MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF S4779-B KRUEGER A 6702-C P PROVIDING

Document Sample
MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF S4779-B KRUEGER A 6702-C P PROVIDING Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                                    

                   MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF S4779-B KRUEGER /A 6702-C PAULIN
PROVIDING TREATMENT FOR SEXUALLY TRANSMISSIBLE DISEASES TO MINORS WITHOUT
                   A PARENT'S OR GUARDIAN'S CONSENT

        NYAM has been advancing the health of people in cities since 1847. An independent 
organization, NYAM addresses the health challenges facing the world’s urban populations through 
interdisciplinary approaches to innovative research, education, community engagement, and policy 
leadership.  
        NYAM supports S4779‐B/A 6702‐C, which facilitates the administration of vaccines to minors to 
prevent sexually transmitted infections (STI). New York law already permits minors to be treated for 
sexually transmitted infections without parental consent. It makes sense to extend this permission to 
disease prevention as well, especially given the disproportionate burden of vaccine‐preventable 
disease and related cancers on minority communities. Latinos, Asian‐Americans, and African‐
Americans are more likely to die from infection‐related cancers than are whites.i  
        Among the STIs preventable through vaccination is hepatitis B. The hepatitis B virus is 
responsible for 60‐80% of the incidence of liver cancer. Despite the availability of the hepatitis B 
vaccine since 1982, vaccination rates are low in many US populations, including the foreign‐born 
(especially Asian immigrants), African‐Americans, and Latinos.ii Nationally, the prevalence of chronic 
hepatitis B is less than 2%. A study in New York City found 15% of people of Asian origin are chronically 
infected with HBV.iii The human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer, is also largely 
preventable through vaccination. Unfortunately, the cervical cancer rate among Hispanic women is 
over twice that in non‐Hispanic white women, and African‐American women develop this cancer about 
50% more often than non‐Hispanic white women.iv  
        To end these disparities in infection, cancer, and death, it is important that practitioners be able 
to offer preventive services to young people before they become sexually active. NYAM research has 
shown that making vaccines available via non‐physicians is both safe and effective in raising 
vaccination rates. We therefore also support the change in law to extend the capacity to vaccinate 
minors without parental consent to other qualified health practitioners in addition to physicians. 
        Lastly, while there has been some debate about whether administering HPV vaccine will 
increase sexual behavior, a NYAM study indicates parents are not worried that administration of 
vaccines will increase sexual behaviors. 
        We urge you to enact S4779‐B/A 6702‐C to increase access to vaccines and improve the health 
of New Yorkers. For more information, please contact Ruth Finkelstein at 212‐822‐7266. 
                                                            
i
  http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/cancer‐health‐disparities 
ii
   http://www.omhrc.gov/templates/content.aspx?ID=7240&lvl=2&lvlid=190 
iii
     http://communications.med.nyu.edu/news/2006/high‐hepatitis‐b‐infection‐found‐nycs‐asian‐american‐community 
iv
   http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_4_1X_What_are_the_key_statistics_for_cervical_cancer_8.asp 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:5
posted:11/13/2009
language:English
pages:1