Is it all about Money_ A Randomized Evaluation of the Impact of

Document Sample
Is it all about Money_ A Randomized Evaluation of the Impact of Powered By Docstoc
					                    Is it all about Money? 
           A Randomized Evaluation of the Impact 
   of Insurance Literacy and Marketing Treatments on the 
                      Demand for Health 
                  Microinsurance in Senegal

    Jacopo Bonan (Milan-Bicocca), Olivier Dagnelie (Namur), 
            Philippe LeMay-Boucher (Heriot-Watt) 
                  and Michel Tenikue (CEPS)

Thanks to: ILO/Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Carnegie Trust of
Scotland, Fonds National de la Recherche Luxembourg and the GRAIM, Thies.

                                                                            1
                 Introduction
Health providers in Senegal:
• Organized according to a tiered system: 
  1) health huts (staffed by community workers)
  2) health posts (nurses and certified midwives)
  3) health centres (with medical doctors, etc.)
  Survey: Thiès  (2nd largest city in Senegal)
  Thies: 1 public hospital and 1 private hospital


                                                    2
              Introduction
• High health costs
  -Cost in health huts and posts are small
  -Hospitals: 
  Xray (6000FCFA); Blood analysis (2000); 
  Consultation (10-25000); Night (>25000)
  (sample median income 112500FCAF/month) 
→ Often too Expensive
  Poor people face difficulties to access 
  ‘modern-medical’ health care
                                             3
                     Introduction
  1) health shocks → direct expenditures (drugs & 
  treatment) : out-of-pocket payments (OOP)
  2) indirect costs → reduction in productivity

• OOP in Senegal : 70% of total expenditure in health (WHO)
  (5% in GBR, 11% in France)

• at low levels of income : strong link between health and 
  income 

  → Scope for more health insurance


                                                              4
    Health Microinsurance Available

• no universal coverage in Senegal 
  No state insurance (ill-functioning: CESAME)

• informal insurance
  (bilateral transfers; networks :De Weerdt et 
  al.(2006); ROSCAS: Dagnelie et al. (2012))



                                                  5
    Health Microinsurance Available

• IPM: treasury made up of employees’ 
  compulsory contributions. 
  (for large employers)

• Private health insurers (PAMECAS, etc)

• Mutual Health Organizations (MHO)

                                           6
             MHOs expansion
• Self or informally employed: no IPM
  (>60% in our sample):
  ill-suited supply of health insurance

• Senegal 1990 in Fandene: first ‘mutuelle de 
  santé’ or MHO
• Grass-root movement: managed by locals
• MHOs in Senegal: 13 (1993) → 140+ (2007)

                                                 7
        MHOs structure and rules
• Open to everybody
• Membership fees (1000-3000FCFA/hh)

• Monthly premium 100-500FCFA/month/person 

• Period of observation (3 months)

• MHO have contracts with all health providers

• cover 25 to 75% of consultation fees
  cover 50% to 100% of medical exams and various 
  inpatients cares fees

                                                 8
  Microinsurance take-up in Thies
• Out of our sample of 360 heads of hh:
  32% of have health insurance, 
  (for 73% of all household members)
  Of which:
  → 19% with IPM (public or private)
  (several private IPM are not working…)
  → 3% with private health insurance 
  → 10% with MHOs
                                           9
           Low MHO take-up
• Overall MHO take-up rate in Thies region = 5% 
Smith et al. (2008) & Lépine et al. (2010). 

→ Our Research Question:
 Why is MHO take-up rate so low despite being 
 well established and having the potential to 
 reach poor people? 


                                              10
       Why low MHO take-up?
• From our sample, people who justified the 
  lack of membership to MHOs:
  1) lack of information about the product 
  offered and/or MHOs existence (70% of hh)
  2) lack of means (16%)
  3) lack of interest (5%) 
  4) lack of trust (2%).


                                               11
                Lack of Information
• Cai et al. (2009): farmers in China refuse to purchase a heavily 
  subsidized insurance for sows → lack of awareness of the 
  program.

• Giné et al. (2007); Cole et al. (2009) and Gaurav et al. (2009): 
  → Limited understanding of rainfall insurance mechanisms in 
  rural India. 

• Jutting (2003): concept of insurance is alien to a large 
  proportion of people in Senegal.
→ information campaign could have some impact


                                                                  12
                     Lack of Means
• Jutting (2003) poorer hh in Senegal less member of MHOs. 
• Chankova et al. (2008) similar results in Ghana and Mali
• Giné et al. (2008) : take-up rate of rainfall insurance increases 
  with household wealth in rural Andhra Pradesh. 
• Cole et al. (2009) low take-up rates of rainfall insurance : 
  insurance is expensive. 
• In our sample: only mentioned by 16% Why?
  → willingness to pay (WTP) = actual premiums 
  → a banana is 100FCFA (!?!)

  Bonan (2011) uses this data and the contingency valuation
  method to get WTP for MHOs premiums.

                                                                  13
                       Lack of Trust
• Cai et al. (2009) low take-up by Chinese farmers: lack of trust 
  toward governmental institutions. 

• Cole et al. (2009) endorsement of rainfall insurance in India 
  from a third party ↑ purchase by 40%. 

