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Revised Preschool_Lettuce

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Revised Preschool_Lettuce Powered By Docstoc
					Food $ense Kids
Lettuce
Written by Kelsey Eller RD
Brought to you by the Utah Food $ense program
Part 1 of the Preschool Obesity Prevention: Family Meal Time and Overcoming Barriers

Objectives
Participant will:
   1.   Participate in a cooking/food sensory experience and sample food.
   2.   Participate in a physical activity or game that reinforces food concept.
   3.   Identify food name through reading, writing or activity.
   4.   Participate in a food exposure experience by doing an art, craft or other activity.

Teacher Instructions:
*Background facts and information for the teacher is included on page 13.

This curriculum is to be used in a variety of ways. If time is limited, pick one food experience and one
activity to supplement. Each activity is to be approximately 10-15 minutes. Additional activities are
included in the back of this lesson that can be substituted or included in the lesson.

Required Materials:
   Introduction materials -
   Ingredients for recipes and materials for food demonstration
   Physical activity materials. Materials are listed in this section on page 2.
   Reading/writing activity materials (pages 2-3).
   Art, craft and other activity materials (page 3).
   Take Home Message (page 4-5).
   Utah Food $ense - required paperwork for program.

Optional Supplemental Materials:
       Salad spinner
       Extra lettuce picture on page 14.


                                                     1
Preparation Required:
   Review lesson plan.
   Review teacher background information.
   Gather ingredients and materials needed to demonstrate the recipe (pages 4-5).
   Make copies of recipes and take home messages handout you wish to distribute (see pages 4-5) –
       enough for all class participants to take home to families.
    Utah Food $ense - Make copies of all required paperwork for lesson.

                                              LESSON PLAN

Introduction
Time: 5 minutes
    Talk to the children about how lettuce grows and that there are different types of lettuce. Show
       them pictures of different types of lettuce including iceberg, romaine, arugula, and radicchio
       (pages 6-9, 12).
    Ask the children what they know about lettuce. Have they tried it before? What types of foods can
       lettuce be used in? (salads, sandwiches, tacos, hamburgers, wraps, etc.) Lettuce is usually eaten
       raw, but it can be cooked.
    Lettuce should be washed, dried, and torn into pieces before use. The children can participate in
       tearing and washing the leaves and a salad spinner can be used to demonstrate an easy and fun
       way to dry the lettuce. This will give the children a chance to get familiar with the look, texture,
       and smell of lettuce.

Objective 1: Participate in a cooking/food sensory experience and sample food.
Time: 15 minutes
Choose a recipe that will work for your lesson:
       1. Creamy lemony pepper parmesan dressing on romaine lettuce salad
              -Children can help wash, tear, and toss the salad.
       2. Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps
              -Children can make their own wrap with guidance.
       3. Creamy Banana Lettuce Salad

Objective 2: Participate in a physical activity or game that reinforces food concept.
Time: 5-10 minutes
“Salad Bowl”
To do this activity:
       Divide the children into small groups. Each group sits in a circle and is named a different food
       item, like lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, etc. When the teacher says the name of one of the groups (i.e.
       tomatoes), the kids in that group have to get up and change places with someone else in their
       group. If the teacher says, “Salad Bowl” then everyone in each group has to get up and change
       places.

Objective 3: Identify food name through a reading, writing or other activity.
Time: 10-15 minutes
Tracing
To do this activity:
    Make enough copies of page 10 for each child.
                                                     2
         Cut green and purple yarn into small lengths (2”, 3” and 4”)
         The children can glue the yarn pieces in the shape of the letters to spell “lettuce”.
         A good exercise may also be to have them write “lettuce” in their own handwriting below the
          dotted lines.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Objective 4: Participate in a food exposure experience by doing an art, craft, or
other activity.
Time 5 -10 minutes
    Coloring page – types of lettuce (page 10).

Additional Activity:
    Use actual arugula, romaine, etc. leaves to do crayon rubbings. Place the leaves under a plain white
       piece of paper, and gently rub the side of a crayon to create a fun lettuce picture!
_____________________________________________________________________________
Conclusion:
Time: 5 minutes
    Where does lettuce grow?
    How can lettuce be used or eaten?
    Did you like lettuce?

Resources :
Teachers.net
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/creamy-lemony-pepper-parmesan-dressing-on-romaine-lettuce-salad-recipe/index.html
http://healthymeals.nal.usda.gov/nal_display/index.php?info_center=14&tax_level=2&tax_subject=526&level3_id=0&level4_id=0&level5_id=0&topic_id=251
9&&placement_default=0
https://extension.usu.edu/fsne/files/uploads/2010%20forms/Viva%20Vegetables%20Newsletters/English/2-4%20salad_greens_FSNE.pdf
http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/food/cooking/grilling-vegetables-guide
http://livelongfood.com/?p=129
http://www.yoursmilingchef.com/easy-recipe/lets-talk-about-lettuce/
http://www.defeatdiabetes.org/self_management/text.asp?id=Iceberg_Lettuce
http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/CaesarSalad/CaesarFunFacts.htm
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/63500/63511/63511_lettuce.htm
http://urbanext.illinois.edu/veggies/lettuce.cfm
http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/?page_id=210
http://www.squidoo.com/vegetables-coloring-pages?utm_source=google&utm_medium=imgres&utm_campaign=framebuster
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/49600/49671/49671_lyrate_leaf.htm




This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689
or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/. In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited
                                                                                                          from discriminating on the basis of race, color,
                                                                                                          national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs
                                                                                                          or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination,
                                                                                                          write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400
                                                                              3
Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.




