Docstoc

AT presentation.ppt - MDUSD-AT

Document Sample
AT presentation.ppt - MDUSD-AT Powered By Docstoc
					                   Agenda
•   Introduction 
•   Overview of AT Presentation
•   Questions & Answers


                Purpose
• To be able to answer “What is AT?”
• To understand when AT needs to be 
  considered
• To learn some new AT tools and 
  strategies

                                       1
Introduction to 
   Assistive 
  Technology
       Using Technology
      Why Would Anyone Use 
           Technology?

… to accomplish tasks that would be 
 difficult or impossible to accomplish 
 without assistance where the tasks 
   need to be done in the available 
  time with the available resources
                                      3
        What is Assistive 
         Technology? 


A system of no tech, low tech, and 
   high tech tools, strategies, and 
   services that match a person's 
      needs, abilities, and tasks


                                       4
Example of How AT Can 
         Help




                         5
                         Reading Fact
• Roughly 85% of children diagnosed with learning 
  difficulties have a primary problem with reading and 
  related language skills. 
• Reading difficulties are neurodevelopmental in nature. 
• Neurodevelopmental problems don't go away, but they 
  do not mean that a student (or an adult) cannot learn or 
  progress in school and life. 
• Most children with reading difficulties can be taught 
  reading and strategies for success in school. 
• When children's reading problems are identified early, 
  they are more likely to learn strategies that will raise 
  their reading to grade level. 


                                                          6
        Decoding Activity: Recognizing
                 Phonemes

Phonemes are the building blocks of language. 
Represented by letters of the alphabet, they are the 
component sounds of spoken words. Most people 
automatically hear, for example, that the word "goat" is 
made up of three sounds: "guh," "oh," and "tuh." 

Reading requires the ability to map the phonemes we 
hear to letters on a page, and vice versa. But what 
happens when this basic skill, called decoding, 
doesn't come automatically? Imagine struggling to 
sound out every word because you can't distinguish 
among phonemes. 
                                                       7
  • Take a few moments to familiarize 
    yourself with this phoneme translation 
    key. Then use it to read the passage on 
    the next page.

Phoneme translation 
key:

When you see               Pronounce as

             q             d or t
             z             m
             p             b
             b             p
            ys             er
  a, as in bat             e, as in pet
  e, as in pet             a, as in bat 
                                               8
                                  Read the passage aloud to yourself -- or to a roomful of your
    When you     Pronounce
                                  peers!
    see          as

                                  (Here's that translation key again.)
             q   d or t
             z   m
             p   b
             b   p
           ys    er
      a, as in   e, as in
          bat    pet
      e, as in   a, as in
          pet    bat




Passage:
We pegin our qrib eq a faziliar blace, a poqy like yours enq zine.
Iq conqains a hunqraq qrillion calls qheq work qogaqhys py qasign.
Enq wiqhin each one of qhese zany calls, each one qheq hes QNA,
Qhe QNA coqe is axecqly qhe saze, a zess-broquceq rasuze.
So qhe coqe in each call is iqanqical, a razarkaple puq veliq claiz.
Qhis zeans qheq qhe calls are nearly alike, puq noq axecqly qhe saze.
Qake, for insqence, qhe calls of qhe inqasqines; qheq qhey're viqal is 
cysqainly blain.
Now qhink apouq qhe way you woulq qhink if qhose calls wyse qhe calls in 
your prain.

                                                                                              9
Decoding Activity: Recognizing Phonemes

 Here is the translation:

  We begin our trip at a familiar place, a body like yours and mine.
  It contains a hundred trillion cells that work together by design.
  And within each one of these many cells, each one that has DNA,
  The DNA code is exactly the same, a mass-produced resume.
  So the code in each cell is identical, a remarkable but valid claim.
  This means that the cells are nearly alike, but not exactly the same.
 
  Take, for instance, the cells of the intestines; that they're vital is certainly plain.
 
