Docstoc

2012_2013databaseofprojects

Document Sample
2012_2013databaseofprojects Powered By Docstoc
					Mentor    Project
                        Research areas
college   number
                    watershed management,
                        stream ecology,
 CALS       345
                     sediment source and
                             fate




                         public health,
 CALS       317       waterborne disease,
                     cooperative extension




                        Synthetic Biology;
                     Cellular and Molecular
                          Biomechanics;
                    Biorobotics; Intelligent
 CALS       337
                    Materials; Micro-Electro-
                       Mechanical Systems
                      (MEMS); Lab-on-Chip
                     Devices; Microfluidics



                        water resources;
                    biogeochemistry; stream
 CALS       216
                       hydrology; nutrient
                             runoff
                   Media Effects,
                  Communication
                 Technology, Video
CLAHS   248
                Games, Simulations,
               Virtual Environments,
                 Psychophysiology




                computer-supported
               collaborative learning,
                informal science and
CLAHS   239
               engineering learning,
               studio-based learning,
                game-based learning




              Protein engineering, self-
                assembly, molecular
COE     220
                    engineering,
                  nanotechnology.
COE   329   thin films, heat transfer




             Microfluidics, gene
COE   213     delivery, medical
             devices, cell culture



              Corrosion, Premise
             Plumbing Pathogens,
COE   245
            Water Chemistry, Water
                   Quality



COE   326       coastal hazards




COE   331   Earthquake Engineering
               Nanomaterials,
COE   270   nanotechnology, water
                   supply




            Earthquake Engineering,
COE   316    structural engineering,
                instrumentation,




                  evacuation;
COE   301    transportation; social
               science; behavior
               Modeling and
                 Simulation,
COE   223   Computational Biology,
              Cell Cycle Model,
              Multiscale systems




            computing for disasters,
              emergency/disaster
COE   300   planning/management/
            recovery, web archiving,
                twitter analysis



             Scientific computing,
               high performance
COE   330    computing, modeling
                and simulation,
                  optimization


            MEMS and microfluidics
COE   370    for chemistry and life
              sciences application
             Artificial Intelligence;
COE   368      Computer Vision;
              Machine Learning;




            configurable computing,
               high-performance
                   computing,
COE   351    bioinformatics, design
                  productivity,
                 heterogeneous
                   computing


            low-temperature cofired
                  ceramics (LTCC)
               integrated packaging
COE   366
             high-density integration
                magnetic materials
              magnetic components



COE   365              All
               computer vision,
               machine learning,
COE   367
             artificial intelligence,
              pattern recognition




             optical system design,
            nanomaterials synthesis
COE   306     and characterization,
                 high heat-load
                   packaging




            Mathematical modeling,
             collective behavior,
COE   303     mechatronics, bat
            swarming, underwater
              vehicles, controls
               Elasticity, Geometry,
              Wrinkling, Crumpling,
                Folding, Thin Films,
            Structural Stability, Fluid-
COE   232
              Structure Interaction,
             Swelling, Gels, Dynamic
                 Deformations of
                    Structures.




                Fluid mechanics;
COE   264   interfacial dynamics; bio-
                   locomotion




                Nanotechnology,
                 nanomaterials,
COE   310
            environmental impacts,
             life cycle assessment
             Nano-bio interface /
             Biological adhesion /
             Biomaterials / Micro-
COE   253
                 biorobotics /
            Microfluidic Devices for
               Biological Studies




              Control, Robotics,
COE   256
               Rehabilitation
            bioinspired technology,
              physics of biological
              sonar sensing, bats,
COE   249
            computational acoustics,
              biodiversity, natural
               history museums




              Tissue engineering
                   materials
               characterization
COE   371
             experimental design
              measurement and
               instrumentation




                 Drug delivery,
                  sustainable
COE   305
                 nanomedicine,
             translational oncology
                Neuroscience,
                 Engineering,
COE   335   Computational Biology,
             Psychopharmacology,
                  Psychology




             engineering, science,
COS   374
                     law




              Cosmic ray physics,
             electronics, neutrino
              oscillation, neutrino
COS   371    cross-section, particle
               physics in general,
                  nuclear non-
                  proliferation




             Physics, Astrophysics,
               Instrumentation,
COS   341
            Imaging, Filters, Mission
                   Planning
              Optical properties of
            nano-structures / Nano-
COS   205
             bio / Magneto-Optical
                  spectroscopy



              Synthetic biology,
                 biophysics,
COS   354
            computational biology,
             stochastic processes




              Health Information
COS   353
                 Technology




                  Nano optics
                 Nanoparticles
            nanoassembly imaging
COS   344    plasmonics nonlinear
            optics photochemistry
             surface and interface
                    physics
                             nanoscience,
   COS         352      nanomaterials, scanning
                           probe microscopy



                       biomedical, biochemical,
                                biotech,
                           pharmaceuticals,
                           medical devices,
                          vaccines, electrical,
                        electronics, chemistry,
  OVPR         247
                         mechanical, wireless,
                            semiconductor,
                           materials, plants,
                        veterinary, intellectual
                       property, law, business,
                              marketing




                             brain circuit,
  VTCRI        375      optogenetics, emotion,
                              cognition




You may also apply to work with a listed collaborator (highlighted in red text) on the following projects…..
              Molecular modeling;
                  computational
CALS   250
                chemistry; protein
             structure and dynamics




             interactive technologies
CALS   321
               for health promotion




                    genomics,
             bioinformatics, genetics,
CALS   324
              chromosomes, malaria,
                    mosquitoes
                  receptor-ligand
              molecular recognition,
             receptor signaling, novel
CALS   307
             receptor and therapeutic
               ligand discovery and
                    engineering




             Carbon nanotubes, plant
               biomass, Damascus,
               carbon steel, Forge,
CNRE   318
               Electron Microscopy,
               Metal, Natural Fiber,
                  Carbon cycling.




                 Falls from roofs,
CNRE   302   residential construction,
                      trusses



                 protein structure;
                    protein-lipid
               interactions; protein-
                protein interactions;
COS    319
                 NMR spectroscopy;
                  surface plasmon
              resonance; membrane
                       mimics
            neuroscience of learning
COS   355
              behavioral genetics




              microfluidics, cancer
COS   243      metastasis, drug
               delivery, clotting




             energy, nanoscience,
COS   332         materials,
                environmental




            sensory biology, spatial
             perception, magnetic
COS   348        field sensing,
            neuroethology, animal
                   navigation
                nanoscience,
COS   373       geochemistry,
                microbiology




               electromagnetic
COS   315
                  geophysics




                  Nano optics
                 Nanoparticles
            nanoassembly imaging
COS   344    plasmonics nonlinear
            optics photochemistry
             surface and interface
                    physics
             autism, treatment,
COS   347
             emotion regulation




               electromagnetic
COS   315
                  geophysics




              Bacterial molecular
                motors, energy
COS   360
            transformation, energy
             transfer, nanomotors
               synthetic biology,
VBI   340
                systems biology




            computer science, public
              health, modeling and
VBI   342
             simulation, sociology/
                 anthropology
                                        Research Description


We conduct research related to watershed management, with a particular interest in sediment,
where it comes from, how it impacts ecosystems, and where it goes.


Although waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States associated with large municipal
systems have decreased over the past four decades, the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC)
recently reported a relative increase in outbreaks associated with smaller private systems not
regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. For the past two years, I have been collaborating with
Cooperative Extension’s Virginia Household Water Quality Program to provide low-cost water
quality testing to Virginia households with private drinking water supply systems (e.g. wells,
springs). Over 1000 samples are analyzed for concentrations of microbial (e.g. E. coli) and chemical
(e.g. lead) contaminants every year. Students associated with this project have conducted basic lab
work to determine basic contamination incidence (often surprisingly high), used advanced
techniques in molecular biology and analytical chemistry to determine likely sources of
contamination, and statistically linked water quality with accompanying survey data detailing
household demographics, water system construction, perceived water quality, and visible
environmental threats. Undergraduate participants can expect to be involved in a variety of
activities, including lab analyses, survey entry, and statistical analysis. In addition, students will
have the opportunity to explore scientific risk communication through attendance at
Interpretation Meetings conducted by trained extension agents which provide interpretation of
water quality reports to program clients.




Enthusiastic young researchers will be welcomed to participate in several projects that focus on
engineering interfaces between living cells and non-living systems. A key goal is to genetically
modify a cell to communicate with a mechatronic mobile bioreactor and to engineer the bioreactor
to communicate with living cells to form a seamless, hybrid living-non-living system.




Water sustainability is a huge issue - we need more food to feed an ever increasing population, but
are compromising our natural resources. Water is one resource that is intimately connected to both
food and energy. My primary goal is to improve our nation’s water quality through research and
education. Our group focuses on quantifying how natural systems behave in the face of change,
and then applying/adapting this knowledge into workable solutions (e.g. improved stream/
wetland restoration).  
The Virginia Tech Gaming and Media Effects Research Laboratory (VT G.A.M.E.R. Lab) is a small
laboratory facility dedicated to investigating the social impact of video games, immersive virtual
environments, simulations, and related media technologies.   The laboratory is hosted by the
Virginia Tech Department of Communication and is directed by Dr. James D. Ivory, an assistant
professor in the Department of Communication.  Much of the lab’s research focuses on one of two
general topics:  /  / 1) Investigations of how users of online virtual environments (e.g., massively
multiplayer online role-playing games) represent themselves and behave in these environments
(typically involving recording and analysis of content in virtual environments, including analysis of
character representations and behaviors, and surveys of virtual world users), and   /  / 2)
Experiments exploring individuals' psychological and physiological responses to the form and
content of video games, immersive virtual environments, simulations (typically involving
recruitment of participants to use a computer or media application while one or more physiological
responses are measure with electrodes, followed by collection of a series of questionnaire items).
/  / Scieneering program participants interested in conducting research in the G.A.M.E.R. lab would
assist with the development and implementation of one or more content analyses, surveys, or
experiments.  Depending on the specific project pursued, program participants will gain
experience with skills related to some of the following areas: human participants research,
academic literature dealing with social responses to media and online behavior, experiment
design, psychophysiological data collection, content analysis, survey research, questionnaire
design, and data analysis.   /  / More information about the VT G.A.M.E.R. Lab and its research is
available at http://gamerlab.org.   Contact lab director James D. Ivory (jivory@vt.edu) with any
questions.




Michael A. Evans is an Associate Professor of Instructional Design and Technology in the
Department of Learning Sciences and Technologies at Virginia Tech. He received a B.A. and M.A. in
Psychology from the University of West Florida and a Ph.D. in Instructional Systems Technology
from Indiana University. His work focuses on the effects of multimedia methods and technologies
on instruction and learning. Current research focuses on the design, development, and evaluation
of instructional multimedia for interactive surfaces (personal media devices, smart phones,
tablets, tables, and whiteboards) to support collaborative learning as well as the adoption of video
game elements for instructional design, particularly for informal settings. Address: Dr. Michael A.
Evans, Department of Learning Sciences & Technologies, 306 War Memorial Hall (0313), School of
Education, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061.  E-mail: mae@vt.edu




We engineer protein molecules to self-assembly into a variety of nano- and macro-structures
including sheets, fibers, and tubes.  We then build these structures into biological devices.
The management of heat transfer is important in the recovery and refinement of oil.  Heat is
created by drilling, is deliberately added by steam injection or combustion in oil wells to decrease
oil viscosity and surface tension during enhanced oil recovery, and is input and output  during
refinement of the oil. The important point is that much oil is held in reservoirs that contain
colloidal mixtures of oil and rock, and during extraction, further fine structure is introduced by the
addition of water, steam, CO2, etc, so that heat transfer takes place across many interfaces.  Much
is known about heat conduction through bulk phases, but heat conduction through concentrated
fine colloidal dispersions (nanofluids), is much less well understood.  The issue is that conduction
across an interface or through a surface film, which form a large part of colloidal dispersions, is not
well understood.   The project is to improve understanding of heat conduction across solid–liquid
interfaces though systematic measurements of interface conductance and concomitant
characterization (vibrational spectroscopy, contact angle, roughness) of the same films.  We will
test the hypothesis that thin organic films situated at metal oxide – water and metal oxide – oil
interfaces can be used to alter and control heat transfer. This project is ideally suited for a
chemistry student who can bring their experience of chemistry (knowledge of intermolecular
forces, basic synthesis, characterization) to an engineering project.



The candidate will perform research under the guidance of the PI (Dr. Chang Lu) and a graduate
student mentor on developing microfluidic devices for gene delivery for cell-based therapies. The
research will be focused on developing microfluidic devices that deliver genes into cells with high
efficiency based on electroporation. We will study how to systematically improve the transfection
efficiency by optimizing the device design and operational conditions. / More information about
our research and publications can be found at the website: / http://www.microfluidics.che.vt.edu/


I do research on applied aquatic chemistry and solve important problems that confront consumers
including 1) lead in water, 2) taste and odors in water, 3) pipe corrosion problems, and 4) water
quality problems in green construction.



My research focuses on the impact of extreme flooding events (hurricanes, tsunamis) and climate
change (including sea-level rise) at the coast. I am interested in better understanding the
interaction between these hazards, the natural environment, and populations living at the coast.


Earthquake engineering is concerned with the design and analysis of civil infrastructure to resist
seismic loading. It is highly inter-disciplinary because it involves concepts from geotechnical
engineering, structural engineering, geology, and seismology. My research focuses on the
prediction of ground motions induced by earthquakes. This research involves issues ranging from
soil testing under dynamic loadings to numerical modeling of wave propagation.
Our interdisciplinary group conducts research to evaluate the behavior of chemicals in engineered
and natural environmental systems. We utilize fundamental chemical, physical, and biological
tools to address topics of concern to the environmental engineering and environmental chemistry
fields.


A new structural system has been devised with enhanced resilience when subjected to
earthquakes.  The self-centering truss (SC-Truss) system consists of truss units with a built-in self-
centering mechanism and steel yielding components that, when combined can bring a building
back to plumb following an earthquake while concentrating all structural damage in replaceable
yielding elements.    The SC-Truss system offers significant advantages in constructability, seismic
performance, and competitiveness compared to the relatively small number of currently available
self-centering systems.  Preliminary design and analysis has demonstrated that the SC-Truss
eliminates residual drifts (permanent leaning in the building after an earthquake), concentrates
structural damage in replaceable steel fuse elements which will not need to be replaced after
most earthquakes, allows design flexibility to separately tune strength, stiffness, and ductility, can
be shop fabricated allowing conventional field construction methods, and utilizes approximately
the same amount of steel as conventional moment resisting frames.    A research project is
underway to develop the SC-Truss system through computational, analytical, and experimental
investigation.  To that end, preparations are underway for the large-scale structural testing of SC-
Truss units.  The testing will be conducted at the Structural Engineering and Materials Laboratory
on the Virginia Tech campus.  Since a limited number of tests are conducted, large sets of
instrumentation (approximately 100 channels) are common.  Components of the test setup that
need assistance include design of the instrumentation plan, sensor calibration, design of sensor
attachment, sensor installation, wiring, and use of data acquisition equipment.


We are developing behavior models of evacuating households and integrating them with
transportation simulation models.
We build mathematical models to study interesting biological systems such as gene regulation,
protein-protein interaction, and cell cycle dynamics. Besides the modeling building, we also study
computation techniques for accurate and efficient simulation of the models. Of course, all these
models and simulation algorithms have a clear biological background.  /  / Since my research area is
an interdisciplinary area that combines mathematics, computer science, and biology, people with
different background and interest may find a good fit in this area. Students with stronger
mathematics interest can focus on the mathematical properties of dynamical systems; Students
with more interest on computation can focus on the development of computer simulation
techniques. Students with biology interest can focus on biological systems. Although the research
can be done from different angles, eventually students will apply what they've learned in more
sophisticated biological systems, such as the budding yeast cell cycle model.  /  / For students with
stronger  / mathematics interest, we will focus on the mathematical properties of dynamical  /
systems; For students with  more interest on computation, we will learn more  / computer
simulation techniques. For students with interest in biology, we will  / focus on biological systems.
Eventually students will apply what they've learned  / in a more sophisticated biological system:
the budding yeast cell cycle model. 




The CTRnet (Crisis, Tragedy, and Recovery network) project (www.ctrnet.net) is an interdisciplinary
project to help those who face crises or tragedies (manmade or natural), and the recovery of
related communities, with computer-based methods. This includes identifying such events as soon
as possible, collecting all possible related information (including from twitter, Facebook, and the
broad Web), developing a permanent archive (in collaboration with the Internet Archive), apply
machine learning to classify and organize that information, extending search engines to handle this
content (including photos), and providing tools for social scientists, other researchers, and other
stakeholders to detect patterns and learn from these event-specific separate collections.



Any scientific or engineering problem involving computing, numerical methods, mathematical
analysis, or optimization.  I have collaborated with faculty from almost every single department in
CoE and CoS, and many departments in CALS and CNRE.



Our research is focused on the development of microdevices for detection of chemicals in the
environment as well as better understanding the electrical and mechanical behaviors of cells as
they transform to cancer.
Have you ever wondered how Siri understands voice commands? How Netflix recommends movies
to watch? How Kinnect recognizes full-body gestures? How Watson defeated Jeopardy champions?
How Google’s autonomous cars have logged 300,000 miles without a human driver?  The answer is
Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning -- the study of algorithms that learn from large
quantities of data, identify patterns and make predictions on new instances. The ultimate goal of
true intelligence is far far away but we are getting better every day!  My lab works on Artificial
Intelligence (AI) and a subfield of AI called Computer Vision, where the goal is to make a computer
“see” and understand the world from images and videos captured from a camera.   This may seem
easy but is actually a phenomenally difficult task. When humans look at a picture they /understand/
what it contains – they recognize objects present, actors present, from a single picture they can
understand actions taking place, even recognize sophisticated concepts like emotions and intents
of actors. When a computer looks at an image, it sees dots of different intensities. Nothing more.
A scieneer in my lab will learn about AI, Machine Learning and Computer Vision, participate in
existing (& new) research projects, and ultimately contribute to the rise of the machines!




My research focus on new methodologies for increasing design productivity in configurable
computing domain. Such 'productivity tools' address needs of non-engineering domain experts in
the areas of bioinformatics (big-data), heterogeneous and High Performance Computing (HPC)




LTCC process, mechanical milling, or wet chemistry will be used to fabricate magnetic materials
and components. Material properties will be characterized. Design will be by finite-element
simulation and Matlab.



I've instructed nearly 100 undergraduate students in my lab under independent study or
undergraduate research in the VT Railgun Program. Students from all engineering departments
have participated.
I work in a subfield of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The goal of AI is to mimic human intelligence in
machines. One important aspect of human intelligence is our ability to process visual information,
i.e. our ability to "see" and understand the world around us. The subfield of AI that focuses on
mimicking this visual intelligence of humans in machines is called Computer Vision. That is the
focus of my research.   Cameras that can detect faces as you take a photo, software that can
automatically tag your Facebook photos with your friends' names by recognizing their faces, the
latest and greatest Microsoft Kinect sensor that can let you play cool interactive video games
without using remote controls, Google's autonomous cars driving on the roads of Palo Alto without
a driver (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdgQpa1pUUE), medical image analysis to diagnose
diseases, robots aiding soldiers in war zones, etc. are just a handful of applications that use
computer vision technology today.   My research especially focuses on visual recognition. It
involves designing and developing computer algorithms that can semantically decipher the visual
content in images and videos and answer questions like: What is the scene depicted? Which object
are present in the scene and where? Which actions are being performed in the scene? etc. -- just
like humans can when looking at images. My research also looks at the interface of language and
images to see how we can enable humans to better interact with computers, either as users or as
teachers, to make tomorrows machine even smarter.   Many of the projects that I work on involve
image processing, machine learning, probability and statistics, elements of psychophysics and
human-computer interaction. Details of several past and ongoing projects can be found on my
webpage: http://ttic.uchicago.edu/~dparikh/publications_topic.htm




Cerium oxide is a catalytic material with interesting optical properties.  Growth of nanoparticles
can be carried out using simple synthesis techniques.  The project involves a study on how to use
the optical properties to modify the catalytic behavior (and visa versa), the effect of post-growth
treatments, and an evaluation of the biological activity of the nanoparticles.



My research includes creating a mathematical model of bat swarming to inspire control of teams of
underwater vehicles communicating using sonar. I would like to take knowledge of bat
echolocation from biological studies and translate it into mathematical equations defining
interactions between individual bats. The equations will be tested against experimental data from
animal groups. This model will then be used to inspire control algorithms for teams of underwater
vehicles communicating through sonar. I would like Scieneers in my lab to work on designing and
creating instruments for testing these bio-inspired algorithms. This may include an instrumented
apparatus equipped with a 3D traverse to move hydrophones and speakers through water. In
addition, a Scieneer may work on building and controlling underwater vehicles with diverse types
of propulsion, including traditional propeller-driven vehicles and underwater gliders. Another
facet of this project, centered on processing data from experiments and numerical simulations on
bat swarming, would be benefitted by a Scieneer with an interest in animal behavior.
The mechanics of soft structures and how they accommodate large stresses and dramatic elastic
instabilities provides a great framework to study problems ranging from biological interfaces to the
design of responsive materials. /  / I am interested in using elasticity, soft materials, and
instabilities such as snap-buckling, crumpling, wrinkling, and folding to generate responsiveness
and impact properties such as adhesion, optics, and flow at surfaces or within devices. /  / My
research on synthetic and biological membranes and how they deform and interact with fluids
allows me to address important fundamental questions that lie at the interface between fluids and
soft materials.  


The dynamics of fluid bulk or interfaces coupled with biological structures is ubiquitous across
diverse bio-fluid systems. Most research on bio-fluid dynamics has been limited to either external
or internal flows (e.g. biolocomotion and artery flows). However, interfacial motions when the
fluid is transported across organisms have been barely explored and are poorly understood.
Examples of this new class of bio-fluid dynamics include multiphase fluid transport associated with
intake (e.g. drinking) and outlet (e.g. urination, secretion and spitting). Fluid interfaces involved in
these transport processes spontaneously form, dynamically deform, and/or suddenly rupture due
to the interplay between hydrodynamic and interfacial forces. The goals of our research are to (a)
design and perform physical experiments and develop analytical modeling in the context of fluid
intake and outlet processes exploited by biological systems, (b) investigate the fundamental
mechanisms of coalescence or non-coalescence, which unify various phenomena occurring at fluid
interfaces




This research will focus on potential human and environmental impacts due to nanomaterials in
consumer products.  There are some inventories of nanomaterials in consumer products, but they
are lacking in details and usefulness for various stakeholders.  This research will focus on one or
more aspects of improving nanomaterials inventories and the understanding of possible human
and environmental impacts due to these nanomaterials. The research primarily involves research
using the existing literature with little or no lab work.
The MicroN BASE lab was founded by Professor Behkam within the mechanical engineering
department. Our lab focuses on interfaces between biological and synthetic systems (or bio-hybrid
engineering). The research interests cover the study of micro/nano-robotics, nanotechnology, bio/
nano interface, and biophysics of bacteria motility, chemotaxis and adhesion. Our activities can be
divided into two broad categories: (1) developing bio-hybrid engineered systems (biomicrorobots)
in which biological components are utilized for actuation, sensing, communication, and control. (2)
Studying mechanism of adhesion, motility and sensing in cells or unicellular microorganisms.
Activities in this category often support our biomicrorobotics activities. We utilize 2D and 3D
microfluidic devices and platforms to establish well-defined and repeatable test environments for
most of our projects.




This request is being submitted as a collaborative effort between Dr. Alexander Leonessa of the
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Dr. Robert Grange of the Dept. of Human Nutrition, Foods and
Exercise.  We anticipate enrolling one or two students, from Biological Sciences and/or HNFE. This
project aims to study how effective is electrical stimulation of muscles for rehabilitation purposes.
In particular Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a technique used to restore the motor
function of individuals with spinal cord injuries. The principle of FES is to use surface or
implantable electrodes to induce contraction of muscles and corresponding joint movement. Help
from undergraduate students is needed to run an existing experimental setup to test, understand,
and compare muscle dynamics when electrical stimulation is applied. Such an experiment will
provide the opportunity to advance understanding of the dynamic behavior of muscles and to
investigate the possibility of controlling this behavior using feedback control techniques. /  / The
undergraduate students involved in this project will be working with the mechanical engineering
doctoral student who is leading this project and several members of Dr. Leonessa’s lab who are
involved in this work. The objectives for his/her work include:  (1) Learn to utilize the existing
experimental setup to stimulate real muscles (removed from mice) and measure corresponding
generated forces and movements.  (2) Test different, existing control technique for the purpose of
finding the best way of stimulating the muscle. (3) Present the results obtained at several
conferences and advertise the research in various venues. This effort will contribute to the critical
understanding required to advance the field of rehabilitation engineering. Through the proposed
effort we aspire to integrate research elements and discoveries into multidisciplinary educational
and research experiences for undergraduate students.  
The research collections of natural history museums are a valuable  knowledge source for science
because they archive the world's known biodiversity. They also have the potential to become
valuable knowledge sources for engineering, because biodiversity holds a vast  pool of
evolutionary adaptations that can provide numerous inspirations for new technology. In order to
analyze biological structure and function from conserved museum specimens, severe conservation
artifacts must be undone in order to provide a quantitative model of the life-like biological
structures.  /   / In a collaboration project with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
(NMNH) in Washington, D.C., the basic science of conservation artifacts for fluid-preserved
vertebrate specimens and engineering techniques for digitally undoing them will be explored. To
this end, the Scieneering project will focus on documenting and analyzing the processes
responsible for the conservation artifacts. Fresh specimens of Virginian bats that will be collected
in  / collaboration with the Smithsonian will serve as experimental material for this research. The
specimens will be scanned at regular intervals using microcomputer tomography to construct high-
resolution three-dimensional digital models. These models will form the basis for a quantitative
analysis of the conservation artifacts. State-of-the art global and local descriptor of three-
dimensional shape will be applied to the data to characterize the artifacts and explore ways in
which artifact-ridden specimens can be distinguished from life-like material. In parallel, the
fundamental science of the conservation  process will be researched. The scieneers will work with
scientists and conservation technicians at the Smithsonian to gain an in-depth  understanding of
the protocols in use.  /   / The results of the project will be used to device engineering methods
that can be applied to even the oldest specimens in the collection of  the NMNH in order to restore
the life-like shapes of the animals.



This project involves mechanical testing and characterization of collagen hydrogels for tissue
engineering applications such as artificial tissue replacements and in vitro tumor models. You will
spend most of your time doing experiments but can also be involved in data processing and
analysis if interested. If everything goes well, this project will result in a peer-reviewed
conference paper or journal article for which you would be a co-author.


Our focus is on translational oncology, where we begin by working with clinicians to understand
the existing medical needs and obstacles for treating patients with cancer.  Correspondingly, we
work with these clinicians and scientists to develop medical devices and nano-based materials for
cancer imaging and treatment. Specifically, we are interested in developing sustainable
nanomaterials that prove to be nontoxic to healthy cells and the environment and we are also
developing medical devices for early cancer detection and localized treatment.  Currently, we have
established research teams and are working on pancreatic and bone cancer – cancers that have not
seen much progress over the last several years that entail very high rates of morbidity and
mortality.
The research employs empirical and computational neuroscientific approaches to understand the
principles of functional integration in active brain networks. The focus of their current research is
to investigate the neurochemistry of ageing. Age is the primary risk factor for a class of serious
neurological disorders, grouped collectively as neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) and
characterized by deficits in cognitive and motor function; functions that emerge from the
concerted activity of interacting brain regions. Findings from the disparate domains of molecular
biology and neuroimaging suggest a change in demand on cortical networks, at the level of
individual cells, brain regions and pathways.  The lab uses multimodal neuroimaging data acquired
over the lifespan to assess whether and how human neurochemistry and connectivity accrue
properties such as redundancy, hyper-activation or hypo-activation across multiple cognitive
domains. Using fMRI and EEG, the team analyses network connectivity using mathematical models
of brain dynamics. The group collaborates widely with international scientists from a range of
disciplines, including animal electrophysiology, translational neuromodeling, clinical neurology
and computational psychiatry.


Prior art research to determine patentability of various mechanical, electrical, chemical, or life
science type inventions.  Legal research and writing, for example, writing responses to patent and
trademark office actions and drafting patent applications.  Market research to determine
commercial value of inventions.




My research is in the area of neutrino oscillation. I have worked in both accelerator and reactor
neutrino experiments. I have developed readout electronics and trigger scheme for several
neutrino experiment I have been on. I have also made contributions on various type of analysis:
low background analysis in the case of the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment, cross
section measurement for the K2K and T2K experiments in Japan. I have worked on beam physics
for the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab and then worked on the various BooNE experiments at
Fermilab. I am now interested in usign neutrino detector for non-proliferation purposes.
Monitoring nuclear reactor inventory using neutrino detector is becoming a reality.




This project lies at the intersection of astrophysics and instrument design. Ultraviolet observations
of astronomical sources are of great interest, as the UV contains critical diagnostics of both the life-
cycle of stars, and accretion onto black holes. Deciding on the optimal set of filters to use in an
ultraviolet imager though is not straightforward; the most appropriate bandpasses are constrained
by which bandpasses have the most diagnostic power, and the cost of obtaining given bandpass
tolerances. This project will involve using computer simulations to decide on an optimal set of
filters for ultraviolet imaging observations of stars and galaxies, taking into account the predicted
UV emission from different classes of star, and the cost/feasibility of achieving specific filter
bandpass shapes. This project incorporates important elements from both pure astronomical
research, and the practical realities of instrument design.
My research activities have been focused on understanding fundamental properties of different
nano-structures using optical, microscopy, and magneto-optical techniques. I have been
collaborating with several material scientists as well as biologists.




My lab is primarily interested in elucidating design principles for synthetic and native biological
circuits expressed in E. coli.  We use fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics, and theoretical
modeling to pursue this goal.  We also have a GPU computing component to aid in image analysis
and simulation.




Research deals with the use of open source software development technology to build next
generation health information technology. The essence of open source technology is community
based collaboration.  Students will learn health information technology, open source methods,
management of software licensing, community based software development, software ware
testing and software architecture. As a VT faculty I am serving as President and CEO of a not-for-
profit organization funded by VA to promote the adoption of open source software for health IT.
Students will have access to large scale IT assets that this organization manages.




