St. Cloud Placemaking Draft by stcloudtimes

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									      City of St. Cloud




Placemaking Design Manual
        October 1, 2013




       L AK OTA
Project Funders:
City of St. Cloud – St. Cloud Planning Commission & St. Cloud Arts Commission
St. Cloud State University
St. Cloud Downtown Council
St. Cloud Convention and Visitor’s Bureau
Central Minnesota Community Foundation
Community Priorities Initiative:
        Morgan Family Foundation
        Initiative Foundation
        Central MN Community Foundation


Steering Committee:
Jake Anderson, Planning Commission Chairperson
Mimi Bitzan, ArtWORKS Chairperson
David Borgert, Centra Care Health Systems
Carolyn Garven, St. Cloud Neighborhood Coalition, St. Cloud Arts Commission
Tony Goddard, Paramount Theatre and Visual Arts Center, River’s Edge Convention Center
Tom Grones, GeoComm
Pegg Gustafson, St. Cloud Downtown Council
Steve Joul, Central MN Community Foundation
Rich Kelly, St. Cloud Neighborhood Coalition
Julie Lunning, St. Cloud Area Convention and Visitors Bureau
Marty Moran, ClearPath Consulting
Katrina Pierson, HBH Consulting
Sandy Toland, St. Cloud Public Library
Eddah Mutua Kombo, St. Cloud State University
Aspa Rigopoulou-Melcher, St. Cloud State University
Mag Patridge, St. Cloud Arts Commission Chairperson
Mark Springer, St. Cloud State University




City of St. Cloud:
Dave Kleis, Mayor
Tammy Campion, Economic Development
Matt Glaesman, Community Development Director
Cathy Mehelich, Economic Development Director
Jennifer Penzkover, St. Cloud Arts Commission Coordinator
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section 1 - Introduction:
    Planning Mission                                5
    Placemaking Process                             6
    Placemaking Design Manual                       7
    What is Placemaking?                            8
    Why is Placemaking Important?                   8
    What Makes a Great Place?                       9


Section 2 - Placemaking Analysis
    Common Themes                                   10



Section 3 - Placemaking in St. Cloud
    St. Cloud > GREATER                             12


Section 4 - Placemaking Implementation Plan
    Priority Placemaking Initiatives                14
    Greater Community                               15
    Greater Connectivity                            20
    Greater Livability                              24
    Greater Activity                                26
    Greater Environment                             28
    Greater Opportunity                             31
    Implementation Roles & Responsibilities         32
    Funding Sources                                 35
    Implementation Matrix                           37


Appendices
    Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits
    Appendix B: Input on Concepts & Strategies
                                                                           SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION




Section 1 - Introduction
PLANNING MISSION
In December of 2012, the City of St. Cloud engaged The
Lakota Group (planning and design), Chicago Public
Art Group (art advisory) and Sparc, Inc. (graphic design
and marketing) to initiate a planning process to identify
placemaking strategies and opportunities that could be
implemented to enhance the community’s quality of
life. The process intended to build upon placemaking
components identified in the City’s Comprehensive
Plan Update (2003), the Strategic Plan for Downtown
St. Cloud (2004), the Community Cultural Arts Plan
(2008), and support several of the 2013 Community
Priorities.

The City’s goal for this planning and design process
is to create a clear, documented and shared vision, or
“game plan,” for placemaking within the City that
sets the stage for private and public activities to better
establish St. Cloud’s “sense of place.” These goals were
shaped by evaluating the City’s cultural, natural, urban
and transportation context, as well as establishing an
understanding of community priorities, character,
financial capacities and human resources.

This planning process provided the City, its partners and
its residents, with an important opportunity to:

•   Review and evaluate existing placemaking initiatives
    within St. Cloud.
•   Facilitate conversations with a range of stakeholders
    around placemaking and community identity and
    values.
•   Educate City leaders and citizens about the value of
    placemaking.
•   Create and test a range of alternative design, public
    art and development concepts and programs that
    increase vitality and sense of place.
•   Develop optimal short-term and long-range
    strategies for placemaking initiatives.




                                                             DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL   5
          SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION




    PLACEMAKING PROCESS
    The first phase of this placemaking process involved
    an overall assessment of the City’s assets, including
    natural features, buildings, urban characteristics, cultural
    amenities, historic resources, transportation networks,
    businesses, institutions, associations and people. This
    phase also focused on extensive public participation
    through interviews, focus group sessions, an online
    community survey, discussions with City staff and
    agencies, as well as a Community Open House. The
    process, which began in January 2013, included the
    following phases:

    Community Immersion Visit #1
    The first visit involved several days of group and one-
    on-one stakeholder interviews, meetings with City staff
    and the Placemaking Steering Committee, “What is
    Placemaking?” presentations to various groups, field
    review of existing conditions and an Open House
    to solicit input from the interested members of the
    community.

    Following this first visit, the Team conducted an online
    survey to receive more input on the key amenities and
    opportunities within the City. The Team then prepared
    a summary of placemaking opportunities and began
    developing a range of concepts and strategies focused on
    these opportunities.


                                                                   Community Immersion Visit #2
                                                                   The second visit included a presentation of the
                                                                   preliminary placemaking concepts and strategies to the
                                                                   Placemaking Steering Committee, an Open House to
                                                                   present the ideas, and several days of Field Office time,
                                                                   where the Team was located in an available space on
                                                                   St. Germain Street to allow stakeholders to provide
                                                                   additional input and discussion. The Team not only
                                                                   prepared concepts and strategies organized in a series of
                                                                   themed exhibits, but also a five-minute summary movie
                                                                   to help convey the overall goals and vision of the project.

                                                                   After the second visit, the Team conducted another
                                                                   online survey to help begin to prioritize the placemaking
                                                                   initiatives. Through further discussions with City staff
                                                                   and the Steering Committee, the final list of priority
                                                                   placemaking strategies was developed.


6   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                           SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION




PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL
A more specific plan direction was developed in the form
of this Design Manual, as well as specific action items to
assist in its implementation.

Purpose of the Design Manual
The City, as well as related organizations, will use
the Placemaking Design Manual for evaluating and
promoting placemaking plans and decisions over the
coming years. The Plan will serve many purposes
depending on the needs of the ultimate user, which may
include:

•   Public Investment Guide: The City will use the
    manual to prioritize public investment initiatives
    and improvement projects. The information
    provided will also be used to seek grants at the
    regional, state and federal levels.
•   Future Vision: The manual will act as a local or
    regional marketing tool to inform current and future
    residents, businesses and private investors about the
    adopted shared vision for the City.
This Placemaking Design Manual describes the specific
plan direction as refined throughout the process, as well
as specific action items to assist in implementation.

Branding Process
Parallel to the placemaking process, the City
undertook a community branding process. Because
of the interrelationships between placemaking and
branding, such as the perception and communication
of community character, these two processes were
synergistic. Both processes helped inform each other,
resulting in richer outcomes.




                                                             DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL   7
          SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION




    WHAT IS PLACEMAKING?                                      WHY IS PLACEMAKING IMPORTANT?
    The terminology of “Placemaking” began to develop in      The act of placemaking, when conducted in a thoughtful
    the 1970’s and has become a popular a philosophy and      and sensitive manner, can result in many benefits for the
    hands-on tool in revitalizing cities and neighborhoods.   community including:
    This philosophy stems from a refinement of community
    planning and urban design principles with a focus on      •   Building connections and creating common ground
    people and their interactions with public spaces..            for a community
                                                                  •   Establishing community focal and gathering
    The outcomes of a placemaking process focus less on the           points
    buildings and more on the new or enhanced spaces such         •   Encouraging social interaction
    as:                                                           •   Developing physical, cultural and visual linkages
    •   Public Squares                                                within a community

    •   Plazas                                                •   Increasing collaboration between various community
                                                                  organizations or groups such as:
    •   Streets
                                                                  •   City Leaders and Staff
    •   Other Public Spaces                                       •   Residents
    •   Improved Pedestrian Access                                •   Non-Profits
    •   Public Art                                                •   Arts Organizations
                                                                  •   Community Foundations
    •   Community Branding Programs                               •   Institutions/Schools
    •   Community Events/Markets                                  •   Business Associations/Chambers of Commerce
    When a placemaking process is handled appropriately,      •   Helping form a community identity
    it can address a range of different scales, levels of         •   Identifying characteristics unique or valuable to
    complexity and budgets to result in realistic and                 the community
    effective concepts and strategies for a community or          •   Creating or strengthening community assets
    neighborhood.                                                 •   Developing a shared community vision to
                                                                      communicate to the outside world
                                                              •   Catalyzing economic and community development
                                                                  •   Positively impacting real estate values
                                                                  •   Increasing tourism
                                                                  •   Increasing revenue for nearby businesses
                                                                  •   Creating jobs
                                                                  •   Attracting attention to the community’s assets
                                                              •   Encouraging healthy communities by:
                                                                  •   Increasing
                                                                      • Walking / Biking
                                                                      • Time outdoors
                                                                      • Social Interaction
                                                                      • Trees and other landscape vegetation
                                                                      • Mental stimulation
                                                                      • Access to food
                                                                  •   Decreasing
                                                                      • Stress
                                                                      • CO2/ Greenhouse Gasses


8   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                                              SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION




WHAT MAKES A GREAT PLACE?
Part of the placemaking process involves evaluating
the existing places within the community. To do so, it
                                                                               COMFORTABLE
is important to understand the elements that all great
places have in common. A great place needs to be:                      It feels safe whether one is alone or
                                                                      with other people

                                                                    There are areas of shade and sun to choose
               CONNECTED                                           from on a typical day

                                                                    There are places to sit and rest
       Takes advantage of existing
     networks at a local and regional scale                           Other physical characteristics reinforce
                                                                       the perception of comfort
  Is conveniently located in proximity to a
  wide range of uses and destinations

  It is accessible by foot, bike and car                          ACTIVE
    It lacks barriers to those with disabilities
                                                       There are multiple things to do
        Has both physical and visual                 It can accommodate groups of different
          connections to the areas                 sizes
                around it                       The space is flexibile enough to be used for a
                                               range of activities
                                               Unexpected events or moments of convergence
                                                can occur there
                                                   Both active and passive uses can occur
                    SOCIAL                          simultaneously
                                                         It is stimulating and can
         It draws a diverse group of                          evoke a mood
       people

    It is a place where people can interact                                      AUTHENTIC
   There are almost always people there
                                                                       It reflects the character of the
    Its friendly, welcoming and neighborly                           community
      People take pride in it                                       It reveals histories and stories of the area
                                                                  It has strong connections with its physical
                                                                  surroundings
                                                                   It isn’t just for tourists (even if tourists like
                                                                     it too)
                                                                       It incorporates local craftsmanship,
                                                                            artists and materials




                                                                           DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL     9
           SECTION 2 - PLACEMAKING ANALYSIS




     Section 2 - St. Cloud Placemaking Analysis:
     COMMON THEMES
     Throughout the early phases of community engagement
     and analysis, the Team was able to meet with a wide
     range of stakeholders from throughout the community
     and region. These meetings included specific group
     meetings, small focus groups, one-on-one interviews and
     a community open house. Through the process, our
     Team came away with one clear theme - summarized by
     the word “Connections.” It was a word heard in many
     conversations relating to many different topics and
     objectives, and often addressed the recognition of gaps,
     missed opportunities and potential linkages that could,
     when addressed, strengthen the community.

     While this one word may seem removed from the
     concept of placemaking, it is a word that has the            Physical Connections
     potential to catalyze ideas and focus solutions for          The physical linkages, between and to places, are critical
     redefining St. Cloud’s identity. With a clearer sense of     to creating a place that is cohesive. The strength of
     the community’s emergent identity comes a stronger           these interrelationships help foster a sense of an overall
     ability to convey this message to the public through         community or region rather than a series of disconnected
     initiatives that strengthen the sense of place by creating   places.
     connections.
                                                                  •   To Lake George – both from the University and
     The potential for meaningful “Reconnections” can                 Downtown
     be divided into four sub-themes – Physical, Social,
     Environmental, and Economic – which are further              •   To St. Could State University
     explored below.                                              •   Across 2nd Street/Route 23/Division – noted many
                                                                      times as challenging to cross
                                                                  •   To the Mississippi River
                                                                  •   To regional trails – specifically to the Wobegon Trail/
                                                                      Beaver Island Trail
                                                                  •   Between the regional communities
                                                                  •   Between the Downtown and the library
                                                                  •   Between public art installations
                                                                  •   Between Downtown and Munsinger Clemens
                                                                      Gardens
                                                                  •   To the Amtrak Station
                                                                  •   To the regional airport
                                                                  •   To the Twin Cities




10   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                               SECTION 2 - PLACEMAKING ANALYSIS




Social Connections
The relationships between different groups of people
or organizations to the region, the City, and specific
elements within the City help build an emotional bond
that results in increased pride and identity.

•   Between the City and the Universities
•   To the student body – making them feel invested
    and welcomed in the community
•   To the City’s identity – many commented that it
    needs to be better defined
•   To a changing population – engaging them into the
    community and celebrating its diversity
•   Between neighboring communities – building off
    regional strength
•   To public art – highlight the strength of the local art
    community
•   To the younger population – giving them reasons to
    stay or come back
                                                              Economic Connections
Environmental Connections                                     Placemaking has strong implications for economic
Increased respect for natural resources and features and      development and positioning of the City in a larger
other environmental considerations can be capitalized         market. Opportunities to create new partnerships and
upon to create a higher quality of life and improved          connections around the synergies of Placemaking can
character and identity.                                       lead to community-wide benefits.