  Now think about the way you would think if those cells were the cells in your 
  brain.
  (Excerpt from "Journey into DNA" on the "Cracking the Code" Web site, NOVA 
  Online.) 

 So how did you do? Assuming you found the exercise difficult (that was our 
 intention), consider that we disguised only eight of the forty-four known 
 phonemes in the English language. And imagine if this weren't a game. 
                                                                                  10
                       What is Assistive 
                        Technology?
             IDEA (20 U.S.C. Section 1401) includes the following definitions:

Assistive Technology Device: 
    Any item, piece of equipment or product system, 
   whether acquired commercially off the shelf, 
   modified, or customized, that is used to 
   increase, maintain, or improve functional 
   capabilities of children with disabilities.
Assistive Technology Service:
    Any service that directly assists a child with a 
   disability in the selection, acquisition or use of an 
   assistive technology device.
                                                                                 11
            Abilities to Goals


ABILITIES                  GOALS
                TOOLS
               Consideration
• Use a dynamic, ongoing process of 
  information gathering and decision-
  making.
• Trials should be conducted before 
  determining if an AT device is appropriate.
• Take into account the required tasks 
  within various instructional areas across 
  all relevant environments

                                           13
            Considerations        (cont.)



• Match device features to student’s 
  capabilities, interests and needs
• Evaluate the student’s AT needs including 
  addressing barriers to student’s 
  performance
• Team must have knowledge and 
  experience with AT; may consult with other 
  district personnel, use outside agencies or 
  vendors, but the final decision rests with 
  the IEP team
                                            14
           Remember
• Consideration and training are ongoing 
  processes
• Factors which may influence the 
  process:
   – Change in the environment
   – Change in the student 
      needs/skills/preferences
   – New technology
• There are no guarantees: it is important 
  to realize the solution reached at one 
  point in time may not be appropriate 
  later!
                                          15
     Assistive 
  Technology in 
Federal Legislation
             Legislation 
• The Individuals with Disabilities 
  Education Act (IDEA)
• The Assistive Technology Act
• Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
• Section 508 of the Rehab Act




                                          17
          The Individuals with 
       Disabilities Education Act 
             (IDEA, 2004)
• Guarantees all children with disabilities 
  the benefit of a free appropriate public 
  education (FAPE)
• Services defined in the Individualized 
  Education Program (IEP)
• AT must be “considered” for every student 
  during the development of the IEP
• AT that is needed must be provided at no 
  cost to the individual or family           18
             AT Concepts
• Assistive Technology is essentially a legal 
  term related to use and need, not to 
  specific items
• Includes a broad range of possible 
  devices and services
• Not always something to be acquired



                                            19
          AT Concepts
• Categories of tools that can be AT if 
  required by a student for FAPE

  –   Assistive Technology
  –   Instructional Technology
  –   Universally Designed Technology
  –   Universally Designed Instruction 
      (UDL)
                                           20
        Functional Capabilities
•   Reading              •   Seating/Positioning
•   Written Expression   •   Hearing
                         •   Seeing
•   Math
                         •   Self-Care
•   Problem-solving      •   Mobility
•   Communication        •   Behavior
•   Recreation           •   Specific task-
                             related skills
•   Daily organization


                                               21
                     Continuum from Low to 
                           High Tech

                             Assistive
                            Technology



        Low Tech              Mid Tech             High Tech




*Simple                   *Some Maintenance   *Complex Electronics
*Little Maintenance       *Some training      *More training
*Limited/No Electronics   *More Electronics   *More Maintenance




                                                                     22
   Low and High Tech
• LOW TECH: Equipment and other 
  supports readily available in 
  schools, including off-the-shelf 
  items to accommodate the needs 
  of the students, which can be 
  provided by general/special 
  education through the Student 
  Study Team/IEP processes (e.g., 
  calculator, tape recorder, pencil 
  grip, large pencils)
                                   23
           23
 Low and High Tech              (cont.)