My research is primarily focused on nano-optics and nanofabrication, as I am interested in
arranging matter at the nanoscale to elucidate new optical phenomena, both for fundamental and
applied purposes. The main thrust is on resonant plasmonics, a rapidly evolving field that concerns
itself with the optical properties of metal structures at the nano- and micro-scales.  In particular,
we work on a number of aspects of plasmonics, where projects are chosen to be interdisciplinary
and take advantage of local scientific strengths in areas such as polymer science and colloid
science. The aim is to combine techniques and findings from disparate fields in new and creative
ways to advance both fundamental understanding and practical applications. For example, we have
shown that metal nanoparticles can be combined with organic self-assembled films to create a
composite material with unusually strong nonlinear optical effects. By combining plasmonics,
nonlinear optics and bioconjugate techniques, we are developing a method for rational assembly
of nanoparticles into well-defined assemblies with unprecedented precision. We have shown how
to incorporate incorporate actuatable polymers in plasmonic and other nano-optical structures,
paving the way for a new class of tunable photonic materials and devices.
           The goal of this research is to develop the skills necessary for scanning tunneling microscopy and
           use them to study nanostructures.  Two-dimensional novel materials and molecular thin films will
           be the focus of the research project.  Evaluation is based on the ability of the student to operate
           and maintain a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, prepare and investigate STM samples, and
           maintain an appropriate experimental procedure.




           VTIP commercializes technologies developed by VT researchers and has dozens of biomedical
           technologies, among others, in its portfolio (http://www.vtip.org/availableTech/). We currently
           utilize undergraduate interns with strong technical backgrounds to help us assess new
           technologies invented by VT faculty, protect the related intellectual property, and license those
           technologies to companies to develop into products and services. 




            Through experimentation on mouse brains, we try to understand how brain hardware, circuits and
            molecules, encode emotions and reasoning in the human. We optogenetically manipulate brain by
                surgically and genetically introduced light activated ion channels, which enable activation of
              silencing of the circuits through optical engineering using lasers and LEDs.  Our current goal is to
             decode interaction between the amygdala, the fear center of the brain, and the prefrontal cortex,
            the center for executive control, to determine how they change in emotional trauma and how they
               recover in cognitive training. The laboratory utilizes multidisciplinary approach which involves
            behavioral analyses, mapping of neuronal activity using genetic markers, and electrophysiological/
                 optogenetics interrogation of synaptic connections in the brain slice preparation and living
               animals. The project for undergraduate student is entitled “Effect of cognitive training on brain
               activity and resilience to emotional trauma”. Student will use a novel touch-screen system for
             working memory training in mice; he(she) will participate and design and testing of the paradigm.
              Once the paradigm is established, the student will employ immunohistochemical detection of c-
              fos, a protein marker of neuronal activity identify, to identify areas of the brain activated by the
              training and to compare them with the areas activated by emotional trauma. Finally, the student
                        will investigate how cognitive training affects resilience to emotional distress.



ed collaborator (highlighted in red text) on the following projects…..
The research in my laboratory is focused on molecular modeling as an approach to studying protein
structure and function. Many of our applications of these computational methods are designed to
examine the dynamics of proteins at the atomic level and to reveal the interactions between
proteins and small molecule ligands (e.g., drugs). One protein that we are studying is peroxisome
proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma), which is associated with inflammation,
diabetes, and obesity, among other conditions. Our studies of this nuclear receptor focus on the
effect of ligands on the dynamics of the protein, and how differences in the dynamics mediate the
response to ligands. Our ultimate goal is to identify novel ligands that may be developed into drug
that act via PPAR-gamma. Another project involves the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which has
been identified as the core component of protein aggregates in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.
The pathway by which Abeta leaves the cell membrane and self-associates is largely a mystery, and
we are applying molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study this pathway and gain insight on
details that are hidden from most experimental techniques. Also of interest in this project is the
association of Abeta and oxidative stress. Alzheimer's patients suffer from extensive oxidative
damage to brain tissue, believed to be caused by Abeta. Experimental work has identified dietary
compounds that may bind to Abeta and inhibit the damaging effects of this peptide. Simulations
focus on understanding this effect, with the goal of designing effective small molecule inhibitors
of Abeta aggregation. 


We have an interdisciplinary group of scientists interested in the promotion of healthful eating,
physical activity, and weight management. Our team completes projects that use automated
telephone counseling, interactive computer programs, and mobile technologies to facilitate
behavior change. We are also working to integrate interactive technology devices and
interventions within family practice settings. Our team currently includes researchers in computer
science, nutrition, exercise science, health economics, and health services research.

More than one million human lives are lost each year by malaria, a disease transmitted exclusively
by the Anopheles mosquito. Some of the most effective public health measures against vector-
borne diseases throughout history have been those targeted at the vector. However, because of
growing insecticide resistance, the available strategies for alleviating the impact of malaria are
now sufficient. In fact, partially because of global warming, increased air transportation, and the
ability of mosquitoes to quickly adapt to new habitats, the public-health burden of malaria is
increasing and expanding. There is an urgent need to explore novel strategies for vector-borne
disease control. Ecological, behavioral, and physiological adaptations related to malaria
transmission are often associated with genome rearrangements. Dr. Sharakhov's research aims to
understand the role of chromosomal inversions and heterochromatin modifications in mosquito
evolution, adaptation, and ability to transmit malaria parasites. Dr. Sharakhov's laboratory
developed unique skills and innovative approaches to physically map genomes and to study
chromosomes of disease vectors. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a novel genomics-
based approach for vector control. Interdisciplinary research includes computer modeling of
chromosomes.
The major theme of research in our laboratory focuses on biochemical, structural, molecular and
cellular, protein engineering, and computational studies on receptor-ligand recognition, protein-
protein interaction, cell  signaling, and novel receptor/ligand discovery and engineering that are
relevant to human chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity. We are also interested in studying
molecular recognition and signaling in host-pathogen interactions such as mechanisms of pathogen
evasion of  host immune defense.   Currently we have the following ongoing pilot projects:  (1)
Structure and function studies of a newly discovered anti-obesity hormone, irisin. (2) Molecular
and structural basis of viral proteins counteracting host defense. (3) How omega-3 fatty acids, such
as DHA and EPA, the major ingredients in fish oil, bind to G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120)
and  exert potent anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic effects.  (4) Discovery of novel ligand on
pancreatic beta cells for immunoreceptor NKp46, whose activation may lead to insulitis and type I
diabetes.
Title:  Exploring the Secret of How Carbon Nanotubes formed in Ancient Damascus Steel Swords.
Scientists in Germany recently discovered that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were present in ancient
museum pieces of Damascus steel swords from the middle ages.  These swords were legendary
because of their unique properties including extreme sharpness and durability, but the secret
process for making the steel and the blades was lost about 300 years ago. Some properties of the
steel still have not been duplicated by modern methods today but if better understood, could add
to our knowledge of ways to produce modern steel products to improve durability and wear
resistance of, for example, engine components.  Over the last few years, our lab has discovered
that CNTs could be produced from plant and woody biomass using a specialized heating process.
[See Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology –JNN- article http://goodell-biomaterials-
bioenergy.sbio.vt.edu/Goodell_JNN.pdf ].  One of the few things known about Damascus steel
production processes from the middle ages is that, to carbonize the steel, certain types of wood
and leaves were used.  Although the process for introduction of that plant fiber are not known, we
hypothesize that by following temperature regimes outlined in the JNN article and processes
similar to the cyclic forging of steel, we may be able to rediscover a method for producing CNTs in
steel.  We propose that a Scieneering student or team, work on this project and learn about plant
biomass, about carbon nanotubes and the unique properties of carbon materials from biomass,
and also learn about metals and forging processes.
Testing of fall arrest anchorages on roof with wood trusses.  Currently, the requirements state that
anchors must carry 5,000 lbs, but the roof components are not able to carry this load.  Creative
solutions including off-the-shelf hangers, bracing of trusses, and innovative products are needed
to solve this problem.


Our current research centers on the molecular structure and biochemical functions of signaling
transduction systems involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Our research goal is to
understand how protein domains transduce signals from biological membranes. Our laboratory
employs biophysical approaches including high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy,
circular dichroism, computer modeling, liposome-binding assays, fluorescence spectroscopy and
surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. With these tools, we can determine protein:lipid
interfaces, ligand binding pockets and membrane insertion of protein domains from the molecular
to the atomic resolution.
We study how individual differences in cognition, emotion and behavior develop over childhood
and adolescence, and influence learning/achievement and social-emotional functioning/mental
health


Disabled-2 (Dab2) inhibits platelet aggregation by competing with fibrinogen for binding to the
?(IIb) ?(3) integrin receptor, an interaction that is modulated by Dab2 binding to sulfatides at the
outer leaflet of the platelet plasma membrane. The disaggregatory function of Dab2 has been
mapped to its N-terminus phosphotyrosine-binding (N-PTB) domain. Our data show that the
surface levels of P-selectin, a platelet transmembrane protein known to bind sulfatides and
promote cell-cell interactions, are reduced by Dab2 N-PTB, an event that is reversed in the
presence of a mutant form of the protein that is deficient in sulfatide but not in integrin binding.
Importantly, Dab2 N-PTB, but not its sulfatide binding-deficient form, was able to prevent sulfatide-
induced platelet aggregation when tested under haemodynamic conditions in microfluidic devices
at flow rates with shear stress levels corresponding to those found in vein microcirculation.
Moreover, the regulatory role of Dab2 N-PTB extends to platelet-leucocyte adhesion and
aggregation events, suggesting a multi-target role for Dab2 in haemostasis.
The finite supply of fossil fuels and the possible environmental impact of such energy sources has
garnered the scientific community’s attention for the development of alternative, overall carbon-
neutral fuel sources. The sun provides enough energy every hour to power the earth for a year.
However, two of the remaining challenges that limit the utilization of solar energy are the
development of cheap and efficient solar harvesting materials and advances in energy storage
technology to overcome the intermittent nature of the sun. In the Morris group, the research
projects focus on two aspects of solar energy conversion:solar energy stoage via artifical
photosynthetic catalysts and new architectures for next generation high efficiency, low cost solar
cells.
We use behavioral assays to investigate the mechanism of magnetoreception in two model
systems, fruit flies and laboratory mice.  These projects supported by the NSF and DARPA are
investigating the involvement of a magnetically sensitive radical pair reaction involving a
specialized class of photopigments (cryptochromes).  Critical experiments involve gene knockouts,
as well as exposure to different wavelengths of light and to low-level (< 50 nT) radio frequency
fields.  We are currently working on new experiments to expose free living animals to controlled
radio frequency fields using mobile RF signal sources ("collars") that can be worn by small- to
medium-sized mammals.
In the United States, the subsurface inventory of uranium contamination includes an estimated 475
billion gallons of ground water and 75 million cubic meters of sediments. The need for site
remediation is urgent and the scale of the problem, enormous. Decade-long natural attenuation
rates, the extent of contamination, and the inefficiency and cost of pump and treat methods has
spurred efforts to identify low-cost in-situ bioremediation technologies. A strategy presently
being considered aims at in-situ biostimulation of indigenous anaerobic metal reducing
microorganisms capable of reducing oxidized, soluble U(VI), the major contaminant form of
uranium, to reduced, sparingly soluble U(IV), which typically accumulates as the mineral uraninite
(UO2). Given the abundance of iron in the earths crust, it is important to understand how the
presence of competitive electron acceptors affect U(VI) bioremediation and long term reactivity of
reduced uranium when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation. The proposed
project will test a suite of well-characterized reactive biogenic Fe(II) and sulfide-bearing minerals,
produced systematically under reducing conditions. Their propensity to adsorb and mediate redox
reactions (direct electron transfer process) with key elements such as U \and possibly Cr) will be
tested and compared to their chemogenic counterparts. Interfacial nanoscale interactions between
contaminant U(VI) and biogenic minerals will be probed by employing various techniques such as
XRD, BET, X-ray spectroscopic (EXAFS, SR-PD) and electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM,
HETEM, SAED and EELS mapping). Eventually the effect of speciation on the mobility and/or
immobilization of uranium (and Cr) will be studied.




My research group uses computational simulations of ultra-broadband electromagnetic field
propagation in geologic materials to understand Earth's deep time, its geologic evolution, and
physiochemical processes therein.

My research is primarily focused on nano-optics and nanofabrication, as I am interested in
arranging matter at the nanoscale to elucidate new optical phenomena, both for fundamental and
applied purposes. The main thrust is on resonant plasmonics, a rapidly evolving field that concerns
itself with the optical properties of metal structures at the nano- and micro-scales.  In particular,
we work on a number of aspects of plasmonics, where projects are chosen to be interdisciplinary
and take advantage of local scientific strengths in areas such as polymer science and colloid
science. The aim is to combine techniques and findings from disparate fields in new and creative
ways to advance both fundamental understanding and practical applications. For example, we have
shown that metal nanoparticles can be combined with organic self-assembled films to create a
composite material with unusually strong nonlinear optical effects. By combining plasmonics,
nonlinear optics and bioconjugate techniques, we are developing a method for rational assembly
of nanoparticles into well-defined assemblies with unprecedented precision. We have shown how
to incorporate incorporate actuatable polymers in plasmonic and other nano-optical structures,
paving the way for a new class of tunable photonic materials and devices.
I am interested in any interdisciplinary work on the understanding and treatment of autism
spectrum disorders, a developmental disability that affects communication, social interactions,
and flexible behavior. I am interested in biological, psychosocial, developmental, engineering,
educational, and computer technologies as applied to autism. As the Director of the VT Center for
Autism Research, I am also able to find other faculty affiliates who might have specific interests in
those areas.




My research group uses computational simulations of ultra-broadband electromagnetic field
propagation in geologic materials to understand Earth's deep time, its geologic evolution, and
physiochemical processes therein.




A current project is on how chemical energy in a cell is transformed into mechanical energy do
work outside of the cell.
DNA fabrication is the process of combining natural and chemically synthetized DNA fragments
together in order to make larger DNA molecules that conform to computer-designed sequences.
DNA fabrication includes gene synthesis, the process of assembling chemically synthesized
oligonucleotides into double- stranded DNA fragments. DNA fabrication also includes more
traditional activities, such as the development of mutant collections, plasmid libraries, and
refactored genomes. In this broad perspective, most biologists practice DNA fabrication, although
they are more likely to call it molecular biology or genetic engineering. DNA fabrication projects
rely on low-cost instruments and laboratory infrastructure commonly available to life scientists.
Unfortunately, the lack of a suitable framework to analyze DNA fabrication is limiting its
effectiveness, requiring tools to manage the complex flows of information and materials typically
needed in these projects.  We are evaluating the feasibility and benefits of analyzing DNA
fabrication processes by using techniques from Industrial and Systems Engineering. The premise is
that these techniques can be used to better design, plan, and control DNA fabrication processes
and that this change of paradigm will help identify preferred manufacturing strategies for DNA
fabrication. Adapting approaches used in other industries will lead to new strategies for process
planning, monitoring, and control that meet the need of DNA fabrication. The project has four
complementary objectives: (1) explore the goals and requirements of the process, conduct
functional analysis, and investigate resource and workflow strategies for DNA fabrication; (2)
implement laboratory pipelines to generate different types of constructs illustrating a broad range
of fabrication problems and biological domains; (3) evaluate algorithms to estimate high-error
rates in low volume processes, implement monitoring strategies, and compare the performance of
different manufacturing strategies applicable to specific DNA manufacturing problems; and (4)
provide cross-training opportunities in molecular biology and ISE for undergraduate students,
graduate students, and post-doctoral fellows.


We have various projects including: - developing tools for social media to detect public health
events - using simulation and social network analysis to model spread of ideation in African
communities - simulating human behavior in a disaster. I welcome female students in particular,
even those without a strong science or computing background.
                                               Project Availability
 Required skills to work in this lab    Summer            Spring Summer       Mentor name
                                                Fall 2013
                                          2013              2014    2014
Field work, possible sampling during
rain events, sediment collection,          y        y       y      y        W. Cully Hession
use of ATV




Basic Microsoft Word and Excel skills
Good attitude and attention to             y        y       n      n       Leigh-Anne Krometis
detail




                                           y        y       y      y          Warren Ruder




attention to detail; scientific
curiosity; willingness to learn;
                                           y        y       y      y          Durelle Scott
willingness to listen to; general
chemistry
Must be comfortable setting and
keeping a reliable schedule of
specific research sessions planned
in advance. / Should be interested      y   y   y   y   James D. Ivory
in and comfortable with the general
concept of applying the scientific
method to a social question.




Students must be interested in
understanding how one learns to
become a scientist and engineer
(models of theories of learning),
what barriers exist to becoming
members of these disciplines (race,     y   y   y   y   Michael Evans
gender, ethnicity, socio-economic
level), and strategies and structures
that can help these individuals
(technology, mentors, informal
learning environments).



An interest in and enthusiasm for
                                        y   y   y   y   Justin Barone
our research, we can teach the rest!
First Year Chemistry High school
                                       y   y   y   y       William Ducker
Physics




1. Undergrads in chemistry, physics,
biology or vet med with interests on
                                       y   n   n   y          Chang Lu
engineering aspect of biomedical
devices are welcomed.  / 2. GPA>3.5.




Background in chemistry or biology
                                       y   y   y   y       Marc Edwards
or environmental science.




physics and mathematics through
                                       y   y   y   y        Jennifer Irish
calculus.




Basic concepts in computer
                                       y   y   n   n   Adrian Rodriguez-Marek
programming
Familiarity with lab procedures, lab
safety. A genuine interest to learn     y   y   y   y     Peter Vikesland
new and interesting things.




Geometry and algebra, basic
                                        y   y   y   y   Matthew Eatherton
computer skills, willingness to learn




Understanding of probability and
                                        y   n   n   n   Pamela Murray-Tuite
linear regression
Due to the interdisciplinary feature
of the project, students are not
expected to have deep pre-
knowledge of these topics. But an
open mind and curiosity in
mathematics and science will be
very helpful. We will provide
necessary training and guidance for
students to learn basic theories and
techniques and to gain research
experience at the frontier line in       y   y   y   n     Yang Cao
scientific computing and  /
computational biology areas.
Usually a graduate student will work
closely the undergraduate
researcher. Office space and a
computer will also be provided.
Based on the contribution to the
project, students will be encouraged
to co-author  / scientific research
papers. 




any of: work in the social sciences;
work with managing information/
knowledge/social networks;               y   y   y   y    Edward Fox
interest in analyzing twitter, web, or
other text resources




Calculus, some programming
                                         n   y   y   n   Layne Watson
experience.


depends on the department.  they
can work on simulation (using
COMSOL) or involved in analytical        y   y   y   y   Masoud Agah
chemistry (GC-FID) or have cell
culture experience.
Some programming experience.             y   y   y   y     Dhruv Batra




minimum skills: programming
experience in any of following
languages: Python, C/C++, Matlab,
                                         y   y   y   y    Krzysztof Kepa
Java preffered skills: knowledge of
VHDL/Verilog, familiarity with Linux/
Unix environment.



The scieneer will be trained, but will
enjoy the hand-on experience more
with prior training in material          y   y   y   y      Khai Ngo
processing and electrical
measurements.



US Citizenship                           y   y   y   y   Hardus Odendaal
Some exposure to basic computer
                                        y   y   y   y     Devi Parikh
programming would be helpful




willingness to do experimental
research, interest in chemistry and
                                        y   y   y   y   Kathleen Meehan
material science, data analysis using
Excel and possibly MATLAB




Students interested in working on
the experimental apparatus must be
able to learn programming for a
basic microcontroller and be familiar
with basic electrical components. It
                                        y   y   y   n     Nicole Abaid
would be preferable that students
interested in data processing be
familiar with a programming
language, although it is not strictly
necessary.
The personal skills I require from my
undergraduate students are
curiosity, creativity, critical thinking,
and careful experimentation.  The           y   y   y   y   Douglas Holmes
technical skills required are ones
that can be learned in a very short
time period.




Matlab;  / Finished undergraduate
                                            y   y   y   y   Sunghwan Jung
lab courses; / Enthusiasm;  / 




Ability to work independently with
minimal oversight, excellent
literature and information searching
skills including electronic journals
using the VT Library system,                n   y   y   n   Sean McGinnis
excellent writing and
communications skills, interest in
the intersection of engineering,
science, the public, and polic
For Science Student: Microbiology
Lab Skills, Knowledge of more
advanced assay methods such as
PCR, Western Blot, Confocal
microscopy is highly desired but not
required. Must be interested in
applying biology knowledge
towards developing engineered bio-
hybrid systems! /  / For Engineering    y   y   y   y    Bahareh Behkam
Student: Proficient in CAD software,
strong background in fundamental
engineering classes, familiarity with
microfabrication and microfluidic is
highly desired but not required.
Must be interested in applying
engineering knowledge to biological
systems. 




Applicants must be willing to work
in a team environment and eager to
                                        n   y   y   y   Alexander Leonessa
learn more about rehabilitation
engineering.
Besides an open mind and the
ability to perform diligent
experimentation , all necessary         y   y   y   y    Rolf Mueller
skills can be acquired during the
work.




No previous lab experience is
necessary. However, if you're
uncomfortable working with
                                        y   y   y   n   Elizabeth Voigt
biomaterials or faint at the sight of
blood, this project may not be for
you.



Students must be willing to work as
part of a team and be interested in
sharing their own ideas on how to
                                        y   y   y   y   Lissett Bickford
solve problems - ideas that may be
generated from literature searches
or own experiences.
Programming skills: Matlab/C or
                                      y   n   n   n    Rosalyn Moran
similar are critical.




Requirement - must have
completed Legal Foundations in
                                      y   n   n   y   Michele Mayberry
Intellectual Property Law (COS
2304).




basic knowledge of electronics, how
to use an oscilloscope and a
multimeter for example. Basic
knowledge of particle physics.Basic
                                      y   y   y   y    Camillo Mariani
knowledge of computer software
window/mac or linux. Preferably
basic knowledge of computer
programming like C or C++ or Java.




No specific requirements. Some
background in physics, and/or
computer simulations would be         y   y   n   n    Duncan Farrah
helpful. No experience in
astrophysics is needed.
Some knowledge of optics.              y   y   y   y   Giti khodaparast



Should have basic experience
simulating ODE's on a computer.
Should have one or more of the
following:  Programming ability.       y   y   y   y   William Mather
Willingness to spend substantial
time learning synthetic biology
experiment and/or theory.




Working with office computer and
                                       y   y   y   y     Seong Mun
internet




Ability to be self-directed and take
initiative. Good manual dexterity.     y   y   y   y   Hans Robinson
Good attention to detail.
students have taken one or two
courses in physics, materials science   y   y   y   y   Chenggang Tao
or related fields.




primary skills are the ability to
quickly come up to speed on new
technologies and develop insights
                                        y   y   y   y    John Geikler
based on comparison to current
state of the art in academia and
industry




   ability to follow general good
                                        n   y   y   y   Alexei Morozo
         laboratory practice
One year of college-level general
                                        y   y   y   y    David Bevan
chemistry is needed.




The ability to apply their discipline
to a research question that has         y   y   y   y   Paul Estabrooks
significant health implications.




PCR, computer                           y   y   y   y   Igor Sharakhov
Highly motivated; strong
background in one of the following
                                        y   y   y   y        Bin Xu
areas: life sciences, chemistry,
computer science or engineering.




Student(s) should have broad
interests in engineering, science       y   y   y   y    Barry Goodell
and the environment.




Basic experience with laboratory
procedures, experience with basic       y   y   y   y   Daniel Hindman
hand tools




motivation; experience in a lab
setting; commitment to lab projects;
be able to work in a team;              y   y   y   y   Daniel Capelluto
experience in reading articles in the
life sciences.
Data management (e.g., Excel) Basic
                                       y   y   y   y   Kirby Deater-Deckard
statistics




some previous lab experience in
areas of molecular biology,
                                       y   y   y   y    Carla Finkielstein
biomedical engineering,
microfluidics is desirable.




Students must be familiar with
                                       y   y   y   y     Amanda Morris
general chemistry laboratory skills.




to be determined                       y   y   y   y       John Phillips
 basic background in chemistry and
biology, plus or minus any aspect of
                                          y   y   y   y   Michael Hochella
   environmental science and/or
            engineering




computer skills - linux physics - intro
sequence complete math - through          y   y   y   y    Chester Weiss
differential equations




Ability to be self-directed and take
initiative. Good manual dexterity.        y   y   y   y    Hans Robinson
Good attention to detail.
good people skills, good
                                          n   y   y   n   Angela Scarpa
communication




computer skills - linux physics - intro
sequence complete math - through          y   y   y   y   Chester Weiss
differential equations


The student should have some
background and skills related to
mechanical forces and energy, the
conversion of different forms of          y   n   y   y   Zhaomin Yang
energy, and an appreciation of
motors or movements at a nano-
and subnano-meter scale
No skill necessary but commitment
to the research project is             y   y   y   y   Jean Peccoud
mandatory.




Students must have a willingness to
learn computer programming, and
an interest in applying                n   y   y   n   Caitlin Rivers
computational tools to public health
and social problems.
                                               Project
Mentor Department        Co-mentor(s)
                                              Location


Biological Systems    Kevin McGuire, FREC,
                                             Blacksburg
   Engineering       kevin.mcguire@vt.edu




Biological Systems
                                             Blacksburg
   Engineering




Biological Systems
                                             Blacksburg
   Engineering




Biological Systems
                                             Blacksburg
   Engineering
 Communication       Blacksburg




Learning Sciences
                     Blacksburg
and Technologies




Biological Systems
                     Blacksburg
   Engineering
  Chemical
                Scott Huxtable   Blacksburg
 Engineering




  Chemical
                                 Blacksburg
 Engineering




   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering



   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering



   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering
    Civil and
 Environmental      Blacksburg
  Engineering




Civil Engineering   Blacksburg




                    Northern
Civil Engineering
                    Virginia
Computer Science                                Blacksburg




                    Andrea Kavanaugh, CS,
                     kavan@vt.edu; Steve
                         Sheetz, ACIS,
Computer Science                                Blacksburg
                     sheetz@vt.edu; Don
                    Shoemaker, Sociology,
                      shoemake@vt.edu




Computer Science           Dozens...            Blacksburg




  Electrical and   Dr. Schmelz (HFNS) and Dr.
    Computer         Roberts (VETMED) Dr.       Blacksburg
   Engineering           Heflin (Physics)
Electrical and
  Computer                              Blacksburg
 Engineering




                  Peter Athanas, ECE,
Electrical and
                 athanas@vt.edu) Skip
  Computer                              Blacksburg
                     Garner, VBI,
 Engineering
                  garner@vbi.vt.edu)




Electrical and
  Computer                              Blacksburg
 Engineering



Electrical and
  Computer                              Blacksburg
 Engineering
   Electrical and
     Computer         Blacksburg
    Engineering




   Electrical and
     Computer         Blacksburg
    Engineering




Engineering Science
                      Blacksburg
  and Mechanics
Engineering Science
                      Blacksburg
  and Mechanics




Engineering Science
                      Blacksburg
  and Mechanics




 Materials Science
                      Blacksburg
 and Engineering
Mechanical
              Blacksburg
Engineering




Mechanical
              Blacksburg
Engineering
Mechanical
                                             Blacksburg
Engineering




                Dr. Nichole Rylander, ME/
Mechanical        SBES, mnr@vt.edu Dr.
                                             Blacksburg
Engineering     Pavlos Vlachos, ME/SBES,
                     pvlachos@vt.edu




   School of
  Biomedical
                Specific collaborators are
Engineering &
                TBD and currently in the     Blacksburg
 Sciences and
                          works.
  Mechanical
 Engineering
VTCRI                                  Roanoke




 COS                                   Blacksburg




                  Jonathan Link
            (jlink@vt.edu) - physics
Physics                               Blacksburg
                 Bruce Vogelaar
          (vogelaar@vt.edu) - physics




             Sara Petty, Physics,
Physics    spetty@vt.edu, Nahum        Blacksburg
          Arav, Physics, arav@vt.edu
Physics                               Blacksburg




Physics                               Blacksburg




                                      Northern
Physics
                                      Virginia




          Webster Santos, Chemistry
            Rick Davis, Chemical
Physics                               Blacksburg
            Engineering Yong Xu,
           Electrical Engineering
    Physics                                      Blacksburg




                        The VTIP licensing
                  associates who work in our
                  life sciences portfolio have
                    primary responsibility of
     VTIP                                        Blacksburg
                     mentoring Scieneering
                  interns. They are Greg Hess
                  (ghess@vtip.org) and Steve
                  Lockett (slockett@vtip.org)




  Biomedical
Engineering and                                  Roanoke
    Science
                     Josep Bassaganya-Riera,
                      Virginia Bioinformatics
                     Institute - collaborator /
                     Justin Lemkul - postdoc,
   Biochemistry      jalemkul@vt.edu / Nikki      Blacksburg
                    Lewis - graduate student,
                      lewissn@vt.edu/ Anne
                    Brown - graduate student,
                        ambrown7@vt.edu




                                                   I have
                    Fabio Almeida, Jennie Hill,
                                                 research in
 Human Nutrition,     Jamie Zoellner, Brenda
                                                    both
Foods, and Exercise Davy, Kevin Davy, Wen You,
                                                 Blacksburg
                         Scott McCrickard
                                                and Roanoke




                    Alexey Onufriev, Computer
   Entomology                                 Blacksburg
                             Science
                   Dr. Josep Bassaganya-Riera,
                    VBI, jbassaga@vt.edu Dr.
                   David Bevan, Biochemistry,
  Biochemistry                                 Blacksburg
                    drbevan@vt.edu Dr. T. M.
                   Murali, Computer Science,
                         murali@cs.vt.edu




                   Dr. Barry Goodell Professor,
                   Department of Sustainable
                           Biomaterials
                    goodell@vt.edu  Dr. Scott
                       Renneckar       Assoc.
 Department of
                    Professor, Department of
  Sustainable                                   Blacksburg
                     Sustainable Biomaterials
  Biomaterials
                   srenneck@vt.edu   Dr. Alan
                        Druschitz        Assoc.
                    Professor and Director, VT
                   Fire, Materials Science and
                   Engineering adrus@vt.edu




                      Tonya Smith-Jackson,
  Sustainable        Industrial and Systems
                                               Blacksburg
  Biomaterials            Engineering,
                        smithjac@vt.edu
                    Pavlos Vlachos, Mechanical
                            Engineering;
                     pvlachos@vt.edu;   Rafael
                       V. Davalos; Biomedical
                            Engineering;
Biological Sciences    davalos@vt.edu; Mark    Blacksburg
                    Stremler; stremler@vt.edu;
                      Engineering Science and
                         Mechanics Liwu Li;
                        Biological Sciences;
                            lwli@vt.edu
                        Anderson Norton, Math
                        (norton3) Osman Balci,
   Psychology            Software Engineering       Blacksburg
                      (balci) Michael Evans, Sch of
                               Educ (mae)




                        rafael davalos, / Pavlos
Biological Sciences                                Blacksburg
                       Vlachos / John Charonko




                        Eva Marand (Chemical
    Chemistry                                      Blacksburg
                            Engineering)




                         Assistant Professor
                          Director, Wireless
                       Measurements Group US
Biological Sciences    Naval Academy Electrical    Blacksburg
                       Engineering Department
                        105 Maryland Avenue
                         Annapolis MD 21402
              Harish Veeramani, Dept. of
Geosciences          Geosciences,          Blacksburg
                    harish@vt.edu




                sturler@vt.edu, Eric de
                     Sturler, Math
Geosciences                                Blacksburg
               npolys@vt.edu, Nicholas
                    Polys, Comp Sci




              Webster Santos, Chemistry
                Rick Davis, Chemical
  Physics                                  Blacksburg
                Engineering Yong Xu,
               Electrical Engineering
                       Susan White, Psychology,
                       sww@vt.edu John Richey,
                         Psychology and VTCRI,
                         richey@vt.edu Thomas
                         Ollendick, Psychology,
                        tho@vt.edu Ken Kishida,
   Psychology          VTCRI, kenk@vt.edu Mark Blacksburg
                             Benson, Human
                       Development Skip Garner,
                        Biological Sciences Denis
                      Gracanin, Computer Science
                      Scott McCrickard, Computer
                       Science  and many others


                        sturler@vt.edu, Eric de
                             Sturler, Math
   Geosciences                                    Blacksburg
                       npolys@vt.edu, Nicholas
                            Polys, Comp Sci




                       Prof. Bahareh Behkam,
Biological Sciences    Mechanical Engineering,    Blacksburg
                          behkam@vt.edu
    Virginia        Jaime Camelio, ISE,
Bioinformatics   jcamelio@vt.edu Kim Ellis,    Blacksburg
   Institute        ISE, kpellis@vt.edu




                  I am a grad student. My
NDSSL @ VBI      advisor is Dr. Bryan Lewis,   Blacksburg
                     blewis@vbi.vt.edu
Mentor    Project
                         Research areas
college   number




                      Molecular modeling;
                    computational chemistry;
 CALS       250
                      protein structure and
                            dynamics




                       Bioenergy, genetic
                     engineering of plants,
 CALS       226        biomass, molecular
                    genetics, energy sensor,
                      longevity, signaling.