•   To the Mississippi River                                  •   To financial and resource sharing opportunities in
                                                                  the Downtown
•   Achieved through improved bikeability/walkability
                                                              •   Between potential users and vacant Downtown
•   Between regional natural systems                              spaces – especially upper floors
•   To Quarry Park & Native Preserve/Sand Prairie             •   To becoming a regional destination instead of just a
                                                                  “gateway” or “pass-through”
                                                              •   To branding and promotion opportunities
                                                              •   Between public art and community development
                                                              •   To CEOs and GMs of major employers as
                                                                  community leaders
                                                              •   To Hospital/Health District
                                                              •   To creative financing tools
                                                              •   Between entrepreneurs and local opportunities –
                                                                  incubator opportunities
                                                              The common theme of “Connections” and the specific
                                                              sub-themes provided the Team with the necessary
                                                              context to develop initial placemaking concepts.


                                                                      DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL          11
           SECTION 3 - PLACEMAKING IN ST. CLOUD




     Section 3 - Placemaking in St. Cloud
     To help further structure the development of
     placemaking concepts, the Team developed an overall
     “brand” for the placemaking process in St. Cloud:            •   Embracing community diversity
     GREATER                                                      •   Further integrating art and the artist community
                                                                  •   Celebrating community history




     The genesis of this idea was derived from synergies with
     the parallel branding study as well as the Team’s analysis   •   Completing regional trail linkages
     and discussions with stakeholders. It became apparent
     through the process that there are many strong assets to     •   Improving connections between the downtown and
     the City of St. Cloud, including:                                neighboring amenities
                                                                  •   Creating unified wayfinding signage
     •   Overall high quality of life
     •   Proximity to the Mississippi River
     •   Centralized location in the region
     •   Location of strong businesses
     •   Active arts community                                    •   Supporting and enhancing the downtown
     •   Range of high-quality secondary education                •   Improving public health through walkability and
         opportunities                                                bikeability
     •   Solid downtown with a core of historic buildings
     •   Access to a range of recreational opportunities
     •   Active leadership
     However, it also became apparent that the people
     who live, work and go to school in the St. Cloud do
     not always acknowledge or flaunt these strengths.
     Additionally, there was a stated desire through the
     process to build upon these strengths. The GREATER
     brand reflects these core ideas and also takes the phrase
     “Greater St. Cloud” region and inverts it, in effect
     putting more emphasis on St. Cloud as the center and
     focus of the region – St. Cloud: GREATER.

     GREATER also allows for flexibility by pairing the
     wording with specific concepts or ideas. The Team
     developed six specific categories to use in framing the
     placemaking concepts:



12   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                          SECTION 3 - PLACEMAKING IN ST. CLOUD




•   Increasing festivals and special events
•   Additional multi-use public open spaces
•   Increasing streetlife in the downtown




•   Increasing opportunities to visually and physically
    interact with the Mississippi River
•   Educating residents and visitors about the river




•   Developing the appropriate environment for a
    creative, innovative community
•   Encouraging an entrepreneurial environment              The Team develop a range of specific placemaking
                                                            concepts supporting each of the GREATER categories.
•   Providing material for conveying the strengths of St.   These concepts, along with the GREATER brand, were
    Cloud to outside entities                               presented to the community at a Public Open House on
                                                            May 15th, and were available for additional review and
                                                            comment on May 16th and 17th at a Field Office set up in
                                                            the downtown. The presentation exhibits are included in
                                                            Appendix A.

                                                            A follow-up on-line survey was used to collect additional
                                                            input regarding community support and prioritization of
                                                            the developed concepts.

                                                            The Team summarized the results (see Appendix B –
                                                            Input on Concepts & Strategies) and discussed them
                                                            with the Placemaking Steering Committee. The input
                                                            received from the Committee informed the prioritization
                                                            of the Implementation Plan as well as a core set of high
                                                            priority initiatives, which is described and outlined in
                                                            the next section



                                                                    DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL           13
           SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




     Section 4 - Placemaking Implementation Plan

     The following Implementation Plan for the City of St.        others initiatives developed through this process. This
     Cloud provides designs and approaches to the range of        matrix provides a longer-range road map for additional
     placemaking projects envisioned through this process.        potential projects that could be pursued once the priority
     These projects seek to enhance the unique characteristics    initiatives have been addressed. The City of St. Cloud
     of St. Cloud to more clearly define a unique sense of        and Placemaking Steering Committee should revisit the
     place and create a more active and vibrant character.        plan and Implementation Matrix on a regular basis to
                                                                  reevaluate initiatives in light of changes to ownership,
     While the Placemaking Plan and process looked to the         funding or community support, and modify the
     City and the Region, many of the Priority Placemaking        approach as necessary.
     Initiatives speak specifically to the downtown. This is
     due, in part, to the higher density of community assets
     located in and around the downtown. Additionally, the        PRIORITY PLACEMAKING INITIATIVES
     largest daytime population is concentrated in this area.     The Priority Placemaking Initiatives are organized
     As a center for commerce and culture in the region, the      and categorized into the six GREATER categories, as
     downtown is not only the core of the City, but of the        previously described.
     Region. This is not to say that there are not valuable
     assets located elsewhere. It is more of a statement that
     initial use of limited resources should work to strengthen
     and enhance the core, and the build from there, thus
     creating more initial impact

     These concepts and ideas indicate conceptual designs
     and approaches. Actual locations, sizes, quantities and
     final design will vary as property owners, agencies and
     organizations generate specific plans and approaches.

     It is understood that there will be limitations due to
     budgets and staff capacity that will impact the ability
     to implement projects. Implementation will take time
     as well as the collaboration of several agencies and
     organizations. Setting clear priorities and expectations
     is critical to achieve short-term goals, show progress and
     build capacity for undertaking more complex projects.
     Prioritization will help in effectively coordinating
     implementation efforts between the public sector and
     other community partners.

     The Priority Placemaking Initiatives provide additional
     detail and support on the projects that should be
     addressed first, based on community support, potential
     impact, existing momentum, staff capacity and budgets.
     The Implementation Matrix provides summary
     information, not only on the priority projects, but


14   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                    SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




GREATER COMMUNITY
Placemaking projects that should further the sense of
community awareness and pride.

Branding & Marketing
St. Cloud’s characteristics and assets are only as successful   Beyond manifesting itself on a macro level as mentioned
as the ability connect them physically and figuratively.        above, the GREATER campaign should also be
In the figurative sense, when you communicate through           implemented on a micro level - vis-a-vis online/social
branding about what St. Cloud has to offer, you assist the      media, promotional paraphernalia such as t-shirts, hats
audience in connecting these assets and characteristics to      and vehicle magnets - all allowing for a very mobile and
their perception of St. Cloud. Additionally, a heightened       extremely swift spread of the campaign. And even more
awareness is created in the wake of the branding and            micro is that ever important “elevator speech!” A script
marketing implementation. The Team believes the City            should be created to allow a common verbal positioning
Branding and the GREATER Brand Extension dovetail               of the GREATER campaign. This script would also allow
with other placemaking initiatives to provide a clear           flexibility for the speaker to expound on the spirit of
voice, visual impact and positioning, eventually leading        the campaign by sharing a personal story or two. This
to a new culture and attitude regarding the City.               interjects the human element and touch sometimes
                                                                missing in public/downtown/city campaigns.
Efforts to brand and market its retail, service,
recreational and cultural offerings and attractions, as well    Lastly, since there is a strong link between the new City
as promote the area’s revitalization potential to investors,    Brand and the GREATER Brand Extension, via the
developers, new businesses and future residents will be         “chevron/greater sign,” rolling out the City Brand can
especially important. Such activities will be critical to       happen simultaneously. This symbiotic marketing effort
communicating the downtown’s characteristics, as well           should prove to be successful in achieving the goals
as the goods and services it offers to shoppers, visitors       set forth by The City of St. Cloud and The City of St.
and potential investors. Therefore, the over-arching            Cloud’s Economic Development Authority.
“GREATER” branding/marketing strategy can be
used to develop marketing materials and advertising
campaigns (print, online, outdoor/billboard and TV),
organize targeted promotional/special events, conduct
more effective public relations activities and coordinate
with the planned downtown signage and wayfinding
system.




                                                                         DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL          15
             SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




     Once the branding study currently underway is
     complete, first step priorities are to:                    Market to Millenials

     •   Receive approval from the City for the proposed        In crafting future campaigns and marketing
         City Brand and GREATER Brand Extension.                materials, specific audiences should be identified.
                                                                One audience that received additional attention
     •   Develop a separate brand-specific implementation       during the placemaking process are the
         plan.                                                  “Millenials,” or “under 35 crowd.” Stakeholder input
     •   Prepare brand guidelines to control how the brand      indicated that specific effort needs to be made
         is used and applied by other organizations and in a    to attracting and retaining young professionals
         variety of mediums.                                    and recent graduates. This audience has been
     •   Begin implementing targeted sectors of the brand       identified by groups, such as Greater St. Cloud
         (print, web, signage, etc.) based on the outcome of    Development Corporation (GSDC) for the energy
         the implementation plan.                               and innovation that they bring to the workforce.
                                                                Marketing efforts need to stress the quality of life,
     •   Identify “collateral” products that can be produced    walkability, bikeability, local art and culture and
         in a short time frame to create brand awareness and    access to recreation opportunities.
         build momentum. These could include:
         •    Merchandise to be sold or given away such as
              shirts, bags, stickers, pins and other items.
         •    Special program incentive items like restuarant
              carry-out bags.
         •    Digital projections of the brand at various
              venues around town like blank walls at night or
              performance space curtains.
     •   Develop a GREATER Campaign Partnership/
         Sponsorship or Licensee Program.
     •   Build a network of GREATER brand
         ambassadors to act as advocates.




16   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                  SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




Enhance Local Artist Programs
St. Cloud has a significant and active artist community,
which supports and is supported by numerous
groups. While there are many opportunities, in the
form of venues and funding, provided through these
organizations, many participants in the Placemaking
process indicated the need for improvement.
Stakeholders cited the need for performing and visual art
spaces that cannot currently be met by existing facilities.
Others noted that the Stearns History Museum is the
only venue that has exhibit space accredited with the
American Association of Museums but it is centrally-
located in the downtown.

The strengthening of individual venues is best supported
by strengthening the perception that St. Cloud is
an exciting place for multiple and complex cultural
experiences. Efforts should be made to identify specific
sites and actions for collaboration between the Arts
Commission, the Paramount Theater, St. Cloud State
University and other associated groups. This may
include establishing new performance or display spaces
in the downtown that address specific unmet needs.

Municipal funding sources should be developed to
allow for quick approval of temporary projects/curators
accomplished cooperatively amongst interested groups.
Additionally, efforts should be made to strengthen
cooperation between all City departments having               Beyond coordination and cooperation, the following
oversight/approval responsibilities and agencies and          recommendations should be considered to increase
individuals seeking to initiate cultural activities           attendance and expand audience participation:

                                                              •   Cross-program using contrasting aesthetic
                                                                  approaches into the same event/venue.
  Case Studies:                                               •   Encourage/permit temporary installations and
                                                                  transformations of specific sites (vacant storefronts).
  In Toronto, a section near downtown, nearly
  abandoned of all use, has become a lively artist,           •   Create more open-studio opportunities to allow
  restaurant and, now, residential area. In Pittsburgh,           visitors to observe artists’ creative processes as
  abandoned buildings have been repurposed to                     performance and with interaction.
  become centers that support artist and community            •   Use temporary art installations that transform
  activities by providing spaces for individuals,                 unused public spaces in unexpected ways.
  private parties, and small not-for-profit and
                                                              •   Continue and expand existing efforts to conduct
  business start-ups. In smaller towns, not-for-profit
                                                                  regular gatherings of the artist community to create
  and community foundations repurpose underused
                                                                  opportunities to present work in progress and
  structures to provide retreat sites for artists that
                                                                  explore options for collaboration and sharing of
  result in performances and installations.
                                                                  resources.



                                                                       DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL            17
             SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




     Additionally, the following should be considered as ways
     to expand financial support for public art enhancements:     “Face Greater St. Cloud”

     •   Include existing creative cultural organizations and     One concept developed during the placemaking
         representatives of less engaged demographic groups       process, was to create a themed portrait program
         in the decision-making.                                  that would raise awareness of the community’s
                                                                  diversity. Many communities and cities across
     •   Expand the target audience to include established        the nation have done a variation on this type of
         residents and newcomers to the region.                   program. In New York, the portraits were plastered
     •   Modification of the revenue streams supporting           to the ground in Times Square. In Kenosha,
         cultural activities such as:                             Wisconsin, photos were taken of resident’s holding
         •    Create a Percent for Art program/ordinance          chalk boards that they wrote messages on. These
              to include a percent of all municipal capital       portraits were hung in downtown shop windows,
              improvement projects. This program should           and eventually compiled in a book, which was
              be flexible to allow funds to be used in other      sold to fund future art programs. During the
              parts of the community and not tied to specific     placemaking process, a pilot project was tested,
              projects or sites, allowing public art to further   with several portraits taken of participants. A
              permeate the community.                             public art project seeking to explore the theme
                                                                  of St. Cloud’s diverse community members
         •    Incentivize private investment in public art        could be put out as a Call to Artists/Request for
              through mechanisms like zoning bonuses or TIF       Qualifications and administrered through a public
              funds.                                              process by the City’s Arts Commission. This could
                                                                  be a relatively short timeframe project to complete
                                                                  and would show momentum developed from the
                                                                  Placemaking Plan.




18   ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




Cultural/Historic Signage                                      Ferndale, Michigan
Embracing St. Cloud’s history and culture is critical
to establishing an authentic sense of place. The City
has already made significant headway by designating
a Commercial Historic District within the downtown
and working to preserve the buildings in this district.
The City, along with the Downtown Council and
Sterns History Museum, has created a walking tour
guide book that highlights the 64 buildings in the
district. Additionally, the City has created several digital
audio tours, funded by grants received by the Historic
Preservation Commission.