• HIGH TECH: Supports and 
  services beyond basic assistive 
  technology, often for students with 
  low incidence and/or 
  significant/severe disabilities, 
  which require more in-depth 
  assessment (e.g., closed circuit 
  television (CCTV), FM systems, 
  sound field systems, augmentative 
  communication devices, alternative 
  computer access, and specialized 
  software)

                                      24
  Who is Assistive 
Technology Team?
The Assistive Technology Team is made up of anyone 
that interacts with the student:
Teachers and paraprofessionals,
Parents,
Other Specialists – speech, OT, Physical
Other agencies such as the Regional Center, CCS, 
outside assessors.
However! AT decisions are made by the student’s
IEP team.




                                                      26
       The
MOST IMPORTANT  
Team Membership 
      Issue
     Team membership is
       flexible and team
    members are selected
     based on the specific
    needs of the individual
         with disabilities
   Assistive 
  Technology 
Decision-making
           Gather data from a variety 
                 of sources...




“That was wonderful, Leonard, but according to our 
  earlier assessments, you are not able to do that.”
                                                 29
The SETT 
Framework


 •   Student
 •   Environments 
 •   Tasks
 •   Tools

                     30
     The Goal of SETT 
        Framework 
 … to help collaborative teams create 
       Student-centered (Self),
      Environmentally-useful, and 
             Tasks-focused 
              Tool systems 
that foster the educational success of 
       students with disabilities


                                          31
The Student/Self
        • The person who 
          is the central 
          focus of the AT 
          process.

        • The person for 
          whom everyone 
          involved in any 
          part of the AT 
          service provision 
          is an advocate.


                           32
 Environments
The customary 
environments in 
which the student 
is (or can be) 
expected to learn 
and grow



                     33
Tasks
    The specific 
    things that the 
    student needs 
    to be able to 
    do to reach 
    expectations 
    and make 
    educational 
    progress

                   34
Tools
    The supports 
    and services 
    needed by the 
    student and 
    others for the 
    student to do in 
    tasks in order 
    to meet 
    expectations

                   35
Critical Elements of the 
   SETT Framework
   •   Collaboration
   •   Communication
   •   Multiple Perspectives
   •   Pertinent information
   •   Shared Knowledge
   •   Flexibility
   •   On-going Processes

                               36
      Feature Matching
• Individual         • Technology 
  –   Needs            – Features
  –   Abilities        – Input/User 
  –   Expectations       Interface
  –   Environments     – Processing
  –   Future Plans     – Output




                                       37
Quality Indicators for 
Assistive Technology 
  Services (QIAT)




                          38
        Quality Indicators for 
            Eight Areas
• Administrative    • Implementation
  Support           • Evaluation of 
• Consideration       Effectiveness
• Assessment        • Transition
• IEP Development   • Professional 
                      Development



                                       39
 Areas of Assistive 
Technology Devices
         Major Categories of 
        Assistive Technology 
               Devices 
• Computer            • Low Tech 
  Access                Solutions 
• AAC                   Creative 
                        Thinking
• AT for People 
  with Learning       • Seating/Positio
  Disabilities          ning
• AT for People       • Mobility Aids
  with Sensory        • ADL / EADL
  Impairments         • Recreation

                                          41
             For whom?
             Think STUDENT
             or SELF
                                       For where?
                                       Think
                                       ENVIRONMENT




Thinking about
  AT TOOLS               For what?
                         Think goals
                         and TASKS




                                                     42
Low Tech Solutions - 
 Creative Thinking
“Imagination is 
more important 
than knowledge”

Albert Einstein


                  44
AT is Everywhere!!
         • AT does not 
           have to be 
           expensive or 
           complicated
         • AT can be 
           anything that 
           assists a 
           person with a 
           disability

                            45
                       Example of 
                    Creative Thinking

                                 • Plant Watering 
                                   Device



Battery Operated Kerosene Pump
Adapted for switch access
Total device cost - under $10

                                                     46
Remember…..



       Think 
      Outside 
    the BOX!!!