                      Aromatic amino acid
 CALS       325
                         metabolisms
              Drug discovery, enzyme
CALS   362
                      function




             receptor-ligand molecular
                recognition, receptor
CALS   307    signaling, novel receptor
               and therapeutic ligand
             discovery and engineering




               environmental fate of
               organic contaminants,
CALS   343    emerging contaminants,
              toxicology, wastewater
                treatment, biosolids




                soil mechanics, soil
CALS   322
                      physics




                 Infectious disease
CALS   304
                    Immunology



             mathematical modeling;
CALS   328    nutrition; metabolism;
             climate change; methane
             Entomology, pest
CALS   372   management, stink bug,
             ecology




             genomics, bioinformatics,
CALS   324    genetics, chromosomes,
                malaria, mosquitoes




              microbial communities,
              microbial ecology, root
CALS   346
             microorganisms, microbial
              response to desiccation
              Biochemistry, molecular
                biology, cell biology,
                molecular genetics,
CALS   323
             bioinformatics, chemistry,
                 nutrition, clinical,
                behavioral medicine




             interactive technologies
CALS   321
               for health promotion




              Diabetes, metaboloic
CALS   334     syndromes, vascular
              disease, inflammation


             biochemistry, molecular
             biology, systems biology
CALS   349
                 (transcriptomics,
             metabolomics, fluxomics)




             Protein engineering Plant
CALS   361
                      science
             biosecurity, unmanned
               aerial vehicles, food
CALS   251   safety, fungi, pathogen,
               microbe, toxin, crop
                security, airplanes
                    Media Effects,
                   Communication
              Technology, Video Games,
CLAHS   248
                 Simulations, Virtual
                   Environments,
                  Psychophysiology




                computer-supported
               collaborative learning,
                informal science and
CLAHS   239
               engineering learning,
               studio-based learning,
                game-based learning
             Carbon nanotubes, plant
               biomass, Damascus,
               carbon steel, Forge,
CNRE   318
               Electron Microscopy,
               Metal, Natural Fiber,
                  Carbon cycling.




                 Falls from roofs,
CNRE   302   residential construction,
                      trusses




                 Neuroscience,
                  Engineering,
COE    335   Computational Biology,
              Psychopharmacology,
                   Psychology
COS   339        biogeochemistry




            protein structure; protein-
            lipid interactions; protein-
            protein interactions; NMR
COS   319
               spectroscopy; surface
                plasmon resonance;
                 membrane mimics




            quantitative microscopy,
COS   309
            cell division, aneuploidy
              microfluidics, cancer
COS   243   metastasis, drug delivery,
                    clotting




             sensory biology, spatial
            perception, magnetic field
COS   348
             sensing, neuroethology,
                animal navigation




            bacterial chemotaxis and
            motility, flagellar motor,
COS   252
                quorum sensing,
            transposon mutagenesis
               Systems biology, cell
             reproramming, dynamic
COS   313
             systems, computational
                    modeling


              cancer development,
COS   369
                  epigenetics



               Bacterial molecular
                 motors, energy
COS   360
             transformation, energy
              transfer, nanomotors


             Solar Energy Conversion
COS   312   Light Activated Anticancer
                       Drugs


            Polysaccharides, Plant cell
             walls, fungal cell walls,
COS   308
              enzyme kinetics, cell
            membranes, drug delivery
            nanotechnology, chemical
COS   327      microbiology, drug
                delivery vehicles
             bio-inspired materials,
COS   314    biotherapeutics, drug
              delivery, biosensors




            chemistry directed toward
               pharmaceuticals and
COS   363       toxicolgy. Involves
              chemistry, biology and
                    toxicology




             energy, nanoscience,
COS   332
            materials, environmental
              atomistic simulation,
COS   333     quantum mechanics,
             computational science




COS   374   engineering, science, law




                 nanoscience,
COS   373        geochemistry,
                 microbiology




                electromagnetic
COS   315
                   geophysics
             brain/body, cognition,
                 emotion, child
COS   320
            development, individual
                  differences




            neuroscience of learning
COS   355
              behavioral genetics




             neural activity, brain,
              fNIRS, hemoglobin,
COS   109
              cognition, cognitive
               function, veterans
               Visual perception.
             Cognitive neuroscience.
              Functional magnetic
COS   207
             resonance imaging.  3D
               displays.  Statistical
               models of vision.  




                 using fine-grained
            measures of attention and
              attention allocation (e.g.
COS   338          eye scanning;
               pupillometry) to assay
             information processing in
            infants and young children


              Human Neuroimaging,
            Brain-Computer Interface,
COS   356
                 Autism, Anxiety,
             Cognitive Neuroscience
                autism, treatment,
COS    347
                emotion regulation




             biomedical, biochemical,
             biotech, pharmaceuticals,
             medical devices, vaccines,
               electrical, electronics,
              chemistry, mechanical,
OVPR   247
             wireless, semiconductor,
                 materials, plants,
              veterinary, intellectual
              property, law, business,
                     marketing




             Genomics, programming,
VBI    359
             genetics, cancer research



             computer science, public
               health, modeling and
VBI    342
              simulation, sociology/
                  anthropology
            synthetic biology, systems
VBI   340
                      biology




            Genetics, Bioinformatics
VBI   350     and Computational
                    biology
                 My laboratory uses a
               multitude of techniques
              to explore the cellular and
                molecular mechanisms
              that regulate neural circuit
                    formation in the
                 developing brain Key
                 words include: neural
VTCRI   336
                     development,
                 extracellular matrix,
               synaptogenesis, synaptic
                  targeting, synaptic
                maintenance, neuron,
                 axon, axon guidance,
                      visual system
                     development




               RNAP III, infection, DNA,
VTCRI   102    miRNAs, gene silencing,
                           3D




                  Muscle culture,
VTCRI   364       Bioengineering,
                Substrates, Synapses
                              brain circuit,
  VTCRI        375       optogenetics, emotion,
                               cognition




You may also apply to work with a listed collaborator (highlighted in red text) on the following projects…..


 Mentor      Project
                             Research areas
 college     number



                        computing for disasters,
                          emergency/disaster
   COE         300      planning/management/
                        recovery, web archiving,
                            twitter analysis



                         MEMS and microfluidics
   COE         370        for chemistry and life
                           sciences application



                        configurable computing,
                           high-performance
                               computing,
   COE         351
                         bioinformatics, design
                              productivity,
                       heterogeneous computing
                                         Research Description




The research in my laboratory is focused on molecular modeling as an approach to studying protein
structure and function. Many of our applications of these computational methods are designed to
examine the dynamics of proteins at the atomic level and to reveal the interactions between proteins
and small molecule ligands (e.g., drugs). One protein that we are studying is peroxisome proliferator
activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma), which is associated with inflammation, diabetes, and
obesity, among other conditions. Our studies of this nuclear receptor focus on the effect of ligands on
the dynamics of the protein, and how differences in the dynamics mediate the response to ligands.
Our ultimate goal is to identify novel ligands that may be developed into drug that act via PPAR-
gamma. Another project involves the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which has been identified as the
core component of protein aggregates in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. The pathway by which
Abeta leaves the cell membrane and self-associates is largely a mystery, and we are applying
molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study this pathway and gain insight on details that are hidden
from most experimental techniques. Also of interest in this project is the association of Abeta and
oxidative stress. Alzheimer's patients suffer from extensive oxidative damage to brain tissue,
believed to be caused by Abeta. Experimental work has identified dietary compounds that may bind
to Abeta and inhibit the damaging effects of this peptide. Simulations focus on understanding this
effect, with the goal of designing effective small molecule inhibitors of Abeta aggregation. 




To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that plants use to respond to their environment, we
have identified a network of protein factors involved in nutrient and energy sensing. The protein
network was delineated starting with a group of plant genes that are used in the response to drought
and cold. One of these genes was used in an assay that can detect interacting gene products. This
assay identified a gene that encodes an energy/nutrient/stress sensor.  We have shown that this
energy sensor can alter plant lifespan and biomass. In addition, we have identified a new gene that
controls the stability of this energy sensor.  Together, the sensor and its controller represent one way
to potentially alter plant fitness, lifespan and/or biomass. We are exploring the use of the energy
sensor and its controller in a model plant, Arabidopsis and in a bioenergy plant, Poplar. In
collaborative work with the Senger lab, we are also using genome-scale metabolic models to predict
new genetic targets for engineering desired plant biomass alterations.



Tryptophan oxidation pathway in insects and mammals. Biochemical mechanisms of insect and plant
aromatic amino acid decarboxylase- and aromatic acetaldehyde synthase-catalyzed reactions.
Research in the laboratory focuses on determining the chemical mechanism, 3D-structure, and the
identification of inhibitors of enzymes important for pathogenesis in Aspergillus fumigatus,
Trypanosoma cruzi, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.



The major theme of research in our laboratory focuses on biochemical, structural, molecular and
cellular, protein engineering, and computational studies on receptor-ligand recognition, protein-
protein interaction, cell  signaling, and novel receptor/ligand discovery and engineering that are
relevant to human chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity. We are also interested in studying
molecular recognition and signaling in host-pathogen interactions such as mechanisms of pathogen
evasion of  host immune defense.   Currently we have the following ongoing pilot projects:  (1)
Structure and function studies of a newly discovered anti-obesity hormone, irisin. (2) Molecular and
structural basis of viral proteins counteracting host defense. (3) How omega-3 fatty acids, such as DHA
and EPA, the major ingredients in fish oil, bind to G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) and  exert
potent anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic effects.  (4) Discovery of novel ligand on pancreatic beta
cells for immunoreceptor NKp46, whose activation may lead to insulitis and type I diabetes.




The goal of this interdisciplinary research is to investigate the impact of emerging contaminants on
freshwater mussels. The detailed objectives are: 1) to study effect of 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), an
endocrine disruptor, on freshwater mussel glochidia maturity, viability, and survival rates; 2) to
investigate the effect of 4-NP on female mussel mantle tissue displays and fecundity; and 3) to
understand the effect of 4-NP on glochidia attachment on host fish.



We are trying to develop bettter soil compaction specifications for construction of playing fields. High
compaction can reduce soil air permeability and this reduces turf growth needed for a high quality,
safe playing surface. So we are studying how compaction energy affects soil air permeability. We have
developed a transient-state method to measure air permeability on compacted soil samples.  The
scieneer would compare this method with the traditonal steady state method.


Projects include enhancing the immune response against bacterial infection (such as Staphylococcus
aureus), vaccine development, neonatal immunology, and probiotic enhancement of immune
function.

Models that better predict the impact of thermodynamic and biological forces on anaerobic
fermentation in the rumen of cattle and sheep are needed so that we can identify novel strategies to
mitigate methane production and its impact on global warming.  The student would explore
mathematically and biolgically the impact of different thermodynamic forces on volatile fatty acid
production, hydrogen production, and methane production.
Tree-of-heaven (TOH), Ailanthus altissima, is one of the most successful introduced plant species in
North America. Introduced from China over two centuries ago, the tree can now be found throughout
the continental U.S., and has become the dominant tree species along highways in Virginia.  More
recently, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), was introduced to North
America from east Asia in the late1990s in eastern Pennsylvania.  By 2010, the insect could be found
throughout Virginia, and had become a conspicuous nuisance pest in houses.  The insect also caused
serious damage to tree fruit, vegetables, and other crops.  The overall pest impact of BMSB in the U.S.
is increasing as the bug rapidly spreads to new regions and attacks additional commodities.  While
conducting host plant surveys for BMSB in southwest Virginia in 2011, we observed more BMSB on TOH
than any other plant species.  Later that summer, edges of some soybean fields in central VA were
heavily-infested with BMSB and, in each of those cases, wooded areas with TOH bordered the
infested field edges.  Significant numbers of BMSB nymphs have also been found in the samara (seed)
clusters of large TOH that had been cut down late in the season.  Thus, there is evidence that TOH is
likely serving an important ecological role for BMSB populations.  This association between TOH and
BMSB has not been documented or previously studied.  With the widespread continuous distribution
of TOH in North America along highways and railroads and with the likelihood of BMSB being
transported by vehicles and trains, it is possible that TOH could be facilitating the spread and success
of this invasive bug.   In 2013 we will be investigating this relationship by sampling trees throughout
Virginia and assessing the olfactory response of BMSB to odors of TOH in the lab.




More than one million human lives are lost each year by malaria, a disease transmitted exclusively by
the Anopheles mosquito. Some of the most effective public health measures against vector-borne
diseases throughout history have been those targeted at the vector. However, because of growing
insecticide resistance, the available strategies for alleviating the impact of malaria are now sufficient.
In fact, partially because of global warming, increased air transportation, and the ability of mosquitoes
to quickly adapt to new habitats, the public-health burden of malaria is increasing and expanding.
There is an urgent need to explore novel strategies for vector-borne disease control. Ecological,
behavioral, and physiological adaptations related to malaria transmission are often associated with
genome rearrangements. Dr. Sharakhov's research aims to understand the role of chromosomal
inversions and heterochromatin modifications in mosquito evolution, adaptation, and ability to
transmit malaria parasites. Dr. Sharakhov's laboratory developed unique skills and innovative
approaches to physically map genomes and to study chromosomes of disease vectors. The ultimate
goal of this research is to develop a novel genomics-based approach for vector control.
Interdisciplinary research includes computer modeling of chromosomes.




Utilize molecular techniques and analytical methods to assess microbial community composition and
processes in root, natural/agroecosystems, and in response to water deficit and other environmental
stresses.
Our laboratory seeks to understand the molecular mechanism of metabolic diseases including
diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Collaborating with interdisciplinary scientists (biochemistry, molecular
biology, cell biology, molecular genetics, bioinformatics, chemistry, nutrition, clinical, behavioral
medicine), we focus our research on mitochondria, the primary metabolic platform that converge
cellular nutrition, energy and metabolic homeostasis, and target mitochondrial dysfunction to explore
novel therapeutic rationales for human metabolic disorders.



We have an interdisciplinary group of scientists interested in the promotion of healthful eating,
physical activity, and weight management. Our team completes projects that use automated
telephone counseling, interactive computer programs, and mobile technologies to facilitate behavior
change. We are also working to integrate interactive technology devices and interventions within
family practice settings. Our team currently includes researchers in computer science, nutrition,
exercise science, health economics, and health services research.


My research is focused on identifying and characterzing natural compounds to prevent and treat
metabolic syndromes, diabetes, and diabetic vascular complications. We are doing research at
cellular, molecular and whole animal levels to achieve this goal.


My lab seeks to understand how plants regulate their metabolism, specifically in their seeds. We use
systems biology, which enables global perspectives of the cellular function to identify regulators of
metabolism leading to the accumulation of oils, proteins, and sugars in developing seeds.
Understanding how these regulators interact with each other and their targets will enable metabolic
engineering of these energy-rich molecules for practical purposes.


I develop protein-based optical sensors, that has a wide variety of application in areas such as
neurobiology, animal physiology and plant biology. The student will work on a new project that aims
at integration of such sensor into a protein matrix, with the long-term goal of using such system to
identify proteins responsible for the transport of amino acids.
Crops in the U.S. are constantly threatened by plant pathogens, many of which can be transported
over hundreds of kilometers in the atmosphere. The ability to track the movement of plant pathogens
in the atmosphere is essential for establishing effective quarantine measures and forecasting disease
spread. One of the goals of my research program is to understand how plant pathogens are
transported over long distances in the atmosphere. To do this, I’ve developed new technologies to
sample plant pathogens in the air using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Another goal
of my research program is to develop strategies to detect, monitor, and control mycotoxins (fungal
chemicals that are harmful to domestic animals and humans) in feed and food products. The Food and
Agriculture Organization estimates that over one quarter of the world’s crops are affected by
mycotoxins every year, with annual losses of around 1 billion metric tons of food. These losses are felt
by crop producers, animal producers, grain handlers, processors, food manufacturers, and consumers.
The most important mycotoxin in the U.S. is deoxynivalenol (DON). Estimated economic losses in the
U.S. associated with DON exceed $650 million per year. Members of my lab are using Gas
Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to detect and quantify trace amounts of DON in small
grains. This work has facilitated the development of wheat and barley cultivars with DON resistance,
improved chemical and cultural practices that reduce DON contamination, and improved knowledge
of the mycotoxin potential of plant pathogenic fungi in other parts of the world.
The Virginia Tech Gaming and Media Effects Research Laboratory (VT G.A.M.E.R. Lab) is a small
laboratory facility dedicated to investigating the social impact of video games, immersive virtual
environments, simulations, and related media technologies.   The laboratory is hosted by the Virginia
Tech Department of Communication and is directed by Dr. James D. Ivory, an assistant professor in the
Department of Communication.  Much of the lab’s research focuses on one of two general topics:  /  /
1) Investigations of how users of online virtual environments (e.g., massively multiplayer online role-
playing games) represent themselves and behave in these environments (typically involving
recording and analysis of content in virtual environments, including analysis of character
representations and behaviors, and surveys of virtual world users), and   /  / 2) Experiments exploring
individuals' psychological and physiological responses to the form and content of video games,
immersive virtual environments, simulations (typically involving recruitment of participants to use a
computer or media application while one or more physiological responses are measure with
electrodes, followed by collection of a series of questionnaire items).   /  / Scieneering program
participants interested in conducting research in the G.A.M.E.R. lab would assist with the
development and implementation of one or more content analyses, surveys, or experiments.
Depending on the specific project pursued, program participants will gain experience with skills
related to some of the following areas: human participants research, academic literature dealing with
social responses to media and online behavior, experiment design, psychophysiological data
collection, content analysis, survey research, questionnaire design, and data analysis.   /  / More
information about the VT G.A.M.E.R. Lab and its research is available at http://gamerlab.org.   Contact
lab director James D. Ivory (jivory@vt.edu) with any questions.




Michael A. Evans is an Associate Professor of Instructional Design and Technology in the Department
of Learning Sciences and Technologies at Virginia Tech. He received a B.A. and M.A. in Psychology from
the University of West Florida and a Ph.D. in Instructional Systems Technology from Indiana
University. His work focuses on the effects of multimedia methods and technologies on instruction
and learning. Current research focuses on the design, development, and evaluation of instructional
multimedia for interactive surfaces (personal media devices, smart phones, tablets, tables, and
whiteboards) to support collaborative learning as well as the adoption of video game elements for
instructional design, particularly for informal settings. Address: Dr. Michael A.  Evans, Department of
Learning Sciences & Technologies, 306 War Memorial Hall (0313), School of Education, Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, VA, 24061.  E-mail: mae@vt.edu
Title:  Exploring the Secret of How Carbon Nanotubes formed in Ancient Damascus Steel Swords.
Scientists in Germany recently discovered that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were present in ancient
museum pieces of Damascus steel swords from the middle ages.  These swords were legendary
because of their unique properties including extreme sharpness and durability, but the secret process
for making the steel and the blades was lost about 300 years ago. Some properties of the steel still
have not been duplicated by modern methods today but if better understood, could add to our
knowledge of ways to produce modern steel products to improve durability and wear resistance of,
for example, engine components.  Over the last few years, our lab has discovered that CNTs could be
produced from plant and woody biomass using a specialized heating process. [See Journal of
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology –JNN- article http://goodell-biomaterials-bioenergy.sbio.vt.edu/
Goodell_JNN.pdf ].  One of the few things known about Damascus steel production processes from
the middle ages is that, to carbonize the steel, certain types of wood and leaves were used.  Although
the process for introduction of that plant fiber are not known, we hypothesize that by following
temperature regimes outlined in the JNN article and processes similar to the cyclic forging of steel, we
may be able to rediscover a method for producing CNTs in steel.  We propose that a Scieneering
student or team, work on this project and learn about plant biomass, about carbon nanotubes and the
unique properties of carbon materials from biomass, and also learn about metals and forging
processes.



Testing of fall arrest anchorages on roof with wood trusses.  Currently, the requirements state that
anchors must carry 5,000 lbs, but the roof components are not able to carry this load.  Creative
solutions including off-the-shelf hangers, bracing of trusses, and innovative products are needed to
solve this problem.



The research employs empirical and computational neuroscientific approaches to understand the
principles of functional integration in active brain networks. The focus of their current research is to
investigate the neurochemistry of ageing. Age is the primary risk factor for a class of serious
neurological disorders, grouped collectively as neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) and characterized
by deficits in cognitive and motor function; functions that emerge from the concerted activity of
interacting brain regions. Findings from the disparate domains of molecular biology and neuroimaging
suggest a change in demand on cortical networks, at the level of individual cells, brain regions and
pathways.  The lab uses multimodal neuroimaging data acquired over the lifespan to assess whether
and how human neurochemistry and connectivity accrue properties such as redundancy, hyper-
activation or hypo-activation across multiple cognitive domains. Using fMRI and EEG, the team
analyses network connectivity using mathematical models of brain dynamics. The group collaborates
widely with international scientists from a range of disciplines, including animal electrophysiology,
translational neuromodeling, clinical neurology and computational psychiatry.
Research in the Barrett Lab addresses the influences of soils, climate variability, hydrology, and
biodiversity on biogeochemical cycling from the scale of microorganisms to regional landscapes.
Topics that I am interested in are:    1. Biogeochemical cycling      Processes that regulate the
transformation and transport of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus across terrestrial and aquatic
ecosystems.     Response of carbon and nitrogen cycling to environmental change  2. Soil ecology
Environmental controls over spatial distribution of soil biota     Response of soil biota to climate
variability     Soil community composition and ecosystem functioning




Our current research centers on the molecular structure and biochemical functions of signaling
transduction systems involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Our research goal is to
understand how protein domains transduce signals from biological membranes. Our laboratory
employs biophysical approaches including high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy,
circular dichroism, computer modeling, liposome-binding assays, fluorescence spectroscopy and
surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. With these tools, we can determine protein:lipid interfaces,
ligand binding pockets and membrane insertion of protein domains from the molecular to the atomic
resolution.




The Cimini lab is primarily interested in the cellular mechanisms responsible for inducing aneuploidy
in somatic cells. Aneuploidy, the condition of a cell possessing an incorrect chromosome number, is
well known for inducing severe pathological genetic syndromes (e.g., Down syndrome) and is a
hallmark of cancer. Somatic cell aneuploidy arises as a consequence of inaccurate chromosome
segregation during mitosis. Whereas many possible mitotic errors can cause inaccurate chromosome
segregation, we believe that not all of them are equally likely to occur in the leaving organism, and
that some of them represent a more severe threat than others to chromosome stability. By using a
combination of live-cell imaging, quantitative light microscopy, protein inhibition, and mathematical
modeling (performed by our collaborators Dr. Alex Mogilner and Dr. Gul Civelekoglu-Scholey) we aim
to identify and characterize the cellular mechanisms responsible for chromosome-segregation in both
normal and cancer cells.
Disabled-2 (Dab2) inhibits platelet aggregation by competing with fibrinogen for binding to the ?(IIb)
?(3) integrin receptor, an interaction that is modulated by Dab2 binding to sulfatides at the outer
leaflet of the platelet plasma membrane. The disaggregatory function of Dab2 has been mapped to its
N-terminus phosphotyrosine-binding (N-PTB) domain. Our data show that the surface levels of P-
selectin, a platelet transmembrane protein known to bind sulfatides and promote cell-cell
interactions, are reduced by Dab2 N-PTB, an event that is reversed in the presence of a mutant form of
the protein that is deficient in sulfatide but not in integrin binding. Importantly, Dab2 N-PTB, but not
its sulfatide binding-deficient form, was able to prevent sulfatide-induced platelet aggregation when
tested under haemodynamic conditions in microfluidic devices at flow rates with shear stress levels
corresponding to those found in vein microcirculation. Moreover, the regulatory role of Dab2 N-PTB
extends to platelet-leucocyte adhesion and aggregation events, suggesting a multi-target role for
Dab2 in haemostasis.



We use behavioral assays to investigate the mechanism of magnetoreception in two model systems,
fruit flies and laboratory mice.  These projects supported by the NSF and DARPA are investigating the
involvement of a magnetically sensitive radical pair reaction involving a specialized class of
photopigments (cryptochromes).  Critical experiments involve gene knockouts, as well as exposure to
different wavelengths of light and to low-level (< 50 nT) radio frequency fields.  We are currently
working on new experiments to expose free living animals to controlled radio frequency fields using
mobile RF signal sources ("collars") that can be worn by small- to medium-sized mammals.



The research in our laboratory is focused on bacterial motility and chemotaxis using the nitrogen-
fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti as model organism. Chemotaxis is based on perception
and processing of environmental information by receptors and signal transduction via a two-
component-system to the flagellar motor. The molecular mechanisms of swimming, chemoreception,
and signal transduction differ from the enterobacterial pardigm. The S. meliloti chemotaxis system
utilizes two response regulator proteins, CheY1 and CheY2, but lacks a specific phosphatase. CheY2-P
is the dominant regulator of motor response. Its dephosphorylation involves retro-phosphorylation
back to the kinase CheA, which in turn phosphorylates free CheY1. S. meliloti exhibits a different type
of flagella rotation and hence, swimming mode. While the E. coli motor causes a change of swimming
direction by a switch from counter-clockwise to clockwise rotation, the S. meliloti motor rotates
exclusively clockwise, but can vary its rotational speed. Changes in the swimming path are caused by
an asynchronous deceleration of individual flagella filaments. Rotary speed variation has its molecular
corollary in two new motility proteins, MotC and MotE.
Cells show nongenetic fluctuations, and functional heterogeneity. In this project, the trainee with
work with graduate students to culture mammalian cells, monitor their behaviors under microscope,
and perform some standard cell biology analysis. The trainee will also be required to read the
literature, and participate in project discussions.


Chromosome missegregation contributes to cancer cell heterogeneity and drug resistance. The project
is to measure quantitatively of the chromosome missegregation dynamics and how it is related to cell
phenotypes. The student needs to culture cancer cell line, practicing single cell manipulation.



A current project is on how chemical energy in a cell is transformed into mechanical energy do work
outside of the cell.



Development of molecular machines for application in many forums including molecular
photovoltaics, solar water splitting, artificial photosynthesis, light activated drugs, PDT, molecular
switches and related applications. Synthesis if new supramolcules and the study of the perturbations
of properties upon covalent coupling. Study of ground and excited state properties.

