The Rebel

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					The Rebel
The real life story of Neville Brody

“why can’t you take a painterly approach within the printed medium? I wanted to make people more aware rather than less aware, and with the design I started to do, I was following the idea of design to reveal, not to conceal.”

Arcadia was created in 1990 and is a sans serif font. It can be identified as a

Neville Brody was born on April 23, 1957 and grew up North of London in a suburb named Southgate. Living in the suburb provided Neville with the opportunity to experience both city and country life, which later down the road enriched his design, letting his work appeal to many walks of life. Brody attended classes at Hornsey University, and catagorrized himself as a fine artist saying “Ever since I had any self-awareness, I’ve wanted to do art or painting.” However, like many artists Brody soon came to a fork in the road, where he had to decide what he really wanted to do. After spending time at Hornsey Brody decided that Graphics would be the way to go, as it would provide him with more opportunities and offer him more possibilities. When once asked about the decision to go into graphics, he answered, “why can’t you take a painterly approach within the printed medium? I wanted to make people more aware rather than less aware, and with the design I started to do, I was following the idea of design to reveal, not to conceal.”

Brody’s popularity grew as he work on The Face magazine from 1981 to 1986, appeared through out the world. He pushed the limits and created new ones for the idea of the magazine industry. His funky bold designs changed the way artists created, and viewers looked at and read magazines. In The Graphic Language of Neville Brody, Jon Wozencroft discusses how over the years so many artists have tried to imitate Brody’s work. He states, “When style rather than content is the driving force of a culture, as it is today, it requires a keen eye to differentiate the original from its countless simulations.” (5). A huge milestone in Brody’s career occurred when, in 1988 he was asked to do an exhibition of his work at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, and a one-man show in Tokyo two years later, according to apple.com. Brody’s expertise for typography is also shown in his creation of typefaces. Brody began designing his own typefaces at a young age and today has over 40, beautifully crafted typefaces. The following is a list of Brody’s fonts: Linotype Arcadia, FFAutotrace Double, FF Autotrace Five, FF Autotrace Nine, FF Autotrace One, FF Autotrace Outline, FF Blur, FF Dirty One, FF Dirty Two, FF Dirty Three, FF Dirty Four, Dirty Seven One, FF Dome Headline, FF Dome Text, FF Gothic One One, FF Gothic One One condensed, FF Gothic Two One, FF Gothic Two Two, FF Harlem, FF Harlem Slang, Jamesrex, Linotype Industria, Linotype Insignia, Lush Us, FF Pop Led, FF Pop Pop, Tokyo One, Tokyo Two, Tokyo Two Solid, FF Typeface Four One, FF Typeface Four Two, FF Typeface Six, FF Typeface Seven, FF World One, FF World Two, FF World Three.

“art is whatever you say it is, and if it still refuses to lie down and die, then it has to look around and embrace other areas.”

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sans serif font because it does not have serifs. Atypical of many san serif fonts Arcadia has a large variation of strokes, particularly displayed on the A,

S and X. It has a very vertical axis, and feels almost stretched due to its exOther events that occured in the year 1990 include treme verticalness. Arcadia’s A’s apex is rounded and the R’s tail is rounded the following: In March the art world shook as two with no loop. This is a very geometric typeface, with a combination of round thieves posing as police officers stole twelve paintand straight edges as seen in the letters S and L. Furthermore, the bowls ings, worth from $300 million, from the Isabella of letters such as p and q are almost four times the size of their decenders. Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. This is the largest art theft in US history, and the paintings have not been recovered, according to wikipedia.com. In May Vincent Van Gogh’s Portrait of Doctor Gachet sold for $82.5 million. In November the first known World Wide Web page was written, ac-

cording to the information found on wikipedia.com.

Brody’s pieces portray a very high level of energy. His use of repetition makes his pieces strong; creating a harmonious feeling of movement and rhythm, while at the same time they have a strong sense of hierarchy. Brody’s typographic design skills have gone far above and beyond any other typographers in the last fifty years. Without the advancements in the magazine world, album art, digital imaging and poster designs, the graphic design world as we know it would be extremely different, and would lack the spark of creative excellence it now has, thanks to Brody. These design elements further help to prove that Brody is one of the worlds great designers, who is not afraid to think outside of the box and create images that are a little (or a lot) out of the ordinary, which is exactly why he was on our list of designers!