These resources need to be further promoted through
interpretive signage that helps make casual visitors and
residents aware of the unique characteristics of St. Cloud.
The effort put forward to select sites and create narratives
for the guide book and audio tours gives the City an
advantage in developing interpretive signs.

A standard format for interpretive signs should be
developed in conjunction with an overall signage and
wayfinding master plan. Standard ground mounted and
building mounted signs should be designed. Creative
funding sources should be sought, including additional
grants similar to the one that funded the audio tours,
and the project should be implemented in phases as
resources are available. Once the specific sites are
selected for a phase, a bid package can be developed for
response by regional and national professional signage
fabricators.
                                                               The City of Ferndale, Michigan developed
                                                               a coordinated, city-wide signage program.
                                                               The process started by developing an overall
                                                               Wayfinding and Signage Master Plan that set the
                                                               roadmap for future phases. The plan not only
                                                               identified community gateways, and directional
                                                               signs for automobiles, bicyclists and pedestrians,
                                                               it also incorporated cultural and historic markers,
                                                               tied with QR codes to walking tours and community
                                                               websites. The QR codes can be scanned using
                                                               smart-phones or mobile devices which will direct
                                                               visitors to specific web-based cultural information.
                                                               In addition, a series of Ferndale Fun Facts was
                                                               integrated into directional map signs to give the
                                                               program a sense of whimsy and discovery. The
                                                               master plan and first phase of installation were
                                                               paid by a Preserve America grant.


                                                                      DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL       19
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    GREATER CONNECTIVITY
    Placemaking projects that link important amenities and
    features of the community, and connect visitors and
    residents to these elements.

    Walkability/Bikeability/Trails
    One of the strongest supported initiatives during               One of the first steps is to hire a professional
    the process was enhancements to the walkability and             transportation planning firm to prepare a Complete
    bikeability of the community. St. Cloud and the                 Streets evaluation for the community, with special
    regional communities have made great strides over the           focus on the downtown. This will help identify priority
    last several years creating regional trail systems, and these   projects to plan, budget and implement. These projects
    improvements should continue to be supported in the             may range from improved cross-walks, to enhanced
    future. Additionally, day-to-day connections, such as           sidewalks, to creation of bike lanes.
    sidewalks and on-street bike lanes, need to be evaluated
    and improved.

    There is a growing national recognition that bicycling is a
    valid form of transportation, and not just recreation. So
    while the trail systems are important to recreation and
    tourism, the local infrastructure needs to be present to
    support bicycling for getting between work, home and
    shopping. While there are doubts in the community
    of the potential for increased biking due to the climate,
    many of the communities in the country with high bike
    usage are in similar climates, including Minneapolis,
    Chicago and New York.

    Pedestrians need to be accounted for as well. The
    change in transportation planning has recently shifted to         Guerilla Signage
    evaluate pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists on an equal
    level, a concept called Complete Streets, as opposed to           One short term, low cost project that could be
    planning with a priority placed on motorists. The City            undertaken is “guerilla signage.” The concept
    adopted a Complete Streets policy in November of 2011             comes from an illegal wayfinding project in Raleigh,
    which creates the foundation for further steps.                   North Carolina. A local designer and his friends
                                                                      hung a series of wayfinding signs at intersections
                                                                      throughout the downtown that directed visitors to
                                                                      local destinations and provided an approximate
                                                                      time needed to walk to them. The signs were
                                                                      initially taken down due to their illegal nature,
                                                                      but became embraced by the community under
                                                                      a campaign called Walk Raleigh, and reinstated.
                                                                      The simple, bold design, along with the message
                                                                      of distance translated to the length of time to
                                                                      walk, makes for a strong message that is quick
                                                                      and inexpensive to implement. Guerilla signage
                                                                      could be considered as a first step project to show
                                                                      results and build momentum.



20 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                   SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




                                                               The initial discussion should determine if the goal of a
10th Ave Enhancements                                          public art project is to present a single/complex public
The distance from Lake George to the downtown is
                                                               art installation expected to last for many years or to
only about 1,000 feet, but it is dramatically affected by
                                                               create the conditions in which many projects can be
the underpass of 10th Avenue at State Highway 23. The
                                                               created over many years. A permanent project requires
character of this area does not provide visual interest,
                                                               attention to details of materials selection, surface
nor does it encourage pedestrians to make the walk.
                                                               preparation and maintenance. A series of temporary
However, it provides the perfect canvas for public art,
                                                               projects permits more variety in materials and aesthetic
integrated with landscape and dramatic lighting, to
                                                               approach, but require vigilant fundraising to remain an
improve the area and help connect these two community
                                                               animated space. Neither approach is particularly more
assets.
                                                               or less expensive than the other; the determination to
Public art can successfully retrofit existing infrastructure   secure either the full funding quickly or to secure the full
at a fraction of the cost of building from the ground          funding over time is significant.
up. St Cloud City Leaders have capacity to transform
                                                               The recommended steps to move this initiative forward
local infrastructure in support of the private/public goal
                                                               include:
of enlivening spaces while creating 24/7/365 visibility
for their efforts. The success of this project will be         •   Determine the scope of the project, including
strengthened by conscious, deliberate and determined               budget and media
mutual support of the community of participants.
                                                               •   Develop a RFQ for public art
Through this process, the transformed environment
will reflect both the creative and persistent nature of the    •   Create a selection panel of stakeholders
agencies involved and will represent the community’s           •   Review potential artists and selecting arts to submit
interest in affirming the value of collaboration between           proposals
different cultures and entities.
                                                               •   Select the artist and contracting with them
Local partners know local skills. Local skills seek            •   Coordinate with the selected artist through design,
opportunities to extend capacity. The exploration of               fabrication and implementation
complex, even contradictory themes, can accurately
                                                               •   Develop contingency budget for long-term care and
represent the strength and vitality of a democratic and
                                                                   maintenance
engaged community.




                                                                        DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL             21
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    5th Ave Enhancements                                         Eddy Street Commons, University of Notre Dame/
    Throughout the placemaking process, the importance           City of South Bend
    of the local universities and colleges was expressed. The
    presence of these institutions within the Region adds to     Many universities and colleges reside in cities
    the vitality and creative spirit of the community. Efforts   and towns without truly becoming part of the
    should be made to strengthen the relationships with all      community. As a way to look outside the boundaries
    of these institutions and look for shared synergies.         of their campus, many universities have begun to
                                                                 develop partnerships with their communities with
    Clearly the closest and largest to the downtown of           the goal of enhancing the physical character of the
    these institutions is St. Cloud State University. While      place and provide culture and improved lifestyles
    there has been some history of issues, both perceived        for their students, faculty and employees.
    and actual, between SCSU and the downtown, there
    is positive momentum being generated by efforts              Unlike many colleges and universities, the
    from both City and SCSU leadership. One of the               University of Notre Dame had never enjoyed
    components of this positive momentum is the 5th Avenue       a “college town” area that offers coffee shops,
    Live project. This effort has been focused towards new       retail stores, restaurants, pubs, townhomes and
    development along 5th Avenue to bridge the gap between       apartments within an easy walk to campus.
    the SCSU campus and the downtown. Components                 Immediately south of campus the Northeast
    have included Coborn Plaza, the Welcome Center and           Neighborhood offered few desirable housing
    the commercial development across the street from City       options and was a deteriorated, mostly vacant
    Hall. Additionally, redevelopment of existing buildings      district—a physical barrier between the University
    north of 2nd Street, including Brothers Pub, and the         and South Bend’s downtown. The University
    Creative Suites have helped bridge the gap.                  embarked on a major redevelopment effort that
                                                                 has transformed its southern boundary into a truly
    These initiatives should be further supported with new       mixed-use neighborhood. Although the University
    streetscape along the 5th Avenue corridor to create a        was the catalyst for this effort, it partnered with
    visual continuum. Currently, the streetscape is worn         local stakeholder organizations and the City of
    and lacks a defined character that establishes a sense       South Bend to create a vision.
    of place. Additional visual elements can help enhance
    the 2nd Street and 5th Avenue intersection, which is         This public participation and partnership was key
    uncomfortable and challenging for pedestrians. The City      to build consensus and initiate the new public/
    has plans already in place for enhanced streetscape, but     private partnership called Eddy Street Commons,
    they are not currently funded. Creative funding sources      a planned mixed-use development. Opening in
    should be pursued to help move this project forward.         2009, the project features retail, both rental and
                                                                 for-sale residential, a hotel and commercial spaces,
    Further redevelopment should also be supported. The          including University office space. As a result, the
    current development is positive as it extends the retail     area has begun to see increased development
    character of the downtown across 2nd Street to bring it      activity and the establishment of a vibrant mixed-
    closer to the campus. The inverse also needs to happen –     use neighborhood that has, for the first time, built
    that the University should bring some related use north      a bridge between South Bend and Notre Dame.
    of 2nd to bring campus activity into the downtown. This
    could be structured around local art or some type of
    incubator space, and could be accomplished as a private/
    public partnership.




22 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                             SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




Wayfinding & Signage                                        Downtown Districts
An integrated and master planned wayfinding system
helps establish and reinforce a character and sense of      One ancillary benefit to a wayfinding plan would
identity for a community. It also helps identify major      be to define and support the idea of downtown
community assets and help direct visitors and residents     districts. While the downtown is not of a scale that
to them. For example, linkages between the east             it needs to be sub-divided to help with wayfinding, it
and west sides of the river can be enhanced through         does have areas of different character and purpose
appropriate signage. Through the placemaking process,       – convention center, arts/historic, east river,
participants identified a defined need to implement a       university, county courthouse - which would lend
wayfinding system to accomplish these goals.                itself to different districts. The idea was brought
                                                            forth in the 2003 St. Cloud Comprehensive Plan
While an entire system would be cost prohibitive            and has applicability to today. The development
to implement in one phase, a comprehensive and              of a wayfinding plan should look to identify, define
coordinated design should still be developed. The City      and reinforce these districts.
should first hire a professional design firm to develop a
wayfinding and signage master plan for the City. This
plan will identify the variety of signs and components
necessary, including gateway markers, directional signs,
informational signs, street signs and other elements.
The plan should also identify the key routes, decision
points and location of community assets necessary
to conceptually locate the necessary signs. Core
neighborhoods and districts should be identified so that
they can be better connected. This master plan will serve
as a roadmap and reference for future improvements.

Following the preparation of the master plan, the
City should appropriately budget within the Capital
Improvement Plan to implement the plan over a series
of years. Additionally, as private redevelopment occurs,
the plan will be in place to guide improvements where
appropriate.




                                                                   DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL         23
          SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    GREATER LIVABILITY
    Placemaking projects that improve the comfort and
    social aspects of the public spaces in the community.

    Downtown Streetscape
    The downtown, and specifically St. Germain Street, have     The concept for improved downtown streetscapes was
    undergone several transformations over the last 40 years.   strongly supported at the community open house and
    While many of the buildings have remained intact, the       online survey. However, a major challenge will be
    public realm was converted into a pedestrian mall 1972,     the funding of a project of this scale. One potential
    which was a trend across the nation at the time. In         opportunity would be to create a Business Improvement
    1997, it was reopened to automobiles and the sidewalks      District (BID) for the downtown. The structure and role
    were enhanced with pedestrian lights and precast            of the BID are discussed later in this report.
    concrete pavers. Some of these amenities have not aged
    well, and the design does not include create an authentic
    character that is unique to St. Cloud.

    A high quality streetscape project, when designed
    and implemented thoughtfully and sensitively to the
    context of the area, has been shown to spur additional
    private investment in nearby businesses and buildings.
    Additionally, master planning of the streetscape can
    include geometric changes to support Complete Streets
    policies as previously described. For example, the angle
    parking within the downtown could be modified to
    become back-in angle spaces. This modification creates
    a safer environment for bicyclists as it puts the driver
    in a position where they can more easily see oncoming
    bicycles when they are exiting the parking space.
                                                                                                        7TH AVENUE
                  8TH AVENUE




                                  ST. GERMAIN STREET




24 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                               SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




The following are the steps necessary to move this
initiative forward:                                           Outdoor Cafes

•   Work with City engineering and public works staff         The presence of outdoor cafes creates a street
    to identify the life expectancy of pavements and          level vibrancy for the downtown. Especially
    underground utilities within the downtown.                in climates like St. Cloud, customers take
                                                              advantage of outdoor dining while the weather
•   Establish a streetscape advisory committee including      is good. Because of the seasonal nature of St.
    members from the City, the Downtown Council,              Cloud, there is some reluctance to integrating
    GSDC, the downtown BID if established, and the            permanent infrastructure to support outdoor
    St. Cloud Convention and Visitors Bureau.                 cafes. Additionally, there are often unintended
•   Seek and identify funding for project design,             regulatory and permitting barriers that dissuade
    engineering and construction.                             businesses from creating outdoor cafes.
•   Retain a consultant team to prepare a Streetscape         Fortunately, in St. Cloud, the City has removed all
    Design Master Plan that identifies and test               permit requirements for outdoor cafes, so there
    options for downtown streetscape design, roadway          should not be any barriers. To overcome the other
    engineering and Complete Streets initiatives and          challenge, the City should consider establishing
    prioritizes the order of streets to be reconstructed.     a policy for leasing on-street parking spaces to
                                                              the immediately adjacent building to allow for
•   Following the completion of the Streetscape Design        the creation of seasonal “parklets” to provide
    Master Plan, the City should identify a preliminary       additional outdoor dining space. While this will
    budget for the first phase of streetscape construction.   create a small reduction in on-street parking
•   Submit the first phase project to State and Federal       spaces, there will be a net benefit of increased
    agencies to attempt to secure supplementary funding       vibrancy and desire of residents and visitors to be
    to construct the project.                                 downtown. The downtown parking decks have the
•   Establish and maintain consistent lines of                capacity to accommodate any additional demand,
    communication with the business community                 and increased pedestrian traffic between the
    to minimize disruptions during construction. A            restaurants and the deck will create more window
    “streetscape survival plan” should be developed           shopping and activity throughout the downtown,
    to mitigate streetscape construction impacts on           to the benefit of all businesses.
    merchants and property owners. Coordinate
    marketing activities, announcements and special
    events throughout the construction process.