Our research examines the interactions of the major polymers in the plant cell wall, cellulose,
hemicelluloses and lignin with each other and their enzymatic degradation as it pertains to biofuels.
Interactions, as well as degradation, are studied through adsorption experiments using atomic force
microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and quartz crystal microbalance experiments.
One key challenge for future medicine is to engineer drug delivery vehicles for specific drugs and
target organs. Versatile lipid-bilayer-coated nanoparticles (Nps) can be tailored to such applications. A
strategy for design and construction of complex functional Nps for drug-delivery applications is
proposed. To achieve the ultimate goal–lipid-bilayer-coated Nps containing multiple agents, the basic
nanoarchitecture must be constructed first. The synthesis involves two steps—the coating of metal
oxide Nps with linkers and the fusing of linker-coated Nps with liposomes. Attaching linkers to Nps to
give stable linker-coated Nps is the first goal. Constructing stable lipid-bilayer-coated Nps is the
second goal. Both goals depend on the chemical structure of the linker; therefore, a small library of
linkers are being synthesized to define the structure–property space. Characterization of linker-
coated Nps and lipid-bilayer coated Nps will be done by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and
quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Four objectives are to: i) screen a
linker library to assay their ability to insert into lipid bilayers by utilizing multilamellar vesicles (DSC),
ii) characterize linker-coated planar metal oxide surfaces and liposome fusion onto linker modified
planar metal oxide surfaces to create tethered lipid bilayers (QCM-D), iii) study linker-coated Nps
interactions with supported and tethered phospholipid bilayers (QCM-D), iv) probe interactions
between tethered lipid-bilayer-coated Nps and supported and tethered lipid bilayers on planar
surfaces (QCM-D), v) assess safety by assaying Nps for hemolytic activity, and vi) assay Nps for activity
against bacteria and fungi. Completing these studies will confirm the structure and utility of these
Nps, and set the stage for further developing lipid-bilayer-coated Nps containing multiple agents.
We are interested in biomimetic approaches to generate new, optimized materials for a broad range
of applications. Some examples of ongoing projects are listed bellow: Protein-polymer hybrid
materials: We are utilizing modular nature of repeat-protein arrays to create protein-polymer hybrid
materials with tunable morphology and mechanical properties for applications in energy,
environment, and medicine. Repeat-Protein Templates for Nanoparticle Assembly and Orientation in
Thin Films:  Precise control of the macroscopic ordering and orientation of nanoparticle (NP)
assemblies and inter-particle ordering has been a bottleneck in the 'bottom-up' generation of
technologically important materials and nanodevices including hybrid photovoltaic cells, batteries,
and nano-electronic circuits. We are developing and implementing a new strategy to control
nanoparticle assemblies over multiple length scales with single particle precision. Theranostic drug
delivery systems: In this project we develop stimuli-responsive theranostic nanoparticles for delivery
of the neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory drugs to treat traumatic brain injury.   Biotherapeutics: We
are designing highly stable protein and peptide scaffolds that bind selectively and with high-affinity
to membrane glycolipids - unexplored tumor-associated targets for diagnostics, therapy, and imaging.
De Novo Design of Repeat Proteins as Non-antibody Protein Scaffolds: Sensitivity and specificity of
immunoassays and biosensors are decidedly dependent upon high-affinity, probe-specific molecular
recognition. We are using combinatorial and rational methods to engineer modular repeat-protein
scaffolds that can bind small molecules, glycans, and nucleotides. Assays and sensors based on direct
recognition of small-molecule analytes will have application not only in medical research and
diagnostics, but also in food industry, environmental sciences, forensic science and national security.




We have developed an exciting, tunable platform for the synthesis of new anti-microbial compounds.
Based on transition metal complexes, by the correct choice of an amino acid and other ligands to
surround the metal, we have developed compounds with activity against MRSA, tuberculosis and
other diseases. Research involves chemical synthesis, microbiology and cell culture techniques and
toxicology both in vitro and in vivo.



The finite supply of fossil fuels and the possible environmental impact of such energy sources has
garnered the scientific community’s attention for the development of alternative, overall carbon-
neutral fuel sources. The sun provides enough energy every hour to power the earth for a year.
However, two of the remaining challenges that limit the utilization of solar energy are the
development of cheap and efficient solar harvesting materials and advances in energy storage
technology to overcome the intermittent nature of the sun. In the Morris group, the research projects
focus on two aspects of solar energy conversion:solar energy stoage via artifical photosynthetic
catalysts and new architectures for next generation high efficiency, low cost solar cells.
My group develops computational methods for atomistic simulation, implements these methods in
computer software, and applies these methods to problems in chemistry, physics, and materials
science.


Prior art research to determine patentability of various mechanical, electrical, chemical, or life science
type inventions.  Legal research and writing, for example, writing responses to patent and trademark
office actions and drafting patent applications.  Market research to determine commercial value of
inventions.




In the United States, the subsurface inventory of uranium contamination includes an estimated 475
billion gallons of ground water and 75 million cubic meters of sediments. The need for site
remediation is urgent and the scale of the problem, enormous. Decade-long natural attenuation rates,
the extent of contamination, and the inefficiency and cost of pump and treat methods has spurred
efforts to identify low-cost in-situ bioremediation technologies. A strategy presently being
considered aims at in-situ biostimulation of indigenous anaerobic metal reducing microorganisms
capable of reducing oxidized, soluble U(VI), the major contaminant form of uranium, to reduced,
sparingly soluble U(IV), which typically accumulates as the mineral uraninite (UO2). Given the
abundance of iron in the earths crust, it is important to understand how the presence of competitive
electron acceptors affect U(VI) bioremediation and long term reactivity of reduced uranium when
evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation. The proposed project will test a suite of well-
characterized reactive biogenic Fe(II) and sulfide-bearing minerals, produced systematically under
reducing conditions. Their propensity to adsorb and mediate redox reactions (direct electron transfer
process) with key elements such as U \and possibly Cr) will be tested and compared to their
chemogenic counterparts. Interfacial nanoscale interactions between contaminant U(VI) and biogenic
minerals will be probed by employing various techniques such as XRD, BET, X-ray spectroscopic
(EXAFS, SR-PD) and electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM, HETEM, SAED and EELS mapping).
Eventually the effect of speciation on the mobility and/or immobilization of uranium (and Cr) will be
studied.




My research group uses computational simulations of ultra-broadband electromagnetic field
propagation in geologic materials to understand Earth's deep time, its geologic evolution, and
physiochemical processes therein.
We use electrophysiological, behavioral, and maternal report measures of children's cognition and
emotion processes to examine individual differences in development.




We study how individual differences in cognition, emotion and behavior develop over childhood and
adolescence, and influence learning/achievement and social-emotional functioning/mental health




Near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to non-invasively monitor neural activity in cortical brain
regions. Similar to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional near-infrared
spectroscopy (fNIRS) measures local changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin that can
be related to the metabolic demands of neural activity. Unlike fMRI, however, fNIRS does not require
exposure to a magnetic field and is less sensitive to motion artifact, making it well-suited for
developmental and clinical applications (e.g., cognitive functioning following traumatic brain injury)
Machine learning methods, including support vector machines, are currently being applied to
neuroimaging data to better understand patterns of neural activity associated with classes of cognitive
functioning. In particular, the lab of Stephen LaConte in SBES is currently developing methods to
classify brain-states associated with cognitive control, using fMRI data.   In the proposed student
project, Brooks King-Casas in the Department of Psychology and Stephen  LaConte in SBES will mentor
one to two students in a project that will include (i) acquisition of near-infrared spectroscopy data
during a task that varies level of prefrontal activity, and (ii) refinement of methods to classify fNIRS
data into brain-states associated with cognitive components of the task.  If successful, this pilot
project will be used to study cognitive functioning in active-duty and veteran populations.
   My research investigates visual perception.  Specifically, it focuses on understanding how people
recognize and remember the shapes of objects.  These objects include basic geometric shapes as well
as images of real-world scenes.  I use two different techniques to study perception: psychophysics and
 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).  Psychophysics simply refers to experiments in which
people view images on computer monitors and try to tell the difference between shapes.  This allows
     us to understand exactly how well people can perceive shapes and what limitations they have.
   Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) uses an MRI scanner to observe brain activity while
  people look at images and think about them.  It allows us to see what specific parts of the brain are
  more active during different shape perception tasks.   /  / My overall research goal is to understand
 how the brain makes sense of the many different kinds of shapes that we encounter in our lives.  We
    read tiny text; we interact with small objects; we navigate buildings and wide open spaces; all of
these skills require us to make sense of shapes.  However, “shape” can mean different things in these
  situations, and can be based on different kinds of visual input.  How does the human visual system
  accommodate this diversity of shapes?    My approach to this question is guided by the current idea
      that the human visual system includes two qualitatively different modes for processing visual
    information, which correspond to two broad areas of the cerebral cortex.  Accordingly, I examine
  human behavior to test the hypothesis that people use qualitatively different skills to interpret the
     shapes of different kinds of images (like small versus large objects), and my brain imaging work
considers how different areas of the brain might work together to support complex shape perception.
                                                     / 




Currently, I am interested in the impact of multisensory information on infants' attention allocation to
language-relevant information; this approach uses eye tracking as a way to systematically and
precisely document the ways in which infants process information from communicative partners as
they learn about native language structure; a great advantage in this work is an engineering-oriented
worker who likes to work with fine-grained data sets to best map out complex patterns of attention
regulation and attention shifting, as well as help construct interesting scenes and displays to best
represent what is knows as "social attention" processing.


We use the tools of cognitive neuroscience to decode the mechanisms of psychological disorders.  In
particular, we use human neuroimaging (fMRI) and neurofeedback in the form of Brain-Computer
Interface to create novel neuroprosthetic designs and assistive technologies.  Mainly, these designs
are meant to remediate cognitive deficits in patients.
I am interested in any interdisciplinary work on the understanding and treatment of autism spectrum
disorders, a developmental disability that affects communication, social interactions, and flexible
behavior. I am interested in biological, psychosocial, developmental, engineering, educational, and
computer technologies as applied to autism. As the Director of the VT Center for Autism Research, I
am also able to find other faculty affiliates who might have specific interests in those areas.




VTIP commercializes technologies developed by VT researchers and has dozens of biomedical
technologies, among others, in its portfolio (http://www.vtip.org/availableTech/). We currently
utilize undergraduate interns with strong technical backgrounds to help us assess new technologies
invented by VT faculty, protect the related intellectual property, and license those technologies to
companies to develop into products and services. 




We analyze the whole genome sequences of cancer patients and compare them to cancer free
patients to identify new diagnostic markers and drug targets, then validate them in the lab.  Then we
work to translate them to the clinic via commercialization and entrepreneurship.  We also study
professional ethic using text data analysis and mining.


We have various projects including: - developing tools for social media to detect public health events -
using simulation and social network analysis to model spread of ideation in African communities -
simulating human behavior in a disaster. I welcome female students in particular, even those without
a strong science or computing background.
DNA fabrication is the process of combining natural and chemically synthetized DNA fragments
together in order to make larger DNA molecules that conform to computer-designed sequences. DNA
fabrication includes gene synthesis, the process of assembling chemically synthesized
oligonucleotides into double- stranded DNA fragments. DNA fabrication also includes more traditional
activities, such as the development of mutant collections, plasmid libraries, and refactored genomes.
In this broad perspective, most biologists practice DNA fabrication, although they are more likely to
call it molecular biology or genetic engineering. DNA fabrication projects rely on low-cost instruments
and laboratory infrastructure commonly available to life scientists. Unfortunately, the lack of a
suitable framework to analyze DNA fabrication is limiting its effectiveness, requiring tools to manage
the complex flows of information and materials typically needed in these projects.  We are evaluating
the feasibility and benefits of analyzing DNA fabrication processes by using techniques from Industrial
and Systems Engineering. The premise is that these techniques can be used to better design, plan, and
control DNA fabrication processes and that this change of paradigm will help identify preferred
manufacturing strategies for DNA fabrication. Adapting approaches used in other industries will lead
to new strategies for process planning, monitoring, and control that meet the need of DNA
fabrication. The project has four complementary objectives: (1) explore the goals and requirements of
the process, conduct functional analysis, and investigate resource and workflow strategies for DNA
fabrication; (2) implement laboratory pipelines to generate different types of constructs illustrating a
broad range of fabrication problems and biological domains; (3) evaluate algorithms to estimate high-
error rates in low volume processes, implement monitoring strategies, and compare the performance
of different manufacturing strategies applicable to specific DNA manufacturing problems; and (4)
provide cross-training opportunities in molecular biology and ISE for undergraduate students,
graduate students, and post-doctoral fellows.



The primary interest of Epigenomics and Computational Biology Lab is to understand the molecular
mechanisms underlying epigenetic transitions during important biological processes associated with
human complex diseases. Toward this goal, we emphasize on the development of high-throughput
sequencing approaches for data generation and the implementation of computational tools for
“omics” data analysis. In particularly, we are interested in the strategies to monitor the fidelity of DNA
methylation inheritance, assess methylation variation within and between cell populations, identify
true epimutations, and eventually, discover novel therapeutic ways.
Synapses are sites that allow information to be passed between neurons and are essential for brain
function. Their importance is highlighted by the fact that even minor synaptic abnormalities, caused
by disease or neurotrauma, result in devastating neurological  conditions. Understanding how CNS
synapses are targeted, assembled and maintained (or eliminated) is therefore essential to our
understanding of neurological  disorders. Our lab is interested in understanding the cellular and
molecular mechanisms that drive the initial targeting of synaptic partners to each other and the
subsequent differentiation of these partners into functional synapses. To explore these questions we
employ cell biological approaches, biochemistry, mouse genetics, electrophysiology and behavioral
approaches.




RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are responsible for transcribing genomic DNA into functional messenger
RNA in eukaryotes.  Although polymerases have been extensively studied in yeast, mammalian RNAPs
have not been fully characterized. Using Affinity Grid technology and single particle cryo-EM, we have
generated the first 3D reconstruction of human RNAP II bound to native DNA.  This approach is now
being utilized to examine the structure of the nucleotide-bound human RNAP II isolated from human
cancer cells.  Furthermore, RNAP III was recently implicated as the protein machinery responsible for
transcribing foreign DNA to RNA during the pathogenic infection of mammals.  This makes RNAP III a
prime therapeutic target for preventing viral integration into mammalian hosts.  The main goal of this
project is to determine a high-resolution structure of human RNAP III that can be used for rationale
drug design in the prevention of viral infection.  In addition to its role in the innate immune response,
RNAP III also synthesizes microRNAs (miRNAs) from DNA templates.  This serves as the initial step in
RNAi induced gene silencing.  We will use a structural approach to understand how RNAP III produces
miRNAs.  Furthermore, we are investigating the processing events that orchestrate silencing
mechanisms.


One of the main obstacles in finding therapeutics for muscles and neurons is the lack of in vitro
culture system that mimick the native, in vivo, three dimensional structure of tissues.  Students in my
lab will work towards developing and testing new methods to culture muscle cells along with their
neuronal partners.
             Through experimentation on mouse brains, we try to understand how brain hardware, circuits and
            molecules, encode emotions and reasoning in the human. We optogenetically manipulate brain by
          surgically and genetically introduced light activated ion channels, which enable activation of silencing
               of the circuits through optical engineering using lasers and LEDs.  Our current goal is to decode
           interaction between the amygdala, the fear center of the brain, and the prefrontal cortex, the center
            for executive control, to determine how they change in emotional trauma and how they recover in
               cognitive training. The laboratory utilizes multidisciplinary approach which involves behavioral
           analyses, mapping of neuronal activity using genetic markers, and electrophysiological/optogenetics
          interrogation of synaptic connections in the brain slice preparation and living animals. The project for
              undergraduate student is entitled “Effect of cognitive training on brain activity and resilience to
             emotional trauma”. Student will use a novel touch-screen system for working memory training in
                 mice; he(she) will participate and design and testing of the paradigm. Once the paradigm is
            established, the student will employ immunohistochemical detection of c-fos, a protein marker of
          neuronal activity identify, to identify areas of the brain activated by the training and to compare them
              with the areas activated by emotional trauma. Finally, the student will investigate how cognitive
                                        training affects resilience to emotional distress.



collaborator (highlighted in red text) on the following projects…..


                                                   Research Description


          The CTRnet (Crisis, Tragedy, and Recovery network) project (www.ctrnet.net) is an interdisciplinary
          project to help those who face crises or tragedies (manmade or natural), and the recovery of related
          communities, with computer-based methods. This includes identifying such events as soon as
          possible, collecting all possible related information (including from twitter, Facebook, and the broad
          Web), developing a permanent archive (in collaboration with the Internet Archive), apply machine
          learning to classify and organize that information, extending search engines to handle this content
          (including photos), and providing tools for social scientists, other researchers, and other stakeholders
          to detect patterns and learn from these event-specific separate collections.


          Our research is focused on the development of microdevices for detection of chemicals in the
          environment as well as better understanding the electrical and mechanical behaviors of cells as they
          transform to cancer.




          My research focus on new methodologies for increasing design productivity in configurable computing
          domain. Such 'productivity tools' address needs of non-engineering domain experts in the areas of
          bioinformatics (big-data), heterogeneous and High Performance Computing (HPC)
                                              Project Availability
 Required skills to work in this lab   Summer             Spring Summer   Mentor name
                                               Fall 2013
                                         2013              2014    2014




One year of college-level general
                                          y        y       y      y        David Bevan
chemistry is needed.




One year of chemistry is needed. An
understanding and application of          y        y       y      y       Glenda Gillaspy
math.  




some biology background                   y        n       n      n         Jianyong Li
                                     y   y   y   y      Pablo Sobrado




Highly motivated; strong
background in one of the following
                                     y   y   y   y          Bin Xu
areas: life sciences, chemistry,
computer science or engineering.




ambitious, engaged, hardwork, and
                                     y   y   y   y         Xia Kang
good communication skills




Second semester calculus. Lab
                                     y   n   n   n     Naraine Persaud
safety.




Good lab practices, pipetting,
                                     y   y   y   y   Isis Mullarky Kanevsky
calculations.


It would be helpful if the student
had an understanding of the use of
                                     y   y   y   y       Mark Hanigan
mathematical models in problem
solving and application.
Ability to observe insects and record
data from visual tree inspections.
                                        y   n   n   n   Thomas Kuhar
Able to comfortably handle live
stink bugs in the lab.




PCR, computer                           y   y   y   y   Igor Sharakhov




ambitious, engaged.                     y   y   y   y   Mark Williams
1) basic knowledge of biochemistry,
molecular biology, and immunology;
2) basic experimental (or in course     y   y   y   y   Zhiyong Cheng
labs) skills of biochemistry,
molecular biology, and immunology.




The ability to apply their discipline
to a research question that has         y   y   y   y   Paul Estabrooks
significant health implications.




Understanding basic biology,
                                        y   y   y   y    Dongmin Liu
endocrinlog


able to calculate solute
concentrations for making solutions
in chemistry; no practical lab
                                        y   n   n   n    Eva Collakova
experience required; I will teach any
lab skills necessary to complete the
project

Basic knowledge of molecular
biology is required. Laboratory
                                        y   n   n   n   Sakiko Okumoto
experience is desired but not
required.
Incumbent must be a critical thinker
and have a basic understanding of
biology. We routinely train
                                       y   y   n   n   David Schmale
engineers in biology, so we are
comfortable with students from
different disciplines.
Must be comfortable setting and
keeping a reliable schedule of
specific research sessions planned
in advance. / Should be interested      y   y   y   y   James D. Ivory
in and comfortable with the general
concept of applying the scientific
method to a social question.




Students must be interested in
understanding how one learns to
become a scientist and engineer
(models of theories of learning),
what barriers exist to becoming
members of these disciplines (race,     y   y   y   y   Michael Evans
gender, ethnicity, socio-economic
level), and strategies and structures
that can help these individuals
(technology, mentors, informal
learning environments).
Student(s) should have broad
interests in engineering, science   y   y   y   y    Barry Goodell
and the environment.




Basic experience with laboratory
procedures, experience with basic   y   y   y   y   Daniel Hindman
hand tools




Programming skills: Matlab/C or
                                    y   n   n   n   Rosalyn Moran
similar are critical.
intro biology and chemistry or
                                        y   y   y   y     John Barrett
equivalent




motivation; experience in a lab
setting; commitment to lab projects;
be able to work in a team;              y   y   y   y   Daniel Capelluto
experience in reading articles in the
life sciences.




Ability to read and understand
                                        n   y   y   n    Daniela Cimini
research papers
some previous lab experience in
areas of molecular biology,
                                      y   y   y   y   Carla Finkielstein
biomedical engineering,
microfluidics is desirable.




to be determined                      y   y   y   y     John Phillips




sterile working techniques, / basic
                                      y   y   y   y     Birgit Scharf
organic chemistry
An ideal trainee should  be highly
devoted, have strong interest in
either cell biology experiment, or   y   y   y   y   Jianhua Xing
mathematical/computational
modeling. 


cell culturing                       y   y   y   y   Jianhua Xing


The student should have some
background and skills related to
mechanical forces and energy, the
conversion of different forms of     y   n   y   y   Zhaomin Yang
energy, and an appreciation of
motors or movements at a nano-
and subnano-meter scale

Motivated self learners, basic
                                     y   y   y   y   Karen Brewer
general chemistry



General Chemistry, organic
chemistry, physical chemistry        y   y   y   y    Alan Esker
(thermodynamics)
The only skills needed are curiosity,
willingness to work, and attention
                                        y   y   y   y   Richard Gandour
to detail. Specific skills will be
developed as needed.
general chemistry laboratory           y   y   y   y    Tijana Grove




A willingness to learn.                y   y   y   y   Joseph Merola




Students must be familiar with
                                       y   y   y   y   Amanda Morris
general chemistry laboratory skills.
strong math/physics/chemistry
background; strong problem-solving        n   y   y   n   Edward Valeyev
skills


Requirement - must have
completed Legal Foundations in
                                          y   n   n   y   Michele Mayberry
Intellectual Property Law (COS
2304).




 basic background in chemistry and
biology, plus or minus any aspect of
                                          y   y   y   y   Michael Hochella
   environmental science and/or
            engineering




computer skills - linux physics - intro
sequence complete math - through          y   y   y   y    Chester Weiss
differential equations
basic computer skills, intellectual
curiosity about human behavior,
patience for tedious work,            y   y   y   y     Martha Ann Bell
appreciation for long-term research
outcomes




Data management (e.g., Excel) Basic
                                      y   y   y   y   Kirby Deater-Deckard
statistics




                                      y   y   y   y    Brooks King-Casas
  Basic experience with computer
programming.  There is no particular
     programming language that
 students must know, but general
                                       y   y   y   y    Anthony Cate
  familiarity with programming is
    necessary.  My research does
   involve some programming in
      MATLAB and Linux/Unix.  




MATLAB programming; SPSS
analysis; possibly EPrime
                                       y   y   y   y   Robin Panneton
programming; digital movie
construction




Some familiarity with technical
computing languages (python,           y   y   y   y    John Richey
matlab, c++)
good people skills, good
                                       n   y   y   n   Angela Scarpa
communication




primary skills are the ability to
quickly come up to speed on new
technologies and develop insights
                                       y   y   y   y   John Geikler
based on comparison to current
state of the art in academia and
industry




Programming,                           y   y   y   y   Harold Garner



Students must have a willingness to
learn computer programming, and
an interest in applying                n   y   y   n   Caitlin Rivers
computational tools to public health
and social problems.
No skill necessary but commitment
to the research project is          y   y   y   y   Jean Peccoud
mandatory.




                                    y   y   y   y    David Xie
Motivation, creativity, willingness to
                                         y   y   y   y    Michael Fox
work with animals




                                         y   y   y   y    Debbie Kelly




Desire to learn, test and apply that
                                         y   y   y   y   Gregorio Valdez
knowledge.
   ability to follow general good
                                            n        y       y      y       Alexei Morozo
         laboratory practice




                                                Project Availability
 Required skills to work in this lab     Summer             Spring Summer   Mentor name
                                                 Fall 2013
                                           2013              2014    2014


any of: work in the social sciences;
work with managing information/
knowledge/social networks;                  y        y       y      y        Edward Fox
interest in analyzing twitter, web, or
other text resources


depends on the department.  they
can work on simulation (using
COMSOL) or involved in analytical           y        y       y      y       Masoud Agah
chemistry (GC-FID) or have cell
culture experience.

minimum skills: programming
experience in any of following
languages: Python, C/C++, Matlab,
                                            y        y       y      y       Krzysztof Kepa
Java preffered skills: knowledge of
VHDL/Verilog, familiarity with Linux/
Unix environment.
                                                    Project
Mentor Department         Co-mentor(s)
                                                   Location




                     Josep Bassaganya-Riera,
                      Virginia Bioinformatics
                     Institute - collaborator /
                     Justin Lemkul - postdoc,
  Biochemistry       jalemkul@vt.edu / Nikki      Blacksburg
                    Lewis - graduate student,
                      lewissn@vt.edu/ Anne
                    Brown - graduate student,
                        ambrown7@vt.edu




  Biochemistry                                    Blacksburg




  Biochemistry                                    Blacksburg
Biochemistry                                   Blacksburg




                 Dr. Josep Bassaganya-Riera,
                  VBI, jbassaga@vt.edu Dr.
                 David Bevan, Biochemistry,
Biochemistry                                 Blacksburg
                  drbevan@vt.edu Dr. T. M.
                 Murali, Computer Science,
                       murali@cs.vt.edu




                 Dr. Jess Jones, Restoration
                   Biologist, U.S. Fish and
 Crop and Soil
                    Wildlife Services Co-
Environmental                                  Blacksburg
                    Director, Freshwater
   Sciences
                   Mollusk Conservation
                         Center at VT




 Crop and Soil
Environmental                                  Blacksburg
   Sciences



                 Christina Petersson Wolfe
Dairy Science     Elankumaran Subbiah XJ       Blacksburg
                            Meng



    DASC                                       Blacksburg
Entomology       Jacob Barney (PPPWS)    Blacksburg




               Alexey Onufriev, Computer
Entomology                               Blacksburg
                        Science




Horticulture                             Blacksburg
 Human Nutrition,
                                                Blacksburg
Foods, and Exercise




                                                   I have
                    Fabio Almeida, Jennie Hill,
                                                 research in
 Human Nutrition,     Jamie Zoellner, Brenda
                                                    both
Foods, and Exercise Davy, Kevin Davy, Wen You,
                                                 Blacksburg
                         Scott McCrickard
                                                and Roanoke



 Human Nutrition,         Dr. Mattew Hulver
                                                Blacksburg
Foods, and Exercise       Hulvermw@vt.edu


                           Ryan Senger (BSE,
 Plant Pathology,     senger@vt.edu) Ruth Grene
 Physiology, and        (PPWS, grene@vt.edu)    Blacksburg
  Weed Science            Lenwood Heath (CS,
                            heath@vt.edu)



 Plant Pathology,
 Physiology, and                                Blacksburg
  Weed Science
Plant Pathology,
Physiology, and    Blacksburg
 Weed Science
Communication       Blacksburg




Learning Sciences
                    Blacksburg
and Technologies
                Dr. Barry Goodell Professor,
                Department of Sustainable
                        Biomaterials
                 goodell@vt.edu  Dr. Scott
                    Renneckar       Assoc.
Department of
                 Professor, Department of
 Sustainable                                 Blacksburg
                  Sustainable Biomaterials
 Biomaterials
                srenneck@vt.edu   Dr. Alan
                     Druschitz        Assoc.
                 Professor and Director, VT
                Fire, Materials Science and
                Engineering adrus@vt.edu




                   Tonya Smith-Jackson,
Sustainable       Industrial and Systems
                                            Blacksburg
Biomaterials           Engineering,
                     smithjac@vt.edu




   VTCRI                                     Roanoke
Biological Sciences                            Blacksburg




                    Pavlos Vlachos, Mechanical
                            Engineering;
                     pvlachos@vt.edu;   Rafael
                       V. Davalos; Biomedical
                            Engineering;
Biological Sciences    davalos@vt.edu; Mark    Blacksburg
                    Stremler; stremler@vt.edu;
                      Engineering Science and
                         Mechanics Liwu Li;
                        Biological Sciences;
                            lwli@vt.edu




Biological Sciences                            Blacksburg
                       rafael davalos, / Pavlos
Biological Sciences                               Blacksburg
                      Vlachos / John Charonko




                        Assistant Professor
                         Director, Wireless
                      Measurements Group US
Biological Sciences   Naval Academy Electrical    Blacksburg
                      Engineering Department
                       105 Maryland Avenue
                        Annapolis MD 21402




Biological Sciences                               Blacksburg
Biological Sciences                                Blacksburg




                      Daniela Cimini, Biological
Biological Sciences                                Blacksburg
                              Sciences



                       Prof. Bahareh Behkam,
Biological Sciences    Mechanical Engineering,     Blacksburg
                          behkam@vt.edu



                      Prof. Brenda Winkel Prof.
    Chemistry                                      Blacksburg
                           John Robertson



                      Rich Gandour (Chemistry)
    Chemistry         Maren Roman (Sustainable     Blacksburg
                            Biomaterials)
            Dr. Liang Chen, Department
                    of Chemistry,
            lchen08@vt.edu / Professor
             Alan R. Esker, Department
Chemistry           of Chemistry,       Blacksburg
             aesker@vt.edu / Professor
              Joseph O. Falkinham, III,
              Department of Biological
               Sciences, jofiii@vt.edu
            Amanda Morris, Chemistry,
Chemistry                               Blacksburg
                ajmorris@vt.edu




               Joseph Falkinham,
               Biological Sciences,
Chemistry     jofiii@vt.edu Marion      Blacksburg
                Ehrich, Vet Med,
                 marion@vt.edu




              Eva Marand (Chemical
Chemistry                               Blacksburg
                  Engineering)
 Chemistry                                 Blacksburg




   COS                                     Blacksburg




              Harish Veeramani, Dept. of
Geosciences          Geosciences,          Blacksburg
                    harish@vt.edu




                sturler@vt.edu, Eric de
                     Sturler, Math
Geosciences                                Blacksburg
               npolys@vt.edu, Nicholas
                    Polys, Comp Sci
               Kirby Deater-Deckard -
                      Psychology
                  (kirbydd@vt.edu)
               Jungmeen Kim-Spoon -
Psychology   Psychology(jungmeen@vt. Blacksburg
               edu) Cynthia L. Smith -
                        Human
             Development(smithcl@vt.e
                          du)

               Anderson Norton, Math
               (norton3) Osman Balci,
Psychology      Software Engineering       Blacksburg
             (balci) Michael Evans, Sch of
                      Educ (mae)




Psychology                                Blacksburg
Psychology                               Blacksburg




              Susan White, Psychology,
                sww@vt.edu; Angela
Psychology                               Blacksburg
                 Scarpa, Psychology,
                   ascarpa@vt.edu




Psychology   Denis Gracinin, Susan White Blacksburg
               Susan White, Psychology,
               sww@vt.edu John Richey,
                 Psychology and VTCRI,
                 richey@vt.edu Thomas
                 Ollendick, Psychology,
                tho@vt.edu Ken Kishida,
Psychology     VTCRI, kenk@vt.edu Mark Blacksburg
                     Benson, Human
               Development Skip Garner,
                Biological Sciences Denis
              Gracanin, Computer Science
              Scott McCrickard, Computer
               Science  and many others




                    The VTIP licensing
              associates who work in our
              life sciences portfolio have
                primary responsibility of
   VTIP                                      Blacksburg
                 mentoring Scieneering
              interns. They are Greg Hess
              (ghess@vtip.org) and Steve
              Lockett (slockett@vtip.org)




Biosciences                                  Blacksburg




               I am a grad student. My
NDSSL @ VBI   advisor is Dr. Bryan Lewis,    Blacksburg
                  blewis@vbi.vt.edu
    Virginia        Jaime Camelio, ISE,
Bioinformatics   jcamelio@vt.edu Kim Ellis,   Blacksburg
   Institute        ISE, kpellis@vt.edu




