Docstoc

Life management strategies as predictors of

Document Sample
Life management strategies as predictors of Powered By Docstoc
					Life management strategies as
predictors of multidimensional
model of mental health in late
          adulthood


   Mojca Petrič1, Maja Zupančič2 Tina Kavčič1  & Blanka 
                        Colnerič2
     1Faculty of Education, University of Primorska
        2Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana
 Introduction
• Selection, optimization and compensation (SOC) life
  management strategies (Baltes & Baltes, 1990; Freund & Baltes, 
  1998): a model/a general framework for the understanding of 
  developmental change and resilience across the life-span.
  ▫ Selection: elective (ES) and loss-based (LBS)
     Selection of domains (goals) of functioning because not all opportunities 
      can be pursued.
  ▫ Optimization (O): 
        Means of achieving desired outcomes and attaining higher levels of 
         functioning.
  ▫ Compensation (C):  
        activation/acqusition of new substitute means for counteracting 
         loss/decline.

• Multidimensional model of mental health (Keyes, 2002, 2007): 
  ▫ Emotional well-being (EWB)
     Positive affect and satisfaction with life
  ▫ Psychological well-being (PWB)
     positive psychological functioning: self-acceptance, personal growth, 
      positive relations with others, environmental mastery and autonomy.
  ▫ Social well-being (SWB)
      the degree of functioning well socially: social integration, social 
      contribution, social coherence, social actualization and social acceptance. 
• The SOC strategies suggested as determinants of successful 
  aging (e.g., Freund & Baltes, 1998; Jopp & Smith, 2006; Svetina 
  & Zupančič, 2007)
• The SOC strategies as predictors of dimensions of Keyes model 
  of mental health have not been examined yet. 
• The aim of the study:  to examine the relative importance of 
  SOC strategies to measures of  Keyes model of mental health. 
  ▫ H1: Self-reported SOC would predict dimensions of mental health: 
    EWB, PWB, SWB and overall WB (OWB). 
  ▫ H2: Self-reported SOC would contribute to assignement to 3 mental 
    health categories: flourishing, languishing and moderate mentally 
    healthy. 
Method
• Sample:
  ▫ N= 328 (73% female), aged 65 to 91 years (M= 72.02, SD = 5.94), 
    living in the community.
• Measures:
  ▫ The SOC questionnaire (Freund & Baltes, 2002)
  ▫ The Slovene translation of MHC-SF (Keyes, 2009)
Results
    Table 1                                                Table 2
    Summary of regression analysis:                        Summary of regression analysis:
    Predicting EWB by SOC                                  Predicting PWB by SOC
                                                                 
                        B           SE B              β                  B     SE B          β
   step 1                                                  step 1
   Constant             13.91           2.11                Constant 29.02      3.63
      gender            -0.65           0.39       -0.09      gender  0.97      0.66        0.08
         age            -0.05           0,03       -0.10          age -0.10     0.05      -0.12*
   step 2                                                  step 2
   Constant              8.98           2.29                Constant 21.06      3,95
      gender            -0.61           0.37 -0.09            gender   0.96     0,64        0.08
         age            -0.02           0.03 -0.04                age  -0.05    0,05       -0.06
          ES            -0.12           0.08 -0.09                 ES  -0.20    0.13       -0.09
        LBS              0.16           0.09   0.11               LBS   0.23    0.15        0.09
           O             0.23           0.08     0.19**             O   0.55    0.14       0.26**
           C             0.11           0.07   0.09                 C -0.04     0.13       -0.02
   Note: R2=0,01 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,09 (p<0,01). **p<0,01   Note: R2=0,02 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,08 (p<0,01). **p<0,01, *p<0,05


Regression results for EWB: The model 1 accounts for 1% of the variance in EWB; adding 
SOC accounts for 9% increment in variability of EWB;  Optimization is the sig. predictor. 
 Regression results for PWB:  The  model  1  accounts  for  2%  of  the  variance  in  PWB;    the 
model 2 additional 8%. Optimization is the sig. predictor. 
Results
Table 3                                                           Table 4
Summary of regression analysis:                                   Summary of regression analysis:
Predicting SWB by SOC                                             Predicting OWB by SOC
                                                                           
                            B          SE B             β                                    B           SE B               β
 Step 1                                                           Step 1
   Constant              17.85          3.47                        Constant            60.64             7.77
    gender               -0.15          0.63         -0.01            gender              0.17            1.42           0.01
        age              -0.07          0.05         -0.08               age             -0.22            0.11          -0.12*
 step 2                                                           step 2
   Constant              12.91          3.80                        Constant            43,03             8.36
    gender               -0.14          0.62         -0.01            gender             0,20             1.36            0.01
        age              -0.03          0.05         -0.03               age            -0,09             0.10           -0.05
         ES              -0.32          0.13         -0.14*               ES            -0,65             0.29           -0.13*
        LBS               0.04          0.15          0.02               LBS             0,43             0.32            0.08
          O               0.37          0.13          0.19**               O             1,13             0.29            0.25**
          C               0.21          0.12          0.11                 C             0,29             0.27            0.07
 Note: R2=0,01 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,07 (p<0,01). **p<0,01, *p<0,05   Note: R2=0,01 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,10 (p<0,01). **p<0,01, *p<0,05


