a little time together in
        advance.
       Ask a trusted adult to be near a phone and available on prom night in case you need to call.
       Make sure your cell phone is fully charged.
                                                           8
Template: Letter from School Administrators to
Parents
Dear Parents:

At [ENTER SCHOOL NAME], members of the school administration have been meeting with student leaders to
discuss important issues, such as the school’s alcohol and drug use policy. These discussions are important in
creating a safe and fun prom experience for your children.

The end of another school year signals excitement and anticipation for our juniors and seniors at [ENTER SCHOOL
NAME]. For seniors, it means that graduation and year-end parties are just around the corner. For juniors, there is
the realization that finally next year will be their year. These are memorable times, and we are committed to making
this chapter of their lives as safe as possible. In this important mission, it is critical that we have the full participation
and support of parents.

Working together with students, parents, and community members, we will be doing everything possible to
encourage our students to celebrate this prom season safely and responsibly – without the use of alcohol or other
drugs. Please take a few minutes to sit down with your student(s) and openly discuss the dangers associated with
illegal underage drinking and drug use. We need parents to continue to set clear and realistic expectations regarding
underage drinking: it is dangerous, it is against the law, and it should not take place.

[INSERT SCHOOL POLICY AND CONSEQUENCES HERE]

In addition to making wise choices concerning drug and alcohol use, students need reminded that automobile
crashes are the leading cause of death for teens. In Indiana alone, 48,017 young drivers were involved in a traffic
collision in 2009. Many factors – including inexperience, alcohol, speeding, cell phones and other countless
distractions – all contribute to this number of fatalities. Research indicates that driver distractions are the primary
cause of fatal collisions. One of the greatest risk factors faced by teens is the number of passengers in the vehicle.
Studies have confirmed that with the presence of just one passenger, teens are twice as likely to be involved in a
fatal crash.

The bottom line is that we all need to openly and clearly express our disapproval of underage drinking, drug use and
irresponsible driving. Together we can work to safeguard these exciting times and make them truly memorable for
our students.

Sincerely,

[INSERT SIGNATURE]




                                                              9
Template: Letter from School Administrators to
Parents (CONTINUED)

TIPS FOR PARENTS:

      Discuss rules for the prom: your own rules, the school rules and the consequences for violating the rules.
      Communicate with your student ahead of time about the agenda for the evening, including curfew.
      Know who is driving. If your teen is riding in a limo, check the company’s policy on allowing alcohol in the
       vehicle.
      Encourage seat belt use.
      Do not rent hotel rooms for prom-goers.
      Communicate with other parents about prom plans.
      Stay up for prom-goers’ return home.



[ ENTER SCHOOL NAME] PROM AND AFTER-PROM TIME SCHEDULE:

[INSERT TIME SCHEDULE HERE]




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Template: Student/ Parent Acknowledgement

Working together with students, parents, and community members, [INSERT SCHOOL NAME] will be doing
everything possible to encourage our students to celebrate this prom season safely and responsibly – without the
use of alcohol or other drugs.
Please read the information below, complete the form, and return it to the main office as a requirement to be
permitted to attend prom.




[INSERT SCHOOL POLICY AND CONSEQUENCES HERE]




Student Name: _____________________________________________ Grade: ___________________


I have read [INSERT SCHOOL NAME]’s policy above and understand that if I violate this policy, there will be
consequences.


Student Signature: ________________________________________ Date: _______________________________


I have read [INSERT SCHOOL NAME]’s policy and consequences above and have discussed them with my child. I
understand that if my child violates this policy, there will be consequences.


Adult Signature: __________________________________________ Date: _______________________________




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Working with Peers




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Know the                                                                           Facts
When working with your peers in hopes of changing attitudes and behaviors, there are numerous ways to provide
education and encouragement to make positive choices. Providing facts and statistics is one simple, but often
persuasive, tool.