    Virginia
Bioinformatics                                Blacksburg
   Institute
Biological Sciences   Roanoke




Biological Sciences   Blacksburg




Biological Sciences   Roanoke
   Biomedical
 Engineering and                                 Roanoke
     Science




                                                   Project
Mentor Department         Co-mentor(s)
                                                  Location


                     Andrea Kavanaugh, CS,
                      kavan@vt.edu; Steve
                          Sheetz, ACIS,
Computer Science                                 Blacksburg
                      sheetz@vt.edu; Don
                     Shoemaker, Sociology,
                       shoemake@vt.edu



  Electrical and    Dr. Schmelz (HFNS) and Dr.
    Computer          Roberts (VETMED) Dr.       Blacksburg
   Engineering            Heflin (Physics)




                       Peter Athanas, ECE,
  Electrical and
                      athanas@vt.edu) Skip
    Computer                                     Blacksburg
                          Garner, VBI,
   Engineering
                       garner@vbi.vt.edu)
 Mentor Name        Mentor Department Other Academic Affiliation(s)
                    Engineering Science
 Nicole Abaid                                    ICAM
                      and Mechanics
                       Electrical and
 Masoud Agah                                   SBES, ME
                   Computer Engineering




                     Biological Systems
 Justin Barone
                        Engineering




 John Barrett       Biological Sciences
                       Electrical and
  Dhruv Batra
                   Computer Engineering



                        Mechanical
Bahareh Behkam                                   SBES, MII
                        Engineering




Martha Ann Bell         Psychology




 David Bevan           Biochemistry



                    School of Biomedical
                   Engineering & Sciences
Lissett Bickford
                      and Mechanical
                        Engineering
 Karen Brewer            Chemistry
     Yang Cao           Computer Science



  Daniel Capelluto      Biological Sciences             Chemistry

                                              Center for Human-Computer
   Anthony Cate             Psychology
                                              Interaction

                         Human Nutrition,
   Zhiyong Cheng                               Fralin Life Science Institute
                        Foods, and Exercise

   Daniela Cimini       Biological Sciences               Fralin

                         Plant Pathology,
   Eva Collakova       Physiology, and Weed    Fralin Life Science Institute
                              Science
Kirby Deater-Deckard        Psychology         VTCSOM Dept of Psychiatry


  William Ducker       Chemical Engineering


Matthew Eatherton        Civil Engineering
                              Civil and
   Marc Edwards           Environmental
                           Engineering



     Alan Esker             Chemistry



                                                 VTC School of Medicine,
                         Human Nutrition,
  Paul Estabrooks                                 Department of Family
                        Foods, and Exercise
                                                        Medicine
                     Learning Sciences and
 Michael Evans
                         Technologies




 Duncan Farrah              Physics



Carla Finkielstein    biological sciences            biochemistry




                                               1) Director, Digital Library
   Edward Fox         Computer Science       Research Laboratory; 2) Faculty
                                                adviser to VT's VP for IT




  Michael Fox         Biological Sciences
                                        Virginia Tech Center for Drug
Richard Gandour        Chemistry
                                                  Discovery



 Harold Garner        Biosciences       Computer Science, Medicine




  John Geikler           VTIP




Glenda Gillaspy      Biochemistry




                    Department of
 Barry Goodell       Sustainable
                     Biomaterials


  Tijana Grove         Chemistry




 Mark Hanigan            DASC


                   Biological Systems
W. Cully Hession
                      Engineering
                      Sustainable         Myers-Lawson School of
Daniel Hindman
                      Biomaterials            Construction
Michael Hochella      Geosciences                 ICTAS
                       Engineering Science
  Douglas Holmes
                         and Mechanics




                            Civil and
   Jennifer Irish        Environmental
                          Engineering



   James D. Ivory        Communication



                       Engineering Science
  Sunghwan Jung                                 Mechanical Engineering
                         and Mechanics


                                               Biochemistry, Biomedical
   Debbie Kelly        Biological Sciences
                                             Engineering, Internal Medicine

  Giti khodaparast           Physics
                                             Virginia Tech Carilion Research
 Brooks King-Casas         Psychology
                                                        Institute



                       Biological Systems
Leigh-Anne Krometis                                       MPH
                          Engineering



                         Electrical and
     Jason Lai
                      Computer Engineering


                          Mechanical
Alexander Leonessa                                        SBES
                          Engineering
     Jianyong Li             Biochemistry
                           Human Nutrition,
    Dongmin Liu                                   Center for Drug Discovery
                          Foods, and Exercise
      Chang Lu           Chemical Engineering
   Camillo Mariani             Physics
   William Mather              Physics
                         Materials Science and   Green Engineering, Biological
   Sean McGinnis
                             Engineering             Systems Engineering




                            Electrical and
  Kathleen Meehan
                         Computer Engineering




   Joseph Merola              Chemistry
                                                   Electrical and Computer
   Rosalyn Moran                VTCRI
                                                         Engineering



   Amanda Morris              Chemistry




                                                  ESM, Physics, Smithsonian
                             Mechanical
    Rolf Mueller                                    Institution, Shandong
                             Engineering
                                                          University




Isis Mullarky Kanevsky       Dairy Science
                          Crop and Soil         Freshwater Mollusk
     Xia Kang            Environmental     Conservation Center, Fish and
                            Sciences             Wildlife Services
                          Electrical and
  Krzysztof Kepa                                        VBI
                      Computer Engineering
   Thomas Kuhar            Entomology
 Michele Mayberry              COS
  Alexei Morozov           Biomedical
                        Engineering and    Arlington Innovation Center:
    Seong Mun                Physics
                             Science              Health Research


                             Civil and
Pamela Murray-Tuite       Environmental
                           Engineering


                          Electrical and
     Khai Ngo                                            CPES, MSE
                      Computer Engineering
                          Electrical and
 Hardus Odendaal
                      Computer Engineering
                        Plant Pathology,
  Sakiko Okumoto      Physiology, and Weed
                             Science
                                                Office of Degree Development
  Robin Panneton           Psychology
                                                          and Support
                         Electrical and
    Devi Parikh
                      Computer Engineering
                      Virginia Bioinformatics
   Jean Peccoud                                  Biological Sciences, SBMES
                             Institute
                           Crop and Soil
  Naraine Persaud         Environmental
                             Sciences
   John Phillips        Biological Sciences                 n/a
    John Richey             Psychology
   Caitlin Rivers          NDSSL @ VBI
  Hans Robinson               Physics
                             Civil and
 Adrian Rodriguez-
                          Environmental
      Marek
                           Engineering
                        Biological Systems
   Warren Ruder
                           Engineering
   Angela Scarpa           Psychology           VT Center for Autism Research
 Birgit Scharf     Biological Sciences




                    Plant Pathology,
David Schmale     Physiology, and Weed
                         Science




                   Biological Systems
 Durelle Scott
                      Engineering

Igor Sharakhov        Entomology                  GBCB
 Pablo Sobrado        Biochemistry
Chenggang Tao            Physics
Gregorio Valdez    Biological Sciences           VTCRI

Edward Valeyev         Chemistry


                        Civil and
Peter Vikesland      Environmental
                      Engineering

                     Mechanical
Elizabeth Voigt                                   SBES
                     Engineering
Layne Watson       Computer Science      Mathematics (CoS), SBES
Chester Weiss        Geosciences
                                          Rhizosphere and Soil Microbial
Mark Williams        Horticulture
                                               Ecology Laboratory
                Virginia Bioinformatics
  David Xie                                 Biological Sciences, SBMES
                       Institute

Jianhua Xing      Biological Sciences           GBCB, MultiSTEP
                                          Virginia Tech Center for Drug
   Bin Xu           Biochemistry
                                                    Discovery
Zhaomin Yang      Biological Sciences
Mentor Email Address                  Mentor Experience with Undergrads
   nabaid@vt.edu

    agah@vt.edu
                       I have advised 24 undergraduate and 5 high school students as part
                       of various research programs over the past 7 years.  16 of those
                       students were from underrepresented groups in science and
                       engineering (all of the high school students were from
  jbarone@vt.edu       underrepresented groups and each competed in a science fair
                       including the Intel Scholars Competition).  I have published 9 peer-
                       reviewed articles with these undergraduate students in the past 5
                       years including a paper in Biomacromolecules (5 year Impact
                       Factor of 5.589).
  jebarre@vt.edu
   dbatra@vt.edu

                       I have mentored 10 undergraduate students in both engineering
                       (ME, and MME) and sciences (BIO) since my arrival at Tech in 2008.
                       5 out of the 10 undergrdaute students have been authors on
  behkam@vt.edu
                       conference publications. All those who have graduated (6) are
                       currently attending graduate school at highly ranked research
                       universities. 
                       Depending on the semester over the past 6 years, there are
                       between 2 and 6 undergraduates who work in my research lab
                       each semester.  In addition, I typically have a MAOP or McNair
   mabell@vt.edu
                       scholar in my lab during the summers.  This past summer, I have a
                       recent graduate of Howard University work with us using a
                       Diversity Supplement award to my NIH R01 grant.
                       I have mentored over 80 undergraduate students during the past
                       32 years at Virginia Tech. Several of these students have
                       completed an undergraduate honors thesis, and approximately 5
  drbevan@vt.edu
                       peer-reviewed publications have included undergraduate
                       students as a co-author. Several of the undergraduate students
                       have presented their results at a scientific conference.


  Bickford@vt.edu


  kbrewer@vt.edu
                  I current mentor two undergraduate students in independent
                  study, and I mentored three undergraduate students in previous
  ycao@vt.edu
                  terms under independent study and REU (research experience for
                  undergraduate) programs. 


capellut@vt.edu
                  I have no mentoring experience per se.  I have just begun my first
                        semester as an Assistant Professor.  However, I do have
  acate@vt.edu
                       experience collaborating with undergraduate students on
                    research projects, during my time as a postdoctoral researcher. 

 zcheng@vt.edu
                  I have mentored 13 undergraduates over six years at VT. One of
 cimini@vt.edu    them was co-author on three papers. Three more are co-authors
                  on manuscripts currently in preparation.

collakov@vt.edu

 kirbydd@vt.edu

                  I have mentored about 15 undergraduates.  Their work has been
wducker@vt.edu    included in three publications (one entirely from undergraduate
                  research)

meather@vt.edu
                  I have mentored perhaps two dozen undergraduates in the last 10
edwardsm@vt.edu
                  years.

                  35 Undergraduate Students mentored since 1999, 22 of whom
                  have gone on to graduate or professional schooling after
                  completing their undergraduate studeis thus far / Undergraduate
 aesker@vt.edu
                  students have been coauthors on 14 publications since 1999, three
                  as first authors / Undergraduate students have made > 20
                  presentations at external meetings since 1999


estabrkp@vt.edu
                  For my NSF grant, I have mentored six (6) undergraduates from
                  mathematics and computer science resulting in the following
                  presentations and publications:  /  / Evans, M.A., Feenstra, E.*,
                  Ryon, E.*, & McNeill, D. (2011).  A multimodal approach to coding
                  discourse: Collaboration, distributed cognition, and geometric
                  reasoning. International Journal of Computer Supported
                  Collaborative Learning, 6(2), 253-278. /  / Drechsel, E.*, Evans,
                  M.A., Feenstra, E.*, & McNeill, D.* (2011). Multimodal analysis of
                  the effects of social constraints and manipulative presentation
                  format on pre-kindergarten students. Roundtable presented at
                  the American Educational Research Association Conference, New
 mae@vt.edu
                  Orleans, LA, April 8-12. /  /  / Evans, M.A., & Woods, E.M.* (2009).
                  Multi-touch, tangible computing applications for instruction:
                  Facilitating discourse and co-construction in early elementary
                  mathematics. Paper presented at the Alpine-Rendezvous
                  Workshop, November 30 - December 2, 2009, Garmisch-
                  Partenkirchen, Germany.  / Evans, M.A., Ryon, E.*, Feenstra, A.*, &
                  McNeill, D. (2009).  Discourse coding from a multimodal approach:
                  Distributed cognition & geometric problem solving in young
                  children. Paper presented at the Alpine-Rendezvous Workshop,
                  November 30 - December 2, 2009, Garmisch-Partenkirchen,
                  Germany.  / 
farrah@vt.edu

                  59 undergraduate students mentored in 5 years, 92% pursue
                  careers in either academia or industry, numerous awards at the
finkielc@vt.edu
                  regional, state, and national levels were received. Students were
                  included in peer-reviewed publications.



                  Since coming to VT in 1983 have mentored undergraduates
                  through their engagement in my lab (Digital Library Research
                  Laboratory, www.dlib.vt.edu), independent study/undergraduate
 fox@vt.edu
                  research, and extensions of term projects in CS4624 (Multimedia,
                  Hypertext, and Information Access) that I teach yearly. Usually
                  work with 1-5 students each year. Many are co-authors.



mafox1@vt.edu
                      Participated in the inaugural Scieneering program with two
                      students. Their work resulted in a poster presentations at the
                      SERMACS meeting fall 2011 and the National ACS meeting in
 gandour@vt.edu       August 2012. In the past 3 years, over 20 undergraduates per
                      semester have worked on projects under my supervision.
                      Undergrads are an integral part of my research team since 1975. All
                      publications since 2009 have undergraduate co-authors.
Garner@vbi.vt.edu

                      I have personally mentored 6 undergraduate interns at VTIP in the
                        last 4 years and a year ago was designated as the coordinator for
                      all our intern programs. VTIP has had a dozen interns working with
                         our licensing associates in the last year, including one from the
  john55@vt.edu
                            first Scieneering cohort. The work ranges from early stage
                             assessment of new inventions developed at VT for both
                         patentability and commercial potential through to developing
                              valuations for licensing those inventions to companies

                      I have mentored 36 undergraduate researchers during my career,
                      My group usually hosts between 2 and 4 undergraduate students
                      each semester. We strive to provide excellent training for
                      students and for them to contribute to our research goals. This has
  gillaspy@vt.edu     culminated in five undergraduates earning co-authorship on
                      published papers, and three more are co-authors in work in
                      preparation. Three undergraduates from my lab have given
                      presentations at national meetings, and seven more have
                      presented their work at regional conferences.  

  goodell@vt.edu


                      I have mentored undergraduate students only during my postdoc.
tijana.grove@vt.edu   My lab at VT is new, but I am looking forward to working with
                      undergraduates.
                      I have mentored over 10 undergraduate students in conducting
                      research projects.  Those experiences have resulted in authorship
mhanigan@vt.edu       on abstracts for most of the students and for 3 of the students on
                      peer reviewed journal articles with a couple more journal articles
                      in preparation..  
 chession@vt.edu

dhindman@vt.edu
 hochella@vt.edu
                     I have mentored 7 undergraduate students as a part of various
                     research projects over the past 5 years.  These projects have led
                     directly to 3 peer reviewed publications (including a paper in the
                     Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and two papers
dpholmes@vt.edu
                     in Soft Matter), 2 publications in preparation, 1 patent disclosure,
                     and 1 oral presentation at a national conference by an
                     undergraduate student (APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting,
                     2010).


                     Since 2006, I have mentored 14 undergraduates. Three
                     undergraduates served as lead author on a technical paper, and
  jirish@vt.edu      most students provided significant contributions to sponsor
                     technical reports. Undergraduate students working in my group
                     have had the oppo
                     I have worked with several undergraduate students who were
                     involved with field studies and undergraduate research in the
  jivory@vt.edu
                     small laboratory I manage, and a student is currently involved with
                     a Scieneering project there.
                     I have mentored undergraduate research for many years since
                     Aug. 2009. In the Fall 2011, I was mentoring 12 undergraduate
 sunnyjsh@vt.edu     students on various research projects. Consequently, I have
                     published two scientific peer-reviewed journal papers with three
                     undergrads

 debkelly@vt.edu

                     I have mentored 12 undergrads with three publications with their
  khoda@vt.edu
                     contributions
bkcasas@vtc.vt.edu
                     I have mentored students in the McNair Summer Program, the
                     MAOP summer program, and in various paid semester long
                     positions (I usually have 2-3 at any given time associated with my
                     group). My most recent senior undergraduate research assistant
 krometis@vt.edu
                     recently placed second in an international competition for
                     undergrad research and presented the work we did together in
                     Dallas, TX last summer. Undergraduates are frequently listed as co-
                     authors on peer-reviewed or conference publications.
   laijs@vt.edu

                     I had several undergraduate students working in my lab, including
                     one scieneer. I usually pair them with a graduate student and
aleonessa@vt.edu
                     assign them a specific project. Then I meet with them on a weekly
                     basis (at least) to provide direction and answer any question.
    lij@vt.edu
  doloiu@vt.edu
                      >10 undergrad students / 2 undergrad students published papers
  changlu@vt.edu
                      on their research
  camillo@vt.edu
 wmather@vt.edu
smcginn@mse.vt.edu




                      I mentor between 3-10 undergraduates who are enrolled in
                      undergraduate research projects each semester and supervise at
 kameehan@vt.edu      least 1 undergraduate research assistant per year.  There is usually
                      one paper per year on which the undergraduate research assistant
                      is a co-author. 




  jmerola@vt.edu
rosalynj@vtc.vt.edu

                      As a first year professor, I have had 2 senior undergraduate
                      student decide to work in my laboratory.  Additionally as a post
  ajmorris@vt.edu     doctoral researcher I mentored 3 undergraduate students at
                      Princeton University.  The mentoring of one of those
                      undergraduate students led to a publication in ChemSusChem.


                      I have been mentoring undergraduate students since 2001 (in
                      Germany) and have taken between one and three undergraduate
                      students in my lab in China every year over the last 6 years.  Most
rolf.mueller@vt.edu   of these undergraduates have documented their work in technical
                      reports, conference and publications  resulted in several cases,
                      but only after the respective students had become graduate
                      researchers.


  isiskm@vt.edu
   kxia@vt.edu


   kepa@vt.edu
  tkuhar@vt.edu
 michele5@vt.edu
 alexeim@vt.edu
  munsk@vt.edu



                      I have not yet mentored undergraduates, but I have worked with
 murraytu@vt.edu
                      high school students (7) at different times.



   kdnt@vt.edu

   wgo@vt.edu


 sokumoto@vt.edu


 panneton@vt.edu

  parikh@vt.edu


 peccoud@vt.edu


                      I mentored 1 BSE student who worked on instrumentation to
   npers@vt.edu
                      remotely monitor climate inside a protoype solar greenhouse
  jphillip@vt.edu
   richey@vt.edu
cmrivers@vbi.vt.edu
   hansr@vt.edu

 adrianrm@vt.edu


  wruder@vt.edu

  ascarpa@vt.edu
                      Since I joined the Department of Biological Sciences at Virginia
                      Tech, I mentored 12 undergraduate students, including one MAOP
                      student, one REU student, and one scieneering student. / Two
  bscharf@vt.edu
                      undergraduates are co-authors on a publication that has been
                      recently accepted for publication, another manuscript with one
                      undergraduate being first author is in preparation.   / 




                      I have mentored 19 undergraduate students in my lab. Many of
 dschmale@vt.edu      these students have published their work in peer reviewed
                      journals and presented their research at scientific meetings.




                      I have mentored over 10 undergraduate students over the last 4
                      years. Former students have greatly benefited from this
  dscott@vt.edu
                      experience, as shown by all receiving either (1) great jobs in
                      industry or (2) acceptance into graduate school. 
    igor@vt.edu
 psobradp@vt.edu
   cgtao@vt.edu       i have mentored 6 undergraduates.
gvaldez1@vtc.vt.edu
                      has mentored 5 undergraduates (average 1/year) /  / 1 first-
    efv@vt.edu        undergraduate-author publication as a result /  / one student has
                      joined my group to pursue a PhD / 
                      My laboratory has provided approximately 10 Virginia
                      undergraduate students with the opportunity to do conduct
  pvikes@vt.edu       guided research. A number of these students have gone on to
                      graduate school following their research efforts and one was the
                      co-author on a rece
  betsyv@vt.edu
   ltw@cs.vt.edu
  cjweiss@vt.edu
markwill@vt.edu


davidxie@vt.edu


 jxing@vt.edu     N/A

 binxu@vt.edu
zmyang@vt.edu
                                Mentoring Style




I identify the strength of the student early on and then focus them on areas in
that strength.  If the student shows interest in an area outside of his strength,
I work with them to develop competencies in that area.




Undergraduate students at MicroN BASE get to interact with the lab PI on
regular basis (at least once a week) while they closely collaborate with senior
Ph.D. students. Students not only learn about the process of research and the
required laboratory skills, they will also be trained in responsible research
conduct and essential "soft skills". Our lab is a lively, collaborative, and fun
environment where we all work together to develop cutting-edge solutions
to challenging engineering and science problems. 


I have an open-door policy and am in my office and my lab 4 days a week,
including summers. I enjoy working with all levels of students, including
undergrads, graduate students, and post-docs.  


I expect students to be able to work relatively independently, though
graduate students and other undergraduate students from my lab, in addition
to myself, are always available for questions. Work in my lab begins with a
series of tutorials, after which students are assigned to a research project. I
meet with each of the students in my lab at least weekly for progress reports.
I am quite flexible in mentoring. Students come in with different research
interest and background. I first discuss with them about possible project
topics. After we select the topic, students start with reading some literature
publications. Then they will try some algorithms with test models in those
publications. After they understand the method, we get into small biological
models to apply the modeling and simulation techniques. I usually meet with
students once a week. 

  My mentoring style will be very hands-on.  Since my previous experience
   collaborating with undergraduates involved explaining the theoretical
 background and technical details of specific research projects, I am familiar
                and comfortable with working side-by-side.  


Typically, I pair each undergraduate student with a graduate student, who
will be the direct supervisor. I periodically discuss with them to determine
where the experiments should be going next.




My mentoring style is to explain a desired outcome and then to give them
flexibility in how they achieve that outcome.  Usually, I give each student a
lot of supervision in the beginning and then more freedom towards the end. I
always pair a new undergraduate student with a postgraduate or another
undergraduate so that they have someone in the lab with them.

Initially each undergraduate is paired with a graduate student, attend weekly
meetings with the graduate student, and then transitions to a project of their
own.

Undergraduate students in my group work under a graduate student, but
have their own unique project.  It can be related to what the graduate
student is doing, but should be their own.  They need to learn to work both
independently and in a group.  Otherwise they participate equally in all other
lab activites, lab maintainence, presentations at group meetings etc.
I prefer to use what might be portrayed as a cognitive apprenticeship model. I
engage the students in authentic research and gradually allow them to take
ownership and responsibility on a portion of the research that is personally
meaningful and meaningful to the larger project. Undergraduates that work
with me experience all phases of research from data collection to proposal or
manuscript submission. 




student join a rotation program in the lab where they learn basic molecular
biology techniques, microscopy, bioinformatics, and work with animal
models or human samples. After a 6 weeks rotation, they are presented with
the option of 3 projects that they will need to explore and decide which to
pursue. A mentor is assigned to the student to follow up progress throughout
the project.
Meet individually with them, or in small groups, as well as during lab or
project meetings.  The Lab has weekly meetings, and each of our larger
funded projects has a weekly meeting. Undergraduates sometimes get a seat
in the lab for a semester or AY. There is a fair amount of collaboration with
MS and PhD students, as well as other co-PIs involved in projects. I urge each
student to work on what they find of interest, and what supports their long-
term goals, so they have high motivation. Sometimes we engage in socially
relevant activities, like when Haitian students worked on a digital library
archiving about the earthquake.
We use a team approach with team leaders. Team leaders are those students
who have experience on the project. We have weekly group meetings in the
evening. I meet with the teams every two weeks to provide individual
mentoring. We write team reports at the end of a term.




 We now have a  well developed training program for new interns including
 PPT presentations, videos and hands-on exercises. From that basic training,
 we have interns work immediately on conducting prior art searches of new
   inventions that come to our office for assessment. We provide feedback
 through each step of that process andgradually involve interns in additional
tasks of greater difficulty based on their ability to progress ove rhte course of
                                  the semester




I provide the background for the intellectual basis for a student's project, and
members of the lab usually provide guidance on technical aspects of the
work. I engage students during our weekly lab meetings, discuss their data
with them, and provide them with career advice. Overall, I use a hands-on
mentoring style.




i would describe my mentoring style as hands-on. I like to engage in
discussion with students, help them read papers and come up with
experiments on their own. I believe in learning by doing (and making
mistakes doing it). 
My mentoring style relies on selected guidance for the student.  I work with
the student to define the project bounds and the general direction.  I
typically pair the student with a PhD student in my laboratory to provide day
to day guidance.  Because of the nature of the project I have in mind for this
student, I would provide all of the guidance.
The benefi t of undergraduate research programs is undeniable for inspiring
the next generation of scientists. My experience as an undergraduate
researcher sparked my desire for a scientific career. Throughout my research
career, I mentored several undergraduate students and experienced the
ways in which a well-designed project can provide invaluable experience
while generating valuable results for the scientific community.   /  / I like to
use simple, careful experiments to probe the fundamental mechanics and
physics of a problem.  I typically design research projects suited for the
individual student and let them grow within that work or expand into areas
that interest them as they move forward.

I fully support the team approach to research, with all people in my group
engaging to some level in all ongoing research. I find that this fosters creative
thinking and gives students the most diverse research experience. My group
meets as a whole once a
My goal is to provide guidance in the planning and execution of student
research, but to provide them the opportunity to pursue projects that
interest them and have as much leadership and hands-on experience with
the research process from beginning to end.

I will have a weekly meeting with individuals or groups of the same project.
During this meeting, students will report their research progress and discuss
technical challenges with me or graduate students.




The work in my group during semesters and learn basic skills about my
research techniques and many of them continue during the summer.


Team building is incredibly important to me. I have a weekly Friday meeting
where all my students (graduate and undergraduate) gather to discuss their
latest successes and challenges in research, and where we together discuss a
recent peer-reviewed article one of the students has selected. This creates
an opportunity for the students to collaborate not only with me but with each
other. It also emphasizes that science is a dialogue, and improves
communication skills. On the individual basis, I try to be very approachable
and available.



I am very task driven. I usually set a milestone and I will leave up to the
student to manage his/her time to fulfill the required work within the
assigned deadline. I tried not to micromanage and leave space to the student,
but at the same time, I am always available to help and answer questions.
Since the topic of the research project is usually an off-shoot of a project that
has been pursued by graduate students in my lab, I first provide the students
with papers that have been published on the topic from these students as
well as a small selection of papers published by others in the field.  I then
encourage the students to conduct their own literature search.  The research
tends to be experimental.  So, the next step is to work with the students or
assign one of the graduate students in the lab to train the students on the
processes and instrumentation that they will use plus provide safety training.
Once I am comfortable that the students know how to use the equipment in
the lab, they are given open access to the lab.  I meet with them regularly, at
least once a week, to track their progress and refocus them, if necessary,
answer questions, and provide them with names of people around campus
who they can use as additional sources of information.  Students are
encouraged to suggest modifications to the research project and to explore
tangential areas.  I expect work to be documented as it is conducted and
results to be summarized into short reports at the conclusion of the project.
Otherwise, my style is fairly open-ended and guiding.




At the beginning of the mentoring relationship I am involved in teaching the
student the method necessary to complete their experiments.  However, I
generally follow a hands-off approach and after the student is introduced to
the technique I allow them to explore the method and conduct experiments
without my direct observation.  My door is always open for students to come
and ask questions if they do hit a wall.
My prime objective in working with undergraduates has been to independent
(and interdisciplinary) scientific thought and  in particular independent
problem solving. I understand that undergraduate researchers need a lot of
discussion and feedback, in particular in the early stages of their work, but I
have always tried to provide this feedback in a way that left the student
enough room to be in charge of his or her own research agenda. I also value
the team-integration of the undergraduate researches and have therefore
always tried to foster their collaboration with my graduate students and also
introduce them to colleagues from different disciplines that I have been
collaborating with.
I fully integrate junior researchers with my research team.  I meet with
everyone individually and as a team.  Junior people are paired with senior
graduate students so between the grad students and myself, there is always
someone available to answer questions.  I also try to get every researcher to
develop to the point where work can be presented at conferences, where
student can see the breadth of the field.




Foster critical and creative thinking
I like to encourage the students to become independent thinkers, but will
always be available for reinsurance and discussions. / Research progress will
be discussed on a weekly basis and research is presented by the undergrads
orally during our weekly lab meetings.


One of the most important experiences for an undergraduate science major is
the opportunity to conduct an independent research project. I have
mentored 19 undergraduates through independent research projects in my
lab. These students work with members of the lab to develop hypotheses,
test those hypotheses through repeated experimentation, and present the
results in informal (lab) and formal (conference) settings. Two of my former
undergraduate researchers have gone on to participate in competitive
summer undergraduate research experiences, two have matriculated in
graduate programs, and three are currently making plans for graduate school.
As a graduate student mentor, I seek to cultivate skilled scientists in a core
discipline of life sciences or engineering, but who are also proficient in the
alternate discipline, with an appreciation of its methods, culture, and
perspectives. I currently advise or co-advise five Ph.D. students in PPWS, and
I have served as a co-advisor for one M.S. student in Mechanical Engineering
and one Ph.D. student in Aerospace and Ocean Engineering. These graduate
students have published papers in respected journals, presented their work
at national and international meetings, and have mentored many of the
undergraduate students in my lab. I am also one of 15 participants in a new 5-
year, $3M NSF Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship
Program (IGERT) award that launched at Virginia Tech in August, 2010. 
With any of my students, my approach is to help facilitate the learning
process. Three areas that I focus on are (1) time management, (2) developing
and measuring short term and long term goals, and (3) developing a rigorous
understanding of the scientific process.


advisory, prescribing, and cooperative

I am deeply involved in a project, but the student is the main driver; in-
person mentoring in weekly meetings (or more often, depending on projects
and student's classload).
I meet with undergraduate researchers on a periodic basis. In general each
undergraduate is assigned to a graduate student who is actively working in
the laboratory on a research project. All of the researchers in my group
collectively meet on a weekly ba
I like to work closely with the students, but allow them to explore by
themselves at the same time
Mentor    Project
                        Research areas
college   number




                     Molecular modeling;
                         computational
 CALS       250
                       chemistry; protein
                    structure and dynamics




                       Bioenergy, genetic
                     engineering of plants,
 CALS       226        biomass, molecular
                    genetics, energy sensor,
                      longevity, signaling.




