Docstoc

INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF LONG TERM ... - Xprimm

Document Sample
INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF LONG TERM ... - Xprimm Powered By Docstoc
					 INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF
    LONG TERM LIFE INSURANCE:
       A MODEL PROPOSAL FOR
           EMERGING MARKETS

Dr. Ahmet Naim OKTAY
Yeditepe University
INTRODUCTION
Introduction
• The Caucasia is a geopolitical region at the border of 
  Europe and Asia and situated between the Black and 
  Caspian  Sea.  Politically,  the  Caucasus  region  is 
  separated between northern and southern parts.
Introduction
Introduction
North Caucasia comprises of the following states:
• Russian Federation (partially) → nominal GDP/Capita $12.993
  ▫ Chechnya                                     Pop: 1.268.989
  ▫ Dagestan                                     Pop: 2.910.249
  ▫ Ingushetia                                   Pop:    412.529
  ▫ Adyghe                                       Pop:    439.996
  ▫ Kabardino-Balkaria                           Pop:    859.939
  ▫ Karachay-Cherkessia                          Pop:    477.899
  ▫ North Ossetia                                Pop:    712.980
  ▫ Krasnador Krai                               Pop: 5.226.647
  ▫ Stavropol Krai                               Pop: 2.786.281
• Total Population                                       15.095.469
Introduction
South Caucasia consists of the countries below:
• Azerbaijan        (Pop: 9.165.000,  nominal GDP/capita: $6.872
• Georgia            (Pop:4.469.000,   nominal GDP/capita: $3.210
• Armenia           (Pop:3.262.200,   nominal GDP capita : $3.032
     Total Population : 16.896.200
         
As a result when we talk about Caucasia Region we talk about a 
population of 32.000.000. Of course this 32.000.000 belongs to 
different cultures and has different languages. But life insurance 
has a universal language which we will have a look in this study.
Introduction
  The World Bank classifies countries according to their GDP per capita.

                                                                                  2010
          Low income Countries                                                 1005 – below
          Middle Income Countries                                             1006 – 12.275
               Lower-Middle Income                                             1006 – 3.975
               Higher-Middle Income                                           3.976 – 12.275
          High Income Countries                                               12.276 - above
    TABLE I: Classifications of World countries according to GDP/Capita
    Source: Halil Seyidoğlu, International Economics p.12 & World Bank Report, p.75
Introduction
   TABLE II: Development in GDP/Capita and Life Insurance

       Years          Number of Insured’s               Mathematical                GDP/Capita
                                                        Reserves (USD)
       1985                         407.719                    11.177.700                 1.330
       1990                       3.724.241                   163.955.137                 2.682
       1995                       4.904.264                   460.177.140                 2.759
       2000                       7.091.561                  1.429.167.938                2.965
       2005*                      7.288.678                  3.943.317.837                5.008

       2010*                     17.497.277                10.313.214.236                 9.890


  *2005 and 2010 includes individual pension funds and their participant.
  Source: Ahmet Naim Oktay, Principale of Investment in Life Insurance, p.2-3,
          Pension Monitoring Centers Statictics ad Insurance Supervisory Board Reports.
              www.tuik.gov.tr
HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF
            LIFE INSURANCE
Historical Development Of Life Insurance
The  main  motivation  for  life  insurance  is  to  provide 
financial  assistance  for  people after the  decease  of  the 
family’s breadwinner. 
• In ancient Greek 
• Rome
• A rider to marine insurance policies 
Historical Development Of Life Insurance
The first example of a life policy was issued in Great Britain in 1583. 

  ▫   “Amicable Society for a Perpetual Assurance Office” 1757.  
  ▫   Some mathematicians were working on mortality tables. 
  ▫   Edmund Halley 
  ▫   James Dudson  (1755). 
  ▫   Equitable Life Society established in 1762 
  ▫   Richard Dune and William Morgan to invent “whole life” policies. 

• “insurable interest” in life contracts in 1774.
• First products with profit sharing launched by Westminster 
  Society (1792) and Pelican Life Office (1797).
Historical Development Of Life Insurance
• After the industrial revolution, for both death and 
  retirement benefit became a new trend.