The development of a Streetscape Design Master
Plan will take approximately twelve months, with
the preparation of detailed design and construction
documents taking approximately another six to eight
months. Construction could be phased over a series of
years depending on funding.




                                                                    DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL       25
          SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    GREATER ACTIVITY                                             Capitol Market, Charleston, West Virginia
    Placemaking projects that create a variety of events
    throughout the year, driving increased desire to visit and   One of the most compelling examples is Capitol
    explore various parts of the community.                      Market in Downtown Charleston, West Virginia,
                                                                 which operates as a 501(c) 3 nonprofit. Capitol
                                                                 Market began operations 14 years ago, in a
    Permanent Farmer’s Market                                    converted railroad freight-transfer building.
    Throughout the country, famer’s markets are taking on
    a stronger role within their community. They become a        The market operates seven days per week and
    key, regular community gathering, they support healthy       hosts eight vendors, including a produce market,
    lifestyles, they provide opportunities to incubate new       butcher, fish monger, wine seller, chocolatier, café,
    businesses, and they provide exposure to the range           and a restaurant. A few vendors specialize in
    of cultures within the community. In many cities             West Virginia products; most of the food vendors
    permanent venues have been constructed to provide the        sell both raw and limited prepared foods (e.g., the
    infrastructure for these markets. They integrate flexible    butcher offers a limited selection of sandwiches).
    space that provides canopies, electrical connections and     Café-style seating and Wi-Fi are available
    other elements to support the market. Additionally, they     throughout the market hall. Outside is a seasonal
    can include a small, year-around, indoor component that      farmers’ market, where growers sell West Virginia
    further helps with the development and incubation of         produce in spring, summer, and fall, and Christmas
    related businesses.                                          trees in December.

    The City has worked with the St. Cloud Area Farmers          - City Population:                           50,000
    Market to provide the parking lot at the northeast           - Est. Market Hall Size:                     15,000 SF
    corner of 10th Avenue and 2nd Street for the 2014 season
    location. Additionally, the Collaborative for a Culturally   - Unenclosed Space:                          20,000 SF
    Diverse Economy has been involved to incorporate             - Est. annual operating revenues (2010)      $366,000
    multi-cultural businesses into the market. The Central
    Minnesota Community Foundation and the Initiative            - Est. annual rent and maintenance
    Foundation have participated to help with funding.            expenses (2010)                             $74,000

    A year-around public market would build on these             - Est. annual salaries and benefits (2010)   $72,000
    efforts, but would likely need to advance incrementally
                                                                 - Building ownership                         City
    over several years and should be supported and furthered
    through the following steps:

    •   Conduct a feasibility analysis including:
        • Projected revenues
        • Projected operating expenses
        • Estimate of working capital needed
        • Projected subsidies
        • Appropriate site location
    •   Establish a market development team
    •   Create a market concept and business plan to test
        feasibility and projections
    •   Determine the preferred business model
    •   Secure site control
    •   Begin grant and capital campaign.


26 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                             SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




Winter Festival
While there are many successful activities and festivals
in St. Cloud, such as Summertime By George, further
attention needs to be given to the winter, to activate
the community throughout the year. The Granite City
Pond Hockey Championship, going into a third year in
2014, is an excellent starting point for increased events,
along with activities such as the Winter Nights & Lights
Parade and the Santa Fun Run

Additionally, there are significant opportunities to
introduce unique events and displays that integrate
the local arts. Ice and snow can be used as a medium
for temporary art installations, which can be further
enlivened through dramatic lighting. Events can also be
centered on other activities, such as snow shoe races, ice
fishing tournaments and sledding.

The City has taken a major step by submitting an
application to host Hockey Day in 2015. Regardless
of whether they are successful or not, the City should
use this as an opportunity to develop the relationships,
capacity and infrastructure to host a yearly winter
festival. Steps should include:

•   Developing a winter festival steering committee,
    including the City, Downtown Council, St. Cloud
    Area Convention & Visitors Bureau, and the
    Minnesota Youth Foundation.
•   Brainstorm activities and components of the festival.
•   Identify potential dates and locations.
•   Establish festival producer/organizer.
•   Develop preliminary budgets/fundraising goals.




                                                                 DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL   27
          SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    GREATER ENVIRONMENT
    Placemaking projects that increase awareness and provide
    additional opportunities to interact with the unique
    natural features of St. Cloud.

    Kelly Inn Site
    The Mississippi River was repeatedly identified as a         further indicated that in the future they can envision a
    key resource throughout the placemaking process.             smaller footprint, however they would want to maintain
    Stakeholders recognized that in the future there needs       adjacency to the convention center and not lose parking.
    to be increased opportunities for the public to easily
    connect with the River, both visually and physically.        Due to the size of the site, the Kelly Inn could easily
    From the downtown, there are limited opportunities to        move into a new, more modern footprint, allowing
    interact with the River. One of the key challenges is that   for a mix of public amenities and river-oriented
    much of the river’s edge in the downtown is developed.       redevelopment. Based on stakeholder input, restaurants
    The Kelly Inn site occupies about 650 feet of river, from    with outdoor dining facing the river are in high demand.
    the River’s Edge Convention Center on the north, to 2nd      Pedestrian connections to the river path could be made
    Street S on the south. While there is a multi-use path       as part of the redevelopment, potentially at the extension
    between the Kelly Inn site and the River, it has limited     of 1st Street S.
    access. The building itself has a large and outdated         This redevelopment will need to occur as a private/public
    footprint, the hotel tower is not oriented to provide        partnership between the City and the Kelly Inn. The
    maximum views of the river and valuable property             City should continue to meet and discuss opportunities
    adjacent to the river is taken up with surface parking.      with ownership of the Kelly Inn as well as look for
    The City has begun discussions with the ownership of         funding opportunities, such as Tax Increment Financing
    the Kelly Inn, who have indicated that they are open         (TIF), to help finance the project.
    to discussions about the future of their site. They have



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28 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                      SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




Rau Field at Cathedral Catholic School
Another site near the downtown that offers expanded
opportunities to interact with the river is the athletic
field belonging to Cathedral Catholic School between
6th and 5th Avenues. While it is assumed that the school
will want to maintain use of athletic fields on this site
in the future, there are still opportunities for the City to
work with the school to improve access to the river. By
vacating 5th Avenue between the field and the river, the
City can create the opportunity to enhance over 500
feet of riverfront. The additional space created through
vacation of the street could allow for grading and
shoreline enhancements and the potential for overlooks
connected to the regional trail system.

Similar to the Kelly Inn site, the City should maintain
contacts with the school and discuss opportunities for a
future partnership to make these improvements.




                                       6TH AVENUE

                                                                                           5TH STREET (POTENTIAL CONNECTION)

                                                      SLED HILL
                       4TH STREET




                                                     ENHANCED FIELD




                                                                                                                               5TH AVENUE
                                                    MULTI-USE TRAIL

                                                                  OVERLOOK
                                    NATURALIZED EDGE



                                                                          DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL                         29
          SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




                                                                   The City Arts Commission would be a likely candidate
    Interpretive Signage/Art                                       to lead this process, while a larger steering committee
    While many stakeholders indicated the Mississippi River
                                                                   may be formed with members of other organizations.
    as a key asset in the community, there is still a broad
                                                                   The following are suggested steps for furthering this
    lack of understanding for its significance in the rise and
                                                                   initiative:
    life of St Cloud. There is a need to build awareness of
    residents and visitors to the social, cultural, scientific,    •     Brainstorm with committee or interview community
    agricultural and historic links between human life and               to develop ideas for topics/themes of installations
    the Mississippi River watershed.
                                                                   •     Develop and approve preliminary budgets
    A large part of embracing the river is through educating       •     Pursue and secure funding
    the broader public of the value and history of the River.
                                                                   •     Select artists
    Typically, this would take the form of interpretive
    signage providing insight on the River. Due to the             •     Design development led by individual artists
    resources in St. Cloud, this is a unique opportunity to        •     Review and approve submitted budgets for each
    also incorporate local artists. Because the goal is not just         artist
    education, but also to convey the value of the river, art
                                                                   •     Fabrication/installation of each piece
    provides a venue for stimulating an emotional response.
                                                                   •     Marketing campaign to create awareness and
    Potential components could include:                                  excitement of the program
    •   Representations of the historic use of the river and
        intended and inadvertent contemporary use of the
        river.
    •   Pieces that convey the historic and environmental              Case Study: Willapa Refuge Art Trail
        importance of the river’s watershed to St Cloud.
    •   Representations of the volume of water and the                 The Willapa Refuge Art trail was developed around
        geologic features of the river.                                the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge in southwest
                                                                       Washington. In total, the project activated both
    •   Installations using flotsam and jetsam picked up               professional artists and University of Washington
        along the river’s edge.                                        students to produce 16 individual pieces. These
    Ultimately, these elements, along with interpretive                pieces included custom art elements in place of
    signage, will encourage improved accessibility to the              picnic tables, boardwalks, and even brochure racks.
    Mississippi River and greater respect for the impact of            Other installations convey information about local
    the river on St. Cloud’s future. Access to the river will          wildlife species and their interrelationships.
    increase collective consciousness about its importance
    as formative resource for defining St. Cloud as a
    moving, fluid place for individuals, cultures, businesses
    and institutions that share the desire for a creative
    community.




30 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                  SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




                                                              A second way that this group can benefit the City
GREATER OPPORTUNITY                                           as a whole is to activate them as champions of the
Placemaking projects that help engage the business            St. Cloud. Through their travels and networks, this
community as leaders in the planning and advancement          group has the potential to be strong advocates and
of placemaking initiatives, as well as champions and          ambassadors delivering the message of St. Cloud to a
storytellers conveying the merits of St. Cloud to a larger    range of audiences. This activity would build off of
audience.                                                     the development of the new City brand. Following
                                                              the development of the brand, an “elevator speech” for
Engage Business Leaders                                       the City should be developed. This will insure that a
One of the City’s major assets is the presence of large       consistent message is delivered to outside audiences, no
regional businesses. Some of these are locally established,   matter who is delivering it. The City should host local
such as Coborn’s and Bernick’s Beverage and Vending,          business leaders to make them aware of the new brand,
while others are international, such as Geringhoff. They      as well as educate them in the desired message and key
all have several things in common, including strong           talking points.
leadership, an understanding of the attributes of St.
                                                              Future steps in furthering this initiative include the
Cloud and a vested interest in seeing St. Cloud improve.
                                                              following:
These commonalities need to be put to use to further
placemaking in St. Cloud.                                     •   Identify key partners for carrying the message
                                                                  forward, including, but not limited to: GCDC,
The first way this can occur is by engaging business
                                                                  Downtown Council, Chamber of Commerce, SCSU
leaders in further planning processes. The City
                                                                  and CentraCare
is looking to initiate an update of the City’s
Comprehensive Plan within the next year. This plan            •   Conduct a placemaking seminar for local business
will be critical for setting the roadmap for the entire           leaders – understanding the links between sense of
community for the next twenty years. The plan will                place and local economy
need to appropriately recognize the role of placemaking       •   Conduct an education session regarding the new
and provide long-term goals and objectives for the                City brand and related message
City. Local business leadership should participate, both
in a stakeholder capacity, but also within a steering
committee structure. In preparation for their role, these
business leaders should be provided resources that help
them to make the connection between placemaking and
economic development.




