4x4 Off-Road Driving

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					         4x4 Off-Road Driving
There is no special license required to drive off-road, even though
  there are many different techniques and practices involved.
                             Gravel roads
•   Traveling on long straight stretches of gravel roads can lull
    the driver into a false sense of security. Modern 4WD's can
    make a relatively rough road seem smooth with their long
    travel suspension and sound deadened interiors.
•   Speed creep can occur in these circumstances and when a
    bend is encountered the high center of gravity in most 4WD's
    may cause you to cross to the other side of the road or it can
    lead to a high risk of rollover.
•   In part-time 4WD's it is best to use 4WD on gravel roads to
    gain the better traction and road-handling of 4WD. Gravel
    roads provide enough slip not to cause any transmission
    windup problems. It is not necessary to use the center diff
    lock of permanent 4WD's on gravel roads.
•   Corrugated gravel roads can cause severe vibrations that con
    cause vehicle damage as nuts rattle off and vibrations
    damage electrical components
•   After driving long distances on poor quality roads, it is a good
    idea to check all nuts and bolts to see they haven't vibrated
    loose. It is especially important to check all suspension
    components. The easiest way is to use an adjustable and
    when a loose nut or bolt is found, use the proper size wrench
    or socket to tighten it rather than risk rounding the head
          4x4 Off-Road Driving
There is no special license required to drive off-road, even
though there are many different techniques and practices
involved.

Four-wheel drive involves redirecting power from the transmission to both
the rear and the front wheels at the same time via a mechanical device
called a “transfer case.”
It’s important always to drive within your ability. There are times
when in soft sand, like beaches and washes, speed needs to be
moderate and flotation through mud and snow needs to be kept
up, hence “within your ability.” If you have a ground clearance
deficiency, going slow helps here, in that, if you do hit a rock
with the differential or other rock grabber, it will usually stop the
vehicle on impact or you will lightly scrape over it.
•      Avoid surprises by surveying the road ahead before you
       encounter it. Make sure the trail goes beyond the obstacle,
       doesn't become a bottomless quagmire, has no back side to
       the hill (cliff?) or just plain ends.
•      Driving diagonally = Rollover. Always drive straight down
       hills or steep terrain. Know your approach and departure
       angles, the bumper to tire distance. Some trails will require
       off-camber driving. In situations like this it’s best to go slow,
       keeping the tires in the tracks. Make every attempt to avoid
       losing attention and ascending up a rock or stump on the
       up side of the hill. Trucks will tend to slide sideways before
       rolling over – the tires will slip sideways a little.
•      Reducing tire pressure will increase traction on gravel and
       sand. For most 4-wheeling purposes, a tire pressure of 18
       to 20psi will be adequate. Highway pressure is another
       consideration altogether..
•      Cross ditches or logs at an angle so that one wheel at a
       time goes over the obstacle; the other three help the one
       wheel to climb over. Dropping the tire into a ditch or crack
       in a rock can put you and your truck in a vulnerable position.
       Turn the vehicle at an angle to facilitate the one tire at a
       time approach. Be careful not to allow one of the front tires
       and one of the rear tires to get in the ditch at the same time.
         4x4 Off-Road Driving
    There is no special license required to drive off-road, even
    though there are many different techniques and practices
                              involved.

•   It’s important always to drive within your ability. There are
    times when in soft sand, like beaches and washes, speed
    needs to be moderate and flotation through mud and snow
    needs to be kept up, hence “within your ability.” If you have
    a ground clearance deficiency, going slow helps here, in that,
    if you do hit a rock with the differential or other rock
    grabber, it will usually stop the vehicle on impact or you will
    lightly scrape over it.
•   Avoid surprises by surveying the road ahead before you
    encounter it. Make sure the trail goes beyond the obstacle,
    doesn't become a bottomless quagmire, has no back side to
    the hill (cliff?) or just plain ends.
•   Driving diagonally = Rollover. Always drive straight down
    hills or steep terrain. Know your approach and departure
    angles, the bumper to tire distance. Some trails will require
    off-camber driving. In situations like this it’s best to go slow,
    keeping the tires in the tracks. Make every attempt to avoid
    losing attention and ascending up a rock or stump on the up
    side of the hill. Trucks will tend to slide sideways before
    rolling over – the tires will slip sideways a little.
•   Reducing tire pressure will increase traction on gravel and
    sand. For most 4-wheeling purposes, a tire pressure of 18 to
    20psi will be adequate. Highway pressure is another
    consideration altogether..
•   Cross ditches or logs at an angle so that one wheel at a time
    goes over the obstacle; the other three help the one wheel to
    climb over. Dropping the tire into a ditch or crack in a rock
    can put you and your truck in a vulnerable position. Turn the
    vehicle at an angle to facilitate the one tire at a time
    approach. Be careful not to allow one of the front tires and
    one of the rear tires to get in the ditch at the same time.

				
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posted:10/15/2013
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