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Neville Brodys’ typeface Arcadia is known for...... 1. The bowls of letters such as p and q being almost four times the size of their decenders 2. Itt’s very vertical axis, makes the typeface feel almost stretched

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Caroline Curtin

“The page is the basic skeleton from which you build everything. It’s equivalent to the scaffolding, or the walls and the joists of a building. A grid is crucialthere has to be enough space incorporated in such a way that you don’t get the impression that things are being thrown out from the centre of the page.

It has to create the enclosure without interrupting the flow from spread to spread”...“the magazine needs to show the reader where a specific feature starts...and you want to encourage people to read an article.

But the way you start an article can take any form you like, as long as you’re still indicating the beginning by directing the reader’s eye to it. You can use a symbol, a form, or a different typeface; you might even use white space.”

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neville brody

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inside the real life of neville brody
by caroline curtin

Neville Brody was born on April 23, 1957 and grew up North of London in a suburb named Southgate. Living in the suburb provided Neville with the opportunity to experience both city and country life, which later down the road enriched his design, letting his work appeal to many walks of life. Brody attended classes at Hornsey University, and catagorrized himself as a fine artist saying “Ever since I had any self-awareness, I’ve wanted to do art or painting.” However, like many artists Brody soon came to a fork in the road, where he had to decide what he really wanted to do. After spending time at Hornsey Brody decided that Graphics would be the way to go, as it would provide him with more opportunities and offer him more possibilities. When once asked about the decision to go into graphics, he answered, “why can’t you take a painterly approach within the printed medium? I wanted to make people more aware rather than less aware, and with the design I started to do, I was following the idea of design to reveal, not to conceal.”

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789
In addition, Brody’s popularity grew as his work on The Face magazine from 1981 to 1986, appeared through out the world. He pushed the limits and created new ones for the idea of the magazine industry. His funky bold designs changed the way artists created, and viewers looked at and read magazines. In The Graphic Language of Neville Brody, Jon Wozencroft discusses how over the years so many artists have tried to imitate Brody’s work. He states, “When style rather than content is the driving force of a culture, as it is today, it requires a keen eye to differentiate the original from its countless simulations.” A huge milestone in Brody’s career occurred when, in 1988 he was asked to do an exhibition of his work at the Victoria and Albert Museum, in London, and a one-man show in Tokyo two years later, according to apple.com. In October of 1994 Brody and his partner Fwa Richards decided to create their own studio called Research Studios, which has now opened in Berlin, London, Paris and New York. Brody’s expertise for typography is also shown in his creation of typefaces. Brody began designing his own typefaces at a young age and today has over 40, beautifully crafted typefaces. The following is a list of Brody’s fonts: Linotype Arcadia, FFAutotrace Double, FF Autotrace Five, FF Autotrace Nine, FF Autotrace One, FF Autotrace Outline, FF Blur, FF Dirty One, FF Dirty Two, FF Dirty Three, FF Dirty Four, Dirty Seven One, FF Dome Headline, FF Dome Text, FF Gothic One One, FF Gothic One One condensed, FF Gothic Two One, FF Gothic Two Two, FF Harlem, FF Harlem Slang, Jamesrex, Linotype Industria, Linotype Insignia, Lush Us, FF Pop Led, FF Pop Pop, Tokyo One, Tokyo Two, Tokyo Two Solid, FF Typeface Four One, FF Typeface Four Two, FF Typeface Six, FF Typeface Seven, FF World One, FF World Two, FF World Three. Arcadia was created in 1990 and is a sans serif typeface. It can be identified as a sans serif font because it does not have serifs. Atypical of many sans serif typefaces Arcadia has a large variation of strokes, particularly displayed in the A, S and X. It has a very vertical axis, and feels almost stretched due to its extreme verticality. Arcadia’s A’s apex is rounded and the R’s tail is rounded as well, only with no loop. This is a very geometric typeface, with a combination of round and straight edges as seen in the letters S and L. Furthermore, the bowls of letters such as p and q are almost four times the size of their decenders. In addition, the number two is also interesting as it uses both horizontal, vertical and diagonal strokes. Furthermore, other events that occured in the year 1990 include the following: In March the art world shook as two robbers pretending to be policemen stole twelve paintings worth $300 million, from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. This is the largest art theft in US history, and the paintings have not been recovered, according to wikipedia.com. In May Vincent Van Gogh’s Portrait of Doctor Gachet sold for $82.5 million. In November the first known World Wide Web page was written, according to the information found on wikipedia.com.