                                                                       DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL         31
            SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    IMPLEMENTATION ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES
    Establishing effective public/private partnerships and       Economic Development Authority
    building local organizational capacity and leadership        The City of St. Cloud’s Economic Development
    will be critical to long-term success in implementing the    Authority (EDA) is made up of a seven-member
    priority placemaking initiatives. Partnerships between the   appointed board that works with economic
    City and entities such as Downtown Council, Greater          development staff to assist existing and prospective
    St. Cloud Development Corporation, St. Cloud State           businesses interested in the community, and
    University, Central Minnesota Community Foundation           generally working towards improving St. Cloud’s
    and the Initiative, the St. Cloud Area Convention &          economic vitality and expanding the City’s tax and
    Visitors Bureau, artists and arts organizations and other    employment base.
    groups, will be especially vital in leveraging financial
    and human resources to accomplish more complex               Planning Commission
    initiatives, and in managing ongoing marketing and           The Planning Commission is a seven-member
    promotion activities. Such partnerships can also             appointed commission that is charged with long-
    maximize the leadership necessary from both the private      range planning for the City and is responsible
    and public sectors to help steward implementation from       for advising the City Council on matters of
    its early stages to the long term. Key partnership and       development, zoning and capital improvements.
    organizational development implementation steps that         The position allows them to comment and influence
    should be considered include:                                planning policy and priorities, which will affect the
                                                                 implementation of the placemaking initiatives.
    City of St. Cloud
    The City will need to take the key leadership role in        St. Cloud Arts Commission
    moving placemaking strategies forward. City roles and        The St. Cloud Arts Commission is an appointed
    responsibilities should include:                             citizen board that oversees arts and culture within
                                                                 the City. Due to the nature of the placemaking plan
    •   Formally approving the Placemaking Design                and the emphasis on public art, the Commission
        Manual.                                                  will play a large role in facilitating the public art
    •   Preparing more detailed design documents for the         processes.
        recommended infrastructure, streetscape, signage
        and physical improvements.                               River’s Edge Convention Center
                                                                 The location of the River’s Edge Convention Center,
    •   The City, along with its implementation partners,        between the downtown and the river, makes it
        will need to seek out and secure funding sources for     uniquely positioned to participate in placemaking
        priority initiatives.                                    activities related to these two assets. Additionally, as
    •   Meeting directly with the owners of impacted sites       an activity generator and home to cultural resources,
        to encourage their involvement and participation in      such as the Minnesota Amateur Baseball Hall of
        placemaking projects.                                    Fame Museum, the River’s Edge is a key asset and
    City of St. Cloud is represented in a variety of ways,       needs to work cohesively with adjacent amenities
    through departments and committees.                          to clearly define and support a sense of place.
                                                                 Additionally, the River’s Edge has an Advisory Board
        City Departments                                         and staff that help appropriately position it within
        •    Planning & Zoning Department                        the community to maximize the economic impact
                                                                 on St. Cloud.
        •    Economic Development Department
        •    Public Works Department
        •    Parks & Recreation Department


32 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                 SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




                                                             It is important to note that to become a strong
ArtWORKS                                                     implementation partner, a BID would first need to
This group is coordinated with the St. Cloud Arts
                                                             develop its organizational capacity by hiring staff and
Commission and the Central Minnesota Community
                                                             developing its operational budget and membership.
Foundation and includes community leaders. The
purpose of this group is to add capacity to the Arts         If organized and funded properly, a BID can effectively
Commission and assist with funding opportunities to          supplement the City by being the “boots on the ground”
help move the Community Cultural Arts Plan forward.          staff/volunteers that work directly with local property
ArtWORKS should help to champion the arts based              and business owners.
components of the placemaking plan.
                                                             Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation
Central Minnesota Community Foundation                       Currently, GSDC has several target initiatives that
The Central Minnesota Community Foundation was               overlap with the goals of the placemaking plan. Due
established in 1985 with the goal of engaging people,        to their strong connections to the local business
connecting resources, and building community.  They          community, they could also play expanded roles in
fulfill their mission by making grants to support key        generating both financial and vocal support for specific
issues in Central Minnesota and have participated in         placemaking programs as well as assist the City in
several placemaking related initiatives in St. Cloud. They   implementing the GREATER brand extension.
are a resource for future support.
                                                             Mississippi Partners
Downtown Council                                             Mississippi Partners was established in 2012
The Downtown Council is a quasi-independent                  to champion implementation of the urban river
organization that works to promote and enhance the           plan by prioritizing, educating, marketing/
downtown, as well as advocate for the interests of           promoting, advocating, and fundraising for future
local businesses and property owners. The Downtown           river initiatives.  Committee membership consists of
Council is well positioned to have a role in many of the     active representatives from area cities and counties,
key initiatives.                                             environmental organizations, local businesses, and other
                                                             river stakeholders meeting quarterly to spur greater
The 2004 Strategic Action Plan for Downtown St. Cloud
                                                             interest, support, and leadership in riverfont projects.
details a strong strategy and support for the development
                                                             Mississippi Partners should continue to participate in the
of a Municipal Service District (MSD) or Business
                                                             river related initiatives.
Improvement District (BID) as a means of furthering
key downtown initiatives. While the Downtown
Council is able to accomplish many things, the creation      Paramount Theatre & Visual Arts Center
of a BID to provide the appropriate organization and         The Paramount, a non-profit organization housed in
funding is critical for the evolution of the downtown        the historic City owned theatre of the same name,
and the implementation of the placemaking plan in the        currently provides opportunities for a diverse range of
downtown.                                                    art and entertainment programs. The facility is a key
                                                             asset to the City and a placemaking anchor within the
Going forward, a BID could assume several                    downtown. The Paramount should continue to play a
implementation tasks and responsibilities that the           role in supporting arts based placemaking initiatives in
City does not currently have the ability to address,         St. Cloud.
including streetscape construction and maintenance.




                                                                      DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL           33
          SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    St. Cloud Area Convention and Visitors Bureau
    The Visitors Bureau currently undertakes a variety
    of activities and initiatives that promote tourism and
    conventions to St. Cloud. The Visitors Bureau can
    participate and collaborate with the City on marketing,
    wayfinding, special events/winter festivals and branding
    activities.

    St. Cloud State University
    While all local colleges and universities should support
    the placemaking process, SCSU is the most proximate to
    the downtown and other assets. The student population
    can provide positive vitality for the downtown. Through
    the enhancement of key community connections and
    support for downtown placemaking activities, SCSU can
    help improve the City to the benefit of residents, visitors
    and students alike.




34 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                 SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




FUNDING SOURCES                                              Arts Funding
Funding from municipal, county, state and federal            As mentioned in the plan, St. Cloud should strongly
sources as well as local foundations, corporate, and civic   consider a consistent form of funding program, such
and business organizations will be needed to finance         as a percent-for-art program, which could be used for a
placemaking elements. Key funding sources and                public art program.
incentive programs that should be explored further as        In addition, the City should continue work on building
critical placemaking plan implementation tools include:      better intercommunication and cooperation with related
                                                             private not-for-profits to build capacity for coordinated
Tax Increment Financing (TIF)                                funding of projects.
Tax Increment Financing is a State authorized program
administered by a municipality that allocates future         Where appropriate, grants should be sought from the
increases in property taxes from a designated area for       Central Minnesota Arts Board, the Minnesota State Arts
improvements dedicated to that area. While TIF is            Board and the National Endowment for the Arts and
typically used for public infrastructure and urban design    private philanthropies like the Central Minnesota, the
improvements, such as streetscape.                           Morgan Family Foundation, the McKnight Foundation
                                                             and more.
Capital Improvement Plan
St. Cloud has incorporated some aspects addressed            Transportation Enhancement Grants
in the placemaking plan within the municipal capital         Transportation Enhancement (TE) activities offer
improvements plan, which should be evaluated on an           funding opportunities to expand transportation choices
annual basis. Capital improvement funding could be           and enhance the transportation experience through 12
used to support various projects outlined in the Plan,       eligible TE activities related to surface transportation,
including:                                                   including pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and
                                                             safety programs, scenic and historic highway programs,
•   Marketing and branding activites                         landscaping and scenic beautification, historic
•   Riverfront improvements                                  preservation, and environmental mitigation. TE projects
                                                             must relate to surface transportation and must qualify
•   Signage and wayfinding programs                          under one or more of the 12 eligible categories.
•   Street improvements and streetscape implementation
                                                             The Minnesota Department of Transportation
Recognizing that public budgets are tight and                (MnDOT) created eight Area Transportation
somewhat limited in the current economy, the City            Partnerships (ATPs) to oversee transportation plans,
should investigate shared improvements and funding           programs and grants. St. Cloud is served by the Central
opportunities with other municipal taxing bodies or          Minnesota ATP, which includes the St. Cloud Area
public/private partnerships.                                 Planning Organization. Potential projects seeking
                                                             Transportation Enhancement funding would need
General Revenue Bonds                                        to work with and be supported by the ATP so that
Depending upon the City’s bond rating and current            they would be included in an Annual Transportation
bond/debt load and retirement, the City may investigate      Improvement Program.
the ability of long-term bonds for specific portions of
the Plan in order to facilitate redevelopment activities.
Bonding for public infrastructure, open space or
streetscape improvements, or site acquisition, are
some of the key catalytic Plan elements that should
be considered. The City should seek professional
consultation to evaluate these opportunities.



                                                                      DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL          35
          SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement             Federal and State of Minnesota Historic Preservation
    (CMAQ) Program                                                Tax Credit Programs (Federal and State HPTCs)
    A major source of flexible funding for improvement            The National Park Service, in partnership with the
    of pedestrian and bicycle facilities and promotional          Internal Revenue Service and the Minnesota State
    activities that encourage bicycle commuting is from the       Historical Society (SHPO), has administered the Federal
    Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement             Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program to encourage
    Program (CMAQ). CMAQ has the objective of                     rehabilitation and reinvestment in historic buildings. A
    improving the Nation’s air quality and managing traffic       federal 20 percent tax credit is provided to owners and
    congestion, by providing support for transportation           developers of income-producing historic buildings who
    projects that contribute to emissions reductions of           undertake a substantial rehabilitation project in which
    carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and ozone and its        rehabilitation costs must be equal to or greater than the
    precursors. CMAQ funding is coordinated through each          property’s adjusted basis. The State of Mineesota offers a
    MnDOT, and would be similar to the Transportation             20 percent tax credit that parallels the Federal program.
    Enhancement grant.                                            Both incentives can be used to finance the adaptive
                                                                  use of some of downtown St. Cloud’s larger historic
    Open Space & Trail Grants                                     buildings. Projects seeking both credits will be reviewed
                                                                  by the SHPO for compliance with the Secretary of the
    The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
    (DNR) oversees several programs relating to open space        Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation.
    and trails. These include

    •   Outdoor Recreation Grant Program
    •   Regional Park Grant Program
    •   Local Trail Grant Program
    •   Regional Trail Grant Program
    St. Cloud has already taken advantage of these or similar
    grants in the funding of the Beaver Island Trail. These
    programs should also be considered for additional
    open space and trail projects, especially related to
    enhancement of the river edge.

    New Market Tax Credits
    The New Markets Tax Credit Program (NMTC),
    established in 2000 and administered by the U.S.
    Treasury, with the goal of spurring the revitalization
    of low-income communities and neighborhoods.
    The NMTC Program provides tax credit incentives
    to investors for equity investments in certified
    Community Development Entities (CDEs), which
    must have a primary mission of investing in low-income
    communities and persons. Commercial and mixed-use
    real estate projects are among the eligible categories, as
    are community facilities and operating businesses. The
    NMTC will provide only a portion, perhaps 15 percent
    to 20 percent of the capital needed for a project, so other
    layers of financing will be needed.


36 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                               SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX
The placemaking process resulted in many additional
concepts and strategies beyond those detailed in the
Priority Placemaking Initiatives. Through the evaluation
process with the community, the Steering Committee
and City Staff, these concepts were positively received
but were lower priorities. The summary matrix on the
following pages defines the main components of all
initiatives, leadership roles, participants, funding sources
and other details to document medium and low priority
items to that they can be re-evaluated in the future. This
matrix should be reviewed by City staff on a yearly basis
to benchmark success and identify accomplishments
and ascertain if factors have changed on medium and
low priority items that make them more attractive to
undertake.




                                                                   DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL   37
            SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN



    LEGEND
    BID: Business Improvement District
    TIF: Tax Increment Financing                                            DNR:
    Department of Natural Resources                                     TE:
    Transportation Enhancements                                          CMAQ:
    Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality


                                                                                                                     Responsible Parties
                 Concept / Initiative                                                 Priority                      (Project Lead in Red)
    GREATER COMMUNITY
     Develop New City Branding & Identity                                                        Office of The Mayor
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
     Create new branding and identity for the City and implement it                     High     City of St. Cloud Branding Resource Team
     appropriately throughout the community.

     Advance Local Artist Initiatives                                                            City of St. Cloud Arts Commission
                                                                                                 Paramount Theater
     Develop and implement initiatives that encourage more people to perform,           High     St. Cloud State University
     install, or exhibit their work in public spaces                                             St Cloud public schools
                                                                                                 Local business and property owners
     Develop Cultural & Historic Signage Program                                                 City of St. Cloud Historic Preservation Commission
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     Create and implement a cohesive signage program that identifies and                High     St. Cloud Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
     describes cultural and historic resources within the community.

    GREATER CONNECTIVITY
     Walkability/Bikeability/Trail Connections                                                   City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Engineering Dept.
     Pursue initiatives that will promote walkability/bikeability through               High     City of St. Cloud Public Works Dept.
                                                                                                 Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation
     enhancements of the public way and expansion of trails.                                     St. Cloud Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
                                                                                                 Lake Woebegon Regional Trails Association
     Enhance 10th Avenue Viaduct                                                                 City of St. Cloud Arts Commission
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     Create a stronger connection between the Downtown and Lake George by                        City of St. Cloud Engineering Dept.
                                                                                        High
     enhancing 10th Avenue, specifically under the viaduct, with public art and                  City of St. Cloud Public Works Dept.
     lighting.                                                                                   Downtown Council

     Enhance 5th Avenue between Downtown and SCSU                                                City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     Create a stronger connection between the Downtown and the SCSU                              St. Cloud State University
                                                                                        High     Private Developers
     campus by enhancing 5th Avenue through streetscape and supporting
                                                                                                 Downtown Council
     appropriate redevelopment.                                                                  City of St. Cloud Planning Commission
     Develop Unified Wayfinding & Identity Signage Program                                       City of St. Cloud Public Works Dept.
     Create and implement a cohesive signage program that establishes City-                      St. Cloud Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
                                                                                        High     City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     wide identity at key entrances and helps guide visitors to key destinations
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Planning Commission
     within the community.
     Develop a Biking Public Awareness Campaign                                                  City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
                                                                                                 Downtown Council
     Create and implement a campaign to improves recognition for bicycling as           Low      St. Cloud Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
     a form of transit and raises awareness to increase safety.                                  City of St. Cloud Planning Commission

    GREATER LIVABILITY
     Downtown Streetscape                                                                        City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
     Strengthen the sense of place within the Downtown by enhancing the                 High     Downtown Council
     public realm through high-quality, authentic streetscapes.                                  City of St. Cloud Planning Commission

     Encourage Outdoor Cafes                                                                     Downtown Council
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
                                                                                        High     City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
     Pursue initiatives that will create additional opportunities for outdoor cafes
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Planning Commission

     Create Healthy Communitiy Initiative Programs                                               City of St. Cloud Planning Commission
                                                                                                 Local hospitals and health organizations
     Partner with local health organizations and other entities to establish           Medium    City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     programs that support public health.