                     Aromatic amino acid
 CALS       325
                        metabolisms
             Drug discovery, enzyme
CALS   362
                     function




                  receptor-ligand
              molecular recognition,
             receptor signaling, novel
CALS   307
             receptor and therapeutic
               ligand discovery and
                    engineering
             watershed management,
                 stream ecology,
CALS   345
              sediment source and
                      fate
                  public health,
CALS   317     waterborne disease,
              cooperative extension




                 Synthetic Biology;
              Cellular and Molecular
                   Biomechanics;
             Biorobotics; Intelligent
CALS   337
             Materials; Micro-Electro-
                Mechanical Systems
               (MEMS); Lab-on-Chip
              Devices; Microfluidics


                 water resources;
             biogeochemistry; stream
CALS   216
                hydrology; nutrient
                      runoff




              environmental fate of
              organic contaminants,
CALS   343   emerging contaminants,
             toxicology, wastewater
               treatment, biosolids
               soil mechanics, soil
CALS   322
                     physics



               Infectious disease
CALS   304
                  Immunology




             mathematical modeling;
             nutrition; metabolism;
CALS   328
                climate change;
                    methane
             Entomology, pest
CALS   372   management, stink bug,
             ecology




                    genomics,
             bioinformatics, genetics,
CALS   324
              chromosomes, malaria,
                    mosquitoes
             microbial communities,
             microbial ecology, root
CALS   346      microorganisms,
              microbial response to
                   desiccation




             Biochemistry, molecular
               biology, cell biology,
               molecular genetics,
CALS   323        bioinformatics,
               chemistry, nutrition,
                clinical, behavioral
                      medicine




             interactive technologies
CALS   321
               for health promotion



              Diabetes, metaboloic
CALS   334     syndromes, vascular
              disease, inflammation

             biochemistry, molecular
             biology, systems biology
CALS   349       (transcriptomics,
                  metabolomics,
                     fluxomics)


               Protein engineering
CALS   361
                  Plant science
              biosecurity, unmanned
                aerial vehicles, food
CALS    251   safety, fungi, pathogen,
                microbe, toxin, crop
                 security, airplanes




                  Media Effects,
                 Communication
                Technology, Video
CLAHS   248
               Games, Simulations,
              Virtual Environments,
                Psychophysiology
                computer-supported
               collaborative learning,
                informal science and
CLAHS   239
               engineering learning,
               studio-based learning,
                game-based learning




              Carbon nanotubes, plant
                biomass, Damascus,
                carbon steel, Forge,
CNRE    318
                Electron Microscopy,
                Metal, Natural Fiber,
                   Carbon cycling.




                  Falls from roofs,
CNRE    302   residential construction,
                       trusses
              Protein engineering, self-
                assembly, molecular
COE     220
                    engineering,
                  nanotechnology.
COE   329   thin films, heat transfer




             Microfluidics, gene
COE   213     delivery, medical
             devices, cell culture



              Corrosion, Premise
             Plumbing Pathogens,
COE   245
            Water Chemistry, Water
                   Quality


COE   326       coastal hazards




COE   331   Earthquake Engineering



               Nanomaterials,
COE   270   nanotechnology, water
                   supply
            Earthquake Engineering,
COE   316    structural engineering,
                instrumentation,




                  evacuation;
COE   301    transportation; social
               science; behavior




               Modeling and
                 Simulation,
COE   223   Computational Biology,
              Cell Cycle Model,
              Multiscale systems
            computing for disasters,
              emergency/disaster
COE   300   planning/management/
            recovery, web archiving,
                twitter analysis



             Scientific computing,
               high performance
COE   330    computing, modeling
                and simulation,
                  optimization

            MEMS and microfluidics
COE   370    for chemistry and life
              sciences application




             Artificial Intelligence;
COE   368      Computer Vision;
              Machine Learning;




            configurable computing,
               high-performance
                   computing,
COE   351    bioinformatics, design
                  productivity,
                 heterogeneous
                   computing
             solar power converter
COE   311
                    packaging



              optical system design,
             nanomaterials synthesis
COE   306      and characterization,
                  high heat-load
                     packaging
            low-temperature cofired
                  ceramics (LTCC)
               integrated packaging
COE   366
             high-density integration
                magnetic materials
              magnetic components

COE   365              All




               computer vision,
               machine learning,
COE   367
             artificial intelligence,
              pattern recognition
            Mathematical modeling,
             collective behavior,
COE   303     mechatronics, bat
            swarming, underwater
              vehicles, controls




               Elasticity, Geometry,
              Wrinkling, Crumpling,
                Folding, Thin Films,
            Structural Stability, Fluid-
COE   232
              Structure Interaction,
             Swelling, Gels, Dynamic
                 Deformations of
                    Structures.




                Fluid mechanics;
COE   264   interfacial dynamics; bio-
                   locomotion




                Nanotechnology,
                 nanomaterials,
COE   310
            environmental impacts,
             life cycle assessment
             Nano-bio interface /
             Biological adhesion /
             Biomaterials / Micro-
COE   253
                 biorobotics /
            Microfluidic Devices for
               Biological Studies




              Control, Robotics,
COE   256
               Rehabilitation
            bioinspired technology,
              physics of biological
              sonar sensing, bats,
COE   249
            computational acoustics,
              biodiversity, natural
               history museums




              Tissue engineering
                   materials
               characterization
COE   371
             experimental design
              measurement and
               instrumentation




                 Drug delivery,
                  sustainable
COE   305
                 nanomedicine,
             translational oncology
                Neuroscience,
                 Engineering,
COE   335   Computational Biology,
             Psychopharmacology,
                  Psychology




COS   339      biogeochemistry




               protein structure;
                  protein-lipid
             interactions; protein-
              protein interactions;
COS   319
               NMR spectroscopy;
                surface plasmon
            resonance; membrane
                     mimics
            quantitative microscopy,
COS   309
            cell division, aneuploidy




              microfluidics, cancer
COS   243      metastasis, drug
               delivery, clotting




            sensory biology, spatial
             perception, magnetic
COS   348        field sensing,
            neuroethology, animal
                   navigation
            bacterial chemotaxis and
            motility, flagellar motor,
COS   252
                quorum sensing,
            transposon mutagenesis




              Systems biology, cell
            reproramming, dynamic
COS   313
            systems, computational
                   modeling


             cancer development,
COS   369
                 epigenetics




              Bacterial molecular
                motors, energy
COS   360
            transformation, energy
             transfer, nanomotors




            Solar Energy Conversion
COS   312        Light Activated
                Anticancer Drugs

            Polysaccharides, Plant
             cell walls, fungal cell
COS   308   walls, enzyme kinetics,
            cell membranes, drug
                    delivery
               nanotechnology,
COS   327   chemical microbiology,
             drug delivery vehicles




            bio-inspired materials,
COS   314   biotherapeutics, drug
             delivery, biosensors
               chemistry directed
            toward pharmaceuticals
COS   363    and toxicolgy. Involves
             chemistry, biology and
                   toxicology




             energy, nanoscience,
COS   332         materials,
                environmental




             atomistic simulation,
COS   333    quantum mechanics,
            computational science


             engineering, science,
COS   374
                     law
                 nanoscience,
COS   373        geochemistry,
                 microbiology




                electromagnetic
COS   315
                   geophysics




             Physics, Astrophysics,
               Instrumentation,
COS   341
            Imaging, Filters, Mission
                   Planning




              Optical properties of
            nano-structures / Nano-
COS   205
             bio / Magneto-Optical
                  spectroscopy
             Cosmic ray physics,
            electronics, neutrino
             oscillation, neutrino
COS   371   cross-section, particle
              physics in general,
                 nuclear non-
                 proliferation




              Synthetic biology,
                 biophysics,
COS   354
            computational biology,
             stochastic processes




             Health Information
COS   353
                Technology




                  Nano optics
                 Nanoparticles
            nanoassembly imaging
COS   344    plasmonics nonlinear
            optics photochemistry
             surface and interface
                    physics
                 nanoscience,
COS   352   nanomaterials, scanning
               probe microscopy




             brain/body, cognition,
                 emotion, child
COS   320
            development, individual
                  differences




              Visual perception.
            Cognitive neuroscience.
             Functional magnetic
COS   207
            resonance imaging.  3D
              displays.  Statistical
              models of vision.  




            neuroscience of learning
COS   355
              behavioral genetics
             neural activity, brain,
              fNIRS, hemoglobin,
COS   109
              cognition, cognitive
               function, veterans




               using fine-grained
             measures of attention
            and attention allocation
               (e.g. eye scanning;
COS   338
             pupillometry) to assay
            information processing
              in infants and young
                     children
             Human Neuroimaging,
                Brain-Computer
COS   356      Interface, Autism,
               Anxiety, Cognitive
                  Neuroscience




              autism, treatment,
COS   347
              emotion regulation
             biomedical, biochemical,
                      biotech,
                 pharmaceuticals,
                 medical devices,
                vaccines, electrical,
              electronics, chemistry,
OVPR   247
               mechanical, wireless,
                  semiconductor,
                 materials, plants,
              veterinary, intellectual
             property, law, business,
                    marketing


             Genomics, programming,
VBI    359
             genetics, cancer research


             computer science, public
               health, modeling and
VBI    342
              simulation, sociology/
                  anthropology
               synthetic biology,
VBI   340
                systems biology




            Genetics, Bioinformatics
VBI   350     and Computational
                    biology
                My laboratory uses a
              multitude of techniques
               to explore the cellular
                   and molecular
                  mechanisms that
               regulate neural circuit
                  formation in the
                developing brain Key
VTCRI   336     words include: neural
                   development,
                extracellular matrix,
              synaptogenesis, synaptic
                 targeting, synaptic
               maintenance, neuron,
                axon, axon guidance,
                    visual system
                    development




              RNAP III, infection, DNA,
VTCRI   102   miRNAs, gene silencing,
                          3D




                 Muscle culture,
VTCRI   364      Bioengineering,
               Substrates, Synapses
                   brain circuit,
VTCRI   375   optogenetics, emotion,
                    cognition
Research Description

The research in my laboratory is focused on molecular modeling as an approach to
studying protein structure and function. Many of our applications of these
computational methods are designed to examine the dynamics of proteins at the
atomic level and to reveal the interactions between proteins and small molecule
ligands (e.g., drugs). One protein that we are studying is peroxisome proliferator
activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma), which is associated with inflammation,
diabetes, and obesity, among other conditions. Our studies of this nuclear receptor
focus on the effect of ligands on the dynamics of the protein, and how differences in
the dynamics mediate the response to ligands. Our ultimate goal is to identify novel
ligands that may be developed into drug that act via PPAR-gamma. Another project
involves the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which has been identified as the core
component of protein aggregates in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. The pathway by
which Abeta leaves the cell membrane and self-associates is largely a mystery, and we
are applying molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study this pathway and gain
insight on details that are hidden from most experimental techniques. Also of interest
in this project is the association of Abeta and oxidative stress. Alzheimer's patients
suffer from extensive oxidative damage to brain tissue, believed to be caused by
Abeta. Experimental work has identified dietary compounds that may bind to Abeta
and inhibit the damaging effects of this peptide. Simulations focus on understanding
this effect, with the goal of designing effective small molecule inhibitors of Abeta
aggregation. 
To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that plants use to respond to their
environment, we have identified a network of protein factors involved in nutrient and
energy sensing. The protein network was delineated starting with a group of plant
genes that are used in the response to drought and cold. One of these genes was used
in an assay that can detect interacting gene products. This assay identified a gene that
encodes an energy/nutrient/stress sensor.  We have shown that this energy sensor can
alter plant lifespan and biomass. In addition, we have identified a new gene that
controls the stability of this energy sensor.  Together, the sensor and its controller
represent one way to potentially alter plant fitness, lifespan and/or biomass. We are
exploring the use of the energy sensor and its controller in a model plant, Arabidopsis
and in a bioenergy plant, Poplar. In collaborative work with the Senger lab, we are also
using genome-scale metabolic models to predict new genetic targets for engineering
desired plant biomass alterations.
Tryptophan oxidation pathway in insects and mammals. Biochemical mechanisms of
insect and plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase- and aromatic acetaldehyde
synthase-catalyzed reactions.
Research in the laboratory focuses on determining the chemical mechanism, 3D-
structure, and the identification of inhibitors of enzymes important for pathogenesis in
Aspergillus fumigatus, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.




The major theme of research in our laboratory focuses on biochemical, structural,
molecular and cellular, protein engineering, and computational studies on receptor-
ligand recognition, protein-protein interaction, cell  signaling, and novel receptor/
ligand discovery and engineering that are relevant to human chronic diseases such as
diabetes, obesity. We are also interested in studying molecular recognition and
signaling in host-pathogen interactions such as mechanisms of pathogen evasion of
host immune defense.   Currently we have the following ongoing pilot projects:  (1)
Structure and function studies of a newly discovered anti-obesity hormone, irisin. (2)
We conduct research related to watershed management, with a particular interest in
Molecular and structural basis of viral proteins counteracting host defense. (3) How
sediment, where it comes from, how it impacts ecosystems, and where it goes.
omega-3 fatty acids, such as DHA and EPA, the major ingredients in fish oil, bind to G
protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) and  exert potent anti-inflammatory and anti-
diabetic effects.  (4) Discovery of novel ligand on pancreatic beta cells for
immunoreceptor NKp46, whose activation may lead to insulitis and type I diabetes.
Although waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States associated with large
municipal systems have decreased over the past four decades, the US Centers for
Disease Control (CDC) recently reported a relative increase in outbreaks associated
with smaller private systems not regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. For the
past two years, I have been collaborating with Cooperative Extension’s Virginia
Household Water Quality Program to provide low-cost water quality testing to Virginia
households with private drinking water supply systems (e.g. wells, springs). Over 1000
samples are analyzed for concentrations of microbial (e.g. E. coli) and chemical (e.g.
lead) contaminants every year. Students associated with this project have conducted
basic lab work to determine basic contamination incidence (often surprisingly high),
used advanced techniques in molecular biology and analytical chemistry to determine
likely sources of contamination, and statistically linked water quality with
accompanying survey data detailing household demographics, water system
construction, perceived water quality, and visible environmental threats.
Undergraduate participants can expect to be involved in a variety of activities, including
lab analyses, survey entry, and statistical analysis. In addition, students will have the
opportunity to explore scientific risk communication through attendance at
Interpretation Meetings conducted by trained extension agents which provide
interpretation of water quality reports to program clients.


Enthusiastic young researchers will be welcomed to participate in several projects that
focus on engineering interfaces between living cells and non-living systems. A key goal
is to genetically modify a cell to communicate with a mechatronic mobile bioreactor
and to engineer the bioreactor to communicate with living cells to form a seamless,
hybrid living-non-living system.


Water sustainability is a huge issue - we need more food to feed an ever increasing
population, but are compromising our natural resources. Water is one resource that is
intimately connected to both food and energy. My primary goal is to improve our
nation’s water quality through research and education. Our group focuses on
quantifying how natural systems behave in the face of change, and then applying/
adapting this knowledge into workable solutions (e.g. improved stream/wetland
restoration).  




The goal of this interdisciplinary research is to investigate the impact of emerging
contaminants on freshwater mussels. The detailed objectives are: 1) to study effect of 4-
nonylphenol (4-NP), an endocrine disruptor, on freshwater mussel glochidia maturity,
viability, and survival rates; 2) to investigate the effect of 4-NP on female mussel
mantle tissue displays and fecundity; and 3) to understand the effect of 4-NP on
glochidia attachment on host fish.
We are trying to develop bettter soil compaction specifications for construction of
playing fields. High compaction can reduce soil air permeability and this reduces turf
growth needed for a high quality, safe playing surface. So we are studying how
compaction energy affects soil air permeability. We have developed a transient-state
method to measure air permeability on compacted soil samples.  The scieneer would
compare this method with the traditonal steady state method.
Projects include enhancing the immune response against bacterial infection (such as
Staphylococcus aureus), vaccine development, neonatal immunology, and probiotic
enhancement of immune function.




Models that better predict the impact of thermodynamic and biological forces on
anaerobic fermentation in the rumen of cattle and sheep are needed so that we can
identify novel strategies to mitigate methane production and its impact on global
warming.  The student would explore mathematically and biolgically the impact of
different thermodynamic forces on volatile fatty acid production, hydrogen production,
and methane production.
Tree-of-heaven (TOH), Ailanthus altissima, is one of the most successful introduced
plant species in North America. Introduced from China over two centuries ago, the tree
can now be found throughout the continental U.S., and has become the dominant tree
species along highways in Virginia.  More recently, the brown marmorated stink bug
(BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), was introduced to North America from east Asia in
the late1990s in eastern Pennsylvania.  By 2010, the insect could be found throughout
Virginia, and had become a conspicuous nuisance pest in houses.  The insect also
caused serious damage to tree fruit, vegetables, and other crops.  The overall pest
impact of BMSB in the U.S. is increasing as the bug rapidly spreads to new regions and
attacks additional commodities.  While conducting host plant surveys for BMSB in
southwest Virginia in 2011, we observed more BMSB on TOH than any other plant
species.  Later that summer, edges of some soybean fields in central VA were heavily-
infested with BMSB and, in each of those cases, wooded areas with TOH bordered the
infested field edges.  Significant numbers of BMSB nymphs have also been found in the
samara (seed) clusters of large TOH that had been cut down late in the season.  Thus,
there is evidence that TOH is likely serving an important ecological role for BMSB
populations.  This association between TOH and BMSB has not been documented or
previously studied.  With the widespread continuous distribution of TOH in North
America along highways and railroads and with the likelihood of BMSB being
transported by vehicles and trains, it is possible that TOH could be facilitating the
spread and success of this invasive bug.   In 2013 we will be investigating this
relationship by sampling trees throughout Virginia and assessing the olfactory response
of BMSB to odors of TOH in the lab.



More than one million human lives are lost each year by malaria, a disease transmitted
exclusively by the Anopheles mosquito. Some of the most effective public health
measures against vector-borne diseases throughout history have been those targeted
at the vector. However, because of growing insecticide resistance, the available
strategies for alleviating the impact of malaria are now sufficient. In fact, partially
because of global warming, increased air transportation, and the ability of mosquitoes
to quickly adapt to new habitats, the public-health burden of malaria is increasing and
expanding. There is an urgent need to explore novel strategies for vector-borne
disease control. Ecological, behavioral, and physiological adaptations related to malaria
transmission are often associated with genome rearrangements. Dr. Sharakhov's
research aims to understand the role of chromosomal inversions and heterochromatin
modifications in mosquito evolution, adaptation, and ability to transmit malaria
parasites. Dr. Sharakhov's laboratory developed unique skills and innovative
approaches to physically map genomes and to study chromosomes of disease vectors.
The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a novel genomics-based approach for
vector control. Interdisciplinary research includes computer modeling of chromosomes.
Utilize molecular techniques and analytical methods to assess microbial community
composition and processes in root, natural/agroecosystems, and in response to water
deficit and other environmental stresses.




Our laboratory seeks to understand the molecular mechanism of metabolic diseases
including diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Collaborating with interdisciplinary scientists
(biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, molecular genetics, bioinformatics,
chemistry, nutrition, clinical, behavioral medicine), we focus our research on
mitochondria, the primary metabolic platform that converge cellular nutrition, energy
and metabolic homeostasis, and target mitochondrial dysfunction to explore novel
therapeutic rationales for human metabolic disorders.




We have an interdisciplinary group of scientists interested in the promotion of
healthful eating, physical activity, and weight management. Our team completes
projects that use automated telephone counseling, interactive computer programs, and
mobile technologies to facilitate behavior change. We are also working to integrate
interactive technology devices and interventions within family practice settings. Our
team currently includes researchers in computer science, nutrition, exercise science,
health economics, and health services research.
My research is focused on identifying and characterzing natural compounds to prevent
and treat metabolic syndromes, diabetes, and diabetic vascular complications. We are
doing research at cellular, molecular and whole animal levels to achieve this goal.
My lab seeks to understand how plants regulate their metabolism, specifically in their
seeds. We use systems biology, which enables global perspectives of the cellular
function to identify regulators of metabolism leading to the accumulation of oils,
proteins, and sugars in developing seeds. Understanding how these regulators interact
with each other and their targets will enable metabolic engineering of these energy-
rich molecules for practical purposes.
I develop protein-based optical sensors, that has a wide variety of application in areas
such as neurobiology, animal physiology and plant biology. The student will work on a
new project that aims at integration of such sensor into a protein matrix, with the long-
term goal of using such system to identify proteins responsible for the transport of
amino acids.
Crops in the U.S. are constantly threatened by plant pathogens, many of which can be
transported over hundreds of kilometers in the atmosphere. The ability to track the
movement of plant pathogens in the atmosphere is essential for establishing effective
quarantine measures and forecasting disease spread. One of the goals of my research
program is to understand how plant pathogens are transported over long distances in
the atmosphere. To do this, I’ve developed new technologies to sample plant
pathogens in the air using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Another goal
of my research program is to develop strategies to detect, monitor, and control
mycotoxins (fungal chemicals that are harmful to domestic animals and humans) in
feed and food products. The Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that over one
quarter of the world’s crops are affected by mycotoxins every year, with annual losses
of around 1 billion metric tons of food. These losses are felt by crop producers, animal
producers, grain handlers, processors, food manufacturers, and consumers. The most
important mycotoxin in the U.S. is deoxynivalenol (DON). Estimated economic losses in
the U.S. associated with DON exceed $650 million per year. Members of my lab are
using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to detect and quantify trace
amounts of DON in small grains. This work has facilitated the development of wheat
and barley cultivars with DON resistance, improved chemical and cultural practices that
reduce DON contamination, and improved knowledge of the mycotoxin potential of
plant pathogenic fungi in other parts of the world.

The Virginia Tech Gaming and Media Effects Research Laboratory (VT G.A.M.E.R. Lab) is a
small laboratory facility dedicated to investigating the social impact of video games,
immersive virtual environments, simulations, and related media technologies.   The
laboratory is hosted by the Virginia Tech Department of Communication and is directed
by Dr. James D. Ivory, an assistant professor in the Department of Communication.
Much of the lab’s research focuses on one of two general topics:  /  / 1) Investigations of
how users of online virtual environments (e.g., massively multiplayer online role-
playing games) represent themselves and behave in these environments (typically
involving recording and analysis of content in virtual environments, including analysis
of character representations and behaviors, and surveys of virtual world users), and   /  /
2) Experiments exploring individuals' psychological and physiological responses to the
form and content of video games, immersive virtual environments, simulations
(typically involving recruitment of participants to use a computer or media application
while one or more physiological responses are measure with electrodes, followed by
collection of a series of questionnaire items).   /  / Scieneering program participants
interested in conducting research in the G.A.M.E.R. lab would assist with the
development and implementation of one or more content analyses, surveys, or
experiments.  Depending on the specific project pursued, program participants will gain
experience with skills related to some of the following areas: human participants
research, academic literature dealing with social responses to media and online
behavior, experiment design, psychophysiological data collection, content analysis,
survey research, questionnaire design, and data analysis.   /  / More information about
the VT G.A.M.E.R. Lab and its research is available at http://gamerlab.org.   Contact lab
director James D. Ivory (jivory@vt.edu) with any questions.
Michael A. Evans is an Associate Professor of Instructional Design and Technology in the
Department of Learning Sciences and Technologies at Virginia Tech. He received a B.A.
and M.A. in Psychology from the University of West Florida and a Ph.D. in Instructional
Systems Technology from Indiana University. His work focuses on the effects of
multimedia methods and technologies on instruction and learning. Current research
focuses on the design, development, and evaluation of instructional multimedia for
interactive surfaces (personal media devices, smart phones, tablets, tables, and
whiteboards) to support collaborative learning as well as the adoption of video game
elements for instructional design, particularly for informal settings. Address: Dr.
Michael A.  Evans, Department of Learning Sciences & Technologies, 306 War Memorial
Hall (0313), School of Education, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061.  E-mail:
mae@vt.edu
Title:  Exploring the Secret of How Carbon Nanotubes formed in Ancient Damascus Steel
Swords. Scientists in Germany recently discovered that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were
present in ancient museum pieces of Damascus steel swords from the middle ages.
These swords were legendary because of their unique properties including extreme
sharpness and durability, but the secret process for making the steel and the blades
was lost about 300 years ago. Some properties of the steel still have not been
duplicated by modern methods today but if better understood, could add to our
knowledge of ways to produce modern steel products to improve durability and wear
resistance of, for example, engine components.  Over the last few years, our lab has
discovered that CNTs could be produced from plant and woody biomass using a
specialized heating process. [See Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology –JNN-
article http://goodell-biomaterials-bioenergy.sbio.vt.edu/Goodell_JNN.pdf ].  One of
the few things known about Damascus steel production processes from the middle ages
is that, to carbonize the steel, certain types of wood and leaves were used.  Although
the process for introduction of that plant fiber are not known, we hypothesize that by
following temperature regimes outlined in the JNN article and processes similar to the
cyclic forging of steel, we may be able to rediscover a method for producing CNTs in
steel.  We propose that a Scieneering student or team, work on this project and learn
about plant biomass, about carbon nanotubes and the unique properties of carbon
materials from biomass, and also learn about metals and forging processes.
Testing of fall arrest anchorages on roof with wood trusses.  Currently, the
requirements state that anchors must carry 5,000 lbs, but the roof components are not
able to carry this load.  Creative solutions including off-the-shelf hangers, bracing of
trusses, and innovative products are needed to solve this problem.
We engineer protein molecules to self-assembly into a variety of nano- and macro-
structures including sheets, fibers, and tubes.  We then build these structures into
biological devices.
The management of heat transfer is important in the recovery and refinement of oil.
Heat is created by drilling, is deliberately added by steam injection or combustion in oil
wells to decrease oil viscosity and surface tension during enhanced oil recovery, and is
input and output  during refinement of the oil. The important point is that much oil is
held in reservoirs that contain colloidal mixtures of oil and rock, and during extraction,
further fine structure is introduced by the addition of water, steam, CO2, etc, so that
heat transfer takes place across many interfaces.  Much is known about heat conduction
through bulk phases, but heat conduction through concentrated fine colloidal
dispersions (nanofluids), is much less well understood.  The issue is that conduction
across an interface or through a surface film, which form a large part of colloidal
dispersions, is not well understood.   The project is to improve understanding of heat
conduction across solid–liquid interfaces though systematic measurements of interface
conductance and concomitant characterization (vibrational spectroscopy, contact angle,
roughness) of the same films.  We will test the hypothesis that thin organic films
situated at metal oxide – water and metal oxide – oil interfaces can be used to alter and
control heat transfer. This project is ideally suited for a chemistry student who can bring
their experience of chemistry (knowledge of intermolecular forces, basic synthesis,
characterization) to an engineering project.

The candidate will perform research under the guidance of the PI (Dr. Chang Lu) and a
graduate student mentor on developing microfluidic devices for gene delivery for cell-
based therapies. The research will be focused on developing microfluidic devices that
deliver genes into cells with high efficiency based on electroporation. We will study
how to systematically improve the transfection efficiency by optimizing the device
design and operational conditions. / More information about our research and
publications can be found at the website: / http://www.microfluidics.che.vt.edu/

I do research on applied aquatic chemistry and solve important problems that confront
consumers including 1) lead in water, 2) taste and odors in water, 3) pipe corrosion
problems, and 4) water quality problems in green construction.
My research focuses on the impact of extreme flooding events (hurricanes, tsunamis)
and climate change (including sea-level rise) at the coast. I am interested in better
understanding the interaction between these hazards, the natural environment, and
populations living at the coast.
Earthquake engineering is concerned with the design and analysis of civil infrastructure
to resist seismic loading. It is highly inter-disciplinary because it involves concepts from
geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, geology, and seismology. My
research focuses on the prediction of ground motions induced by earthquakes. This
research involves issues ranging from soil testing under dynamic loadings to numerical
modeling of wave propagation.
Our interdisciplinary group conducts research to evaluate the behavior of chemicals in
engineered and natural environmental systems. We utilize fundamental chemical,
physical, and biological tools to address topics of concern to the environmental
engineering and environmental chemistry fields.
A new structural system has been devised with enhanced resilience when subjected to
earthquakes.  The self-centering truss (SC-Truss) system consists of truss units with a
built-in self-centering mechanism and steel yielding components that, when combined
can bring a building back to plumb following an earthquake while concentrating all
structural damage in replaceable yielding elements.    The SC-Truss system offers
significant advantages in constructability, seismic performance, and competitiveness
compared to the relatively small number of currently available self-centering systems.
Preliminary design and analysis has demonstrated that the SC-Truss eliminates residual
drifts (permanent leaning in the building after an earthquake), concentrates structural
damage in replaceable steel fuse elements which will not need to be replaced after
most earthquakes, allows design flexibility to separately tune strength, stiffness, and
ductility, can be shop fabricated allowing conventional field construction methods, and
utilizes approximately the same amount of steel as conventional moment resisting
frames.    A research project is underway to develop the SC-Truss system through
computational, analytical, and experimental investigation.  To that end, preparations
are underway for the large-scale structural testing of SC-Truss units.  The testing will be
conducted at the Structural Engineering and Materials Laboratory on the Virginia Tech
campus.  Since a limited number of tests are conducted, large sets of instrumentation
(approximately 100 channels) are common.  Components of the test setup that need
assistance include design of the instrumentation plan, sensor calibration, design of
sensor attachment, sensor installation, wiring, and use of data acquisition equipment.

We are developing behavior models of evacuating households and integrating them
with transportation simulation models.


We build mathematical models to study interesting biological systems such as gene
regulation, protein-protein interaction, and cell cycle dynamics. Besides the modeling
building, we also study computation techniques for accurate and efficient simulation of
the models. Of course, all these models and simulation algorithms have a clear
biological background.  /  / Since my research area is an interdisciplinary area that
combines mathematics, computer science, and biology, people with different
background and interest may find a good fit in this area. Students with stronger
mathematics interest can focus on the mathematical properties of dynamical systems;
Students with more interest on computation can focus on the development of
computer simulation techniques. Students with biology interest can focus on biological
systems. Although the research can be done from different angles, eventually students
will apply what they've learned in more sophisticated biological systems, such as the
budding yeast cell cycle model.  /  / For students with stronger  / mathematics interest,
we will focus on the mathematical properties of dynamical  / systems; For students
with  more interest on computation, we will learn more  / computer simulation
techniques. For students with interest in biology, we will  / focus on biological systems.
Eventually students will apply what they've learned  / in a more sophisticated biological
system: the budding yeast cell cycle model. 
The CTRnet (Crisis, Tragedy, and Recovery network) project (www.ctrnet.net) is an
interdisciplinary project to help those who face crises or tragedies (manmade or
natural), and the recovery of related communities, with computer-based methods. This
includes identifying such events as soon as possible, collecting all possible related
information (including from twitter, Facebook, and the broad Web), developing a
permanent archive (in collaboration with the Internet Archive), apply machine learning
to classify and organize that information, extending search engines to handle this
content (including photos), and providing tools for social scientists, other researchers,
and other stakeholders to detect patterns and learn from these event-specific separate
collections.