“You should pursue an idea, do it, stop, then go on to the next one.”

Without the advancements in the magazine world, album art, digital imaging and poster designs, the graphic design world as we know it, would be extremely different, and would lack the spark of creative excellence it now has, thanks to Brody. These accomplishments prove that Brody is one of the worlds great designers.

pg

9

Rebel

Neville Brodys’ typeface Arcadia is known for...... 1. The bowls of letters such as p and q being almost four times the size of their decenders 2. Its very vertical axis, which makes the typeface feel almost stretched

The

“The page is the basic skeleton from which you build everything. It’s equivalent to the scaffolding, or the walls and the joists of a building. A grid is crucial, there has to be enough

space incorporated in such a way that you don’t get the impression that things are being thrown out from the center of the page. It has to create the enclosure without interrupting the flow from spread to spread. ”

“the magazine needs to show the reader where a specific feature starts...and you want to encourage people to read an article. But the way you start

an article can take any form you like, as long as you’re still indicating the beginning by directing the reader’s eye to it. You can use a symbol, a form, or a different typeface; you might even use white space.”

The Real Life Story of Neville Brody

Neville Brody’s Typeface Arcadia is known for...
1. The bowls of letters such as p and q being almost four times the size of their decenders 2. Its very vertical axis, which makes the typeface feel almost stretched

the rebel
article by caroline curtin

“Design is a language just as French and German are languages. Whilst some people are able to understand design fluently, there are those who just use phrases [from] books.They don’t understand the words they are using, but the phrase meets their need.” -Neville Brody

Neville Brody was born on April 23, 1957 and grew up North of London in a suburb named Southgate. Living in the suburb provided Neville
with the opportunity to experience both city and country life, which later down the road enriched his design, letting his work appeal to many walks of life. Brody attended classes at Hornsey University, and catagorrized himself as a fine artist saying “I don’t remember a time in my life when I was going to be doing something else. Ever since I had any selfawareness, I've wanted to do art or painting.” This to me is pretty interesting considering I have wanted to be an artist since I was little, and am getting degree in both design and painting! However, like many artists Brody soon came to a fork in the road, where he had to decide what he really wanted to do, “The big decision I took at this stage was whether to follow Fine Art, or to pursue Graphics. I felt that the fine art world had become elitist and would appeal only to a specific gallery market.” After spending time at Hornsey Brody decided that Graphics would be the way to go, as it would provide him with more opportunities and offer him more possibilities. When once asked about the decision to go into graphics, he answered, “why can’t you take a painterly approach within the printed medium? I wanted to make people more aware rather than less aware, and with the design I started to do, I was following the idea of design to reveal, not to conceal.”

After making the decision to go in to graphics, Brody enrolled in a three-year graphics program at the London College of Printing, in the fall of 1976. By 1977 Punk Rock had taken London by storm, and Brody loved it! According to the Graphic Language of Neville Brody, Brody stated, “I felt that if you wanted to react against anything, you had to learn about that thing totally...Punk gave me the confidence I needed.” Brody was especially inspired by Wire’s Pink Flag (the record released in Dec. 1977), because of their motto “you should pursue an idea, do it, stop, then go on to the next one.” Brody did in fact take this quote to heart, as he learned to move on to the next idea, because he was almost thrown out of the University for creating a stamp with the Queen of England’s head turned sideways. Though Brody’s initial designs did not go down well in the music and art industries, he was able to gain experience by creating posters for concerts put on by his University.

