Life management strategies as predictors of by pptfiles

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 7

									Life management strategies as
predictors of multidimensional
model of mental health in late
          adulthood


   Mojca Petrič1, Maja Zupančič2 Tina Kavčič1  & Blanka 
                        Colnerič2
     1Faculty of Education, University of Primorska
        2Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana
 Introduction
• Selection, optimization and compensation (SOC) life
  management strategies (Baltes & Baltes, 1990; Freund & Baltes, 
  1998): a model/a general framework for the understanding of 
  developmental change and resilience across the life-span.
  ▫ Selection: elective (ES) and loss-based (LBS)
     Selection of domains (goals) of functioning because not all opportunities 
      can be pursued.
  ▫ Optimization (O): 
        Means of achieving desired outcomes and attaining higher levels of 
         functioning.
  ▫ Compensation (C):  
        activation/acqusition of new substitute means for counteracting 
         loss/decline.

• Multidimensional model of mental health (Keyes, 2002, 2007): 
  ▫ Emotional well-being (EWB)
     Positive affect and satisfaction with life
  ▫ Psychological well-being (PWB)
     positive psychological functioning: self-acceptance, personal growth, 
      positive relations with others, environmental mastery and autonomy.
  ▫ Social well-being (SWB)
      the degree of functioning well socially: social integration, social 
      contribution, social coherence, social actualization and social acceptance. 
• The SOC strategies suggested as determinants of successful 
  aging (e.g., Freund & Baltes, 1998; Jopp & Smith, 2006; Svetina 
  & Zupančič, 2007)
• The SOC strategies as predictors of dimensions of Keyes model 
  of mental health have not been examined yet. 
• The aim of the study:  to examine the relative importance of 
  SOC strategies to measures of  Keyes model of mental health. 
  ▫ H1: Self-reported SOC would predict dimensions of mental health: 
    EWB, PWB, SWB and overall WB (OWB). 
  ▫ H2: Self-reported SOC would contribute to assignement to 3 mental 
    health categories: flourishing, languishing and moderate mentally 
    healthy. 
Method
• Sample:
  ▫ N= 328 (73% female), aged 65 to 91 years (M= 72.02, SD = 5.94), 
    living in the community.
• Measures:
  ▫ The SOC questionnaire (Freund & Baltes, 2002)
  ▫ The Slovene translation of MHC-SF (Keyes, 2009)
Results
    Table 1                                                Table 2
    Summary of regression analysis:                        Summary of regression analysis:
    Predicting EWB by SOC                                  Predicting PWB by SOC
                                                                 
                        B           SE B              β                  B     SE B          β
   step 1                                                  step 1
   Constant             13.91           2.11                Constant 29.02      3.63
      gender            -0.65           0.39       -0.09      gender  0.97      0.66        0.08
         age            -0.05           0,03       -0.10          age -0.10     0.05      -0.12*
   step 2                                                  step 2
   Constant              8.98           2.29                Constant 21.06      3,95
      gender            -0.61           0.37 -0.09            gender   0.96     0,64        0.08
         age            -0.02           0.03 -0.04                age  -0.05    0,05       -0.06
          ES            -0.12           0.08 -0.09                 ES  -0.20    0.13       -0.09
        LBS              0.16           0.09   0.11               LBS   0.23    0.15        0.09
           O             0.23           0.08     0.19**             O   0.55    0.14       0.26**
           C             0.11           0.07   0.09                 C -0.04     0.13       -0.02
   Note: R2=0,01 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,09 (p<0,01). **p<0,01   Note: R2=0,02 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,08 (p<0,01). **p<0,01, *p<0,05


Regression results for EWB: The model 1 accounts for 1% of the variance in EWB; adding 
SOC accounts for 9% increment in variability of EWB;  Optimization is the sig. predictor. 
 Regression results for PWB:  The  model  1  accounts  for  2%  of  the  variance  in  PWB;    the 
model 2 additional 8%. Optimization is the sig. predictor. 
Results
Table 3                                                           Table 4
Summary of regression analysis:                                   Summary of regression analysis:
Predicting SWB by SOC                                             Predicting OWB by SOC
                                                                           
                            B          SE B             β                                    B           SE B               β
 Step 1                                                           Step 1
   Constant              17.85          3.47                        Constant            60.64             7.77
    gender               -0.15          0.63         -0.01            gender              0.17            1.42           0.01
        age              -0.07          0.05         -0.08               age             -0.22            0.11          -0.12*
 step 2                                                           step 2
   Constant              12.91          3.80                        Constant            43,03             8.36
    gender               -0.14          0.62         -0.01            gender             0,20             1.36            0.01
        age              -0.03          0.05         -0.03               age            -0,09             0.10           -0.05
         ES              -0.32          0.13         -0.14*               ES            -0,65             0.29           -0.13*
        LBS               0.04          0.15          0.02               LBS             0,43             0.32            0.08
          O               0.37          0.13          0.19**               O             1,13             0.29            0.25**
          C               0.21          0.12          0.11                 C             0,29             0.27            0.07
 Note: R2=0,01 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,07 (p<0,01). **p<0,01, *p<0,05   Note: R2=0,01 for Step 1, ΔR2=0,10 (p<0,01). **p<0,01, *p<0,05