• In Thies:
  We asked the sample of non-members aware of the existence 
  of MHOs: trust towards MHOs 1 to 10

  Rescaled median score w.r.t. Trust in mother and family:  8/10 

→ Large positive a priori from locals towards MHOs

                                                                   14
  What if we inform and ↓ fees?
• Factors at play: Information & Means
  impact on membership of: 
  -more info 
  -↓ financial barriers
→ Randomized Control Trials
• Design and implement two treatments: 
1)Insurance Literacy module
2)Marketing with 3 vouchers

                                          15
      Our 2 treatments on 360 hh
1) Literacy: 180 hh invited to:
   3hour module on health microinsurance, MHOs 
   and the concepts of risk and insurance. 
   (given by GRAIM)
After
2) Marketing: redeemable for 3 months
Voucher 1: invitation to GRAIM (120 hh)
Voucher 2: membership fees (120 hh)
Voucher 3: memb. fees + 3000FCFA obs period 
   (120hh)                                        16
17
        Randomized Evaluation 
• Old technique:
  The first published RCT appeared in the 1948 
  paper entitled:
  "Streptomycin treatment of pulmonary 
  tuberculosis“
  which described a Medical Research Council 
  investigation. 
  -Austin Bradford Hill is credited as having 
  conceived the modern RCT
                                                  18
   Randomized Evaluation examples (I)
• Very active field in recent years:
  impulse from MIT and Poverty Action Lab
• Ex.: PROGRESA Mexico (1998)
  506 communities (half randomly selected)
  Treatment: cash grants to women conditional 
  on school attendance and preventive health 
  measures.
Results: Gertler et al. (2001)
↓ illness, ↑ height, ↑enrollment

                                             19
   Randomized Evaluation examples (II)
• Ex: Kenya, free breakfast program effect on 
  school participation.
  Results: Vermeersch (2002)
  ↑ school participation
• Ex: Kenya, program providing uniforms and 
  textbooks (to 7 randomly selected schools)
  Results: Kremer et al. (2002)
  ↓ Dropout rates

                                                 20
         Randomized Evaluation 
Ex: avg test scores (Duflo et al. 2007)
Schools with textbook (T) – Schools without (C)



D = treatment effect + selection bias
→ with successful randomization : 
We can pretend selection bias = 0



                                                  21
      Our data: Thies June 2010
• Second city of importance in Senegal 
  population of 240,000 (2002 census)
  -its MHOs are the oldest in Senegal: well 
  established supply of MHOs. 
• 360 randomly selected households
• Urban area: 20 km2
• Baseline survey : housing information, 
  household composition, info on head hh.
• Uptake decision: head of hh 

                                               22
Survey timeline:
                                     Our dependent
  Invitation to Module is            variable: subscribe
  made followed by                   or not to MHO
  Marketing treatment                between May-Sept


     May-June 2010:                  September 2010:
     Survey of 360hh                 deadline for
                                     vouchers



 Greedy enumerators constantly
 asking for an increase in salary…




                                                           23
24
• ‘Strongly risk averse’ 
  based on Voors et al. (2010)
  takes value 1 if individuals always opted for the 
  certain outcome ‘A’ when presented with :




                                                       25
• ‘Patient’
  We elicit discount factors (Voors et al. (2010))
  → discount factors at one month of:
  5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, 150%, 200%. 
  dummy if head is more patient half of our sample. 
                                •Aside: experience
                                with real money
                                gave very different
                                results…




                                                      26
•No significant difference if we look at the assignment
across vouchers 1-2-3 (not shown)
                                                          27
Not good news
Selection bias is clearly not equal to zero.
Treatment group:
-less insured (↑ intake)
-less rich (↓ intake)
-less knowledge about insurance (minor)
-less public servant (↑ intake)

Bias can be + or – difficult to guess


                                               28
29
             Empirical Strategy
• Our model:

  -M takes value 1 if hh subscribes to a MHO 
  following our treatments
  -E takes value 1 if hh was invited to module 
  -Voucher takes value 1 if hh was given either 
  voucher 2 or 3
• Results similar with probit (shown) and OLS


                                                   30
                Our estimates
• E measures the ‘invitation effect’
  - does not measure the actual participation 
  effect 
  - α :‘intend to treat’ effect
• Low compliance rate (58%)
  we compute also ‘treatment on treated’ or 
  ‘average treatment effect’ (Imbens-Angrist 1994)
  à IV  (instrument attendance by invitation)
• Both techniques give similar results
                                               31
32
    Randomized Evaluation related to insurance

• Rainfall insurance intake
1)Gaurav et al (2009): Gujarat, India (600hh)
Treatments: insurance educ module & Marketing
→ module ↑ intake; little impact from marketing

1)Cole et al. (2009): India (2000hh)
  Treatment: insurance educ module
→ no impact from module
                                                  33
34
                 Conclusion
• Literacy module has no significant impact
Why?
-  Representative present (not being the head)
- Health insurance is a simple product (relative 
   to rainfall insurance): no need
- Quality of our module delivery?
• Vouchers 2-3 have strong and positive impact
-efficient to only distribute voucher 2

                                                    35

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:9/6/2013
language:English
pages:35