• In parallel with increasing inflation and volatilities in 1970’s,  
  Universal Life policies 

• Several life insurance companies had to be liquidated

• Balwin United (1983). Executive Life (1991), First Capital Life 
  (1991), Fidelity Bankers Life, Monarch Capital Corporation, 
  Mutuel Benefit (1991).
Historical Development Of Life Insurance
• In order to protect insured’s from this kind of financial 
  disasters, states brought new regulations 
  ▫ The solvability
  ▫ The transparency
  ▫ The audit and rating.
THE IMPORTANCE OF LIFE
 INSURANCE IN TERMS OF
            ECONOMICS
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
Some researches  showing  that  insurance  market  has  significant 
roles  in  promoting  economic  growth. The process  of  economic 
growth requires investment and increases in real savings.
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
• There are a lot of instruments of which people can save 
  ▫ accounts in the banks, securities, bonds, etc.
• But life assurance provides protection from economic loss of an 
  unexpected death, people can also save through their life  
• We can say that, premium payment may be considered as a semi
  -compulsory saving. 
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
• The logic of those premium reserves 
  ▫ early premium payments 
  result in overpayments in the early policy 
                  Death risk (0,00)                                    Risk


                          11
                         10
                             9
                             8
                             7                                                Premium
                             6
                             5
                             4
                          3
                          2
                             1
                                                                    T=time
                         0       10   20   30   40   50   60   70




 Source: Ahmet Naim Oktay, Pension Funds and their taxation, p.99

 • In this way, life insurance has indirectly increased savings of the economy.
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
• TABLE III: Life premium volume in USD in 2010

                   Region                                    Premium Volume
                                                            (in millions of USD)
                   North America                                   557.007
                   Latin America and Carrabin                       54.458
                   Europe                                          955.553
                   Asia                                            858.466
                   Africa                                           42.796
                   Oceania                                          39.436
                   TOTAL                                          2.507.715
 •   Source: Sigma, World Insurance in 2010, Statistical Appendix, p.10


 • The life insurance premium composes 57,9% of the 
   total premium volume which is USD 4.324.239 million.
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
An empirical and theoretical study done in Nebraska shows us 

• that one  percentage  point  increase  in  the  growth  of  life 
  insurance industry is associated with a 0,25 per cent increase in 
  the growth rate 
• the life  insurance  growth  explains  approximately  14%  of  the 
  variance of economic growth
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
• Insurance and pension sector normally induces a superior GDP growth then other sectors.         




 • Source: TSSRB, Shaping our future: 2023 vision for Turkish Insurance Sector, 2012, p.6
Impact of Life Insurance on Macro-
Economics
Europe 
• produces 38% of life premiums, in the world

• life insurance reserves and in pension funds reserves was 
  1.442.643 million of euro in 2011
Impact of Life Insurance on Household’s 
Economics

• The family as a smallest unit of the society and economy
Impact of Life Insurance on Household’s 
Economics
Keep in mind some differences from general insurance: 
  ▫ risk namely “death” is certain. 
  ▫ life insurance is a long-term contract
  ▫ It is difficult to determine the economic or the financial value 
    of life.
  ▫ life insurance contract is not a contract of indemnity.
  ▫ the premium is calculated according to mortality table.
Impact of Life Insurance on Household’s 
Economics
• Different economic uses life insurance offers:
• Life insurance makes the family financially secure.
• Life insurance is also a saving instrument.
• Helps in meeting responsibilities of even after death like higher 
  education of children,    
• Helps in repaying the mortgage loans
• Life insurance also provides old age benefits, 
• Creditors can also use it in case of non-repayment
Impact of Life Insurance on Household’s 
Economics
People are likely to change their saving behaviour if they have life 
insurance
• they feel less necessary to accumulate funds
• policy loans are utilized as an emergency fund
• insurance helps reducing worry and fear 
   ▫ peace of mind, 
• increases the happiness of individuals.   
Impact of Life Insurance on the Micro-
Economics
• Partners of  firm can get the lives of the partners insured 

• A firm can get the life of its key man insured

• Group insurance policies can improved productivity.

• Industry offers regular full time employment to a large number 
  of people
TYPES OF LONG TERM LIFE
             INSURANCE
Types of Long Term Life Insurance