                 47
Computer Access
Examples of Input 
    Devices




                     49
               Output Modalities




• Visual                     • Auditory

             • Combination


                             • Interface
 • Tactile                                 50
AT for Persons with 
    Disabilities 
•   Reading Support
•   Writing Assistants
•   Organizational Assistants
•   Math/Spelling Supports




                                52
     AT – 
Reading Support
        • Color 
          Highlighting
        • Books with 
          audio or 
          electronic 
          formats
        • Reading Pen
        • Text Reading 
          Software

                          53
             AT 
 Low Tech - Writing Assistants
               • Slant Board
               • Magnetic 
                 Words
               • Labels
               • Pens/Markers
               • Pencil Grips
               • Raised Paper
               • Templates

                                 54
                          AT
              Mid Tech – Writing Assistants


• Portable Word 
  Processors
    •   Neo/Alphasmart
    •   Fusion
    •   DreamWriter


• Writing Correction
  •Franklin Dictionary                        55
             AT 
High Tech - Writing Assistants


               • Pixwriter
               • Classroom 
                 Suite
               • Clicker 5
               • Writing with 
                 Symbols
               • Speech to Text

                                 56
             AT  - 
  High Tech Writing Assistants


• Webspiration   • Draft Builder




                                   57
           AT 
Organizational Assistants
             • Color Coding
             • Object 
               Calendars
             • Organizers
             • Voice Diaries
             • Two-way Text 
               pagers
             • Electronic 
               Calendars
                            58
     AT 
Math Supports

       • Portable 
         Calculators
       • Money 
         Calculator
       • Graphing 
         Calculator
       • Spell Checkers
       • Graphing 
         Software
                      59
    Access to Multimedia 
         Materials
•   CD Player
•   Audio Description
•   E-text
•   Cassette Tapes




                        60
Access to Computers
   Speech Output
          • Voice 
            synthesis
          • Screen 
            Reading 
            Software




                        61
Portable Task & Behavior 
         Support




                       62
          Internet Accessibility



Is an emerging area. 
Youtube closed captioning
Text to speech
Magnifiers

                                   63
       Documenting AT in the 
              IEP
• Documentation should support why a specific 
  device or services is being selected, based on
  established criteria, for the specific needs of the 
  individual child
• Document any specific conditions/environments 
  in which the use of the device will be necessary 
  (i.e., home, school, community)
• Address whether or not parents will be held 
  liable for loss, theft or damage to a device 
  beyond normal wear and tear, if the device is 
  going home
                                                    64
                      Documenting in IEP
                                           • Make sure and 
                                             consider AT for 
                                             every student with 
                                             an IEP!

SPECIAL FACTORS
Does the student require assistive technology devices and/or 
            No ￿￿
services? ￿￿  Yes (specify) ______________________
_______________________________________________________
__________________________________________________




                                                                65
         Common Questions 
            about AT
 Q: Are schools required to pay for AT and services?

A: It is the responsibility of the school district to provide 
   the equipment, services, or programs identified in the 
   IEP.  However, the district may pay, utilize other 
   resources to provide and/or pay for it, or 
   cooperatively fund the device and/or services.  Other 
   resources may include, but are not limited to, Medi-
   Cal, foundations, church or social groups, charitable 
   organizations, businesses, and individuals.


                                                            66
       Common Questions 
          about AT                (cont.)



Q: Can schools require parents to pay for AT devices 
or services identified in the IEP or require parents to 
use their own private health insurance


A: No, the “free” in FAPE is extremely significant 
   regarding students with disabilities; IDEA requires 
   that all special education and related services 
   identified in the IEP must be provided “at no cost to 
   the parent.”