I found Brody’s philosophy about graphic design in college quite interesting, “What college teaches you is design as problem-solving, in the sense of design needing to please rather than to invent. You are taught to solve a problem, which is not the same as meeting your public halfway. Design is no different than art...as a means of communication, it cannot remain neutral.” While in school, as well as during his professional career, Neville was also intrigued by Dadaism and Pop art, and in his first year thesis paper he stated “Dadaism embraced the means of the deconstruction of art, and set against the carnage that was taking place in World War I, it was saying that art too, in its previous role, was dead. It was a period of crisis when art was looking to itself and saying ‘why does art exist?’ ‘why paint?’” Brody decided that Dadaism reached the “ultimate statement that art is whatever you say it is, and if it still refused to lie down and die, then it had to look around and embrace other areas.” According to The Graphic Language of Neville Brody, Brody further hypothesized that anyone whom is anti art is anti human, and thus one should always create. Moreover, Neville’s work had a “threedimensionality...via two distinct areas of influence, one literary, the other artistic...he introduced a ‘random factor’ like that in Dadaism” that pulled the viewer in.

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Brody’s expertise for typography is also shown in his creation of typefaces. Brody began designing his own typefaces at a young age and today has over 40, beautifully crafted typefaces. The following is a list of Brody’s fonts: Linotype Arcadia, FFAutotrace Double, FF Autotrace One, FF Autotrace two, FF Autotrace Outline, FF Blur, FF Dirty One, Dirty Seven One, FF Dome Headline, FF Dome Text, FF Dome Seven, FF FF Gothic I don’t remember a time in my life when I was going to be doing something else. One One, FF Gothic Ever since I had any self-awareness, I've wanted to do art or painting.” Two One, Gothic Two Two, Gothic Two Condensed, FF Harlem, FF Harlem Slang, Jamesrex, Linotype Industria, Linotype Insignia, Lush Us, FF Pop Led, FF Pop Pop, Tokyo One, Tokyo Two Solid, FF Typeface Four One, FF Typeface Four Two, FF Typeface Six, FF Typeface Seven, FF World One, FF World Two, FF World Three. Arcadia, one of Brody’s most popular typefaces, was created in 1990 and is In addition, other artists that influenced Brody include Man Ray and Lazlo a sans serif font. It can be identified as a sans serif font because it does not have Moholy Nagy, and Alexander Rodchenko. Furthermore, El Lissitzky was a serifs. Atypical of many sans serif typeface Arcadia has a large variation of strokes, Russian constructivist and used a combination of photography, typography particularly displayed on the A, S and X. It has a very vertical axis, and feels almost and geometric forms, as elements of the piece as a whole. He was concerned stretched due to its extreme verticality. Arcadia’s A’s apex is rounded and the R’s tail with communicating messages and also created photomontages to help is rounded, as well, only with no loop. This is a very geometric typeface, with a comdemonstrate this. El Lissitzky influenced Brody and it is evident as many of bination of round and straight edges as seen in the letters S and L. Furthermore, Brody’s works are bold and contain sharp vertical, horizontal and diagonal the bowls of letters such as p and q are almost four times the size of their decenders. lines, that create structural relationships with forms on the page. Both artists Furthermore, other events that occured in the year 1990 include the followalso deal/dealt a lot with balance, shape and form. Funny enough El Lissitzsky ing: In March the art world shook as two thieves posing as police officers stole also started out as a painter and later became a famous graphic designer. twelve paintings, worth from $300 million, from the Isabella Stewart Gardner In a conversation between Neville Brody and Jon Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. This is the largest art theft in US hisWozencroft, in The Graphic Language of Neville tory, and the paintings have not been recovered, according to wikipedia.com. Brody 2, Jon asked what factors govern the design of a Without the advancements in the magazine world, almagazine? Brody replied“The page is the basic skeleton bum art, digital imaging and poster designs, the graphfrom which you build everything. It’s equivalent to the ic design world as we know it would be extremely difscaffolding, or the walls and the joists of a building.” ferent, and would lack the spark of creative excellence it now has, thanks to Brody. These accomplishments prove that Brody is one of the worlds great designers.

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