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International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

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									International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

In some jobs, the danger is obvious ….

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

In others, the danger may not be quite so obvious

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

Background
 Certain jobs are more dangerous than others. The risk of serious injury or illness is far greater in certain occupations.  World-wide, there is a lack of handbooks, manuals and other single sources of information related to specific tasks and occupations.  There is a need for an informational datasheet on hazardous occupations that can serve as a first step towards the development of practical action to assure the safety and health of the worker carrying out this occupation.  Actions may include but not necessarily be limited to informational datasheets on specific occupations, directed educational activities and bipartite discussion on procedures and techniques to limit exposures.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

A Joint Project

The International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations project is an undertaking of the International Labour Office (ILO), which was initiated by the Israel Institute for Occupational Safety and Hygiene (IIOSH). It is being developed in cooperation with National ILO/CIS Occupational Safety and Health Information Centres throughout the world.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

Objective

To provide a broad, professional audience with information on hazards relating to a specific, dangerous occupation. This information will include the most important hazards the worker may be exposed to during the routine performance of tasks within the scope of this occupation. The datasheet will also provide a sample of basic prevention and protection measures associated with the hazards.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

These datasheets are a basic informational tool designed to...

• Describe the danger • Discuss who’s at risk

• Describe the most important hazards
• Provide basic notions of protection and prevention

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

The first page is relevant for almost anyone. It describes the datasheet itself, a general description of the target occupation and some notions of what is dangerous about this occupation.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

• The second page is for the safety and health professional or the health care worker. It lists different hazards associated with the occupation. • Included are general accident hazards, physical hazards, chemical hazards, biological hazards as well as ergonomic, psychosocial and organizational factors. • Next to the hazard is a shield with a number. The number is linked to prevention measure listed on the third page.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

• The third page is dedicated to measures of prevention, linked to the hazards mentioned on the second page. • Each page on the Web-based version has navigational tools that will bring the user to other pages of the datasheet or the index.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

The fourth page is also for the safety and health professional but provides more details about the occupation. Included are synonyms for the occupation, a definition and/or description, related occupations, tasks, equipment used and workplaces where the occupation is common.
There is also a place for notes and references. Where possible Web-based references will be included. On the bottom of each page, a place is designated for a Web link to the authoring and / or the sponsoring institution.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

In summary, the format of these datasheets provides for …
•Information on the most relevant hazards related to the occupation. •Suggestions for preventive and protective measures for selected hazards. •Specialized information such as a brief job description, a list of tasks, notes and references. •For the Web-based datasheets, links to other relevant information.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

An example

In Thailand, a small group of indigenous people harvest products from the sea for a living using surface-supplied compressed air.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

Outcomes due to exposures at work include ...

 Death due to gas embolism  Death due to drowning  Death due to the complications of decompression sickness  Paralysis due to decompression sickness  Impotency

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

Public health officials at the Ministry of Public Health as well as those at the provincial, district and community level were aware of the outcomes through their normal work, however prevention of decompression sickness, as a result of diving, was difficult.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

In this example, the International Datasheet on Hazardous Occupations on the Indigenous Diver was provided to health care workers with a view to explain the hazards the divers face and some basic notions for prevention.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

The datasheet as a basis to develop further information

Using Job Safety Analysis, a tool developed by the National Safety Council of the United States, the local health care workers carried out interviews with a small group of divers. The International Datasheet on Hazardous Occupations for the Indigenous Divers provided sufficient background to facilitate this task.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

Based on the Job Safety Analysis, ten rules were developed, by consensus, that would reduce the risk of decompression sickness,
     

   

Make the deepest dive of the day first and each succeeding dive shallower. Stay on the surface at least one hour between dives. Always continue to breathe normally, never hold your breath. Make the deepest part of every dive first and work your way to shallower water. Come up slowly from every dive. Make a safety stop at five meters for three to five minutes after every dive. Make decompression stops when necessary. Display the international diver down flag every time a diver is in the water. Drink lots of water before, between and after dives. Bring fresh air into the compressor’s air intake away from exhaust gases. While diving, remain in sight of another diver.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

An information sheet was developed for each rule. Each information sheet contains ...
 

The rule Points the diver should remember, describing both the problem and solutions.



An illustration (as the target audience are visual learners)



Additional notes if needed

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

The village health care workers are using the ten rules and information sheets …
 To provide training for the divers in small groups.  As a tool promote a change in working procedures by fostering discussions with village leaders and boat owners.  To raise posters. awareness by preparing

 As a basis for discussion in families and schools.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

The International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations therefore can be used as a vehicle to raise the awareness of safety and health professionals, government officials, and employers’ and workers’ representatives, affording them the possibility to subsequently develop interventions to reduce the exposures to the hazards related to the job.

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations

Produced by David Gold, Occupational Safety and Health Branch, ILO

14/04/99

International Hazard Datasheets on Occupations


								
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