Docstoc

Living Safely with Mental Illness_ The Value of CIT - Pennsylvania

Document Sample
Living Safely with Mental Illness_ The Value of CIT - Pennsylvania Powered By Docstoc
					Helping People to Live Safely 
    with Mental Illness:
   Police Training and CIT

    Joel A. Dvoskin, Ph.D., ABPP
              Tucson AZ 
         joelthed@aol.com
If You Think This Is Funny…
     If You Think This Is Funny…
• …you might be too old for this work.
The Difference between Us and Them
• Them is scarier than us
The Difference between Us and Them


• Them has dark motivations
• Us makes well-intentioned mistakes
The Difference between Us and Them


• Them has symptoms
• Us has “coping strategies”
The Difference between Us and Them


• Them has disorders
• Us has personalities
The Difference between Us and Them


• Them is manipulative
• Us has social skills
                 THEM AND US
•   Them is crazy.
•   Us is quirky…
•   …no, wait.
•   Us is creative. (Yea, creative! That’s the 
    ticket!!!)
      Is It Always “Crazy” to Refuse 
                Treatment?
• Treatment-resistant clients? Or client-
  resistant treatments
• Why I hate the word “empower.”
• “Freedom’s just another word…”
• Chronic hiccups and the fear of drugs 
• MH professionals can be kind of bossy
• The definition of insight
• “And they call it help.”
  What I Hate about Psychology and 
             Psychiatry
• The Book of Insults
• The thing we’re the worst at
• Which would you rather get when you’re 
  hungry, advice or a ham sandwich?
• “Judge not, lest ye be judged.”
• Basic credibility – Where do we get off telling 
  other people how to live their lives?
              Manipulation
• The difference between manipulation and 
  exploitation.
• Only psychologists think manipulating people 
  is a bad thing.
• The real definition of manipulation…
• …is getting your needs met without violence.
• Why do you think they’re called “needs?”
          Manipulation (cont.)
• Criminal justice settings tend to place a 
  relatively low priority on meeting an 
  offender’s perceived needs.
• The definition of “intolerable” anxiety
• Trying to feel safe in unsafe places
• Example: Preventing suicide by punishing 
  people
                Malingering
• Malingering is a question – not an answer.
• Malingering does not preclude real mental 
  illness or severe emotional distress.
• “We can’t treat you – You’re not suicidal.”
• Trying to get help when there isn’t enough 
  help to go around.
• “If this isn’t mental illness…”
• Pathological strategies are…well…
• …pathological.
            Jail and Prison Ethics
•   Mind your own business
•   Never ask an authority figure for help
•   Never show weakness or self-doubt
•   The only acceptable emotion is anger

How do you think there ethical principles will 
work in the free world?
                   SURVEY
• Raise your hand if you think of yourself as a 
  “Violent Person.”
• Now raise your hand if you can honestly say 
  that you would never, ever behave with 
  violence.
      Are You a Violent Person?
• The difference between us and them
• “We do everything we can to avoid the use of 
  force.”
• “I haven’t fired my service weapon in 35 years 
  on the force.”
   Are You Sure You’re Not a Violent 
               Person?
• What would push you “over the line?”
• Survey says: 
  – “If someone was going to hurt my kids.”
  – “To save a life.”
• The special role of emotions in unplanned, 
  non-predatory violence
• The monsters within us all
  – Fear
  – Anger
               Case Example
• A man is in front of a well-known church, 
  waving a real sword at apparently imaginary 
  enemies, and cursing loudly
• TV Police Officers approach, yelling, “Drop the 
  sword, or I’ll shoot!”
• Likely result?  
              Case Example
• What is missing from this picture?
• Why is this man behaving this way?
• What are his likely motivations?
• What are his likely goals?
• What is the desired outcome of this police 
  encounter?
• What would you do or say?
             Response Options
•   “Drop the sword.”
•   “DROP THE SWORD!”
•   “DROP THE FREAKIN’ SWORD!!!!!!”
•   “Drop the sword or I’ll shoot.”
•   “Good news. You’re safe now. You don’t need 
    your sword any more. I have a gun, and it’s my 
    job to make sure nobody hurts you.”
 The Front Lines of Mental Health
• “Who you gonna call?”
• Police officers are the most prolific MH 
  workers in America
• Police officers can make it better…or worse.
• “To serve and protect” 
• Spectacular tragedies
• Don’t get mad at police officers for doing 
  exactly what we trained them to do.
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
        with a Person in Crisis
• Speak clearly, not too fast, and very respectfully. 
• The person may be having trouble 
  communicating because of confusion. Be patient, 
  and consider the possibility that the person is 
  doing the best they can. 
• It's OK to say their name as a way of helping 
  them attend to you, but it is neither helpful nor 
  particularly polite to yell at them.
• If you become frightened, back off. 
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
     with a Person in Crisis (cont.)
• Dealing with delusions: 
  – No need to agree or disagree with “delusional” 
    statements; you are not in charge of the "truth." 
  – Look for common ground. 
  – Validate their feeling of distress without getting into 
    an argument with them about the truth of their belief
  – If you disingenuously pretend to believe them, they'll 
    probably know you’re lying 
  – Remember, words are your most potent weapon. 
    Keep your powder dry by maintaining your credibility.
               Case Example
– “I’m Jesus Christ, and Satan is trying to kill me.” 

