Docstoc

Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

Document Sample
Wolff Parkinson White syndrome Powered By Docstoc
					Wolff-Parkinson-White 
      syndrome
• The prevalence on the surface ECG is 0.15% to 0.25% in the 
  general population. 
• The prevalence is increased to 0.55% in first-degree relatives 
  of affected patients.
• The prevalence is higher among males and decreases with age.
• Most patients have structurally normal hearts:
   – mitral valve prolapse, 
   – cardiomyopathies, and 
   – Ebstein’s anomaly
• The existence of an accessory pathway 
• Two parallel routes : one is subject to delay through 
  the AV node, and the other occurs without delay 
  through the accessory pathway and results in 
  preexcitation of the ventricle resulting in delta wave
• Tachycardias occur when conduction is orthodromic
• Some patients (∼5% to 10%) with WPW syndrome 
  have multiple accessory pathways.
 Orthodromic AVRT:
  Ø delta wave is absent, QRS complex is normal and 
    P waves are inverted in the inferior leads. 
 Antidromic  AVRT 
  Ø Less common
  Ø the QRS is wide, 
  Ø delta wave
 Orthodromic AVRT
•   The QRS complexes are narrow, 
•   without evidence of a delta wave 
•   orthodromic atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia or OAVRT.
Antidromic AVRT
•   The 12 lead ECG shows the typical features of Wolff-Parkinson-White; 
•   the PR interval is short (*) and the Q
•   RS duration prolonged as a result of a delta wave (arrow), indicating 
    ventricular preexcitation.
• The accessory pathway:
  – left lateral (50 percent), 
  – posteroseptal (30 
    percent), 
  – right anteroseptal (10 
    percent), 
  – right lateral (10 percent)
    Associated cardiac abnormalities
•    Most patients do not have 
  coexisting structural cardiac 
  abnormalities.
• Associated congenital heart 
  disease.
     –  Ebstein's anomaly is the congenital 
       lesion most strongly associated with 
       WPW syndrome. 
• Mitral valve prolapse
• hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
             Signs and symptoms
•   Palpitations 
•   mild chest discomfort 
•   Mild dizziness
•   Syncope 
•    cardiac arrest
            Physical findings 
• Normal cardiac examination
• During tachycardic episodes, the patient may 
  be cool, diaphoretic, and hypotensive
• Crackles in the lungs from pulmonary vascular 
  congestion
                     Diagnosis
•  EKG:
  – A shortened PR interval  (<0.12 seconds)
  – A slurring and slow rise of the initial upstroke of 
    the QRS complex (delta wave)
  – A widened QRS complex (total duration >0.12 
    seconds)
• WPW pattern : preexcitation manifest on an 
  ECG in the absence of symptoms.
• WPW syndrome : preexcitation manifest on 
  an ECG and symptomatic .
                        Treatment 
•  WPW pattern who do not experience tachycardia do 
  not need treatment except a high-risk occupation or 
  professional athletes( electrophysiologic testing)

•  Radiofrequency ablation treatment of choice for 
  patients with WPW syndrome
   – ablation cures the WPW syndrome over 95 percent 
• Medications 
•   Class IC: flecainide, propafenone; class IA: quinidine, procainamide, 
    disopyramide.
                    RF ablation
• Indication  :
   – Symptomatic AVRT
   – AF or other atrial tachyarrhythmias that have rapid 
     ventricular response via an AP (preexcited AF)
   – AVRT or AF with rapid ventricular rates found 
     incidentally during EPS for unrelated dysrhythmia
   – Asymptomatic patients with ventricular preexcitation 
     whose livelihood, profession, insurability, or mental 
     well-being may be influenced by unpredictable 
     tachyarrhythmias or in whom such tachyarrhythmias 
     would endanger the public safety
   – Patients with WPW and a family history of SCD

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:8
posted:9/9/2013
language:Unknown
pages:22