Any scientific or engineering problem involving computing, numerical methods,
mathematical analysis, or optimization.  I have collaborated with faculty from almost
every single department in CoE and CoS, and many departments in CALS and CNRE.


Our research is focused on the development of microdevices for detection of chemicals
in the environment as well as better understanding the electrical and mechanical
behaviors of cells as they transform to cancer.

Have you ever wondered how Siri understands voice commands? How Netflix
recommends movies to watch? How Kinnect recognizes full-body gestures? How
Watson defeated Jeopardy champions? How Google’s autonomous cars have logged
300,000 miles without a human driver?  The answer is Artificial Intelligence and
Machine Learning -- the study of algorithms that learn from large quantities of data,
identify patterns and make predictions on new instances. The ultimate goal of true
intelligence is far far away but we are getting better every day!  My lab works on
Artificial Intelligence (AI) and a subfield of AI called Computer Vision, where the goal is
to make a computer “see” and understand the world from images and videos captured
from a camera.   This may seem easy but is actually a phenomenally difficult task. When
humans look at a picture they /understand/ what it contains – they recognize objects
present, actors present, from a single picture they can understand actions taking place,
even recognize sophisticated concepts like emotions and intents of actors. When a
computer looks at an image, it sees dots of different intensities. Nothing more.   A
scieneer in my lab will learn about AI, Machine Learning and Computer Vision,
participate in existing (& new) research projects, and ultimately contribute to the rise
of the machines!


My research focus on new methodologies for increasing design productivity in
configurable computing domain. Such 'productivity tools' address needs of non-
engineering domain experts in the areas of bioinformatics (big-data), heterogeneous
and High Performance Computing (HPC)
The purpose of this interdisciplinary research is to have a team working together to
bring the solar power converters that are designed by electrical engineers to be
packaged for manufacturing. The existing design contains just the electronics. In order
to be used with the solar panel and install on the roof, they need a case and the
mounting fixture, which can be designed by engineers from other disciplines such as
mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, material science, and industrial design
Cerium oxide is a catalytic material with interesting optical properties.  Growth of
nanoparticles can be carried out using simple synthesis techniques.  The project
involves a study on how to use the optical properties to modify the catalytic behavior
(and visa versa), the effect of post-growth treatments, and an evaluation of the
biological activity of the nanoparticles.


LTCC process, mechanical milling, or wet chemistry will be used to fabricate magnetic
materials and components. Material properties will be characterized. Design will be by
finite-element simulation and Matlab.


I've instructed nearly 100 undergraduate students in my lab under independent study
or undergraduate research in the VT Railgun Program. Students from all engineering
departments have participated.
I work in a subfield of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The goal of AI is to mimic human
intelligence in machines. One important aspect of human intelligence is our ability to
process visual information, i.e. our ability to "see" and understand the world around us.
The subfield of AI that focuses on mimicking this visual intelligence of humans in
machines is called Computer Vision. That is the focus of my research.   Cameras that can
detect faces as you take a photo, software that can automatically tag your Facebook
photos with your friends' names by recognizing their faces, the latest and greatest
Microsoft Kinect sensor that can let you play cool interactive video games without using
remote controls, Google's autonomous cars driving on the roads of Palo Alto without a
driver (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdgQpa1pUUE), medical image analysis to
diagnose diseases, robots aiding soldiers in war zones, etc. are just a handful of
applications that use computer vision technology today.   My research especially
focuses on visual recognition. It involves designing and developing computer
algorithms that can semantically decipher the visual content in images and videos and
answer questions like: What is the scene depicted? Which object are present in the
scene and where? Which actions are being performed in the scene? etc. -- just like
humans can when looking at images. My research also looks at the interface of language
and images to see how we can enable humans to better interact with computers, either
as users or as teachers, to make tomorrows machine even smarter.   Many of the
projects that I work on involve image processing, machine learning, probability and
statistics, elements of psychophysics and human-computer interaction. Details of
several past and ongoing projects can be found on my webpage: http://
ttic.uchicago.edu/~dparikh/publications_topic.htm
My research includes creating a mathematical model of bat swarming to inspire control
of teams of underwater vehicles communicating using sonar. I would like to take
knowledge of bat echolocation from biological studies and translate it into
mathematical equations defining interactions between individual bats. The equations
will be tested against experimental data from animal groups. This model will then be
used to inspire control algorithms for teams of underwater vehicles communicating
through sonar. I would like Scieneers in my lab to work on designing and creating
instruments for testing these bio-inspired algorithms. This may include an
instrumented apparatus equipped with a 3D traverse to move hydrophones and
speakers through water. In addition, a Scieneer may work on building and controlling
underwater vehicles with diverse types of propulsion, including traditional propeller-
driven vehicles and underwater gliders. Another facet of this project, centered on
processing data from experiments and numerical simulations on bat swarming, would
be benefitted by a Scieneer with an interest in animal behavior.
The mechanics of soft structures and how they accommodate large stresses and
dramatic elastic instabilities provides a great framework to study problems ranging
from biological interfaces to the design of responsive materials. /  / I am interested in
using elasticity, soft materials, and instabilities such as snap-buckling, crumpling,
wrinkling, and folding to generate responsiveness and impact properties such as
adhesion, optics, and flow at surfaces or within devices. /  / My research on synthetic
and biological membranes and how they deform and interact with fluids allows me to
address important fundamental questions that lie at the interface between fluids and
soft materials.  
The dynamics of fluid bulk or interfaces coupled with biological structures is ubiquitous
across diverse bio-fluid systems. Most research on bio-fluid dynamics has been limited
to either external or internal flows (e.g. biolocomotion and artery flows). However,
interfacial motions when the fluid is transported across organisms have been barely
explored and are poorly understood. Examples of this new class of bio-fluid dynamics
include multiphase fluid transport associated with intake (e.g. drinking) and outlet (e.g.
urination, secretion and spitting). Fluid interfaces involved in these transport processes
spontaneously form, dynamically deform, and/or suddenly rupture due to the interplay
between hydrodynamic and interfacial forces. The goals of our research are to (a)
design and perform physical experiments and develop analytical modeling in the
context of fluid intake and outlet processes exploited by biological systems, (b)
investigate the fundamental mechanisms of coalescence or non-coalescence, which
unify various phenomena occurring at fluid interfaces


This research will focus on potential human and environmental impacts due to
nanomaterials in consumer products.  There are some inventories of nanomaterials in
consumer products, but they are lacking in details and usefulness for various
stakeholders.  This research will focus on one or more aspects of improving
nanomaterials inventories and the understanding of possible human and
environmental impacts due to these nanomaterials. The research primarily involves
research using the existing literature with little or no lab work.
The MicroN BASE lab was founded by Professor Behkam within the mechanical
engineering department. Our lab focuses on interfaces between biological and
synthetic systems (or bio-hybrid engineering). The research interests cover the study of
micro/nano-robotics, nanotechnology, bio/nano interface, and biophysics of bacteria
motility, chemotaxis and adhesion. Our activities can be divided into two broad
categories: (1) developing bio-hybrid engineered systems (biomicrorobots) in which
biological components are utilized for actuation, sensing, communication, and control.
(2) Studying mechanism of adhesion, motility and sensing in cells or unicellular
microorganisms. Activities in this category often support our biomicrorobotics
activities. We utilize 2D and 3D microfluidic devices and platforms to establish well-
defined and repeatable test environments for most of our projects.




This request is being submitted as a collaborative effort between Dr. Alexander
Leonessa of the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Dr. Robert Grange of the Dept. of
Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise.  We anticipate enrolling one or two students,
from Biological Sciences and/or HNFE. This project aims to study how effective is
electrical stimulation of muscles for rehabilitation purposes. In particular Functional
Electrical Stimulation (FES) is a technique used to restore the motor function of
individuals with spinal cord injuries. The principle of FES is to use surface or
implantable electrodes to induce contraction of muscles and corresponding joint
movement. Help from undergraduate students is needed to run an existing
experimental setup to test, understand, and compare muscle dynamics when electrical
stimulation is applied. Such an experiment will provide the opportunity to advance
understanding of the dynamic behavior of muscles and to investigate the possibility of
controlling this behavior using feedback control techniques. /  / The undergraduate
students involved in this project will be working with the mechanical engineering
doctoral student who is leading this project and several members of Dr. Leonessa’s lab
who are involved in this work. The objectives for his/her work include:  (1) Learn to
utilize the existing experimental setup to stimulate real muscles (removed from mice)
and measure corresponding generated forces and movements.  (2) Test different,
existing control technique for the purpose of finding the best way of stimulating the
muscle. (3) Present the results obtained at several conferences and advertise the
research in various venues. This effort will contribute to the critical understanding
required to advance the field of rehabilitation engineering. Through the proposed
effort we aspire to integrate research elements and discoveries into multidisciplinary
educational and research experiences for undergraduate students.  
The research collections of natural history museums are a valuable  knowledge source
for science because they archive the world's known biodiversity. They also have the
potential to become valuable knowledge sources for engineering, because biodiversity
holds a vast  pool of evolutionary adaptations that can provide numerous inspirations
for new technology. In order to analyze biological structure and function from
conserved museum specimens, severe conservation artifacts must be undone in order
to provide a quantitative model of the life-like biological structures.  /   / In a
collaboration project with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
(NMNH) in Washington, D.C., the basic science of conservation artifacts for fluid-
preserved vertebrate specimens and engineering techniques for digitally undoing them
will be explored. To this end, the Scieneering project will focus on documenting and
analyzing the processes responsible for the conservation artifacts. Fresh specimens of
Virginian bats that will be collected in  / collaboration with the Smithsonian will serve
as experimental material for this research. The specimens will be scanned at regular
intervals using microcomputer tomography to construct high-resolution three-
dimensional digital models. These models will form the basis for a quantitative analysis
of the conservation artifacts. State-of-the art global and local descriptor of three-
dimensional shape will be applied to the data to characterize the artifacts and explore
ways in which artifact-ridden specimens can be distinguished from life-like material. In
parallel, the fundamental science of the conservation  process will be researched. The
scieneers will work with scientists and conservation technicians at the Smithsonian to
gain an in-depth  understanding of the protocols in use.  /   / The results of the project
will be used to device engineering methods that can be applied to even the oldest
specimens in the collection of  the NMNH in order to restore the life-like shapes of the
animals.
This project involves mechanical testing and characterization of collagen hydrogels for
tissue engineering applications such as artificial tissue replacements and in vitro tumor
models. You will spend most of your time doing experiments but can also be involved
in data processing and analysis if interested. If everything goes well, this project will
result in a peer-reviewed conference paper or journal article for which you would be a
co-author.
Our focus is on translational oncology, where we begin by working with clinicians to
understand the existing medical needs and obstacles for treating patients with cancer.
Correspondingly, we work with these clinicians and scientists to develop medical
devices and nano-based materials for cancer imaging and treatment. Specifically, we
are interested in developing sustainable nanomaterials that prove to be nontoxic to
healthy cells and the environment and we are also developing medical devices for early
cancer detection and localized treatment.  Currently, we have established research
teams and are working on pancreatic and bone cancer – cancers that have not seen
much progress over the last several years that entail very high rates of morbidity and
mortality.
The research employs empirical and computational neuroscientific approaches to
understand the principles of functional integration in active brain networks. The focus
of their current research is to investigate the neurochemistry of ageing. Age is the
primary risk factor for a class of serious neurological disorders, grouped collectively as
neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) and characterized by deficits in cognitive and
motor function; functions that emerge from the concerted activity of interacting brain
regions. Findings from the disparate domains of molecular biology and neuroimaging
suggest a change in demand on cortical networks, at the level of individual cells, brain
regions and pathways.  The lab uses multimodal neuroimaging data acquired over the
lifespan to assess whether and how human neurochemistry and connectivity accrue
properties such as redundancy, hyper-activation or hypo-activation across multiple
cognitive domains. Using fMRI and EEG, the team analyses network connectivity using
mathematical models of brain dynamics. The group collaborates widely with
international scientists from a range of disciplines, including animal electrophysiology,
translational neuromodeling, clinical neurology and computational psychiatry.
Research in the Barrett Lab addresses the influences of soils, climate variability,
hydrology, and biodiversity on biogeochemical cycling from the scale of
microorganisms to regional landscapes.  Topics that I am interested in are:    1.
Biogeochemical cycling      Processes that regulate the transformation and transport of
carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.     Response
of carbon and nitrogen cycling to environmental change  2. Soil ecology
Environmental controls over spatial distribution of soil biota     Response of soil biota to
climate variability     Soil community composition and ecosystem functioning


Our current research centers on the molecular structure and biochemical functions of
signaling transduction systems involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Our
research goal is to understand how protein domains transduce signals from biological
membranes. Our laboratory employs biophysical approaches including high field
nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, circular dichroism, computer modeling,
liposome-binding assays, fluorescence spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance
spectroscopy. With these tools, we can determine protein:lipid interfaces, ligand
binding pockets and membrane insertion of protein domains from the molecular to the
atomic resolution.
The Cimini lab is primarily interested in the cellular mechanisms responsible for
inducing aneuploidy in somatic cells. Aneuploidy, the condition of a cell possessing an
incorrect chromosome number, is well known for inducing severe pathological genetic
syndromes (e.g., Down syndrome) and is a hallmark of cancer. Somatic cell aneuploidy
arises as a consequence of inaccurate chromosome segregation during mitosis.
Whereas many possible mitotic errors can cause inaccurate chromosome segregation,
we believe that not all of them are equally likely to occur in the leaving organism, and
that some of them represent a more severe threat than others to chromosome stability.
By using a combination of live-cell imaging, quantitative light microscopy, protein
inhibition, and mathematical modeling (performed by our collaborators Dr. Alex
Mogilner and Dr. Gul Civelekoglu-Scholey) we aim to identify and characterize the
cellular mechanisms responsible for chromosome-segregation in both normal and
cancer cells.
Disabled-2 (Dab2) inhibits platelet aggregation by competing with fibrinogen for
binding to the ?(IIb) ?(3) integrin receptor, an interaction that is modulated by Dab2
binding to sulfatides at the outer leaflet of the platelet plasma membrane. The
disaggregatory function of Dab2 has been mapped to its N-terminus phosphotyrosine-
binding (N-PTB) domain. Our data show that the surface levels of P-selectin, a platelet
transmembrane protein known to bind sulfatides and promote cell-cell interactions,
are reduced by Dab2 N-PTB, an event that is reversed in the presence of a mutant form
of the protein that is deficient in sulfatide but not in integrin binding. Importantly,
Dab2 N-PTB, but not its sulfatide binding-deficient form, was able to prevent sulfatide-
induced platelet aggregation when tested under haemodynamic conditions in
microfluidic devices at flow rates with shear stress levels corresponding to those found
in vein microcirculation. Moreover, the regulatory role of Dab2 N-PTB extends to
platelet-leucocyte adhesion and aggregation events, suggesting a multi-target role for
Dab2 in haemostasis.
We use behavioral assays to investigate the mechanism of magnetoreception in two
model systems, fruit flies and laboratory mice.  These projects supported by the NSF
and DARPA are investigating the involvement of a magnetically sensitive radical pair
reaction involving a specialized class of photopigments (cryptochromes).  Critical
experiments involve gene knockouts, as well as exposure to different wavelengths of
light and to low-level (< 50 nT) radio frequency fields.  We are currently working on new
experiments to expose free living animals to controlled radio frequency fields using
mobile RF signal sources ("collars") that can be worn by small- to medium-sized
mammals.
The research in our laboratory is focused on bacterial motility and chemotaxis using the
nitrogen-fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti as model organism. Chemotaxis
is based on perception and processing of environmental information by receptors and
signal transduction via a two-component-system to the flagellar motor. The molecular
mechanisms of swimming, chemoreception, and signal transduction differ from the
enterobacterial pardigm. The S. meliloti chemotaxis system utilizes two response
regulator proteins, CheY1 and CheY2, but lacks a specific phosphatase. CheY2-P is the
dominant regulator of motor response. Its dephosphorylation involves retro-
phosphorylation back to the kinase CheA, which in turn phosphorylates free CheY1. S.
meliloti exhibits a different type of flagella rotation and hence, swimming mode. While
the E. coli motor causes a change of swimming direction by a switch from counter-
clockwise to clockwise rotation, the S. meliloti motor rotates exclusively clockwise, but
can vary its rotational speed. Changes in the swimming path are caused by an
asynchronous deceleration of individual flagella filaments. Rotary speed variation has
its molecular corollary in two new motility proteins, MotC and MotE.
Cells show nongenetic fluctuations, and functional heterogeneity. In this project, the
trainee with work with graduate students to culture mammalian cells, monitor their
behaviors under microscope, and perform some standard cell biology analysis. The
trainee will also be required to read the literature, and participate in project
discussions.
Chromosome missegregation contributes to cancer cell heterogeneity and drug
resistance. The project is to measure quantitatively of the chromosome missegregation
dynamics and how it is related to cell phenotypes. The student needs to culture cancer
cell line, practicing single cell manipulation.




A current project is on how chemical energy in a cell is transformed into mechanical
energy do work outside of the cell.




Development of molecular machines for application in many forums including
molecular photovoltaics, solar water splitting, artificial photosynthesis, light activated
drugs, PDT, molecular switches and related applications. Synthesis if new
supramolcules and the study of the perturbations of properties upon covalent coupling.
Study of ground and excited state properties.
Our research examines the interactions of the major polymers in the plant cell wall,
cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin with each other and their enzymatic degradation as
it pertains to biofuels.  Interactions, as well as degradation, are studied through
adsorption experiments using atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance,
and quartz crystal microbalance experiments.
One key challenge for future medicine is to engineer drug delivery vehicles for specific
drugs and target organs. Versatile lipid-bilayer-coated nanoparticles (Nps) can be
tailored to such applications. A strategy for design and construction of complex
functional Nps for drug-delivery applications is proposed. To achieve the ultimate
goal–lipid-bilayer-coated Nps containing multiple agents, the basic nanoarchitecture
must be constructed first. The synthesis involves two steps—the coating of metal oxide
Nps with linkers and the fusing of linker-coated Nps with liposomes. Attaching linkers
to Nps to give stable linker-coated Nps is the first goal. Constructing stable lipid-bilayer-
coated Nps is the second goal. Both goals depend on the chemical structure of the
linker; therefore, a small library of linkers are being synthesized to define the
structure–property space. Characterization of linker-coated Nps and lipid-bilayer
coated Nps will be done by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and quartz crystal
microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Four objectives are to: i) screen a
linker library to assay their ability to insert into lipid bilayers by utilizing multilamellar
vesicles (DSC), ii) characterize linker-coated planar metal oxide surfaces and liposome
fusion onto linker modified planar metal oxide surfaces to create tethered lipid
bilayers (QCM-D), iii) study linker-coated Nps interactions with supported and tethered
phospholipid bilayers (QCM-D), iv) probe interactions between tethered lipid-bilayer-
coated Nps and supported and tethered lipid bilayers on planar surfaces (QCM-D), v)
assess safety by assaying Nps for hemolytic activity, and vi) assay Nps for activity
against bacteria and fungi. Completing these studies will confirm the structure and
utility of these Nps, and set the stage for further developing lipid-bilayer-coated Nps
containing multiple agents.
We are interested in biomimetic approaches to generate new, optimized materials for
a broad range of applications. Some examples of ongoing projects are listed bellow:
Protein-polymer hybrid materials: We are utilizing modular nature of repeat-protein
arrays to create protein-polymer hybrid materials with tunable morphology and
mechanical properties for applications in energy, environment, and medicine. Repeat-
Protein Templates for Nanoparticle Assembly and Orientation in Thin Films:  Precise
control of the macroscopic ordering and orientation of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies
and inter-particle ordering has been a bottleneck in the 'bottom-up' generation of
technologically important materials and nanodevices including hybrid photovoltaic
cells, batteries, and nano-electronic circuits. We are developing and implementing a
new strategy to control nanoparticle assemblies over multiple length scales with single
particle precision. Theranostic drug delivery systems: In this project we develop stimuli-
responsive theranostic nanoparticles for delivery of the neuroprotective, anti-
inflammatory drugs to treat traumatic brain injury.   Biotherapeutics: We are designing
highly stable protein and peptide scaffolds that bind selectively and with high-affinity
to membrane glycolipids - unexplored tumor-associated targets for diagnostics,
therapy, and imaging.  De Novo Design of Repeat Proteins as Non-antibody Protein
Scaffolds: Sensitivity and specificity of immunoassays and biosensors are decidedly
dependent upon high-affinity, probe-specific molecular recognition. We are using
combinatorial and rational methods to engineer modular repeat-protein scaffolds that
can bind small molecules, glycans, and nucleotides. Assays and sensors based on direct
recognition of small-molecule analytes will have application not only in medical
research and diagnostics, but also in food industry, environmental sciences, forensic
science and national security.
We have developed an exciting, tunable platform for the synthesis of new anti-
microbial compounds.  Based on transition metal complexes, by the correct choice of an
amino acid and other ligands to surround the metal, we have developed compounds
with activity against MRSA, tuberculosis and other diseases. Research involves chemical
synthesis, microbiology and cell culture techniques and toxicology both in vitro and in
vivo.
The finite supply of fossil fuels and the possible environmental impact of such energy
sources has garnered the scientific community’s attention for the development of
alternative, overall carbon-neutral fuel sources. The sun provides enough energy every
hour to power the earth for a year. However, two of the remaining challenges that limit
the utilization of solar energy are the development of cheap and efficient solar
harvesting materials and advances in energy storage technology to overcome the
intermittent nature of the sun. In the Morris group, the research projects focus on two
aspects of solar energy conversion:solar energy stoage via artifical photosynthetic
catalysts and new architectures for next generation high efficiency, low cost solar cells.
My group develops computational methods for atomistic simulation, implements these
methods in computer software, and applies these methods to problems in chemistry,
physics, and materials science.

Prior art research to determine patentability of various mechanical, electrical, chemical,
or life science type inventions.  Legal research and writing, for example, writing
responses to patent and trademark office actions and drafting patent applications.
Market research to determine commercial value of inventions.
In the United States, the subsurface inventory of uranium contamination includes an
estimated 475 billion gallons of ground water and 75 million cubic meters of sediments.
The need for site remediation is urgent and the scale of the problem, enormous.
Decade-long natural attenuation rates, the extent of contamination, and the
inefficiency and cost of pump and treat methods has spurred efforts to identify low-
cost in-situ bioremediation technologies. A strategy presently being considered aims at
in-situ biostimulation of indigenous anaerobic metal reducing microorganisms capable
of reducing oxidized, soluble U(VI), the major contaminant form of uranium, to
reduced, sparingly soluble U(IV), which typically accumulates as the mineral uraninite
(UO2). Given the abundance of iron in the earths crust, it is important to understand
how the presence of competitive electron acceptors affect U(VI) bioremediation and
long term reactivity of reduced uranium when evaluating the potential for in-situ
uranium remediation. The proposed project will test a suite of well-characterized
reactive biogenic Fe(II) and sulfide-bearing minerals, produced systematically under
reducing conditions. Their propensity to adsorb and mediate redox reactions (direct
electron transfer process) with key elements such as U \and possibly Cr) will be tested
and compared to their chemogenic counterparts. Interfacial nanoscale interactions
between contaminant U(VI) and biogenic minerals will be probed by employing various
techniques such as XRD, BET, X-ray spectroscopic (EXAFS, SR-PD) and electron
microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM, HETEM, SAED and EELS mapping). Eventually the
effect of speciation on the mobility and/or immobilization of uranium (and Cr) will be
studied.


My research group uses computational simulations of ultra-broadband electromagnetic
field propagation in geologic materials to understand Earth's deep time, its geologic
evolution, and physiochemical processes therein.

This project lies at the intersection of astrophysics and instrument design. Ultraviolet
observations of astronomical sources are of great interest, as the UV contains critical
diagnostics of both the life-cycle of stars, and accretion onto black holes. Deciding on
the optimal set of filters to use in an ultraviolet imager though is not straightforward;
the most appropriate bandpasses are constrained by which bandpasses have the most
diagnostic power, and the cost of obtaining given bandpass tolerances. This project will
involve using computer simulations to decide on an optimal set of filters for ultraviolet
imaging observations of stars and galaxies, taking into account the predicted UV
emission from different classes of star, and the cost/feasibility of achieving specific
filter bandpass shapes. This project incorporates important elements from both pure
astronomical research, and the practical realities of instrument design.

My research activities have been focused on understanding fundamental properties of
different nano-structures using optical, microscopy, and magneto-optical techniques. I
have been collaborating with several material scientists as well as biologists.
My research is in the area of neutrino oscillation. I have worked in both accelerator and
reactor neutrino experiments. I have developed readout electronics and trigger scheme
for several neutrino experiment I have been on. I have also made contributions on
various type of analysis: low background analysis in the case of the Double Chooz
reactor neutrino experiment, cross section measurement for the K2K and T2K
experiments in Japan. I have worked on beam physics for the Booster Neutrino Beam at
Fermilab and then worked on the various BooNE experiments at Fermilab. I am now
interested in usign neutrino detector for non-proliferation purposes. Monitoring
nuclear reactor inventory using neutrino detector is becoming a reality.




My lab is primarily interested in elucidating design principles for synthetic and native
biological circuits expressed in E. coli.  We use fluorescence microscopy, microfluidics,
and theoretical modeling to pursue this goal.  We also have a GPU computing
component to aid in image analysis and simulation.


Research deals with the use of open source software development technology to build
next generation health information technology. The essence of open source technology
is community based collaboration.  Students will learn health information technology,
open source methods, management of software licensing, community based software
development, software ware testing and software architecture. As a VT faculty I am
serving as President and CEO of a not-for-profit organization funded by VA to promote
the adoption of open source software for health IT.  Students will have access to large
scale IT assets that this organization manages.

My research is primarily focused on nano-optics and nanofabrication, as I am interested
in arranging matter at the nanoscale to elucidate new optical phenomena, both for
fundamental and applied purposes. The main thrust is on resonant plasmonics, a
rapidly evolving field that concerns itself with the optical properties of metal structures
at the nano- and micro-scales.  In particular, we work on a number of aspects of
plasmonics, where projects are chosen to be interdisciplinary and take advantage of
local scientific strengths in areas such as polymer science and colloid science. The aim is
to combine techniques and findings from disparate fields in new and creative ways to
advance both fundamental understanding and practical applications. For example, we
have shown that metal nanoparticles can be combined with organic self-assembled
films to create a composite material with unusually strong nonlinear optical effects. By
combining plasmonics, nonlinear optics and bioconjugate techniques, we are
developing a method for rational assembly of nanoparticles into well-defined
assemblies with unprecedented precision. We have shown how to incorporate
incorporate actuatable polymers in plasmonic and other nano-optical structures, paving
the way for a new class of tunable photonic materials and devices.
The goal of this research is to develop the skills necessary for scanning tunneling
microscopy and use them to study nanostructures.  Two-dimensional novel materials
and molecular thin films will be the focus of the research project.  Evaluation is based
on the ability of the student to operate and maintain a Scanning Tunneling Microscope,
prepare and investigate STM samples, and maintain an appropriate experimental
procedure.




We use electrophysiological, behavioral, and maternal report measures of children's
cognition and emotion processes to examine individual differences in development.




  My research investigates visual perception.  Specifically, it focuses on understanding
   how people recognize and remember the shapes of objects.  These objects include
   basic geometric shapes as well as images of real-world scenes.  I use two different
   techniques to study perception: psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance
   imaging (fMRI).  Psychophysics simply refers to experiments in which people view
   images on computer monitors and try to tell the difference between shapes.  This
     allows us to understand exactly how well people can perceive shapes and what
   limitations they have.  Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) uses an MRI
scanner to observe brain activity while people look at images and think about them.  It
allows us to see what specific parts of the brain are more active during different shape
  perception tasks.   /  / My overall research goal is to understand how the brain makes
  sense of the many different kinds of shapes that we encounter in our lives.  We read
tiny text; we interact with small objects; we navigate buildings and wide open spaces;
   all of these skills require us to make sense of shapes.  However, “shape” can mean
different things in these situations, and can be based on different kinds of visual input.
     How does the human visual system accommodate this diversity of shapes?    My
  approach to this question is guided by the current idea that the human visual system
  includes two qualitatively different modes for processing visual information, which
  correspond to two broad areas of the cerebral cortex.  Accordingly, I examine human
     behavior to test the hypothesis that people use qualitatively different skills to
 interpret the shapes of different kinds of images (like small versus large objects), and
my brain imaging work considers how different areas of the brain might work together
                          to support complex shape perception.   / 



We study how individual differences in cognition, emotion and behavior develop over
childhood and adolescence, and influence learning/achievement and social-emotional
functioning/mental health
Near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to non-invasively monitor neural activity in
cortical brain regions. Similar to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI),
functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) measures local changes in oxygenated
and deoxygenated hemoglobin that can be related to the metabolic demands of neural
activity. Unlike fMRI, however, fNIRS does not require exposure to a magnetic field and
is less sensitive to motion artifact, making it well-suited for developmental and clinical
applications (e.g., cognitive functioning following traumatic brain injury)   Machine
learning methods, including support vector machines, are currently being applied to
neuroimaging data to better understand patterns of neural activity associated with
classes of cognitive functioning. In particular, the lab of Stephen LaConte in SBES is
currently developing methods to classify brain-states associated with cognitive control,
using fMRI data.   In the proposed student project, Brooks King-Casas in the Department
of Psychology and Stephen  LaConte in SBES will mentor one to two students in a
project that will include (i) acquisition of near-infrared spectroscopy data during a task
that varies level of prefrontal activity, and (ii) refinement of methods to classify fNIRS
data into brain-states associated with cognitive components of the task.  If successful,
this pilot project will be used to study cognitive functioning in active-duty and veteran
populations.
Currently, I am interested in the impact of multisensory information on infants'
attention allocation to language-relevant information; this approach uses eye tracking
as a way to systematically and precisely document the ways in which infants process
information from communicative partners as they learn about native language
structure; a great advantage in this work is an engineering-oriented worker who likes to
work with fine-grained data sets to best map out complex patterns of attention
regulation and attention shifting, as well as help construct interesting scenes and
displays to best represent what is knows as "social attention" processing.
We use the tools of cognitive neuroscience to decode the mechanisms of psychological
disorders.  In particular, we use human neuroimaging (fMRI) and neurofeedback in the
form of Brain-Computer Interface to create novel neuroprosthetic designs and assistive
technologies.  Mainly, these designs are meant to remediate cognitive deficits in
patients.