     Pursue Main Street Designation                                                              Downtown Council
                                                                                                 City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     Work to become recognized as a Main Street community to attain access to           Low      City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
     organizational and revitalization resources for the Downtown.




38 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                                               SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN



                                 $$$         >$500,000
                                 $$          $100,000 - $500,000
                                 $            <$100,000




    Implementation                 Cost           General                                                                                 Action/Task
 Tools/Funding Sources             Level          Timeline                                    Actions/Key Tasks                            Duration

City Funds                                                         Finalize Brand Mark                                                   1 month
                                                                   Create Implementation Plan                                            1 month
                                       $            0-2 Years      Develop "collatoral" to create brand awareness                        6 months
                                                                   Implement Brand Mark Launch                                           24 months

City Funds                                                         Municipal funding for quick approval of temporary projects/curators   3 months
Arts Grants                                                        Identify specific sites and actions for collaboration                 12 months
Private Funds                          $$           0-5 Years      Solicit grants from private and governmental sources                  2 years
                                                                   Fabrication/installation as funding is secured                        3 years

City Funds                                                         Identify key elements                                                 2 months
Grants                                                             Develop standard sign design                                          2 months
                                        $           2-5 Years      Prepare bid package                                                   4 months
                                                                   Select farbicator/installer and implement                             6 months



City Funds                                                         Complete a walkability assessment                                     6 months
TIF                                                                Identify target improvements                                          3 months
DNR Grants                             $$           0-2 Years      Develop engineering plans for target improvements                     6 months
BID Funding                                                        Identify funding                                                      3 months
TE Grants                                                          Implement improvements                                                6 months
CMAQ Grants
City Funds                                                         Interview community regarding ideas for theme                         3 months
Arts Grants                                                        Preliminary budget approved                                           3 months
Private Funds                          $$           2-5 Years      Artist selection                                                      3 months
                                                                   Design development led by artist                                      4 months
                                                                   Budget reviewed and approved                                          2 months
                                                                   Fabrication/installation                                              12 months
Private Funds                                                      Build public support for plan                                         6 months
TIF                                                                Establish site control                                                6 months
BID Funding                            $$$          2-5 Years      Select developer for site specific projects through RFP process       6 months
                                                                   Implement site specific projects                                      2 years
                                                                   Implement streetscape concurrently                                    2 years
City Funds                                                         Identify key community activity generators                            2 months
TE Grants                                                          Develop wayfinding master plan for the City                           6 months
TIF                                    $$           2-5 Years      Integrate phased implementation into CIP                              2 months
                                                                   Implement wayfinding master plan in phases                            4 years

City Funds                                                         Identify critical barriers and target audience                        2 months
CMAQ Grants                                                        Develop message and goals                                             2 months
BID Funding                             $           2-5 Years      Develop campaign materials                                            6 months




City Funds                                                         Develop base understanding of infrastructure                          3 months
TIF                                                                Establish streetscape advisory committee                              1 month
BID Funding                            $$$          2-5 Years      Retain consultant team to prepare plan                                3 months
TE Grants                                                          Develop streetscape plans and construction documents                  12 months
                                                                   Implement phased approach to construction as funds are available      4 years
Private Funds                                                      Prepare policy for seasonal cafes in on-street parking spaces         3 months
BID Funding                                                        Create awareness of City's "no-permit" stance.                        2 months
                                       $            0-2 Years



Private Funds                                                      Identify potential partnership organizations                          2 months
City Funds                                                         Develop key goals                                                     2 months
Grants (Safe Routes to School)         $            0-2 Years      Draft program and identify priority projects                          6 months
                                                                   Implement projects                                                    2 years

BID Funding                                                        Monitor Minnesota State Main Street program                           On-going
                                                                   Regularly evaluate pros/cons to designation                           On-going
                                        $           2-5 Years      Pursue designation if appropriate                                     On-going




                                                                                                        DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL       39
            SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




    LEGEND
    BID: Business Improvement District
    TIF: Tax Increment Financing                                           DNR:
    Department of Natural Resources                                    TE:
    Transportation Enhancements                                         CMAQ:
    Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality


                                                                                                                 Responsible Parties
                   Concept / Initiative                                           Priority                      (Project Lead in Red)
    GREATER ACTIVITY
     Develop Permanent Farmer's Market                                                       St. Cloud Area Farmer's Market
                                                                                             City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     Identify a location and establish a permanent site for a year around           High     Downtown Council
     farmer's market                                                                         Collaborative for Culturally Diverse Economy

     Develop Additional Winter Festivals                                                     City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
                                                                                             Convention and Visitors Bureau
     Work with regional communities to create a diverse and complimentary           High     Downtown Council
     series of winter festivals to increase winter tourism.                                  Sterns History Museum
                                                                                             Adjacent Communities
     Develop Downtown Lounge Open Space                                                      City of St. Cloud Parks & Recreation Department
                                                                                             St. Cloud Area Convention & Visitors Bureau
     Create and implement a Downtown open space for passive recreation,            Medium    Downtown Council
     festivels and special events.                                                           City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.

    GREATER ENVIRONMENT
     Redevelop Kelly Inn Site                                                                City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     Support redevelopment of the Kelly Inn site to provide opportunities for                Kelly Inn Ownership
                                                                                    High     Mississippi Partners
     placemaking through increased access to and visibility of the Mississippi
                                                                                             Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation
     River.                                                                                  Downtown Council
     Develop Rau Field at Cathedral Catholic School                                          City of St. Cloud Parks & Recreation Department
     Capitalize on Cathedral Field's proximity to the Mississippi River by                   Cathedral Catholic School
                                                                                   Medium    Mississippi Partners
     renovating it into a Community Park, tied into regional bike paths with
                                                                                             City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     direct access to the River.
     Develop Interpretive Signage/Art Program for River                                      City of St. Cloud Arts Commission
                                                                                             Mississippi Partners
     Create and implement a cohesive signage and interpretive art program           High     City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     that educates and creates a sense of wonder of the Mississippi River.

     Develop River Design Guidelines & Standards                                             City of St. Cloud Planning Commission
     Protect the health and character of the Mississippi River through the                   Mississippi Partners
                                                                                   Medium    City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     development of guidelines and standards that apply to development
     adjacent to the river.
     Create Environmental Educational Opportunities                                          Mississippi Partners
                                                                                             City of St. Cloud Arts Commission
     Develop programs and seasonal activites that further education of the         Medium    Local Schools
     Mississippi River and the local environment.

    GREATER OPPORTUNITY
     Engage Local Business Leaders                                                           Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation
     Continue current efforts to tap into existing knowledge base of local                   City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
                                                                                    High     City of St. Cloud Planning & Zoning Dept.
     business leaders to support further placemaking activites, including
                                                                                             City of St. Cloud Economic Development Authority
     branding and marketing.                                                                 City of St. Cloud Chamber of Commerce
     Strengthen Relationships with Local Colleges & Universities                             City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
     Continue to foster a supportive environment between the City and                        St. Cloud State University
                                                                                   Medium    St. Cloud Technical College
     regional secondary education institutions through marketing and private-
                                                                                             St. John's University/College of St. Benedict
     public partnerships.
     Develop a Pop-Up Shops Program                                                          City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
     Work with building owners to develop a pop-up shop program to incubate                  City of St. Cloud Economic Development Authority
                                                                                   Medium    Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation
     new businesses and introduce seasonal variety into the downtown
                                                                                             Downtown Council
     environment.                                                                            St. Cloud State University
     Develop a Food Truck Program/Policy                                                     City of St. Cloud Economic Development Authority
     Create a program and related policies to encourage food trucks as a means               City of St. Cloud Economic Development Dept.
                                                                                    Low      Downtown Council
     of creating seasonal vibrancy, unique food options, and incubators for new
     restaurants.




40 ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL DRAFT
                                                                                       SECTION 4 - PLACEMAKING IMPLEMENTATION PLAN




                         $$$         >$500,000
                         $$          $100,000 - $500,000
                         $            <$100,000




    Implementation         Cost           General                                                                          Action/Task
 Tools/Funding Sources     Level          Timeline                                   Actions/Key Tasks                      Duration

Private Funds                                              Conduct site feasibility study                                 6 months
City Funds                                                 Create market business plan                                    6 months
Grants                         $$$          2-5 Years      Secure site control                                            12 months
                                                           Begin grant and capital campaign                               12 months

City Funds                                                 Establish a festival committee                                 2 months
Private Funds                                              Develop concepts for additional festivals                      2 months
                               $            0-2 Years      Build community support for festivals                          1 year
                                                           Identify venues, dates and producer/organizers                 6 months
                                                           Begin fundraising                                              6 months
City Funds                                                 Evaluate potential sites and select preferred location         6 months
DNR Grants                                                 Secure site control                                            6 months
Private Funds                  $$           2-5 Years      Develop design and engineering drawings                        6 months
                                                           Begin grant and capital campaign                               12 months



City Funds                                                 Advance the site design process                                6 months
Private Funds                                              Develop preliminary budgets                                    6 months
TIF                            $$$         5-10 Years      Identify funding sources                                       6 months
NMTC                                                       Prepare design and engineering drawings                        12 months
DNR Grants
City Funds                                                 Continue conversations with school                             6 months
Private Funds                                              Develop preliminary budgets                                    3 months
DNR Grants                     $$          5-10 Years      Prepare design and engineering drawings                        6 months
                                                           Vacate roadways as necessary                                   6 months
                                                           Construct improvements                                         12 months
City Funds                                                 Develop topics/themes of installations                         3 months
Private Funds                                              Develop preliminary budgets                                    3 months
Arts Grants                    $$           2-5 Years      Pursue and secure funding                                      6 months
                                                           Select artists, fabricate and install                          1 year
                                                           Create awareness campaign                                      6 months
City Funds                                                 Identify issues and goals                                      2 months
                                                           Conduct research                                               3 months
                               $            0-2 Years      Draft guidelines                                               3 months
                                                           Refine and submit to City for approval                         2 months

City Funds                                                 Develop educational goals                                      2 months
Private Funds                                              Develop topics/themes of programs/activities                   2 months
                               $            0-2 Years      Identify partnerships                                          2 months
                                                           Identify locations/dates                                       2 months
                                                           Prepare programs/installations/activities                      6 months


Private Funds                                              Identify key partners                                          2 months
City Funds                                                 Develop materials to help in storytelling                      4 months
                               $            0-2 Years      Conduct educational seminars                                   2 months


Private Funds                                              Continue and strengthen communication between entities         On-going
City Funds                                                 Identify opportunities for cooperative initiatives             On-going
                               $            0-2 Years      Implement initiatives as appropriate                           On-going


BID Funding                                                Identify potential storefronts/buildings/participants          4 months
Private Funds                                              Prepare template agreements/contracts                          2 months
                               $            0-2 Years      Adjust City ordinance/develop policy as necessary              6 months
                                                           Advertise program and available storefronts                    On-going

City Funds                                                 Identify issues and goals                                      2 months
Private Funds                                              Research comparable policies                                   2 months
BID Funding                    $            0-2 Years      Draft policy                                                   4 months
                                                           Submit to City for approval                                    2 months




                                                                                               DRAFT ST. CLOUD PLACEMAKING DESIGN MANUAL   41
EMBRACE CULTURAL                        AND       ARTISTIC DIVERSITY
FACE GREATER ST. CLOUD              INSIDED-OUT NEW YORK   SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS
                                                            Consider a downtown arts center
                                                            Offer classes
                                                            Displays and gallery shows
                                                            Coordinate with Paramount and Saint Cloud State University




                                                           DEVELOP A FOCAL FEATURE WITH NATIONAL RECOGNITION



     CAPTURE DIVERSITY OF THE COMMUNITY IN A PORTRAIT
                                                                                                                         Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




   PROGRAM THAT IS DISPLAYED IN UNIQUE WAYS THROUGHOUT
                         THE CITY.




                                                            Location should be prominent and
                                                            visible from the river.
 TELL STORIES
USE CULTURAL AND HISTORIC SIGN TO TELL A                                                                                                                                                                                                       USE IDENTITY AND BRANDING TO TELL THE STORY OF
                                                                                                                                                                                       CASE STUDY: FERNDALE, MI
STORY OF THE REGION.                                                                                                                                                                                                                           THE CITY AND THE REGION TO THE WHOLE WORLD.
                                                                                                                                                                                       SIGN PROGRAM
                                                                                                                                                                                       A coordinated sign program for Ferndale, Michigan
                                                                                                                                                                                       incorporated cultural and historic markers, tied with   BRANDING EXAMPLES
                                                                                                                                                                                       QR codes to walking tours and community websites.
                                                                                                                                                                                       A series of Ferndale Fun Facts gives the program a
                                                                                                                                                                                       sense of whimsey and discovery.




                           PARAMOUNT
                           THEATRE & VISUAL
                           PERFORMING ARTS




                            On Christmas Eve, 1921, citizens of Central Minnesota paid fifty cents to        with its 180 mahogany-finished rooms, two dining rooms, and elevators

                            attend the grand opening of “St. Cloud’s Largest and Finest Playhouse,”         that brought guests up to a roof garden which, at the time, was the

                            The Sherman Theatre. The event, featuring D.W. Griffith’s silent film “Way       highest point in the city.

                            Down East” accompanied by a live orchestra, was the beginning of                Today, these landmark buildings stand as symbols to residents of what a

                            generations of entertainment at the theatre including Vaudeville acts,          lively, bustling downtown St. Cloud might have been like in the “Roaring

                            operas, concerts, Broadway road shows, animal acts, wrestling matches,          Twenties.” In 1997, the Breen Hotel is now known as the Germain Towers;

                            speeches, political rallies, plays and movies.                                  the upper floors have been converted to housing units for elderly

                            Although it was not the first theatre of its kind in St. Cloud, it was said to   residents. The Sherman Theatre (originally named after well-known

                            be the grandest, with seating for 1,700, a decorative lobby and foyer, a        Minneapolis motion picture executive Harry A. Sherman) was renamed

                            majestic theatre organ, and a stage to accommodate large sets and up            the Paramount in 1930 when the theatre underwent its first renovation,

                            to thirty dancers. Entertainers and celebrities enjoyed the Sherman’s           adding sound equipment to accommodate the new “talkies” and

                            private dressing rooms, state-of-the-art “air conditioning system,” and         featuring a new marquee.

