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ARTISTS-IN-THE-SCHOOLS

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					ARTISTS-IN-THE-SCHOOLS
THEME - PORTRAITS: EXPRESSIVE PERSONALITIES

BEYOND BENDAY DOTS

ARTISTS-IN-THE-SCHOOLS
THEME – PORTRAITS: EXPRESSIVE PERSONALITIES ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS – FOR THE TEACHER
Since the beginning of time, artists have created expressive portraits. These include selfportraits, depictions of family or friends, historical figures, or imaginary characters. A portrait’s style can range from realistic to abstract. Portraits can be made using any media or technique. Students can learn much about different cultures and time periods by studying portraits. We can all gain insight into human nature, learning about those portrayed, as well as the artists who portrayed them. Students will explore different types of portraiture.

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS – FOR THE STUDENTS
Artists make portraits in many different styles and using many different materials. You can learn much about people, artists, and culture by becoming familiar with portraits, including self portraits, portraits of family and friends, as well as portraits of historical figures and people from other cultures or time periods. Roy Lichtenstein was a Pop artist who was inspired by the style of comic book images. You can create abstract portraits!

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
Does everyone in the world experience the same cultural environment? Did you know that artists share their observations about their culture in their artwork? Do all artists find the same things interesting, have the same opinions, or the same styles? Did you know that in the 1960’s some artists made art about things in their environment called “Pop” art (popular culture)? Did you know Roy Lichtenstein was inspired by comic strips? What can you think of in the culture around you that might be interesting to make art about? Did you know that the screen dot patterns that create different values (light/dark) in comic strips are called Benday dots? As a unique artist, can you be inspired by other artists to create your own work? How can you create contrast in a black and white artwork? Can you use art words/vocabulary when you talk about your art and art made by others? Can you describe how your original portrait is similar to and different from your peers? What do you like about your artwork and what would you change?

GRADE 5: PORTRAITS WITH STYLE: BEYOND BENDAY DOTS
Students gain confidence as they learn to balance the conceptual and technical aspects of art making. This project tackles two critical art issues. While providing students with an opportunity to push the development of original ideas, stressing content, it also addresses the formal issue of creating contrast. Students will study Roy Lichtenstein’s narrative pop art paintings and observe how he uses Benday screen dot patterns to imitate the style of comic strips. Students will work with a variety of contrasting computer-generated patterns to design their own wild portraits.

ART REFERENCES
Roy Lichtenstein was inspired by comic strip dramas to create his own original narrative works of art. He used Benday dots to create the feeling of comic strips. Benday dots create value or shading. Lichtenstein worked with the art elements of line, shape, color, texture, and value in his paintings. The addition of pattern and color create contrast in his work. Text bubbles help to communicate the stories he explores. You can show students art by many other Pop artists, including Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauchenberg, James Rosenquist, Tom Wesselman, Richard Hamilton, and Andy Warhol. Discuss how these artists were inspired by popular culture, daily life, and mass media to create their artwork.

CONNECTIONS
Math: shape, pattern, scale Reading: reading comic books Writing: creating comic strips with text

MATERIALS
white copy paper with computer generated patterns (2 per student and extras) (Caution: remember to make copies of these so that you can retain your master sheets for future use!), 9” x 12” white construction paper (one per student), scissors, glue sticks, and paper towels (two per student)

VOCABULARY
Pop art, comic book art, Benday dots, pattern, contrast, shape, size, scale, value, light/dark, contrast, portrait, expressive, expression

LESSON 1
       Share examples of Pop Art with students. Explain how some artists in the 1960’s were inspired by popular culture, daily life, and mass media to create their artwork. Emphasize works by Roy Lichtenstein. Talk about how he got his ideas from comic strips. Explain how Benday dots are used in comic strips to create values other then black and white. Ask students to look in newspapers and comic books for Benday dots. Have students select two contrasting pattern sheets. They should consider contrast in size (small/large), contrast in value (light/dark), contrast in shape (round/square) and volume (linear/solid). (Caution: remember to make copies of these so that you can retain your master sheets for future use!) Students can begin by cutting out the head shape. Draw with finger first (not pencil) to make sure the shape is as large as possible, then cut. The head can be any shape. Next students can cut hair from the second pattern sheet. Students can cut out features for their portrait, sharing scraps with peers. Save usable scraps. Do not glue yet. Collect.

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LESSON 2
   Continue to cut shapes for the features of the face. Lay them on the head shape. Arrange and rearrange until satisfied. Use the whole page, maybe adding a hat or more hair, neck, or shoulders to fill space. Similar patterns may blend or merge together. The juxtaposition of different patterns, either different in shape or size or value, create contrast. Contrast enables the viewer to discriminate different shapes. Students will need to understand this concept in order to create a discernable portrait out of the patterned chaos. Demonstrate how to glue down all shapes, using a paper towel to protect the table and allows for students to apply glue to the edges of each shape. Lay a second towel over the shape and smooth it down so that all edges are flat. These can be photocopied, in the spirit of Pop Art. They can be mounted onto black construction paper to provide a framing border. When these expressive portrait collages are complete, lead students in a constructive oral critique of their work. Ask them to point out interesting shapes and examples of strong contrast. Students can write a narrative in the voice of their invented character. They may write dialogue, comic strip style, to add to their artwork in the style of Roy Lichtenstein. The may also write humorous poems about their characters. Display both the collage portraits and written work together. Enjoy!