• Term life insurance

• Whole life insurance

• Endowment insurance

• Pensions
Term Assurance Plans
• protection for a limited number of years.
• no maturity value.
• The face amount of the policy is payable only if the insured’s 
  death occurs.
• Nothing paid in case of survival
• Can be issued for a short period but customarily provides 
  protection for at least a set number of years, 
• Since price of terms products of different companies can be 
  easily comparable, a wide variety product diversification was 
  made
Term Assurance Plans
• Level  term  assurance:  The  amount  insured  is  at  a  fix 
  level within the term of the policy.
• Renewable Term Assurance: The insured can renew his 
  policy  at  maturity  date  without  any  medical 
  examination.
• Convertible  Term  Assurance:  The  insured  can  convert 
  his policy into a whole life or endowment policy at any 
  time he wants.
• Decreasing  Term  Assurance:  These  policies  are 
  commonly used to pay off a loan balance on the death 
  of the debtor, insured e.g. mortgage protection plan.
Term Assurance Plans
• Expanding  Term  Assurance:  Fixed  Death  Benefit  may  cause  a 
  decrease  in  real  terms  during  the  period  of  the  policy.  This  policy 
  gives the opportunity to increase death benefit at a fixed rate each 
  year.
• Index-linked Term Assurance: This type of policies gives a rise to the 
  amount insured according to the consumer price index.
• Unit linked Term Assurance: The premium paid by the insured are 
  allocated to purchase “units”. If the value of the limits is higher than 
  the  amount  defined  at  the  inception  of  the  policy,  this  surplus  is 
  paid to the insured.
• Money back Policies: In case of a death, the amount insured is paid to 
  the beneficiary of the policy. If the insured survives at maturity date, 
  the premium is refunded.
Whole Life (Straight Life) Policies
• Whole  life  insurance provide  protection over  one’s 
  entire life time. 
• Payment of the face amount upon the insured’s death 
  regardless of when death occurs.
• Terminal age in all mortality tables is 100 years. 
• Cash values are available by surrendering the policy.
• Loan can be obtained.
Whole Life (Straight Life) Policies
• For a $ 100.000, straight life policy issued at age 35, for example, the 
  cash value may be $5.000 after five years and $12.000 after ten years, 
  $28.000 after twenty years and $100.000 after sixty-five years.




 FİGURE: Joseph M Belth, Life Insurance a consumer’s handbook  
Whole Life (Straight Life) Policies
• Policies paying a set benefit ordinary whole life policies 
  are  certainly  sold,  however  investment  linked  benefits 
  are  more  common.  Policies  with  profits  (also  termed 
  “participating”), 

• Another variation is unit-linked cover. Once the number 
  of units possessed known, the policyholder can quickly 
  value the policy as the unit price is publicly quoted.
Whole Life (Straight Life) Policies

• Universal  Life  Policies launched in  USD  in  1970’s  and 
  still a good product for emerging market. 

• It has  two  main  characteristics:  Transparency  and 
  Flexibility.
Whole Life (Straight Life) Policies

• Transparency is achieved by breaking down the 
  contract into its three components:
  ▫ The protection component
  ▫ The saving’s component and
  ▫ The expense component
• The  second  main  characteristic is the  “flexibility”  of 
  charging the face amount, premium payments and cash 
  value
Whole Life (Straight Life) Policies
• In general the amount of risk stays constant irrespective of the level of 
  the cash value, so that the death benefit increases with the cash value.



                                      Sum at Risk



                                                    Cash value
            Death benefit



                                  Duration of policy



        •    FIGURE : Universal Life, Cologne Re, p.6
Endowment Insurance
• Endowment policies promise 
  ▫ the policy face amount on the death of the insured during 
  ▫ to pay the full-face amount at the end of the term of the insured services the term




         FIGURE: Diagram of Hypothetical Twenty-Year Endowment
         • Source: Joseph M.Belth, p.43
Endowment Insurance
Endowment policies may be diversified as follows:
• Single premium endowment policies.
• Retirement  income  policy:  the  amount  payable  at  death  is 
  the face amount or cash value, whichever is greater.
• A semi endowment policy-pay upon survival.
• Modified  endowment  policy-provides  for  payment 
  periodically.
• Deposit  term-  First  year  premium  were  not  to  be  higher 
  than renewed premiums.
• Juvenile  endowment  policies  –  designed  to  cover  child’s 
  education, marriage, and independence
Endowment Insurance

Those policies can be with profit or without profit. Cash 
value  of  the  policy  that  is  to  say  the  mathematical 
reserves  of  the  company  is  allocated  for  investment  on 
financial instruments and real estates.

The  periodical  (usually  yearly)  return  of  those 
investments  is  shared  between  the  company  and  the 
insured at a defined percentage.
Endowment Insurance

• In unit linked policies, an investment fund is established 
  and divided into “units”. Each unit has a daily value. The 
  number  of  unit  obtained  by  the  policy  owner  and  the 
  value of each unit gives us total cash value.

• The  policyholder  has  the  option  of  investing  across 
  various schemes, i.e. diversified equity funds, balanced 
  funds, debt funds etc.
Endowment Insurance
Pension (Retirement) Policies
There are two main types of Pension products.
  ▫ Defined – benefit
  ▫ Defined contribution
• In defined benefit, 
  ▫ the capital or the annuity to be paid at the maturity date is 
    known. 
  ▫ The actuarial formula being used is the same as “defined 
    capital” or “deferred annuity” formulas. 
  ▫ The increasing longevity of life and fluctuation of interest in 
    the market may cause problem
• Defined contribution product is an investment plan
• The investment principle is almost the same with unit-
  linked policies.
GOVERNMENTAL SUPPORT
Governmental Support

• The governments support life insurance due to the 
  reason stated in chapter 3.