From the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute’s 2010 Indiana Traffic Safety Facts for Young Drivers in 2009:

       Motor vehicle collisions are consistently the leading cause of death and one of the leading causes of non-
        fatal injury for young people ages 15 to 20.
       In 2009 in Indiana, this age group (15-20) represented 9 percent of the population, 6 percent of licensed
        drivers, and 17 percent of drivers involved in collisions.
       In Indiana alone, 48,017 young drivers were involved in a traffic collision in 2009.
       Inexperience, inadequate driving skills, greater propensity for risk-taking, driving while impaired, and in-
        vehicle driver distractions put young drivers at greater risk for involvement in collisions than adults.
       Young drivers with passengers are consistently at greater risk of collisions due to the combination of
        passenger-induced distractions, driver inexperience, and greater propensity for driver risk taking.
       Seat belt use rates for all age groups are generally higher for less severe injuries, suggesting that seat belts
        reduce the incidence of more serious injuries. Fifteen year old drivers are the least likely to use seat belts.
       Nighttime driving (6pm-6am) proves to be particularly problematic and challenging for young drivers
        because of inexperience driving at night, lower visibility, fatigue, and alcohol/drug use.
       As a result of the increasingly growing number of distracted driving crashes among teens, legislative action
        was taken in 2009 to affect change for teens concerning passengers and cell phone use.
       Though traffic crashes involving young drivers decreased in 2009, the number of young driver fatalities is still
        too high!
       In 2009, 112 Hoosier lives were lost as a result of a crash involving a young driver – with nearly half of those
        fatalities being the young driver. This does not include the thousands of injuries also caused as a result of
        these crashes.
       Drivers 16-17 years old are much more likely than 15 year olds or 18-20 year olds to be distracted while
        driving.
       Drivers 18-20 years olds are more than twice as likely to attempt driving while impaired.
       Young male drivers are almost twice as likely to attempt driving impaired than young female drivers.
       Young driver fatalities are most common around 2am and 5pm.

For more information visit www.in.gov/cji and www.nhtsa.gov.




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Know the                                                                           Laws
Often times, teens (and adults) think they know the law, but in fact, they may only know part of the law or have
misunderstood what they have been told. It’s important to know current laws to ensure you are abiding them.
Also, it is important to educate others, as laws have influence on citizens - even if they aren’t always enforced.

GDL (Graduated Driver Licensing) Law
    Effective July, 2009, those under 18 are prohibited from using any type of telecommunication device while
       operating a vehicle except for making 911 calls.
    Effective July 2009, probationary drivers are prohibited from driving from 10pm-5am for the first 180 days.
       After first 180 days: Sun.-Thurs. 11pm-5am; Sat. and Sun. 1am-5am. Exemptions: work, school or church
       related functions or if accompanied by a licensed driver 25 years or older.
    Effective July 2009, no passengers for the first 180 days unless accompanied by a licensed driver 25 years or
       older. Exemptions: siblings and/or child of the driver OR a spouse and/ or child of the driver.
    Effective 2009, probationary drivers no longer qualify for court diversion programs.
    Effective July 2010, learner permits can be issued to those 15 years and 180 days with Driver Ed or 16 years
       old without Driver Ed.
    Effective July 2010, probationary licenses can be issued to those 16 years and 180 days with Driver Ed and
       16 years and 270 days without Driver Ed.
    Effective July 2010, those receiving probationary licenses must first hold their learner permit for 180 days.
    Effective July 2010, those receiving probationary licenses must have 50 hours of supervised practice driving
       with a licensed instructor or a licensed driver at least 25 years old or a spouse at least 21 years old.
    Violations of any part of Indiana’s new GDL law is a class C infraction which carries a fine of up to $500 plus
       fixed court costs of $144.50.
Seat Belt Law
     Indiana law requires that each occupant of a passenger motor vehicle must be properly restrained when the
        vehicle is moving.
     Effective July of 1998, Indiana’s seatbelt law became a primary enforcement law – which means a car can be
        pulled over if an occupant is not wearing a seatbelt, even if no other laws are being broken.
     Effective July of 2007, occupants of pickup trucks or sport utility vehicles that display truck plates are no
        longer exempt from the seat belt requirement; nor are back seat passengers.
Underage Drinking Law
    It is illegal in Indiana – as well as every other state – for persons under the age of 21 to purchase or possess
       alcoholic beverages.
    Those under the age of 21 who are caught drinking may or may not spend the night in jail and are put on
       probation with serious restrictions.
    Those under the age of 21 who are pulled over for driving while under the influence of alcohol can receive
       penalties including a suspended driver’s license, up to 60 days in jail and a $500 fine.