  Regression results for SWB: The model 1 accounts for 1% of the variance in SWB, adding 
  SOC acconts for 7% increment in the variability of SWB;  Optimization and elective selection 
  are sig. predictors. The elective selection is negatively related to SWB. 
  Regression results for OWB:  The  model  1  accounts  for  1%  of  the  variability  in  OWB, 
  adding SOC accounts for 10% increment in the variability of OWB. Optimization and elective 
  selection are sig. predictors. The elective selection is negatively related to SWB.
Results
 • ES: no effect of ES on mental health diagnostic categories (MHDC) F(2, 317)=0.81, 
   p>0.05.
 • LBS: a significant effect of LBS on MHDC: F(2,327)=5,31, p<0,01.
   ▫ Hochsberg’s GT2 post hoc: the flourishing participants (M=8.25, SD=2.04) use 
      more LBS than moderate mentally healthy (M=6.58, SD=2.16, p<0.05)  and 
      languishing (M=6.58, SD=2.16, p<0.05), but the languishing and moderate 
      mentally healthy do not differ.
 • O: a significant effect of O on MHDC: Welch’s F (2, 29.46) =10,06, p<0,01-
   ▫ Games-Howell post-hoc: the flourishing (M =7.87, SD=2.14) use more O than 
      moderate mentally healthy (M=6.80, SD=2.60, p <0.01)  and languishing (M=5.42, 
      SD=3.17, p= 0.05), but the languishing and moderate mentally healthy do not differ.
 • C: a significant effect of C on MHDC: F(2, 327)=5.71, p<0,01. 
   ▫ Hochsberg’s GT2 post hoc: the flourishing participants (M=5.80, SD=2.41) use more 
      C than moderate mentally healthy (M=6.58, SD=2.16, p<0.05)  and languishing 
      (M=3.91, SD=3.06, p<0.05): no sig. difference between moderate mentally healhty 
      and languishing.

Conclusions
 Different SOC life-management strategies have differential effects on aspects of 
   mental health.
    ▫ optimization contributes to all dimensions of mental health.
    ▫ compensation and loss-based selection are not associated with dimensions 
       of mental health.
    ▫ elective selection is related to social well-being and overall well-being 
       negatively. 
Conclusions
• Different SOC life-management strategies contribute to assigment to mental 
  health categories.
   ▫ The flourishing participants use more loss-based selection, optimization and 
      compensation than moderate mentally healthy, who use more of these 
      strategies that languishing individuals. The languishing use more elective 
      selection than moderate mentally healthy and flourishing. 
• The use of loss-based selection, optimization and compensation may serve as a 
  mean of maintaining mental health in elderly, whereas the use of elective selection 
  in late adulthood should be examined further. No effect on aging satisfaction was 
  found previously (Jopp & Smith, 2006), although the SOC model proposes 
  elective selection as an adaptive resource in the old age.

References
Baltes, P. B., & Baltes, M. M. (1990). Psychological perspectives on successful aging: The model of selective optimization with 
    compensation. In P. B. Baltes & M. M. Baltes (Eds.), Successful aging: Perspectives from the behavioral sciences (pp. 1–34). 
    New York: Cambridge University Press
Freund, A.M. & Baltes, P. (1998). Selection, optimization and compensation as strategies of  life-management: Correlations with 
    subjective indicators of successful aging. Psychology and Aging, 13(4), 531-543.
Freund, A. M. &Baltes, P. B. (2002). Life management strategies of selection, optimization and compensation: Measurement by self
    -report and construct validity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 642 – 662.  
Jopp, D. & Smith, J. (2006). Resources and life-management strategies as determinants of successful sging: On the protective effect 
    of selection, optimization, and compensation. Psychology and Aging, 21(2), 253-265.
Keyes, C. L. M. (2002). The mental health continuum: From languishing to flourishing in life. Journal of Health and Social
    Behavior, 43, 207 – 222.  
Keyes, C. L. M. (2007). Promoting and protecting mental health as flourishing: A complementary strategy for improving national 
    mental health. American Psychologist, 62(2), 95 – 108. 
Keyes, C. L. M. (2009). Atlanta: Brief description of the mental health continuum short form (MHC-SF).  Available: 
    http://www.sociology.emory.edu/ckeyes/. [On–line, retrieved  03 July 2011].
Svetina, M. & Zupančič, M. (2007). Life-management strategies in adulthood: A cross-sectional study in Slovenia. Horizons of
    Psychology 16(4), 43 – 63. 

								
To top