                                                         Lettuce
Creamy Lemony Pepper-Parmesan Dressing on Romaine Lettuce Salad
Ingredients:
3 heaping tablespoons mayonnaise
1 lemon, zested and juiced
1 teaspoon coarse pepper
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
Pinch salt
3 hearts romaine lettuce, chopped

Directions:
Combine the mayonnaise, lemon zest and lemon juice. Cut the lemon across in half. Squeeze the lemon
halves while holding them upright over the dressing bowl so that the seeds stay with the lemon halves.
Add pepper to the dressing bowl, too. Whisk the dressing and pour in the extra-virgin olive oil while you
whisk. If you pour in a slow, steady stream, 3 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil will pour out in a count
to the number six. Once the oil is combined with the lemon juice and the mayonnaise, you can stir in the
cheese and a pinch of salt. Chop up the lettuce into 2-inch pieces. Place the lettuce in a salad bowl and top
with the dressing when you are ready to serve.




Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps
Ingredients:
3 boneless skinless chicken breasts
¼ c soy sauce
4 tsp. brown sugar
1 T vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
¼ tsp. cumin
Shredded carrots
½ tsp lemon juice
Iceberg lettuce leaves

Directions:
Boil chicken breasts until cooked through, and then dice. Mix rest of ingredients in a small bowl, Add the
chicken, shredded carrots, and sauce to a frying pan and heat through. Place a generous spoonful onto a
lettuce leaf and enjoy.




                                                                     4
Creamy Banana Lettuce Salad
Ingredients:
2 large sliced bananas
½ tsp. lemon juice
1 ½ tablespoons of light mayo
½ tsp. sugar
2 cups torn salad greens
6 sliced strawberries
granola or peanuts (optional)

Directions:

Toss bananas with lemon juice. Remove ¼ cup of bananas and mash in a bowl. Stir in the mayo and
sugar. In a big bowl add salad greens, strawberries and remaining banana slices. Top with banana
dressing. Sprinkle with granola or peanuts (optional).


Lettuce Tips:

          Look for dark green leaves. Choose
          heads that are compact and firm.

          If stored properly, most greens will keep
           for one week. Romaine lettuce can last
           for about 10 days.

          Rinse lettuce with cold water or soak loose
          leaves in cool water and stir with your hand
          to remove dirt. Lay lettuce leaves on a
         paper towel and gently pat dry.

          Dark lettuce leaves indicate higher fiber,
           flavor, and nutrients.




This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689
or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/. In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited
from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write
                                                                                                               USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400
                                                                                                               Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C.
                                                                                                               20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.
                                                                                 5
RADICCHIO
    6
ROMAINE
   7
ARUGULA
   8
ICEBERG
   9
AR
U
G
UL        RO
A         MA
ICEBERG   INE
                RADICCHIO




           10
11
12
                                                 Preschool Curriculum
                                                     Lettuce Facts
                                            Background Teaching Information

TYPES OF LETTUCE
There are five distinct types of lettuce: leaf (also called loose-leaf lettuce), Cos or romaine, crisphead,
butterhead and stem (also called asparagus lettuce).

Leaf lettuce, the most widely adapted type, produces crisp leaves loosely arranged on the stalk. Nearly every
garden has at least a short row of leaf lettuce, making it the most widely planted salad vegetable. Cos or romaine
forms an upright, elongated head and is an excellent addition to salads and sandwiches. The butterhead varieties
are generally small, loose-heading types that have tender, soft leaves with a delicate sweet flavor. Stem lettuce
forms an enlarged seedstalk that is used mainly in stewed, creamed and Chinese dishes.

NUTRITION IN LETTUCE
Iceberg lettuce is the most popular lettuce in the United States. It is a head lettuce that is also low in nutritional
value and flavor. The most abundant nutrient in iceberg lettuce is water. Dark green lettuce leaves always
indicate higher fiber, flavor and nutritional value.

Lettuce is naturally saturated fat free, cholesterol free, and sodium free. It is also very low in calories, high in
vitamin A, and a good source of folic acid.

GROWING LETTUCE
Lettuce does not withstand hot summer days well and spring planting should be completed at least a month before
the really hot days of early summer begin. Plantings started in late summer mature during cool fall weather.
Watering is essential for seed germination and establishment of seedlings.

Leaf lettuce may be cut whenever it is large enough to use. Cutting every other plant at ground level gives the
remaining plants more space for growth. Leaf lettuce reaches maximum size (6 to 12 ounces) in 50 to 60 days.
Butterhead varieties form small, loose heads that weigh 4 to 8 ounces at harvest (60 to 70 days). The innermost
leaves, that tend to blanch themselves, are a delicacy. Cos varieties have an upright growth habit and form a long,
medium-dense head.

To store lettuce, wash, drip dry and place in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Lettuce keeps best at 32°F and high
(96%) humidity.

TIPS FOR CHOOSING LETTUCE
    Look for dark green leaves. Choose lettuce heads that are compact and firm.
    To store greens, wrap them in slightly damp paper towels. Place in the refrigerator in a plastic bag with
      holes for air.
    If stored properly, most greens will keep for one week. Romaine lettuce can last for about 10 days.
    Rinse lettuce with cold water or soak loose leaves in cool water and stir with your hand to remove dirt. Lay
      lettuce leaves on a paper towel and gently pat dry.
     Dark lettuce leaves have more nutrients.

         his material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
        (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact
        1-800-221-5689 or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/. In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy,
                                                                                                        this institution is prohibited from discriminating
                                                                                                        on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex,
                                                                                                        age, religion, political beliefs or disability. To file
                                                                                                        a complaint of discrimination, write USDA,
                                                                                                        Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400

                                                                            13
Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.




                                                           14
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