                                  Want to know more? Visit www.betterteendriving.com.

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Pre-Prom                                                                            Awareness
Activities
SADD chapters plan various different types of pre-prom activities for their peers leading up to “The Big Night.”
Consider some of the ideas below as you make plans to remind your peers to be safe this prom season.
Think about…
       Utilize your school announcements – whether they are audio or video – to remind students to be safe during
        prom season. But don’t leave it at that; tell them specifically how to be safe (See PSA Template).
       Place table tents with important information you want to share concerning traffic safety and good decision
        making during prom season on your lunch tables in the cafeteria (See Table Tent Template).
       Use posters throughout your school to educate students about the dangers that come with prom season.
       Plan an assembly for your peers to share a motivational message or real-life example of a poor decision.
       Work with your local EMT, funeral home, etc. to plan a mock car crash.
       Contact Indiana SADD to visit your school with their educational outdoor programming during the weeks
        before prom.
       Include fliers with campaign messaging for local restaurants where large teen populations are served.
       Create fliers with campaign messages for local tuxedo shops and flower shops to include for customers.
       Contact local businesses about donating sign or billboard space to promote safe prom season messaging.
       Utilize all SADD members to send out mass texts with safe prom messaging to students at your school.
       Design a big banner reminding students, “Tomorrow Starts Tonight” – and have students sign it, listing
        reasons why they plan to make good decisions on prom night. (Examples: I want to graduate and go to
        college one day. I want to be a role model for my little sister. I want to have many more fun times with my
        friends – that I remember!)
       Hold a safety belt check/survey one morning before school or one afternoon as students are leaving.
        Provide students wearing seatbelts with a piece of candy and messaging thanking them for buckling up, and
        provide those without seatbelts with a piece of candy and different messaging reminding them of the
        importance of buckling up.
       With a group of SADD students, create a video (skit, music video, PSA, etc.) emphasizing the importance of
        being safe during prom season. Post it on youtube.com, and then use myspace, facebook and word of
        mouth to encourage as many students as possible to watch it.
       Contact your elementary school for a partnership; have SADD students go speak to elementary students
        about the upcoming prom season and the importance of those students making good decisions. Then, have
        the elementary students write letters to the juniors and seniors to remind them of this.


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   Visit www.noys.org/YouthTrafSafe/toolkit.html or utilize your free copy of the Young Driver Traffic Safety
    Toolkit to find more traffic safety activity ideas.

Template: School Announcement PSA Scripts

Though you may not feel Public Service Announcements (PSAs) are important, think about a PSA like advertising
for your prom campaign. And we all know how impactful advertising can be. Consider some of the PSAs
below…or create your own!


       In 2009, 15-20 year olds represented only 9 percent of licensed drivers, but also represented 17 percent
        of those involved in a crash. Pay attention while driving, and be safe! Tomorrow Starts Tonight!
       Did you know that as of July, 2009, Indiana law prohibits those under the age of 18 to use a cell phone
        while driving? This might be because distractions – like cell phones – were contributing factors to
        thousands of Indiana traffic crashes involving a teen driver in 2009 alone! Watch the road. Tomorrow
        Starts Tonight!
       Studies have shown that with the presence of just one passenger, teens are twice as likely to be involved
        in a fatal crash. Celebrate this prom season with your friends, but celebrate responsibly. Tomorrow
        Starts Tonight!
        What are your plans for After Prom? Consider the possibilities and the consequences. Remember the
        importance of making good decisions to ensure you’ll have positive, lasting memories of “The Big
        Night.” Tomorrow Starts Tonight!
       Did you know that if a teenager is pulled over for driving while under the influence of alcohol, they can
        receive penalties including a suspended driver’s license, up to 60 days in jail and a $500 fine? Don’t risk
        it! Celebrate prom alcohol-free. Tomorrow Starts Tonight!




