Creating Safe Spaces for Adolescent Girls

Document Sample
Creating Safe Spaces for Adolescent Girls Powered By Docstoc
					Creating Safe Spaces for 
   Adolescent Girls
              Julie Wood
          Josephine Ramage
 The Young Women’s Leadership School 
             of Brooklyn
Emotional Wellness 
    Programs
       at 
 TYWLS Brooklyn
         Welcoming Goodie Bag
• Turn and Talk
• Share Out
       Advisory                      Safe Space

• a place where the physical,  •   a place where our girls can 
  social, emotional, and           come together and support 
  academic developmental           the full inclusion and 
  needs of our girls are           celebration of GLBTQ and 
  addressed.                       other marginalized 
• Each year our students are       populations of our school.
  known as a “whole girl” by at 
  least one adult – their 
  advisor
      Advisory              Safe Space
• Meets two or three    • Meets once a week
  times/week            • Discussions topics are 
• Has a curriculum        chosen by both staff and 
• Every student           students
  participates          • Voluntary, changing 
• Changes yearly          group of participants
                        • Available to the same 
                          students every year
Strategies for Building 
 Strong Relationships 
                   Staff

– Starts with the hiring process
– Attendance at yearly training required for both 
  Advisory and Safe Space
– United vision around school’s mission 
  statement
– Common language around expectations – 
  Habits of Being - C2OP3R2 – Confident, 
  compassionate, open-minded, present, prompt, 
  prepared, respectful, responsible
                    MISSION STATEMENT
The Young Women’s Leadership School of Brooklyn (TYWLS, Brooklyn) 
    was established to nurture the intellectual curiosity  and creativity of 
    young women and to address their developmental needs.  Learning is 
    dynamic and participatory, enabling students to experience great success 
    on many levels, especially in science, mathematics, and technology.
 
At TWYLS, Brooklyn, students are encouraged to achieve their 
   personal best in and out of the classroom.  Teachers will deliberately 
    make connections to students’ lives, prior knowledge, and the world.  
    Through advisory, small class size, and ongoing assessments, students will 
    be known well by the adults in the building.  Thus, learning will be tailored 
    to students’ interests, needs, and strengths.  Students will be challenged 
    and supported so that they will be prepared for higher level courses 
    throughout middle and high school.
 
Every TYWLS student is college bound.  The Young Women’s Leadership 
  School of Brooklyn will graduate 100% of its students in seven years and 
  each young woman will be accepted into a four year college or university. 

Students of TYWLS, Brooklyn, will grow academically and emotionally 
  into leaders of their school, community, and the world.  TYWLS strives to 
  work with families to instill in the students a sense of community, 
  responsibility, and ethical principles of behavior-characteristics that will 
  help to make them leaders of their generation.  

Through exposure to technology, engagement in community service, 
  and participation in action-research and interdisciplinary projects, 
  students will find their voice and take responsibility for their community.  
  At TYWLS, Brooklyn, parents are partners and together will support the 
  experience as each leader grows in Brooklyn.
Ingrained in the school’s culture 
  • Time built into the school day for Advisory 
    connections 
  • Safe Space stickers on classroom doors (teachers 
    who feel comfortable talking with students about 
    issues around bullying) 
  • Staff supports one another, hence students 
    support one another
  • Explicit commitment to “No Bullying”
  • Whole school Pledge Day every other week
      – Acknowledgment of Bullying
      – Reminders, Read Alouds, Video Clips
                 Safe Space
• Out of 200 students, about 60 different students 
  have attended at least once.
• Core group of 15 students that have come almost 
  every week since we started
• Mostly older students (8th and 9th)
• Focus on relationships – friendships, family, 
  romantic partners
• Focus on internal dynamics – not on impacting 
  surrounding community (outside of our school 
  building)
           Safe Space Launch
• Use of GLSEN Safe Space kit (manual, signs, 
  stickers) 
• Mandatory staff training, although stickers not 
  mandatory
• Launch in Pledge Day (whole school meeting) 
  each year with a video
         What Students Value About 
          Safe Space and Advisory

•   Confidentiality
•   Not feeling judged
•   Others sharing their joys and struggles
•   Consistency of group
•   Knowing adults care deeply
         How to Establish Safety
We have three rules in Safe Space:
1. There’s no attendance requirement; come as often or 
   as little as you want.
2. What happens here, stays here.  Don’t talk about the 
   group outside of the space unless you’re only talking 
   with people who were there with you.
3. There are no labels.  Being here doesn’t mean you 
   identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or 
   straight.  It means you care about making our school 
   safe for all students.  You can identify, but you don’t 
   have to.  
  How to Establish Safety in Advisory
• Being responsive to the needs of our girls
• Creating a feeling of “coming home” 
• Advisory House Rules – “Circle of Trust”
  – What is said here, stays here
  – Understand others’ perspectives 
• Discussions around C2OP3R2 behavior
  – What does it mean?
  – How do we achieve this
  – What does it look like
 How do we Turnkey these 
Strategies to our Students?
•   Teambuilding Activities
•   Self-esteem building Activities
•   Problem solving – academic, social, relational
•   Role play – practice conversations that may be 
    difficult
•   Explicit Conversations
•   Goal setting/Self Reflection
•   Student Led Conferences
•   Communication skills
    – Listening vs. Hearing
            Advisory Activities 
• The following foster a sense of camaraderie 
  amongst the students:
  – Holiday Door Decorating Contest
  – Advisory Banner Contest
  – Holiday and Birthday Celebrations
  – Community Service – food drives, Shoeboxes for 
    Soldiers, toy drive, book drive, breast cancer walk, 
    Penny Harvest, etc.
  – Advisory Trips
                 Resources
• GLSEN link: www.glsen.org
• http://www.makeitbetterproject.org 
• One  by Kathryn Otashi
• Bullying and Me : Schoolyard Stories by Ouisie 
  Shapiro  
• Handout of advisory resources from              
  The Young Women’s Leadership Network

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:9/22/2013
language:English
pages:20