                            its proximity to St. Cloud’s finest hotel, the Breen. Also built in 1921, the    Although movies had become the primary focus, the generation that

                            Breen Hotel served as the perfect companion for this lush new theatre           followed enjoyed various types of entertainment including road shows,

                            with its 180 mahogany-finished rooms, two dining rooms, and elevators            movie stars, and eventually WWII rallies and performances. The
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




SIGNAGE EXAMPLES
 “UNITY ACROSS DIVISION”
PROGRAM GOALS                                                 ENHANCE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN DOWNTOWN & LAKE GEORGE:
   Improve the physical and emotional connections             10TH AVE. VIADUCT
   across Division (2nd Street)
                                                              10TH AVENUE CONNECTION CONCEPT RENDERING -               ENHANCE VIADUCT WITH LIGHTING AND ART                                    VIADUCT ART
   Improve the safety and appearance of key
   crossings
   Enhance the 10th Avenue viaduct with art and
   lighting
   Support the 5th Avenue Live initiative
   Rename Division
   Improve wayfinding to key locations


                                                                 BEFORE                                                    AFTER




ENHANCE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN DOWNTOWN & SCSU: SUPPORT 5TH AVENUE LIVE
BIRD’S EYE ILLUSTRATION DIVISION AVE. CROSSING      The Idea:
                                                    Many universities and colleges reside in
                                                    cities and towns without truly becoming         CASE STUDY: UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS
                                                    part of the community. As a way to look         Eddy Street Commons, University of Notre Dame/City of South Bend
                                                    outside the boundaries of their campus,         Unlike many colleges and universities, the University of Notre Dame had never enjoyed a “college town” area that offers
                                                    many universities have begun to develop         coffee shops, retail stores, restaurants, pubs, townhomes and apartments within an easy walk to campus. Immediately
                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                    partnerships with their communities             south of campus the Northeast Neighborhood offered few desirable housing options and was a deteriorated, mostly
                                                    with the goal of enhancing the physical         vacant district—a physical barrier between the University and South Bend’s downtown. The University embarked
                                                                                                    on a major redevelopment effort that has
                                                    character of the place and provide              transformed its southern boundary into a
                                                    culture and improved lifestyles for their       truly mixed-use neighborhood. Although the
                                                    students, faculty and employees.                University was the catalyst for this effort, it
                                                                                                    partnered with local stakeholder organizations
                                                        program grounded in successful strategies   and the City of South Bend to create a vision.
                                                        Continue to support planned improvements
                                                        south of Division/2nd Street                This public participation and partnership was
                                                                                                    key to build consensus and initiate the new
                                                        Create improvements to 5th Avenue/2nd
                                                                                                    public/private partnership called Eddy Street
                                                        Street intersection
                                                                                                    Commons, a planned mixed-use development.
                                                        Full intersection paving enhancements       Opening in 2009, the project features retail,
                                                        Encourage fencing/landscaping at edges of   both rental and for-sale residential, a hotel
                                                        existing parking lots                       and commercial spaces, including University
                                                                                                    office space. As a result, the area has begun
                                                        Extend program further into the Downtown    to see increased development activity and
                                                        Blur the edge between campus and            the establishment of a vibrant mixed-use
                                                        Downtown                                    neighborhood that has, for the first time, built a
                                                        Offer programs in Downtown spaces to         bridge between South Bend and Notre Dame.
                                                        attract students
CONNECTIVITY THROUGH REGIONAL TRAILS & WAYFINDING SIGNS
REGIONAL TRAIL MAP                             WAYFINDING & IDENTITY SIGNAGE
                                               Sign elements should relate to each other as a unified family.
                     LEGEND
                              Existing Route
                              Proposed Route   CONCEPT A
                              Existing River
                              Access Point
                              Proposed River
                              Access Point




                                               CONCEPT B
                                                                                                               Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




 NORTH
                                                                                                                                   ST. GERMAIN STREET
                                                                                                                     CONCEPTUAL STREETSCAPE RENDERING
 GREAT PLACES
DOWNTOWN ENHANCEMENTS
    Existing buildings, uses, and community anchors should be supported with authentic public
    improvements that help create a sense of place.
    The Downtown is the core of the city and the region; it should be supported and nurtured
    to build strength.


                                                                                                                                             BEFORE

   CASE STUDY: MARION STREET, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS
   In late 2006, the Village of Oak Park decided to move forward with an
   aggressive timeline for reopening Marion Street to vehicular traffic by
   constructing a high quality streetscape design. Historically, Marion Street
   has been a key north/south roadway in Downtown Oak Park, linking the main
   east/west shopping street – Lake Street – to the commuter train and elevated
   train stations. Marion Street was converted into a pedestrian mall in the late
   1970s along with Lake Street. Lake Street was reopened to traffic in the
   late 1990s while Marion Street remained a pedestrian mall. Over the years,
   the Marion Street Mall suffered from significant vacancies and from limited
   property maintenance. By Thanksgiving 2007, two blocks of streetscape
   improvements along Marion Street were completed, including brick streets,
   historically inspired lighting, stone sidewalks and sustainable design features.
   The response from the private sector to the improvements was significant
   with a dramatic increase in private investment in building improvements and
   new tenants and businesses. Marion Street is now “the place” in Oak Park
   to locate a business. The Village implemented similar enhancements on two
   blocks of South Marion in 2011.
                                                                                                                                                        Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                                                                                                              AFTER

CONCEPTUAL STREETSCAPE PLAN - ST. GERMAIN STREET




                                                                                      OUTDOOR DINING   SPEED TABLE
                                                               ST. GERMAIN STREET




                                8TH AVE.
                                                                                                                                 7TH AVE.




                                                                                                                                              NORTH
                                                                                                                                                               RECREATION/JOGGING TRAIL NETWORK




P OTENTIAL D OWNTOWN D ISTRICT S TRUCTURE
                                                              DOWNTOWN                                    WALKABILITY
                                                              DISTRICTS                                      Being in a “walkable” area is one of the most
                                                                                                             sought after traits in real estate.
                                                                    Raised initially in 1996
                                                                                                             Residents of neighborhoods with higher average
                                                                    Downtown Streetscape &
                                                                                                             walkscore ratings benefit from improved health.
                                                                    Urban Design Plan
                                                                                                             Increased walkability is achieved through:
                                                                    Opportunity to change
                                                                                                                Increased density
                                                                    perceptions of “Downtown”
                                                                                                                A mix of land uses
                                                                    Ability to define character
                                                                                                                Attractive public realm enhancements
                                                                    and influence uses
                                                                                                                Active storefronts
                                                                                                                Safe and comfortable pedestrian environments


                                                                                                          DOWNTOWN ST. CLOUD’S WALK SCORE MAP
MAIN STREET APPROACH TO DOWNTOWN
   Enhances organizational capacity         Benefits of Main Street include:
   and helps leverage local resources          Engage more stakeholders
   Use the successful Main Street              Build additional financial and volunteer resources
   Four-Point Approach™ developed              Provide the necessary tools and support for local
   by the National Trust for Historic          businesses
   Preservation                                Work with business and property owners to improve
                                               buildings and facilitate catalytic development projects
   Establish volunteer committees
                                               Partner with City and other entities to design
   (5-10 people) for each approach             infrastructure, streetscape improvement and public art
   point:                                      projects
      Design       Economic Restructuring      Receive training and technical assistance in Main Street
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




      Promotion    Organization                revitalization
                                               Access to statewide and national Main Street
                                               membership networks
                                                                                                           HEALTHY COMMUNITIES CASE STUDY: BLUE ZONES, ALBERT LEA, MN

                                                                                                               Community wide health initiatives
GUERRILLA SIGNAGE (D.I.Y. City Building)                                                                       program
                                                                                                               Sponsored by healthcare providers
                                                                                                               Programs include:
                                                                                                                   Workplace wellness policies
                                                                                                                   Revised restaurant menu and vending
                                                                                                                   machine offerings
                                                                                                                   Community gardens
                                                                                                                   Walking clubs
                                                                                                                   Walking school buses
                                                                                                                   New hiking trails.
CREATE                              A        BIKE-FRIENDLY COMMUNITY
BIKING PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGN                                                       D IVISION S TREET B IKE L ANE I MPROVEMENT C ONCEPTS
                                                                                       TYPICAL DIVISION STREET CONFIGURATION    - WEST END                DIVISION STREET BRIDGE
   Case Study: Bike Cleveland
   Support creative transportation solutions that increase biking, walking and
   the use of public transit to improve the health, vibrancy and quality of life
   Engaging casual bikers, not just hardcore
         Bike lanes
         Bike transportation safety ordinances
         Bike sharing programs
         Share the road messaging campaign
         Complete streets implementation
         Support for bike master plan
                                                                                                                                                          BEFORE
         Special events
         Bike friendly business awards




HIGH-QUALITY BICYCLE AMENITIES                                                         POTENTIAL DIVISION STREET CONFIGURATION      - WEST END
                                                                                                                                                                                                Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                                                                                                                          AFTER



Dedicated Bike Lanes
Kinzie St., Chicago, IL




Capital Bikeshare Program
Washington, D.C.                                    Sheltered Bike Parking, NYC    Customized Bike Racks   Sheltered Bike Parking   Bike Parking as Art            Bike Parking on the Street
 THE DOWNTOWN LOUNGE
BIRD’S EYE ILLUSTRATION OF A GRAND DOWNTOWN OPEN SPACE
                                                                                A GRAND OPEN SPACE
                                                                                FOR THE DOWNTOWN
                                                                                    New “front door” for the downtown on Division
                                                                                    Street
                                                                                    Opportunity to integrate complimentary
                                                                                    events to those at lake george
                                                                                    Integrate public art, performance space,
                                                                                    seasonal lighting
                                                                                    Support office workers and shoppers with
                                                                                    passive recreation space




COMMUNAL SEATING AREAS                                   LOUNGING AT THE PARK   DECORATIVE / THEMED SEATING CURBSIDE
                                                                                                                                    Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits
 STREET LIFE
                                                                                                               CONCEPT RENDERING OF ST. GERMAIN STREET CAFES AT NIGHT
FOOD TRUCKS                                                             OUTDOOR CAFES
Food trucks have risen in popularity with the advent                       Heavily supported by community in
of social media such as Facebook and Twitter allowing                      on-line survey
mobile food sellers the ability to creating instant,                       Helps create a vibrant downtown
ever-changing marketing campaigns. Food trucks
                                                                           Evaluate requirements/code/
offer aspiring restauranteurs lower start-up costs than
                                                                           enforcement - remove unnecessary
opening bricks-and-mortar establishments and allow
                                                                           barriers
entrepreneurs to build a customer base before settling
into a single location.                                                    Help businesses understand the
                                                                           permit/approval process
Food trucks often cluster around areas of high activity                    Explore temporary/pop-up space -
and can become a placemaking tool by contributing                          Chicago’s People Space Program
to the energy and activity of plazas, public spaces and
social centers. Many cities have started food truck
gathering by bringing the trucks to a single location for
people to sample the various cuisines.
                                                                        INFORMAL OUTDOOR CAFES
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                                                                               PERMANENT FARMER’S MARKET
                                             Food truck festival,                                                CASE STUDY: CAPITOL MARKET, CHARLESTON, WV
                                                    Fulton, CA                                                   One of the most compelling examples of a permanent farmer’s market is Capitol Market in Downtown
                                                                                                                 Charleston, West Virginia, which operates as a 501(c) 3 nonprofit. Capitol Market began operations 14 years ago,
                                                                                                                 in a converted railroad freight-transfer building.
 CASE STUDY: AUSTIN TRUCK ROUND-UP
                                                                                                                 The market operates seven days per week and
 Food truck roundups have become popular events in Austin, Texas.                                                hosts eight vendors, including a produce market,
 Throughout different times of the year, food trucks congregate in                                                butcher, fish monger, wine seller, chocolatier, café,
 specific locations such as parks, plazas, commercial streets and                                                 and a restaurant. A few vendors specialize in
 parking lots for festivals and contests. Often, the events will take                                            West Virginia products; most of the food vendors
 place as part of larger festivals, often associated with music. The                                             sell both raw and limited prepared foods (e.g., the
 popularity of the trucks has become such an integral piece of                                                   butcher offers a limited selection of sandwiches).
 the food and social scene of the city that dozens of websites are                                               Café-style seating and Wi-Fi are available
 devoted to providing information for the various trucks, trailers                                               throughout the market hall. Outside is a seasonal
 and carts. These websites feature anything and everything                                                       farmers’ market, where growers sell West Virginia
 about the vast array of food truck options, such as menus, maps,                                                produce in spring, summer, and fall, and Christmas
 photographs and upcoming destinations and events.                       Parking lanes used for cafe             trees in December.                                                           Photo Credit: Josh Bloom
                                                                         seating - San Francisco
 WINTER FUN
ICE ART DISPLAY   SNOW SCULPTURES   ICE FISHING TOURNAMENT

                                                                 WINTER FESTIVAL
                                                                 OPPORTUNITIES
                                                                      Build on the successful existing festivals
                                                                      Granite City Pond Hockey Championship
                                                                      St. Cloud State Weekend – Winter Celebrate!
                                                                      Ice Bowl Disc Golf – St. Joseph
                                                                      Coordinate within the region to complement, not
                                                                      compete
ICE SCULPTURE                                                    Possible ideas:
                                                                      Showshoe race at Quarry Park
                                                                      Snow or Ice Wall painted by local artists
                                                                      Ice fishing contest
                                                                      Ice sculpture molds made from the River – placed
                                                                      on front yards
                                                                      Snow(wo)man portraits
                                                                                                                                        Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                             CASE STUDY - QUEBEC WINTER CARNIVAL
                                                             Since the beginning of our French colony, the habitants of New France
                                                             created a rowdy tradition of feasting for a week or two up until Mardi
                                                             gras (“Fat Tuesday”, or Shrove Tuesday) before the 40-day-long fasting
                                                             observance of Lent begins. Carnival celebrations were a private affair
                                                             long before the first organized event in 1894 in Quebec City with the
                                                             construction of the first ice castle.