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18
Working with Media




        19
Working with Media

“If you don’t exist in the media, for all practical purposes, you don’t exist.” – Daniel Schorr, NPR
Building relationships with your local media is hopefully something your chapter is already working toward. As this
friendly and professional relationship is built, it is more likely they will take interest in what you are doing. If you
have not worked with your local media before, now is the perfect time to start.


By utilizing media in your area, parents and community members will be aware of the message you are trying to
spread during this prom season – and hopefully, as a result, they will support your chapter by reminding and
encouraging teens to be safe during this time.


Consider these media sources in your school and community:
School:
         School Newspaper
         School Announcements
         School Broadcasting Station
Community:
         Newspaper
         Local Radio Stations
         Local TV Stations
         Social Networking Sites
         Blogs




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Template: Press Release
Print press releases on your letterhead.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE [DATE]                                                CONTACT [NAME & PHONE]

[NAME OF SCHOOL] SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) students are teaming up with school
administrators, parents and others to promote a safe, fun prom season – specifically drawing attention to the
dangers students need to be aware of while behind the wheel this time of year.

Between [DATE] and [DATE], [NAME OF SCHOOL] SADD is joining in a campaign launched in partnership with State
Farm Insurance and Indiana SADD. The campaign is entitled Tomorrow Starts Tonight. Traffic crashes are the
leading cause of death among youth ages 15-20 nationwide, and [NAME OF SCHOOL] SADD has developed a strategy
to make sure their peers will not be adding to those numbers this spring.

The goal of the campaign is to raise awareness about the risks involved in getting behind the wheel – especially
during this celebratory time of year.

[INSERT A FEW WAYS YOUR SADD CHAPTER IS WORKING TO KEEP YOUR PEERS SAFE]

“[NAME OF SCHOOL] SADD wants to get the word out that driving is a big responsibility, and there can be major
consequences if teens don’t take this responsibility seriously,” said [NAME, TITLE OF CHAPTER SPOKESPERSON].

Many factors – including inexperience, alcohol, speeding, cell phones and other countless distractions – all
contribute to these teen traffic fatalities. In Indiana alone, 48,017 young drivers were involved in a traffic collision in
2009. Research indicates that driver distractions are the primary cause of fatal collisions. One of the greatest risk
factors faced by teens is the number of passengers in the vehicle. Studies have confirmed that with the presence of
just one passenger, teens are twice as likely to be involved in a fatal crash.

By partnering with State Farm Insurance and Indiana SADD in promoting Tomorrow Starts Tonight, [NAME OF
SCHOOL] SADD hopes to save lives in [CITY] and reduce the number of teen traffic safety crashes.




                                                            21
Template: Local Radio PSA Scripts

Consider submitting one or both of these PSAs to your local radio station…or create your own traffic safety PSA
message!


30 Second PSA
       [INSERT STATION NAME], State Farm Insurance and SADD want you to know that spring can be a dangerous
        time for students. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, alcohol-related traffic
        fatalities rise during these months - especially during prom season. If you’re a parent, that’s something to
        think about. We’re asking parents to do their part when it comes to underage drinking: do not host teen
        parties where alcohol is served, keep track of alcohol in your home, and talk with your kids early and often
        about the dangers of underage drinking. It’s against the law, and the consequences that can result from a
        teen’s choice to drink are serious. Do your part to spread the message – underage drinking isn’t worth it.
        Tomorrow Starts Tonight.
60 Second PSA
       [INSERT STATION NAME], State Farm Insurance and SADD want to alert the community to the facts about
        underage drinking. Spring, the season for prom and after-prom parties, can be a dangerous time for
        students. Alcohol-related traffic fatalities rise during these months, according to the National High Traffic
        Safety Administration. Nearly thirty percent of all Indiana traffic fatalities involve an impaired driver. You,
        your family or your friends could be affected next. Most teens think alcohol doesn’t affect them, and most
        parents think their teens aren’t drinking. Think again. Heavy drinking is especially dangerous for teenagers,
        whose brains are still developing, and alcohol-related damage incurred at a young age can have long-term
        effects. A National Institute of Health study suggests that the region of the brain that inhibits risky behavior
        is not fully formed until age 25. This information serves as a wakeup call to parents, physicians, law
        enforcement, purveyors of alcohol and teens themselves. Many people believe that underage drinking is an
        inevitable “rite of passage” that adolescents can easily recover from because their bodies are more resilient,
        but the opposite is true. We’re working to alert our community: underage drinking is against the law and
        the consequences are serious. Do your part to spread the message – underage drinking isn’t worth it.
        Tomorrow Starts Tonight.