  Regression results for SWB: The model 1 accounts for 1% of the variance in SWB, adding 
  SOC acconts for 7% increment in the variability of SWB;  Optimization and elective selection 
  are sig. predictors. The elective selection is negatively related to SWB. 
  Regression results for OWB:  The  model  1  accounts  for  1%  of  the  variability  in  OWB, 
  adding SOC accounts for 10% increment in the variability of OWB. Optimization and elective 
  selection are sig. predictors. The elective selection is negatively related to SWB.
Results
 • ES: no effect of ES on mental health diagnostic categories (MHDC) F(2, 317)=0.81, 
   p>0.05.
 • LBS: a significant effect of LBS on MHDC: F(2,327)=5,31, p<0,01.
   ▫ Hochsberg’s GT2 post hoc: the flourishing participants (M=8.25, SD=2.04) use 
      more LBS than moderate mentally healthy (M=6.58, SD=2.16, p<0.05)  and 
      languishing (M=6.58, SD=2.16, p<0.05), but the languishing and moderate 
      mentally healthy do not differ.
 • O: a significant effect of O on MHDC: Welch’s F (2, 29.46) =10,06, p<0,01-
   ▫ Games-Howell post-hoc: the flourishing (M =7.87, SD=2.14) use more O than 
      moderate mentally healthy (M=6.80, SD=2.60, p <0.01)  and languishing (M=5.42, 
      SD=3.17, p= 0.05), but the languishing and moderate mentally healthy do not differ.
 • C: a significant effect of C on MHDC: F(2, 327)=5.71, p<0,01. 
   ▫ Hochsberg’s GT2 post hoc: the flourishing participants (M=5.80, SD=2.41) use more 
      C than moderate mentally healthy (M=6.58, SD=2.16, p<0.05)  and languishing 
      (M=3.91, SD=3.06, p<0.05): no sig. difference between moderate mentally healhty 
      and languishing.

Conclusions
 Different SOC life-management strategies have differential effects on aspects of 
   mental health.
    ▫ optimization contributes to all dimensions of mental health.
    ▫ compensation and loss-based selection are not associated with dimensions 
       of mental health.
    ▫ elective selection is related to social well-being and overall well-being 
       negatively. 
Conclusions
• Different SOC life-management strategies contribute to assigment to mental 
  health categories.
   ▫ The flourishing participants use more loss-based selection, optimization and 
      compensation than moderate mentally healthy, who use more of these 
      strategies that languishing individuals. The languishing use more elective 
      selection than moderate mentally healthy and flourishing. 
• The use of loss-based selection, optimization and compensation may serve as a 
  mean of maintaining mental health in elderly, whereas the use of elective selection 
  in late adulthood should be examined further. No effect on aging satisfaction was 
  found previously (Jopp & Smith, 2006), although the SOC model proposes 
  elective selection as an adaptive resource in the old age.

References
Baltes, P. B., & Baltes, M. M. (1990). Psychological perspectives on successful aging: The model of selective optimization with 
    compensation. In P. B. Baltes & M. M. Baltes (Eds.), Successful aging: Perspectives from the behavioral sciences (pp. 1–34). 
    New York: Cambridge University Press
Freund, A.M. & Baltes, P. (1998). Selection, optimization and compensation as strategies of  life-management: Correlations with 
    subjective indicators of successful aging. Psychology and Aging, 13(4), 531-543.
Freund, A. M. &Baltes, P. B. (2002). Life management strategies of selection, optimization and compensation: Measurement by self
    -report and construct validity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 642 – 662.  
Jopp, D. & Smith, J. (2006). Resources and life-management strategies as determinants of successful sging: On the protective effect 
    of selection, optimization, and compensation. Psychology and Aging, 21(2), 253-265.
Keyes, C. L. M. (2002). The mental health continuum: From languishing to flourishing in life. Journal of Health and Social
    Behavior, 43, 207 – 222.  
Keyes, C. L. M. (2007). Promoting and protecting mental health as flourishing: A complementary strategy for improving national 
    mental health. American Psychologist, 62(2), 95 – 108. 
Keyes, C. L. M. (2009). Atlanta: Brief description of the mental health continuum short form (MHC-SF).  Available: 
    http://www.sociology.emory.edu/ckeyes/. [On–line, retrieved  03 July 2011].
Svetina, M. & Zupančič, M. (2007). Life-management strategies in adulthood: A cross-sectional study in Slovenia. Horizons of
    Psychology 16(4), 43 – 63. 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:9/6/2013
language:Unknown
pages:7