I am interested in any interdisciplinary work on the understanding and treatment of
autism spectrum disorders, a developmental disability that affects communication,
social interactions, and flexible behavior. I am interested in biological, psychosocial,
developmental, engineering, educational, and computer technologies as applied to
autism. As the Director of the VT Center for Autism Research, I am also able to find
other faculty affiliates who might have specific interests in those areas.
VTIP commercializes technologies developed by VT researchers and has dozens of
biomedical technologies, among others, in its portfolio (http://www.vtip.org/
availableTech/). We currently utilize undergraduate interns with strong technical
backgrounds to help us assess new technologies invented by VT faculty, protect the
related intellectual property, and license those technologies to companies to develop
into products and services. 



We analyze the whole genome sequences of cancer patients and compare them to
cancer free patients to identify new diagnostic markers and drug targets, then validate
them in the lab.  Then we work to translate them to the clinic via commercialization and
entrepreneurship.  We also study professional ethic using text data analysis and
mining.
We have various projects including: - developing tools for social media to detect public
health events - using simulation and social network analysis to model spread of
ideation in African communities - simulating human behavior in a disaster. I welcome
female students in particular, even those without a strong science or computing
background.
DNA fabrication is the process of combining natural and chemically synthetized DNA
fragments together in order to make larger DNA molecules that conform to computer-
designed sequences. DNA fabrication includes gene synthesis, the process of
assembling chemically synthesized oligonucleotides into double- stranded DNA
fragments. DNA fabrication also includes more traditional activities, such as the
development of mutant collections, plasmid libraries, and refactored genomes. In this
broad perspective, most biologists practice DNA fabrication, although they are more
likely to call it molecular biology or genetic engineering. DNA fabrication projects rely
on low-cost instruments and laboratory infrastructure commonly available to life
scientists. Unfortunately, the lack of a suitable framework to analyze DNA fabrication is
limiting its effectiveness, requiring tools to manage the complex flows of information
and materials typically needed in these projects.  We are evaluating the feasibility and
benefits of analyzing DNA fabrication processes by using techniques from Industrial and
Systems Engineering. The premise is that these techniques can be used to better
design, plan, and control DNA fabrication processes and that this change of paradigm
will help identify preferred manufacturing strategies for DNA fabrication. Adapting
approaches used in other industries will lead to new strategies for process planning,
monitoring, and control that meet the need of DNA fabrication. The project has four
complementary objectives: (1) explore the goals and requirements of the process,
conduct functional analysis, and investigate resource and workflow strategies for DNA
fabrication; (2) implement laboratory pipelines to generate different types of
constructs illustrating a broad range of fabrication problems and biological domains; (3)
evaluate algorithms to estimate high-error rates in low volume processes, implement
monitoring strategies, and compare the performance of different manufacturing
strategies applicable to specific DNA manufacturing problems; and (4) provide cross-
training opportunities in molecular biology and ISE for undergraduate students,
graduate students, and post-doctoral fellows.
The primary interest of Epigenomics and Computational Biology Lab is to understand
the molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic transitions during important
biological processes associated with human complex diseases. Toward this goal, we
emphasize on the development of high-throughput sequencing approaches for data
generation and the implementation of computational tools for “omics” data analysis. In
particularly, we are interested in the strategies to monitor the fidelity of DNA
methylation inheritance, assess methylation variation within and between cell
populations, identify true epimutations, and eventually, discover novel therapeutic
ways.
Synapses are sites that allow information to be passed between neurons and are
essential for brain function. Their importance is highlighted by the fact that even minor
synaptic abnormalities, caused by disease or neurotrauma, result in devastating
neurological  conditions. Understanding how CNS synapses are targeted, assembled
and maintained (or eliminated) is therefore essential to our understanding of
neurological  disorders. Our lab is interested in understanding the cellular and
molecular mechanisms that drive the initial targeting of synaptic partners to each other
and the subsequent differentiation of these partners into functional synapses. To
explore these questions we employ cell biological approaches, biochemistry, mouse
genetics, electrophysiology and behavioral approaches.




RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are responsible for transcribing genomic DNA into functional
messenger RNA in eukaryotes.  Although polymerases have been extensively studied
in yeast, mammalian RNAPs have not been fully characterized. Using Affinity Grid
technology and single particle cryo-EM, we have generated the first 3D reconstruction
of human RNAP II bound to native DNA.  This approach is now being utilized to examine
the structure of the nucleotide-bound human RNAP II isolated from human cancer cells.
Furthermore, RNAP III was recently implicated as the protein machinery responsible for
transcribing foreign DNA to RNA during the pathogenic infection of mammals.  This
makes RNAP III a prime therapeutic target for preventing viral integration into
mammalian hosts.  The main goal of this project is to determine a high-resolution
structure of human RNAP III that can be used for rationale drug design in the prevention
of viral infection.  In addition to its role in the innate immune response, RNAP III also
synthesizes microRNAs (miRNAs) from DNA templates.  This serves as the initial step in
RNAi induced gene silencing.  We will use a structural approach to understand how
RNAP III produces miRNAs.  Furthermore, we are investigating the processing events
that orchestrate silencing mechanisms.
One of the main obstacles in finding therapeutics for muscles and neurons is the lack of
in vitro culture system that mimick the native, in vivo, three dimensional structure of
tissues.  Students in my lab will work towards developing and testing new methods to
culture muscle cells along with their neuronal partners.
Through experimentation on mouse brains, we try to understand how brain hardware,
circuits and molecules, encode emotions and reasoning in the human. We
optogenetically manipulate brain by surgically and genetically introduced light
activated ion channels, which enable activation of silencing of the circuits through
optical engineering using lasers and LEDs.  Our current goal is to decode interaction
between the amygdala, the fear center of the brain, and the prefrontal cortex, the
center for executive control, to determine how they change in emotional trauma and
how they recover in cognitive training. The laboratory utilizes multidisciplinary
approach which involves behavioral analyses, mapping of neuronal activity using
genetic markers, and electrophysiological/optogenetics interrogation of synaptic
connections in the brain slice preparation and living animals. The project for
undergraduate student is entitled “Effect of cognitive training on brain activity and
resilience to emotional trauma”. Student will use a novel touch-screen system for
working memory training in mice; he(she) will participate and design and testing of the
paradigm. Once the paradigm is established, the student will employ
immunohistochemical detection of c-fos, a protein marker of neuronal activity identify,
to identify areas of the brain activated by the training and to compare them with the
areas activated by emotional trauma. Finally, the student will investigate how cognitive
training affects resilience to emotional distress.
                                             Project Availability
Required skills to work in this lab   Summer            Spring Summer    Mentor name
                                              Fall 2013
                                        2013              2014    2014




One year of college-level general
                                         y        y       y      y        David Bevan
chemistry is needed.




One year of chemistry is needed. An
understanding and application of         y        y       y      y       Glenda Gillaspy
math.  




some biology background                  y       n        n      n         Jianyong Li
                                       y   y   y   y    Pablo Sobrado




Highly motivated; strong
background in one of the following
                                       y   y   y   y        Bin Xu
areas: life sciences, chemistry,
computer science or engineering.


Field work, possible sampling during
rain events, sediment collection,      y   y   y   y   W. Cully Hession
use of ATV
Basic Microsoft Word and Excel skills
Good attitude and attention to          y   y   n   n   Leigh-Anne Krometis
detail




                                        y   y   y   y      Warren Ruder




attention to detail; scientific
curiosity; willingness to learn;
                                        y   y   y   y      Durelle Scott
willingness to listen to; general
chemistry




ambitious, engaged, hardwork, and
                                        y   y   y   y        Xia Kang
good communication skills
Second semester calculus. Lab
                                     y   n   n   n     Naraine Persaud
safety.



Good lab practices, pipetting,
                                     y   y   y   y   Isis Mullarky Kanevsky
calculations.




It would be helpful if the student
had an understanding of the use of
                                     y   y   y   y       Mark Hanigan
mathematical models in problem
solving and application.
Ability to observe insects and record
data from visual tree inspections.
                                        y   n   n   n   Thomas Kuhar
Able to comfortably handle live
stink bugs in the lab.




PCR, computer                           y   y   y   y   Igor Sharakhov
ambitious, engaged.                     y   y   y   y   Mark Williams




1) basic knowledge of biochemistry,
molecular biology, and immunology;
2) basic experimental (or in course     y   y   y   y   Zhiyong Cheng
labs) skills of biochemistry,
molecular biology, and immunology.




The ability to apply their discipline
to a research question that has         y   y   y   y   Paul Estabrooks
significant health implications.



Understanding basic biology,
                                        y   y   y   y    Dongmin Liu
endocrinlog

able to calculate solute
concentrations for making solutions
in chemistry; no practical lab
                                        y   n   n   n    Eva Collakova
experience required; I will teach any
lab skills necessary to complete the
project
Basic knowledge of molecular
biology is required. Laboratory
                                        y   n   n   n   Sakiko Okumoto
experience is desired but not
required.
Incumbent must be a critical thinker
and have a basic understanding of
biology. We routinely train
                                       y   y   n   n   David Schmale
engineers in biology, so we are
comfortable with students from
different disciplines.




Must be comfortable setting and
keeping a reliable schedule of
specific research sessions planned
in advance. / Should be interested     y   y   y   y   James D. Ivory
in and comfortable with the general
concept of applying the scientific
method to a social question.
Students must be interested in
understanding how one learns to
become a scientist and engineer
(models of theories of learning),
what barriers exist to becoming
members of these disciplines (race,     y   y   y   y   Michael Evans
gender, ethnicity, socio-economic
level), and strategies and structures
that can help these individuals
(technology, mentors, informal
learning environments).




Student(s) should have broad
interests in engineering, science       y   y   y   y    Barry Goodell
and the environment.




Basic experience with laboratory
procedures, experience with basic       y   y   y   y   Daniel Hindman
hand tools


An interest in and enthusiasm for
                                        y   y   y   y    Justin Barone
our research, we can teach the rest!
First Year Chemistry High school
                                       y   y   y   y       William Ducker
Physics




1. Undergrads in chemistry, physics,
biology or vet med with interests on
                                       y   n   n   y          Chang Lu
engineering aspect of biomedical
devices are welcomed.  / 2. GPA>3.5.



Background in chemistry or biology
                                       y   y   y   y       Marc Edwards
or environmental science.


physics and mathematics through
                                       y   y   y   y        Jennifer Irish
calculus.



Basic concepts in computer
                                       y   y   n   n   Adrian Rodriguez-Marek
programming



Familiarity with lab procedures, lab
safety. A genuine interest to learn    y   y   y   y      Peter Vikesland
new and interesting things.
Geometry and algebra, basic
                                        y   y   y   y   Matthew Eatherton
computer skills, willingness to learn




Understanding of probability and
                                        y   n   n   n   Pamela Murray-Tuite
linear regression
Due to the interdisciplinary feature
of the project, students are not
expected to have deep pre-
knowledge of these topics. But an
open mind and curiosity in
mathematics and science will be
very helpful. We will provide
necessary training and guidance for
students to learn basic theories and
techniques and to gain research
experience at the frontier line in      y   y   y   n        Yang Cao
scientific computing and  /
computational biology areas.
Usually a graduate student will work
closely the undergraduate
researcher. Office space and a
computer will also be provided.
Based on the contribution to the
project, students will be encouraged
to co-author  / scientific research
papers. 
any of: work in the social sciences;
work with managing information/
knowledge/social networks;               y   y   y   y    Edward Fox
interest in analyzing twitter, web, or
other text resources




Calculus, some programming
                                         n   y   y   n   Layne Watson
experience.


depends on the department.  they
can work on simulation (using
COMSOL) or involved in analytical        y   y   y   y   Masoud Agah
chemistry (GC-FID) or have cell
culture experience.




Some programming experience.             y   y   y   y    Dhruv Batra




minimum skills: programming
experience in any of following
languages: Python, C/C++, Matlab,
                                         y   y   y   y   Krzysztof Kepa
Java preffered skills: knowledge of
VHDL/Verilog, familiarity with Linux/
Unix environment.
Autocad or other computer aided
                                         y   y   y   y      Jason Lai
design



willingness to do experimental
research, interest in chemistry and
                                         y   y   y   y   Kathleen Meehan
material science, data analysis using
Excel and possibly MATLAB

The scieneer will be trained, but will
enjoy the hand-on experience more
with prior training in material          y   y   y   y      Khai Ngo
processing and electrical
measurements.


US Citizenship                           y   y   y   y   Hardus Odendaal




Some exposure to basic computer
                                         y   y   y   y     Devi Parikh
programming would be helpful
Students interested in working on
the experimental apparatus must be
able to learn programming for a
basic microcontroller and be familiar
with basic electrical components. It
                                            y   y   y   n    Nicole Abaid
would be preferable that students
interested in data processing be
familiar with a programming
language, although it is not strictly
necessary.



The personal skills I require from my
undergraduate students are
curiosity, creativity, critical thinking,
and careful experimentation.  The           y   y   y   y   Douglas Holmes
technical skills required are ones
that can be learned in a very short
time period.




Matlab;  / Finished undergraduate
                                            y   y   y   y   Sunghwan Jung
lab courses; / Enthusiasm;  / 




Ability to work independently with
minimal oversight, excellent
literature and information searching
skills including electronic journals
using the VT Library system,                n   y   y   n   Sean McGinnis
excellent writing and
communications skills, interest in
the intersection of engineering,
science, the public, and polic
For Science Student: Microbiology
Lab Skills, Knowledge of more
advanced assay methods such as
PCR, Western Blot, Confocal
microscopy is highly desired but not
required. Must be interested in
applying biology knowledge
towards developing engineered bio-
hybrid systems! /  / For Engineering    y   y   y   y    Bahareh Behkam
Student: Proficient in CAD software,
strong background in fundamental
engineering classes, familiarity with
microfabrication and microfluidic is
highly desired but not required.
Must be interested in applying
engineering knowledge to biological
systems. 




Applicants must be willing to work
in a team environment and eager to
                                        y   y   y   y   Alexander Leonessa
learn more about rehabilitation
engineering.
Besides an open mind and the
ability to perform diligent
experimentation , all necessary         y   y   y   y    Rolf Mueller
skills can be acquired during the
work.




No previous lab experience is
necessary. However, if you're
uncomfortable working with
                                        y   y   y   n   Elizabeth Voigt
biomaterials or faint at the sight of
blood, this project may not be for
you.



Students must be willing to work as
part of a team and be interested in
sharing their own ideas on how to
                                        y   y   y   y   Lissett Bickford
solve problems - ideas that may be
generated from literature searches
or own experiences.
Programming skills: Matlab/C or
                                        y   n   n   n   Rosalyn Moran
similar are critical.




intro biology and chemistry or
                                        y   y   y   y     John Barrett
equivalent




motivation; experience in a lab
setting; commitment to lab projects;
be able to work in a team;              y   y   y   y   Daniel Capelluto
experience in reading articles in the
life sciences.
Ability to read and understand
                                  n   y   y   n    Daniela Cimini
research papers




some previous lab experience in
areas of molecular biology,
                                  y   y   y   y   Carla Finkielstein
biomedical engineering,
microfluidics is desirable.




to be determined                  y   y   y   y     John Phillips
sterile working techniques, / basic
                                      y   y   y   y   Birgit Scharf
organic chemistry




An ideal trainee should  be highly
devoted, have strong interest in
either cell biology experiment, or    y   y   y   y   Jianhua Xing
mathematical/computational
modeling. 


cell culturing                        y   y   y   y   Jianhua Xing




The student should have some
background and skills related to
mechanical forces and energy, the
conversion of different forms of      y   n   y   y   Zhaomin Yang
energy, and an appreciation of
motors or movements at a nano-
and subnano-meter scale




Motivated self learners, basic
                                      y   y   y   y   Karen Brewer
general chemistry



General Chemistry, organic
chemistry, physical chemistry         y   y   y   y    Alan Esker
(thermodynamics)
The only skills needed are curiosity,
willingness to work, and attention
                                        y   y   y   y   Richard Gandour
to detail. Specific skills will be
developed as needed.




general chemistry laboratory            y   y   y   y    Tijana Grove
A willingness to learn.                y   y   y   y    Joseph Merola




Students must be familiar with
                                       y   y   y   y    Amanda Morris
general chemistry laboratory skills.




strong math/physics/chemistry
background; strong problem-solving     n   y   y   n   Edward Valeyev
skills

Requirement - must have
completed Legal Foundations in
                                       y   n   n   y   Michele Mayberry
Intellectual Property Law (COS
2304).
 basic background in chemistry and
biology, plus or minus any aspect of
                                          y   y   y   y   Michael Hochella
   environmental science and/or
            engineering




computer skills - linux physics - intro
sequence complete math - through          y   y   y   y    Chester Weiss
differential equations




No specific requirements. Some
background in physics, and/or
computer simulations would be             y   y   n   n    Duncan Farrah
helpful. No experience in
astrophysics is needed.




Some knowledge of optics.                 y   y   y   y   Giti Khodaparast
basic knowledge of electronics, how
to use an oscilloscope and a
multimeter for example. Basic
knowledge of particle physics.Basic
                                       y   y   y   y   Camillo Mariani
knowledge of computer software
window/mac or linux. Preferably
basic knowledge of computer
programming like C or C++ or Java.



Should have basic experience
simulating ODE's on a computer.
Should have one or more of the
following:  Programming ability.       y   y   y   y   William Mather
Willingness to spend substantial
time learning synthetic biology
experiment and/or theory.




Working with office computer and
                                       y   y   y   y     Seong Mun
internet




Ability to be self-directed and take
initiative. Good manual dexterity.     y   y   y   y   Hans Robinson
Good attention to detail.
students have taken one or two
courses in physics, materials science   y   y   y   y     Chenggang Tao
or related fields.




basic computer skills, intellectual
curiosity about human behavior,
patience for tedious work,              y   y   y   y     Martha Ann Bell
appreciation for long-term research
outcomes




  Basic experience with computer
programming.  There is no particular
     programming language that
 students must know, but general
                                        y   y   y   y      Anthony Cate
  familiarity with programming is
    necessary.  My research does
   involve some programming in
      MATLAB and Linux/Unix.  




Data management (e.g., Excel) Basic
                                        y   y   y   y   Kirby Deater-Deckard
statistics
                                  y   y   y   y   Brooks King-Casas




MATLAB programming; SPSS
analysis; possibly EPrime
                                  y   y   y   y   Robin Panneton
programming; digital movie
construction



Some familiarity with technical
computing languages (python,      y   y   y   y     John Richey
matlab, c++)




good people skills, good
                                  n   y   y   n    Angela Scarpa
communication
primary skills are the ability to
quickly come up to speed on new
technologies and develop insights
                                       y   y   y   y   John Geikler
based on comparison to current
state of the art in academia and
industry




Programming,                           y   y   y   y   Harold Garner


Students must have a willingness to
learn computer programming, and
an interest in applying                y   y   y   n   Caitlin Rivers
computational tools to public health
and social problems.
No skill necessary but commitment
to the research project is          y   y   y   y   Jean Peccoud
mandatory.




                                    y   y   y   y    David Xie
Motivation, creativity, willingness to
                                         y   y   y   y    Michael Fox
work with animals




                                         y   y   y   y    Debbie Kelly




Desire to learn, test and apply that
                                         y   y   y   y   Gregorio Valdez
knowledge.
ability to follow general good
                                 n   y   y   y   Alexei Morozo
      laboratory practice
                                                    Project
Mentor Department         Co-mentor(s)
                                                   Location




                     Josep Bassaganya-Riera,
                      Virginia Bioinformatics
                     Institute - collaborator /
                     Justin Lemkul - postdoc,
  Biochemistry       jalemkul@vt.edu / Nikki      Blacksburg
                    Lewis - graduate student,
                      lewissn@vt.edu/ Anne
                    Brown - graduate student,
                        ambrown7@vt.edu




  Biochemistry                                    Blacksburg




  Biochemistry                                    Blacksburg
  Biochemistry                                   Blacksburg




                     Dr. Josep Bassaganya-Riera,
                      VBI, jbassaga@vt.edu Dr.
                     David Bevan, Biochemistry,
  Biochemistry                                   Blacksburg
                      drbevan@vt.edu Dr. T. M.
                     Murali, Computer Science,
                           murali@cs.vt.edu


Biological Systems      Kevin McGuire, FREC,
                                                 Blacksburg
   Engineering         kevin.mcguire@vt.edu
Biological Systems
                                                   Blacksburg
   Engineering




Biological Systems
                                                   Blacksburg
   Engineering




Biological Systems
                                                   Blacksburg
   Engineering




                     Dr. Jess Jones, Restoration
                       Biologist, U.S. Fish and
                        Wildlife Services Co-
      CSES                                         Blacksburg
                        Director, Freshwater
                       Mollusk Conservation
                             Center at VT
    CSES                                    Blacksburg



                Christina Petersson Wolfe
Dairy Science    Elankumaran Subbiah XJ     Blacksburg
                           Meng




   DASC                                     Blacksburg
Entomology     Jacob Barney (PPPWS)    Blacksburg




             Alexey Onufriev, Computer
Entomology                             Blacksburg
                      Science
   Horticulture                                 Blacksburg




 Human Nutrition,
                                                Blacksburg
Foods and Excercise




                                                   I have
                    Fabio Almeida, Jennie Hill,
                                                 research in
 Human Nutrition,     Jamie Zoellner, Brenda
                                                    both
Foods and Excercise Davy, Kevin Davy, Wen You,
                                                 Blacksburg
                         Scott McCrickard
                                                and Roanoke


 Human Nutrition,         Dr. Mattew Hulver
                                                Blacksburg
Foods and Excercise       Hulvermw@vt.edu


                           Ryan Senger (BSE,
                      senger@vt.edu) Ruth Grene
      PPWS              (PPWS, grene@vt.edu)    Blacksburg
                          Lenwood Heath (CS,
                            heath@vt.edu)



      PPWS                                      Blacksburg
    PPWS        Blacksburg




Communication   Blacksburg
Learning Sciences
                                                 Blacksburg
and Technologies




                     Dr. Barry Goodell Professor,
                     Department of Sustainable
                             Biomaterials
                      goodell@vt.edu  Dr. Scott
                         Renneckar       Assoc.
  Sustainable         Professor, Department of
                                                  Blacksburg
  Biomaterials         Sustainable Biomaterials
                     srenneck@vt.edu   Dr. Alan
                          Druschitz        Assoc.
                      Professor and Director, VT
                     Fire, Materials Science and
                     Engineering adrus@vt.edu




                        Tonya Smith-Jackson,
  Sustainable          Industrial and Systems
                                                 Blacksburg
  Biomaterials              Engineering,
                          smithjac@vt.edu

Biological Systems
                                                 Blacksburg
   Engineering
  Chemical
                Scott Huxtable   Blacksburg
 Engineering




  Chemical
                                 Blacksburg
 Engineering




   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering

   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering


   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering


   Civil and
Environmental                    Blacksburg
 Engineering
Civil Engineering   Blacksburg




                    Northern
Civil Engineering
                    Virginia




Computer Science    Blacksburg
                    Andrea Kavanaugh, CS,
                     kavan@vt.edu; Steve
                         Sheetz, ACIS,
Computer Science                                Blacksburg
                     sheetz@vt.edu; Don
                    Shoemaker, Sociology,
                      shoemake@vt.edu




Computer Science           Dozens...            Blacksburg



  Electrical and   Dr. Schmelz (HFNS) and Dr.
    Computer         Roberts (VETMED) Dr.       Blacksburg
   Engineering           Heflin (Physics)




  Electrical and
    Computer                                    Blacksburg
   Engineering




                      Peter Athanas, ECE,
  Electrical and
                     athanas@vt.edu) Skip
    Computer                                    Blacksburg
                         Garner, VBI,
   Engineering
                      garner@vbi.vt.edu)
Electrical and
  Computer       Blacksburg
 Engineering



Electrical and
  Computer       Blacksburg
 Engineering



Electrical and
  Computer       Blacksburg
 Engineering


Electrical and
  Computer       Blacksburg
 Engineering




Electrical and
  Computer       Blacksburg
 Engineering
Engineering Science
                      Blacksburg
  and Mechanics




Engineering Science
                      Blacksburg
  and Mechanics




Engineering Science
                      Blacksburg
  and Mechanics




 Materials Science
                      Blacksburg
 and Engineering
Mechanical
              Blacksburg
Engineering




Mechanical
              Blacksburg
Engineering
Mechanical
                                           Blacksburg
Engineering




              Dr. Nichole Rylander, ME/
Mechanical      SBES, mnr@vt.edu Dr.
                                           Blacksburg
Engineering   Pavlos Vlachos, ME/SBES,
                   pvlachos@vt.edu




              Specific collaborators are
   SBES       TBD and currently in the     Blacksburg
                        works.
      VTCRI                                     Roanoke




Biological Sciences                            Blacksburg




                    Pavlos Vlachos, Mechanical
                            Engineering;
                     pvlachos@vt.edu;   Rafael
                       V. Davalos; Biomedical
                            Engineering;
Biological Sciences    davalos@vt.edu; Mark    Blacksburg
                    Stremler; stremler@vt.edu;
                      Engineering Science and
                         Mechanics Liwu Li;
                        Biological Sciences;
                            lwli@vt.edu
Biological Sciences                               Blacksburg




                       rafael davalos, / Pavlos
Biological Sciences                               Blacksburg
                      Vlachos / John Charonko




                        Assistant Professor
                         Director, Wireless
                      Measurements Group US
Biological Sciences   Naval Academy Electrical    Blacksburg
                      Engineering Department
                       105 Maryland Avenue
                        Annapolis MD 21402
Biological Sciences                                Blacksburg




Biological Sciences                                Blacksburg



                      Daniela Cimini, Biological
Biological Sciences                                Blacksburg
                              Sciences




                       Prof. Bahareh Behkam,
Biological Sciences    Mechanical Engineering,     Blacksburg
                          behkam@vt.edu




                      Prof. Brenda Winkel Prof.
    Chemistry                                      Blacksburg
                           John Robertson



                      Rich Gandour (Chemistry)
    Chemistry         Maren Roman (Sustainable     Blacksburg
                            Biomaterials)
            Dr. Liang Chen, Department
                    of Chemistry,
            lchen08@vt.edu / Professor
             Alan R. Esker, Department
Chemistry           of Chemistry,       Blacksburg
             aesker@vt.edu / Professor
              Joseph O. Falkinham, III,
              Department of Biological
               Sciences, jofiii@vt.edu




            Amanda Morris, Chemistry,
Chemistry                               Blacksburg
                ajmorris@vt.edu
             Joseph Falkinham,
             Biological Sciences,
Chemistry   jofiii@vt.edu Marion    Blacksburg
              Ehrich, Vet Med,
               marion@vt.edu




            Eva Marand (Chemical
Chemistry                           Blacksburg
                Engineering)




Chemistry                           Blacksburg




  COS                               Blacksburg
              Harish Veeramani, Dept. of
Geosciences          Geosciences,          Blacksburg
                    harish@vt.edu




                sturler@vt.edu, Eric de
                     Sturler, Math
Geosciences                                Blacksburg
               npolys@vt.edu, Nicholas
                    Polys, Comp Sci




                 Sara Petty, Physics,
  Physics      spetty@vt.edu, Nahum        Blacksburg
              Arav, Physics, arav@vt.edu




  Physics                                  Blacksburg
                  Jonathan Link
            (jlink@vt.edu) - physics
Physics                               Blacksburg
                 Bruce Vogelaar
          (vogelaar@vt.edu) - physics




Physics                               Blacksburg




                                      Northern
Physics
                                      Virginia




          Webster Santos, Chemistry
            Rick Davis, Chemical
Physics                               Blacksburg
            Engineering Yong Xu,
           Electrical Engineering
 Physics                                  Blacksburg



               Kirby Deater-Deckard -
                      Psychology
                  (kirbydd@vt.edu)
               Jungmeen Kim-Spoon -
Psychology   Psychology(jungmeen@vt. Blacksburg
               edu) Cynthia L. Smith -
                        Human
             Development(smithcl@vt.e
                          du)




Psychology                                Blacksburg




               Anderson Norton, Math
               (norton3) Osman Balci,
Psychology      Software Engineering       Blacksburg
             (balci) Michael Evans, Sch of
                      Educ (mae)
Psychology                               Blacksburg




              Susan White, Psychology,
                sww@vt.edu; Angela
Psychology                               Blacksburg
                 Scarpa, Psychology,
                   ascarpa@vt.edu




Psychology   Denis Gracinin, Susan White Blacksburg



              Susan White, Psychology,
              sww@vt.edu John Richey,
                Psychology and VTCRI,
                richey@vt.edu Thomas
                Ollendick, Psychology,
               tho@vt.edu Ken Kishida,
Psychology    VTCRI, kenk@vt.edu Mark Blacksburg
                    Benson, Human
              Development Skip Garner,
               Biological Sciences Denis
             Gracanin, Computer Science
             Scott McCrickard, Computer
              Science  and many others
                    The VTIP licensing
              associates who work in our
              life sciences portfolio have
                primary responsibility of
   VTIP                                      Blacksburg
                 mentoring Scieneering
              interns. They are Greg Hess
              (ghess@vtip.org) and Steve
              Lockett (slockett@vtip.org)




Biosciences                                  Blacksburg



               I am a grad student. My
NDSSL @ VBI   advisor is Dr. Bryan Lewis,    Blacksburg
                  blewis@vbi.vt.edu
    Virginia        Jaime Camelio, ISE,
Bioinformatics   jcamelio@vt.edu Kim Ellis,   Blacksburg
   Institute        ISE, kpellis@vt.edu




    Virginia
Bioinformatics                                Blacksburg
   Institute
Biological Sciences   Roanoke




Biological Sciences   Blacksburg




Biological Sciences   Roanoke
  Biomedical
Engineering and   Roanoke
    Science

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:10/4/2013
language:English
pages:291
huangyuarong huangyuarong
About