                                                          22
The “Big Night”
  Activities




       23
Valet, Please!
 Many Indiana high schools already offer valet parking for their prom attendees; if you don’t, below is a brief list of
considerations and variations to think about when organizing valet parking. If your school provides valet parking,
don’t overlook this section, as State Farm Insurance and Indiana SADD offer an additional way to spread the
message of safe driving as part of this very Big Night!
ORGANIZATIONAL TIPS:
       Service: Think about the level of service you want to provide. Will valet parking be offered just as students
        arrive, or will it also be offered as they leave? If also offered as they leave, how will the rush at the end of
        the night be handled? If students just retrieve their keys at the end of the night, how will they know where
        to find their car?
       Volunteers: Consider the number of cars that will be arriving that evening. How many adult volunteers will
        be needed to ensure a smooth, timely process? You will need several to park cars, and at least a few to help
        collect keys and keep them organized. Utilize parents and community leaders. Contact your local State
        Farm agents for additional volunteers!
       Key Organization: Discuss the different possibilities of keeping keys organized as they are being collected.
        Some schools have students pick up valet parking tags with their prom tickets – so students can place one
        tag on their key chain in advance (and of course, keep the other tag to claim their keys/ vehicle at
        departure). Other schools do this all at the door the night of prom. The size of your school would probably
        weigh in as to how to deal with this. Also, don’t forget to create a hook board or file system so keys can be
        quickly retrieved for students when leaving.
       Time Schedule: Decide in advance the length of time valet parking will be available – and announce those
        times! This will help students and adult volunteers. Perhaps valet parking will only be available during the
        first hour of prom. Also, make sure volunteers are available to students wanting to leave the prom – even if
        it is just passing out keys – rather than retrieving the vehicle for them.
       Parking Space: Consider the parking space you have to work with. Will valets have a designated area to
        park cars? Do students choosing to not take advantage of valet parking need to park anywhere in
        particular? If valet parking is only being offered for the arrival, how will students know where to find their
        car?

SPREAD THE MESSAGE:
       “Valet, Please!” Message: State Farm and Indiana SADD have partnered together to create one more way to
        offer a message of safe driving the night of prom. Contact Indiana SADD at jvickery@indianasadd.org or at
        765.730.1194 for individual note pads for your volunteers to place safe driving messaging within each
        vehicle as it is being parked. Then, students will read the messaging right before leaving the prom. When
        you receive these note pads, there will be specific instructions as to where each note is to be placed within
        the car. Also, don’t forget to have volunteers arrive early so they understand the valet process, including
        their role in spreading the safe driving message as each car is parked. (See page 24 for Note Pad examples.)

                                                           24
“Valet, Please” Notepads




                      25
Zero Tolerance

State Farm Insurance, Indiana SADD and, of course, Indiana laws all support zero tolerance when it comes to the
issue of underage drinking. It is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to consume alcohol. Many school
corporations in Indiana are also making it clear that they support zero tolerance by requiring students to take a
portable breath test (PBT) before entering the prom. Schools are viewing this as a method of prevention,
encouraging students not to drink – and giving them one more reason to say “no.”