– "You must be exhausted!” 
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
     with a Person in Crisis (cont.)
• Personal Space:  
  – Avoid getting too close to the person, unless 
    you’re trying to get into a fight. 
  – Don’t try to get into a fight. 
  – They may not be able to verbally tell you to give 
    them space, which might cause some physical act 
    that will appear aggressive, but is in fact defensive.
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
     with a Person in Crisis (cont.)
• If you are never afraid…
• Either you’re some sort of alien, or …
• …you’re kind of stupid. (I was going to say “No 
  offense,” but then I realized how silly that 
  would be.)
• Anyway, you need to retire, because you’re 
  endangering your colleagues. 
• Fear is your friend. It tells you when to duck.
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
     with a Person in Crisis (cont.)
• When people are confused, it may be hard for 
  them to communicate.
• Try to avoid asking a bunch of questions, and 
  consider giving the person a little time and 
  space…
• …so long as they are not putting themselves 
  or others in any danger.
• Doing nothing is an option.
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
     with a Person in Crisis (cont.)
• High on everyone's list of "wants" is to feel 
  safe. Whether a person's fear is reasonable or 
  unreasonable, we all want to feel safe. 
• If the person is able to tell you, it is a very 
  good idea to ask them what would make them 
  feel safer.
Stuff You Already Know about Dealing 
     with a Person in Crisis (cont.)
• Don't take it personally. 
• Their crisis is probably not about you. 
• There may be something that they want, and 
  it may be reasonable. 
• So don't be afraid to ask them what they want. 
  But…
• …don’t reward threats.
                 CIT and Kids
• Adolescence and other mental illnesses
• How good was your judgment at 15? So cut 
  ‘em a break.
• “There’s impulses and then there’s impulses”
  – Angry impulsivity
  – Hedonistic impulsivity
• “There’s worse things than juvy.”
  – Why would a kid run away from a safe home?
          CIT and Kids (cont.)
• Can you afford a separate CIT program for 
  kids?
• Adding child development information to CIT 
  training
• Know your local resources
• The consequences of ejecting children from 
  their communities
    The Worst Thing about This Work
• Prevention never says thank you
• You seldom get to know what you prevented
• The offensive linemen of a safe society…
• The only time they call your name
• Sometimes the people you are trying to serve 
  and protect call you ugly names…
• And sometimes they try to shoot you
         But Here You Are
• You show up for work
• Sometimes you risk your lives
• You take the abuse
• You get branded and insulted when one 
  percent of you don’t act right
• You serve and you protect
                  And So…
• From a grateful public…
• From the people in crisis whose lives you have 
  saved (even if you don’t know it)…
• From the loved one whose lives you have 
  saved (even if you don’t know it)…
• And to your own families, who wait for you 
  and hope you’ll come home safe…
THANK YOU!

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:9/6/2013
language:English
pages:36