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Couple Sends Over 500 Gifts to Overseas Soldiers

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					Couple Sends Over 500 Gifts to Overseas Soldiers

Because of a interesting find in Coxs Creek, KY, a couple got inspired to distribute over 500 gifts to
overseas U.S. soldiers. Michael Kirchhubel found letters in his attic that served as correspondence
between his father and mother during WWII.

Coxs Creek, KY, September 19, 2013 --(PR.com)-- His father, Fredrick Kirchhubel, served as a ball
turret gunner in a B-17 bomber and flew in over 30 missions. “My father and the letters were my
inspiration,” says Mike. “When I realized how important those letters were to my father, I suddenly
understood the importance and need of such letters today.”

“Time and time again I hear and read that soldiers, above all else, just want acknowledgement,
encouragement and to know that they are not forgotten. I thought... There are tens of thousands of
Fathers, Mothers, Sons and Daughters overseas and I want to honor as many of these soldiers as I can
with something to help remind them that they are being thought of.”

So, he and his wife started to put together and send “THINKING OF YOU" brass tokens with a card. The
size of a quarter, the brass pieces' perimeter reads... "MAY THIS THOUGHT GIVE YOU PEACE AND
THIS PIECE KEEP YOU SAFE”

He and his wife couldn't keep sending gifts without some help, so they started www.brasspeace.com.

For every gift-card bought another gift-card gets sent to either a soldier overseas or to a wounded soldier
stateside.

Frederick married his sweetheart, Midge after he returned. Midge kept all their correspondence. Mike
said, “Thinking of someone and sending that thought with a letter cultivates that relationship and creates a
lasting bond between the two individuals.

"I saw this when my Mother would send letters seemingly every week to friends and relatives with her
thoughts and encouragement. I saw this when my Father would exchange letters with his fellow crewman
years and years after the war. I saw this when I looked in a box in the attic.

"The cardboard was ruffled and torn. Holding a flashlight I noticed large writing in black marker which
read, 'Midge's stuff' on one flap of the box. Peeling away the top of the box I saw in one corner, next to a
stack of cookbooks and the bible, a neatly arranged set of opened and yet full envelopes. Within these
envelopes were letter upon letter between my Dad and my Mother (then his girlfriend) from when he was
serving in the Army Air Corps in WWII.

"The ability to bond through these letters gave them both hope and encouragement. These two major
feelings combined with constant communication kept that budding relationship alive all the way through
the time he came home. Hope, encouragement and communication are the staples of every great
relationship.”

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Fred and Midge have passed on now, but their legacy remains in the small gifts that their son and his
wife, Sissy sent to the soldiers. For more information you can visit their website www.brasspeace.com or
contact them through email at mike@brasspeace.com.




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Contact Information:
Brass Peace Inc.
Michael Kirchhubel
502-264-7323
Contact via Email
www.brasspeace.com


Online Version of Press Release:
You can read the online version of this press release at: http://www.pr.com/press-release/517277


News Image:




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DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Because of a interesting find in Coxs Creek, KY, a couple got inspired to distribute over 500 gifts to overseas U.S. soldiers. Michael Kirchhubel found letters in his attic that served as correspondence between his father and mother during WWII.
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