If your school does not currently provide PBTs for every student attending prom, consider using these tips below to
help establish a zero tolerance program.
       Speak with your school administration about starting this program.
       If your school currently has grant funding for drug testing, some of those funds may be able to be used for
        this program. Many schools have purchased their own PBT unit, with training videos to learn how to use the
        device.
       If your school does not have funding to purchase a PBT unit, contact your SRO (School Resource Officer) or
        local police and/or sheriff’s department to see about the possibility of borrowing equipment.
       Work with your administration and local law enforcement to decide who will be administering the tests.
       Invite local law enforcement to be present for security purposes, which also deters students from drinking
        prior to prom.
       Announce to students and parents in advance – and frequently – that all students attending prom will be
        required to take a PBT. Remind them that the purpose is to keep the evening safe and drug-free.




                                                         26
Operation Call Home
The goal of “Tomorrow Starts Tonight” is to keep students as safe as possible during prom season. One concern is
that parents often times aren’t aware of where their children are throughout the duration of prom night. Operation
Call Home is just one more way to work toward providing a safe, fun, memorable evening – calling parents if
students are leaving prom well before the evening is scheduled to end. Due to all of the different factors to consider
(number of students, format for After-Prom party, etc.), there are several variations of how Operation Call Home
may work. Read through the options below to decide what would be most fitting for your school prom.


Variations:
       Who to call: With the number of prom attendees in mind, think about and decide whose parents will be
        called. Will every student’s parents from your high school be called? Will parents of students from other
        schools attending your prom be called? Perhaps only the driver’s parent will be called if leaving early? Will
        parents have to sign up for this call – or will it happen automatically? What about students leaving after-
        prom early? One suggestion is to ask any parent called during prom if they would also like a complementary
        call in case their child leaves after-prom early, as well.
       When to call: Consider the block of time in which students’ parents will be called. Some schools require
        students to stay until a half hour before prom ends. Perhaps calls should be made for any students leaving
        prom earlier than the last half hour of prom. Whatever time you decide on, make sure parents know prior
        to prom what time their students can leave without receiving a phone call.
Organizational Considerations:
       Collecting and organizing contact information: How will you go about having parent phone numbers on
        hand? Will students have to submit this information before receiving their prom tickets, or will you be
        allowed to pull this information from student files? See the attached template of Student/Parent Prom
        Night Information for a suggested form for students to fill out. Or…if you are planning to use the
        Student/Parent Acknowledgement form concerning school policy, consider combining the two forms into
        one.
       Gathering volunteers: Plan ahead for how many volunteers you might need for this activity. Also, consider
        using the same volunteers who are helping with valet parking, as some parents would be more than happy
        to be part of the entire evening. Again, don’t forget to contact your local State Farm agents for help.
        Finally, don’t forget to provide volunteers with a clear description of their responsibilities for the evening
        (including their time commitment, their specific role, what to say if they need to call a parent, etc.).




                                                          27
Template: Student/ Parent Prom Night
Information

In order for students to receive prom tickets, this form must be completed and returned to the school. Note that
any parent of a student who leaves before the final half hour of the prom will be notified by phone.


Student Name: _________________________________ Student Grade: ______________________________


Parent Name: _______________________________________________________________________________


Home Phone: ___________________________________ Parent Cell Phone: ___________________________


Parent Signature: ____________________________________________________________________________


As a concerned parent, I would also like a complementary call if my child leaves early from the organized after-prom
party. YES              NO




                                                         28
Prom PSA
Though students will have likely heard safe driving messages over the weeks leading up to the “Big Night,”
it’s important that your chapter takes advantage of reminding students even during the prom. If students
are going to get in a crash, it is most likely to happen late into the evening or early into the next day – after
prom has ended. Before they get in their car to go to after prom parties, remind them one last time.