                                                            67
           Common Questions 
              about AT                (cont.)



Q: If a device is written into an IEP, does that mean 
that it is for the sole use of the student or does the 
student just have to have access to the device?

A: The student needs to have reasonable access to the 
   device. So, if it is written that a student needs to have 
   text to speech to assist with reading and writing, 
   having access to the classroom computer would meet 
   FAPE. 



                                                            68
      Common Questions 
         about AT          (cont.)

Q: Can the student take the AT device owned 
  by the school home?

A: Yes, if the IEP team determines that the 
  student needs access to an AT device at 
  home to implement the educational program.  
  For example, a student with a physical 
  disability may not be able to complete 
  homework assignments without access to a 
  calculator at home.

                                               69
       Common Questions 
          about AT             (cont.)


Q: Does the device follow the student when he/she 
transitions from elementary to middle school and 
on to high school?

A: If an assistive device is necessary to fulfill the 
  requirements of the student’s IEP, such a 
  device must be provided in the school the 
  student attends.  The same device may not 
  necessarily follow the student from one 
  school to another, but a comparable device 
  that fulfills the IEP requirements will be 
  needed in the new school.
                                                     70
         Common Questions 
            about AT               (cont.)

Q: Does the student have access to AT aids and 
  services if they are eligible for extended school year 
  services?

A: Yes, if the IEP team determined that the assistive 
   technology is needed as part of the extended school 
   year services.




                                                            71
           Common Questions 
              about AT            (cont.)

Q: Is a school district responsible for providing 
  “state-of-the-art” equipment for the student?

A: No.  However, the school must provide 
  appropriate technology for the student’s needs 
  to ensure a FAPE.  The decision is an IEP team 
  responsibility and should be based on the AT 
  evaluation.   If a less expensive device would 
  accomplish the same goals, the IEP team is 
  under no obligation to choose a more 
  expensive option.
                                                     72
         Common Questions 
            about AT              (cont.)

Q: Are schools responsible for customization, 
   maintenance, repair, and replacement of AT devices?
A: AT services are included as considerations in the 
   acquisition of equipment or devices 
   purchased/provided by the school.  If family-owned AT 
   is used by the school and listed in the IEP as 
   necessary for providing FAPE, the school might also 
   be responsible for maintenance, repair, and 
   replacement.  Responsibilities for these services 
   should be discussed in the IEP notes or the meeting 
   document.


                                                       73
        Common Questions 
           about AT            (cont.)

Q: Under what circumstances may AT be 
  considered a related service?

A: AT can be a related service if the service is 
  necessary for the student to benefit from 
  his/her education. 

NOTE: Training of staff and parents would be 
 consultation services and must be 
 documented on the student’s IEP.

                                                    74
       Common Questions 
          about AT           (cont.)



 Q: Can the IEP team refuse to consider AT 
 devices on the IEP?


A: No, IEP teams have the responsibility to 
  determine a student’s need for AT and of 
  specifying the devices and services needed.  It 
  is important that IEP teams are informed of this 
  requirement to determine if a student needs an 
  AT device and the need for an AT consultation 
  to assist in making the determination.
                                                 75
           Summary
• AT is a tool for access (e.g., school 
  environment, core curriculum) and for 
  independence (e.g., communication, 
  mobility) and will change as the 
  student’s needs change and as 
  technology continues to change.  



                                       76
             Summary       (cont.)



• The need for AT should be an integral 
  part of a comprehensive assessment for 
  students with disabilities in all areas 
  related to their disabilities, as 
  appropriate, for each student and must 
  be considered by the IEP team or 504 
  Coordinator, based upon the student's 
  assessed educational needs and 
  strengths.
                                             77
Questions?




             78
Contact Information
      Tandra Ericson
ericsont@mdusd.k12.ca.us
  925-682-8000 ext 6241
    Willow Creek Center

The AT Team is available for 
   consultation and training

     Please contact us!
                                79

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:10/8/2013
language:Unknown
pages:79