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EXTENSIONS
Science:  Try this approach with a scientific topic, an animal, insect, plant, or habitat. Social Studies:  Try this approach with a famous person in history, a time period, a place, or any current topic of study. Mathematics:  Students can create their own patterns on the computer or by hand. Reading and Writing:  Have students read comic books and write dialog for their own comics. Art:  You may explore other subject matter with this technique. It would be interesting to have students create two different characters who could have a dialogue, comic strip style.  Scraps can be stored in a Benday dot center where students can continue to make original collages.

VISUAL ARTS STANDARDS – GRADE 5
BEYOND BENDAY DOTS 1.0 ARTISTIC PERCEPTION
Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the

environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations. Develop Perceptual Skills and Visual Arts Vocabulary 1.1 Identify and describe the principles of design in visual compositions, emphasizing unity and harmony. 1.2 Identify and describe characteristics of representational, abstract, and nonrepresentational works of art. Analyze Art Elements and Principles of Design 1.3 Use their knowledge of all the elements of art to describe similarities and differences in works of art and in the environment.

2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION
Creating, Performing, and Participating in the Visual Arts Students apply artistic processes and skills, using a variety of media to communicate meaning and intent in original works of art. Skills, Processes, Materials, and Tools 2.3 Demonstrate beginning skill in the manipulation of digital imagery (e.g., computer-generated art, digital photography, or videography). Communication and Expression Through Original Works of Art 2.4 Create an expressive abstract composition based on real objects. 2.7 Communicate values, opinions, or personal insights through an original work of art.

3.0 HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT
Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING
Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own, according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities. Derive Meaning 4.1 Identify how selected principles of design are used in a work of art and how they affect personal responses to and evaluation of the work of art. 4.2 Compare the different purposes of a specific culture for creating art. Make Informed Judgments 4.3 Develop and use specific criteria as individuals and in groups to assess works of art.

4.4 Assess their own works of art, using specific criteria, and describe what changes they would make for improvement.

5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS
Connecting and Applying What Is Learned in the Visual Arts to Other Art Forms and Subject Areas and to Careers Students apply what they learned in the visual arts across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to the visual arts. Visual Literacy 5.2 Identify and design icons, logos, and other graphic devices as symbols f or ideas and information. Career and Career-Related Skills 5.3 Research and report on what various types of artists (e.g., architects, designers, graphic artists, animators) produce and how their works play a role in our everyday environment.

Beyond Benday Dots Word List

Pop art comic book art Benday dots pattern contrast shape size scale value light/dark

contrast portrait expressive expression

ARTISTS-IN-THE-SCHOOLS

BEYOND BENDAY DOTS
 Roy Lichtenstein (1923 - 1997) was an American artist.  Artists find different things interesting, have different opinions, work in different styles and with different materials.  In the 1960’s some artists made art about common (or popular) things in their cultural environment called “Pop” art (popular culture).  What can you think of in your world that might be interesting to make art about?  Roy Lichtenstein was inspired by comic strips.  He used Benday dots, the dot patterns that create different values (light/dark) in comic strips, in his paintings, so they would look like comic book pictures.  As a unique artist, you can be inspired by other artists to create your own work.  You can make an original portrait in the Pop style of Roy Lichtenstein.  How can you create contrast in a black and white artwork?  Can you make even more different patterns on the computer to use in your art? Vocabulary: Pop art, comic book art, Benday dots, pattern, contrast, shape, size, scale, value, light/dark, contrast, portrait, expressive, expression

ARTISTS-IN-THE-SCHOOLS

BEYOND BENDAY DOTS
 Roy Lichtenstein (1923 - 1997) was an American artist.  Artists find different things interesting, have different opinions, work in different styles and with different materials.  In the 1960’s some artists made art about common (or popular) things in their cultural environment called “Pop” art (popular culture).  What can you think of in your world that might be interesting to make art about?  Roy Lichtenstein was inspired by comic strips.  He used Benday dots, the dot patterns that create different values (light/dark) in comic strips, in his paintings, so they would look like comic book pictures.  As a unique artist, you can be inspired by other artists to create your own work.  You can make an original portrait in the Pop style of Roy Lichtenstein.  How can you create contrast in a black and white artwork?  Can you make even more different patterns on the computer to use in your art? Vocabulary: Pop art, comic book art, Benday dots, pattern, contrast, shape, size, scale, value, light/dark, contrast, portrait, expressive, expression


				
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