To participate in Prom PSA, create two prom traffic safety PSAs to be shown during prom. Stipulations for
the PSAs include:
      You must create TWO video PSAs, one a minimum of 15 seconds – and another a minimum of 30
       seconds.
      Both PSAs must be aired during prom a minimum of one time in the main dancing and/or eating
       area– ideally during the times when nearly everyone is available to view it.
      One PSA should be a general safe driving message, while the other PSA should address a specific
       danger teenagers at your school will face that evening while in the car (driver distractions,
       underage drinking, speeding, etc.).
      Each PSA must be directly connected to the Tomorrow Starts Tonight campaign, either by showing
       the Tomorrow Starts Tonight logo during the PSA or by stating, “Tomorrow Starts Tonight.”
      Each of the PSAs must be submitted to Indiana SADD with your participation reporting form.
       Please submit a DVD or a link to YouTube to view the PSAs.




                                                       29
Other Suggested Activities

When thinking about the “Big Night,” brainstorm several different possibilities as to how your SADD chapter could
influence your peers to make good decisions that evening. Here are a few additional suggestions.
      Have something on the tables for prom-goers from your SADD chapter with safe driving messaging...table
       tents, candy, key chains, etc.
      Work with the DJ hired for prom to remind students of important messages throughout the night and right
       before they leave the building.
      Host an after-party.
      If you already have an organized after party, find a way to contribute to that party to make it even bigger
       and better (sponsor a karaoke area, provide a non-alcoholic beverage bar, get some great giveaways
       donated, etc.)
      Host an after-after-party (or even a breakfast…around 4 or 5am).
      Plan an awesome activity for students the day after prom – motivating them to stay sober and get a little
       sleep so that they can attend.




                                                         30
Chapter Participation Reporting Form
State Farm Insurance and Indiana SADD want to hear all about what you did to help educate your peers and
community to keep them safe during this very important time of year. Please fill out this participation form as a
recognition that you participated in the Tomorrow Starts Tonight campaign, and submit it no later than Friday, May
20, 2011 to:                                                                                                     d
Indiana SADD, 121 Allen Dr., Union City, IN 47390                                     f                            d
Fax: 765.964.7233 Email: jvickery@indianasadd.org

State Farm Insurance will be awarding the top five SADD chapters or groups with the best overall campaigns $500
for their efforts to keep their peers safe during prom season. These top five chapters will be announced to the
public and media no later than Friday, June 3, 2011.

In order to qualify for this competition, you must have:

       Used a minimum of two templates provided in the Tomorrow Starts Tonight Campaign kit.

       Completed two of the four “Big Night” activities.

       Contacted at least one local State Farm agent for assistance with your campaign (schools will not be
        penalized if agents were unavailable to help).
School: ______________________________________________________________________________

School Address: _______________________________________________________________________

School Phone: ____________________________ School Fax: __________________________________

SADD Chapter? YES       NO, Other: _______________________________________________________

Adult Advisor: _______________________________ Title: ____________________________________

Advisor Phone: _____________________________ Advisor Email: ______________________________

Youth Contact: ____________________________ Title (if any): _________________________________

Youth Email: __________________________________________________________________________

What was the date of your prom? _________________________________________________________

Roughly how many students attended prom? ________________________________________________

                       Please continue to part 2 of the Chapter Participation Reporting Form.


                                                            31
Chapter Participation Reporting Form – Part 2
List which of the Tomorrow Starts Tonight templates you used during your prom campaign, and attach your final
copies that were distributed or used to this reporting form.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________________



Mark all “Big Night” Activities you held during your prom night. Also, attach pictures, print materials used and a
brief description to explain how you conducted each of the activities.

    Valet, Please!                               Operation Call Home

    Zero Tolerance                               Prom PSA


Please list the name(s) of the State Farm agent(s) contacted to assist you with your Tomorrow Starts Tonight
campaign.

Agent Name: _______________________________________ City of Agent’s Office: ______________________

Agent Name: _______________________________________ City of Agent’s Office: ______________________

Agent Name: _______________________________________ City of Agent’s Office: ______________________

How did the agent(s) assist you, if at all?

____________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________



Please attach any addition information, pictures, created materials, descriptions of activities, etc. that showcase
what your chapter did during your 2010 prom season to encourage your peers, parents, administration and
community to take part in promoting and celebrating a fun, safe prom season.


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