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Pity Not Needed

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									                                                                                                     Contact: Melissa Becker, EFMN
                                                                                                 Marketing & Communications Director
                                                                                                                       952.484.0518
                                                                                                                 mbecker@efmn.org



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


 COACH KILL IS 1 OF 3 MILLION PEOPLE WITH EPILEPSY – EDUCATION, NOT PITY, IS NEEDED
                   Many people with epilepsy are successful in high-profile careers

St. Paul, MN – September 16, 2013 – The Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN) is disappointed by recent media reports
that Coach Kill and people with epilepsy are not capable of high-profile careers.

Coach Kill is just one of 60,000 Minnesotans who live with the unpredictable nature of seizures every day. Despite the
challenges, people with epilepsy are highly successful in stressful careers: Chief Justice John Roberts, Atlanta Falcons running
back Jason Snelling and countless CEOs and professionals who live with epilepsy.

“To question Coach Kill’s abilities illuminates the need for more education around seizures,” said EFMN executive director
Vicki Kopplin. “Coach Kill is a man of integrity and character, and his bravery and strength while dealing with seizures should
be celebrated, not scrutinized. He’s spent time with hundreds of kids with epilepsy over the last year, and seeing his sheer
determination will sustain many of them through school bullying, health setbacks and the stigma they too face.”

People with epilepsy are no less deserving of a chasing their dreams and realizing success – they just need to have a plan for if a
seizure were to happen. Coach Kill has a plan and players and coaches alike share a basic understanding that if seizures happen,
life goes on. “The team knows what they have to do, and nothing changes,” said defensive coordinator and acting head coach
Tracy Claeys after Saturday’s game.

“Those of us with epilepsy, including Coach Kill, can and are making a difference. We cannot control whether our seizures are
in public or private environments. Educating the public on how to respond and support someone that may have a seizure actually
provides confidence to those of us with seizures to achieve,” said EFMN board president Brett Boyum.

EFMN is working with Rebecca Kill and the U of MN to raise epilepsy awareness at the October 26 Gopher Football game
against Nebraska. The Kills have become tremendous partners in educating people about seizures and working hard to end the
stigma that unfortunately surrounds people living with the challenges of epilepsy.


About the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota
The Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN) leads the fight to stop seizures, find a cure and overcome the challenges created
by epilepsy. One in 10 people will have a seizure in their lifetime, and 1 in 26 people will develop epilepsy. The Foundation’s
programs and services cover all of Minnesota and Eastern North Dakota. For more information, visit www.efmn.org.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

       Interviews: Vicki Kopplin, executive director: vkopplin@efmn.org or 651.246.2001. Brett Boyum, EFMN board president,
        VP of marketing at a local company and person with epilepsy: brettb@marvin.com or 952.484.0518.

EPILEPSY FACTS:

       Epilepsy is very common – 60,000 people in MN have epilepsy also known as a seizure disorder. Epilepsy affects more Americans
        than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s disease combined.

       3 million people in the U.S. have epilepsy, also known as a seizure disorder. One in 10 people will have a seizure in their lifetime.
        60,000 people in Minnesota and North Dakota have epilepsy.

       There is a wide spectrum of seizures. Seizures can be serious and no two seizures are alike. You can’t make generalizations about
        seizures. Each person with epilepsy is an individual and their seizures are unique to them.
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