                                                             The first large winter Carnival in Québec City, the world’s snow capital,
                                                             took place in 1894. Often faced with winter’s hardships, the city’s
                                                             population reinvented this popular tradition with a winter celebration
                                                             that warmed up the hearts of all of it revelers.

                                                             Events:
                                                             •   Winter amusement park          • Life-sized ice palace
                                                             •   Skiing, snow rafting           • Extreme canoe race- paddlers
                                                             •   Ice sculptures                 navigate the frozen St. Lawrence
                                                             •   Snow sled slides               River’s snow and ice obstacles.
                                                             •   Outdoor shows                  • Human-sized foosball game
                                                             •   Canoe races                    players are attached to long metal
                                                             •   Dogsled races                  rods in rows of three.
 INCREASE OPPORTUNITIES                                                        TO INTERACT WITH THE RIVER
CATHEDRAL FIELD


                   5th Street (Extended)
                                                                                   REDEVELOPMENT OF THE KELLY INN SITE CREATES OPPORTUNITIES TO
                                                                                 CONNECT TO THE RIVER WITH VISUAL CONNECTION ALONG 1ST STREET, AND
                                                                                      PHYSICAL CONNECTIONS THROUGH PLAZAS AND PATH LINAGES.



                                                                           DOWNTOWN RIVERFRONT




         6th Ave
                       4th Street
                                                                                                                                                     Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                                   NORTH
Cathedral Field offers an opportunity to interact with the river.
   vacate 5th ave and continue bike path
    pedestrian access to river
    River edge enhancements
    terraced seating for football field
INCREASE                          UNDERSTANDING AND                                                                                                                                                                   RESPECT                FOR THE                     ENVIRONMENT
INCREASE UNDERSTANDING AND RESPECT FOR THE ENVIRONMENT                                                                                                                                                          EDUCATION
Interpretive signage and art can help educate visitors and create an
emotional response to the natural environment.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                CREATE OPPORTUNITIES TO
                                                                                                                                                                                                                EDUCATE CHILDREN ON THE ROLE
                                                                                                                                                                                                                OF THE RIVER. A SERIES OF WATER
                                                                                                                                                                                                                TABLES PLACED IN THE DOWNTOWN
                                                                                                                                                                                                                OR AT LOCAL FESTIVALS CAN HELP
                                                                                                                                                                                                                CREATE APPRECIATION OF THE
                                                    THE MIGHTY
                                                    MISSISSIPPI                                                                                                                                                 RIVER.
                                                    RIVER AND SHORELINE




                                                     On Christmas Eve, 1921, citizens of Central Minnesota paid fifty cents to        with its 180 mahogany-finished rooms, two dining rooms, and elevators
                                                     attend the grand opening of “St. Cloud’s Largest and Finest Playhouse,”         that brought guests up to a roof garden which, at the time, was the
                                                     The Sherman Theatre. The event, featuring D.W. Griffith’s silent film “Way       highest point in the city.
                                                     Down East” accompanied by a live orchestra, was the beginning of                Today, these landmark buildings stand as symbols to residents of what a
                                                     generations of entertainment at the theatre including Vaudeville acts,          lively, bustling downtown St. Cloud might have been like in the “Roaring

                                                     operas, concerts, Broadway road shows, animal acts, wrestling matches,          Twenties.” In 1997, the Breen Hotel is now known as the Germain Towers;
                                                     speeches, political rallies, plays and movies.                                  the upper floors have been converted to housing units for elderly
                                                     Although it was not the first theatre of its kind in St. Cloud, it was said to   residents. The Sherman Theatre (originally named after well-known
                                                     be the grandest, with seating for 1,700, a decorative lobby and foyer, a        Minneapolis motion picture executive Harry A. Sherman) was renamed
                                                     majestic theatre organ, and a stage to accommodate large sets and up            the Paramount in 1930 when the theatre underwent its first renovation,
                                                     to thirty dancers. Entertainers and celebrities enjoyed the Sherman’s           adding sound equipment to accommodate the new “talkies” and
                                                     private dressing rooms, state-of-the-art “air conditioning system,” and         featuring a new marquee.

                                                     its proximity to St. Cloud’s finest hotel, the Breen. Also built in 1921, the    Although movies had become the primary focus, the generation that
                                                     Breen Hotel served as the perfect companion for this lush new theatre           followed enjoyed various types of entertainment including road shows,
                                                     with its 180 mahogany-finished rooms, two dining rooms, and elevators            movie stars, and eventually WWII rallies and performances. The
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




  CASE STUDY: WILLAPA REFUGE ART TRAIL                                                                                                                                                                                              CONSIDER RIVER DESIGN GUIDELINES/STANDARDS
      Art from University of Washington Students and
      Professional Artists                                                                                                                                                                                                          Establish guidance for what can/cannot occur adjacent to the river
      16 separate pieces                                                                                                                                                                                                            Protect views from river to the shores
      In place of traditional interpretive signs, traditional                                                                                                                                                                       Encourage practices that embrace and respect the river
      picnic tables, or other features.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Establish setbacks to provide space for greenway corridor and future trails

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Also address:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Architecture
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Building construction
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Parking
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Fencing
CULTIVATE ASSETS
ENGAGE LOCAL BUSINESS LEADERS                ACTIVELY MARKET
  Efforts currently underway by the Greater   TO ‘MILLENIALS’
  St. Cloud Development Corporation
  Build Public / Private Partnerships            Looking for vibrant community with
  Mentorship - local SCORE (Service Corps        culture
  of Retired Executives) office                    Opportunities to live close to work
                                                 Bikeable/walkable core




                                             MAJOR GATEWAY SIGN CONCEPT




CAPITALIZE ON REGIONAL STRENGTHS
                                                                                       STRENGTHEN RELATIONSHIPS WITH
                                                                                                                       Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




                                                                                       LOCAL COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES




 C ENTRACARE S T . C LOUD
 H OSPITAL C AMPUS
 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
POP-UP SHOPS                                                                         BUSINESS INCUBATOR PROGRAMS
The Idea:                                                                             Incubators support entrepreneurial development through the delivery of various business support
                                                                                      resources and services
Pop-up shops are seasonal or temporary retailers that occupy vacant storefronts or
retail spaces without committing to long term lease agreements. Pop-up retailers      Typical services provided by the incubator management entity include:
are often willing to occupy underutilized areas within infill development and in         Help with business basics
commercial districts, thereby contributing to placemaking and providing cash flow        Networking activities
for property owners. Traditionally these retailers have been used to fill unwanted       Marketing assistance
retail spaces, but recently and increasingly have occupied transient spaces that         High-speed Internet access
are geared toward creating a fresh and dynamic retail environment.                       Links to higher education resources

                                                                                      Access to financing and angel investments networks
                                                                                      Outside technical resources providers may include the local Small Business Development Center
                                                                                      (SBDC)
                                                                                      Incubator businesses have access to shared rental space/administrative services at lower rates than
                                                                                      private market
                                                                                      Most incubators, businesses will have a timeline to “graduate” usually three years or less
                                                                                      More common incubators include:
                                                                                         Art cooperatives                      Farmers and craft markets
                                                                                         Community kitchens                    Shared office environments
                                                                                                                                                                                            Appendix A: Placemaking Presentation Exhibits




  CASE STUDY - THE VERDEHOUSE, WASHINGTON, D.C.
  VerdeHOUSE is an organization that
  specializes in filling under-utilized space
  with temporary uses. The group partners
  with real estate professionals to match
  temporary tenants with available vacant
  space with the goal of turning the spaces
  into event venues. The ultimate goal of the
  organization works to provide benefits for
  both the property/building owner and the
  “pop-up” event holder. They market the
  space to recoup holding costs of property,
  while the short-term use brings foot traffic
  and marketing exposure to the space. The
  shop or event organizers get a space to
  display their goods and services without
  committing to a long-term contract.
                                          Appendix B: Input on Concepts & Strategies

                                                                                                Planning
                                                                                                Urban Design
                                                                                                Landscape Architecture
                                                                                                Community Relations



MEMO
TO:       Jennifer Penzkover, City of St. Cloud                                                           June 19, 2013
FR:       Daniel Grove, Associate Principal
RE:       St. Cloud Placemaking – Input on Concepts & Strategies
CC:       Matt Glaesman, City of St. Cloud
          Cathy Mehelich, City of St. Cloud
          Tammy Campion, City of St. Cloud

The following is a summary of the public input and reaction to the concepts and strategies presented as
part of the St. Cloud Placemaking process.

The initial concepts and strategies, divided into the six different “Greater” categories, were presented to
the public at the May 15th Community Open House. About 40 people participated in that event, where
they were shown a five-minute video that provided an overview of the concepts. They were also given
the opportunity to review a series of exhibits that provided more detail about each concept, and they were
asked to identify their preferred concepts using eight gold star stickers that were provided to them. In
addition, participants were encouraged to submit comments as another opportunity to provide input.

Following the Open House, the concepts were displayed at the Black Box Theater space on the 16th and
17th. The Lakota Team was there to describe the process, answer any questions and elaborate on the
concepts and ideas. There were about 30 visitors over the two days. These participants were also offered
gold star stickers to use in identifying preferred concepts.

Based on the input received from the Open House and the Field Office, all of the placemaking concepts
and strategies were well received. None of the ideas were dismissed out-right, and all seemed to have
some level of favorable response. Several participants identified that they felt the east side of the City was
left out, and they would like some additional thoughts provided in the next phase of work.

The preferred concepts identified through the placement of the stars were:
    Redevelopment of the Kelly Inn site to provide additional access to the Mississippi River.
    Creation of a centralized downtown green space, identified in the concept as the Downtown
       Lounge.
    Creation of a cultural and historic signage program.
    Enhancement of the downtown through new streetscape.
    Promotion of walkability within the City.
    Support of local artists.

An on-line survey was opened at the beginning of June in an attempt to collect further input. The Open
House exhibits were provided digitally for review and participants were asked to identify what priority
they thought should be assigned to each concept or strategy. A total of 145 people completed the survey.
This data was then synthesized with the Open House and Field Office feedback.




212 West Kinzie Street, 3rd Floor Chicago, Illinois 60654    p 312.467.5445    f 312.467.5484       www.thelakotagroup.com
                                Appendix B: Input on Concepts & Strategies



Based on the input received, the top priority projects are:
    Promotion of walkability within the City.
    Improving & expanding the area’s regional trail network.
    Creation of a permanent indoor Farmer’s Market
    Engaging the local business leaders to provide additional resources for new businesses.
    Continue to strengthen relationships with the local colleges and universities.
    Enhance connections between the Downtown and Lake George.

While Lakota thinks any of the concepts or strategies could be successfully moved forward within St.
Cloud, a successful implementation strategy needs to respond to the organizational and fiscal capacities of
the community. Additionally, it needs to balance community desires with political will. Based on our
professional opinion, the implementation plan will need to identify both priorities and timing. Therefore,
we have taken all of the concepts and assigned a priority level (1, 2 or 3), and a timeframe (Short = 3 to 6
months, Medium = 1 to 2 years, Long = 2 to 10 years). We have based these recommendations on the
input received as well our professional opinion.


Priority   Timeframe       Concept

1          Short            Promote Walkability
1          Medium           Permanent Farmer's Market
1          Short            Engaging Local Business Leaders
1          Medium           Enhancing Connections between Downtown & Lake George
                            via the 10th Avenue Viaduct
1          Short            Support Local Artists
1          Short            Outdoor Cafes
1          Short            Enhancing Connections between Downtown & SCSU by
                            Supporting 5th Avenue Live
1          Medium           Downtown Streetscape Enhancements
1          Long             Kelly Inn site
1          Short            Winter Festival Opportunities
1          Medium           Cultural & Historic Signage Program
1          Medium           Unified Wayfinding & Identity Signage System
1          Short            New City Branding & Identity
1          Medium           Interpretive Signage & Art
1          Short            Portrait Program
2          Medium           Improving and expanding the area's regional trail network
2          Short            Capitalizing on Regional Strengths
2          Short            Strengthening Relationships with Local Colleges & Universities
2          Medium           Business Incubator Programs
2          Short            River Design Guidelines & Standards
2          Short            Educational Opportunities
2          Short            Healthy Community Initiatives
2          Medium           High Quality Bicycle Amenities
2          Medium           Actively Marketing to Millenials
2          Medium           Downtown Lounge Open Space
2          Short            Guerrilla Signage



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                                Appendix B: Input on Concepts & Strategies



2          Short            Pop-Up Shops
3          Medium           Main Street Program
3          Medium           Biking Public Awareness Campaign
3          Long             Bike Lanes on Division Street
3          Long             Cathedral Field
3          Long             Developing a Focal Feature with National Recognition
3          Medium           Downtown Districts
3          Short            Food Trucks

Working with City Staff, Lakota would like to identify the best approach to the Implementation Plan, if
the full list of concepts and strategies should be included, what organizational capacities exist to move the
concepts forward, and what budgets or financial resources are available to support these concepts. This
information will be used to inform the creation of the Implementation Plan as the final piece of this
process.




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