• Additionally, life insurance serves as a complementary 
  benefit to social security. 
 Governmental Support
• Turkish social security has an annual institution deficit > TL 25b...
• Total revenue and expenditure of Social Security Institution
• Billion TL




                            2000    01      02      03      04      05      06      07      08      09 2010

   • Source: TSSRB; Shaping our future: 2023 vision for Turkish Insurance Sector, 2012, p.9
Governmental Support
• Therefore, long term life assurance and private pension has been 
  considered as a third pillared of social security.
                                             PRIVATE PENSİON               
                                                     &
                                              LIFE ASSURANCE

                                                                       
                                         OCCUPATIONAL PENSİONS         
                                                                                

                                              SOCIAL SECURİTY

                                                     
                       DEATH                   RETIREMENT                     DISABILITY
                                                     




  • FIGURE: Life and pension as a supplementary Benefit
  • There are three types of governmental supports for long term life insurance
Regulations as to Transparency of Life 
Insurance
• Each  year  the  global  economy  adds  an  estimated  150 
  million new customer of financial services. 
• Even in  well-developed  markets,  weak  consumer 
  protection  and  a  lack  of  financial  literacy  can  render 
  households  vulnerable  to  unfair  and  abusive  practices 
  by  financial  institutions  as  well  as  financial  frauds  and 
  scams operated by intermediaries. 
• At its heart, the need for consumer’s protection arises 
  from  an  imbalance  of  power,  information  and 
  resources  between  consumers  and  financial  service 
  providers
Regulations as to Transparency of Life 
Insurance
• A financial sector should provide consumers with:
• Transparency by providing full, plain, adequate and 
  comparable information
• Choice by ensuring fair, non-coercive and reasonable 
  practices
• inexpensive and speedy mechanism to address 
  complaints and resolve disputes. 
Financial Transparency

• Insurance companies have a great importance 

 ▫ by alleviating the financial hardship if a covered risk takes 

 ▫ by giving  a  considerable  amount  of  saving,  providing 
   financial security 
Financial Transparency
• That is why the supervisory authorities impose rules to 
  facilitate customer’s periodic control on their on-going 
  contracts as
For this reason;
  ▫ The customer should receive periodic statements 
  ▫ Customers should have a means to dispute the accuracy 
    of the statement within a stipulated period.
  ▫ Insurers  should  be  required  to  disclose  the  cash  value 
    within a reasonable time. 
  ▫ a table showing projected cash values should be provided 
    at the time of delivery of the initial contract
Financial Transparency
• As a general rule;
  ▫ Every  insurance  undertaking  is  required  to  establish  an 
    available solvency margin 
  ▫ The solvency margin shall correspond to the assets free of 
    any foreseeable liabilities less any intangible item.
  ▫ Detailed rules  of  assets  that  can  be  included  in  the 
    available solvency margin.   
• Solvency I rather crude “one size fits all” sets of rules. 
• It only  considers  underwriting  risk.  The  rules  are  not 
  designed to take into account credit, market or liquidity 
  risk.
Financial Transparency
• European Commission announced that they were going 
  to  “take  a  global  lead  in  insurance  regulation”  ….  by 
  2013. 

• The  Solvency  II  exercise  envisages  a principals  Basel II 
  approach. The insurers assess their  capital  needs, 
  degree of volatility, availability of reinsurance other risk 
  factors such as credit, market and liquidity risks.
Contractual Transparency
Consumer products can be broken into three categories: 
• search goods (can be assessed in advance of purchase-
  e.g. a piece of art), 
• experience goods  (can  be  assessed  relatively  quickly 
  with use- e.g. soap powder), 
• credence good (attributes only discovered after a long 
  delay or upon occurrence of contingent event or never- 
  e.g.  a  mutual  fund).  Insurance  clearly  fits  into  the 
  credence  good  category  and  the  sector  thus  relies 
  heavily on the public’s trust 
Contractual Transparency

• the aim of policy holder protection should surely be to:

  a)   Protect policyholders against losses arising from fraud
  b)   Ensure that policyholders are not misled
  c)   Prevent insurers from unfairly avoiding claims.
  d)   Provide compensation for policyholders
Contractual Transparency
• An insurance  contract  -likewise  other  legal  contract-  is 
  supposed to be concluded with good faith. 
• Good faith “bona fide” might require the parties to;
  a) keep every promise which is made,
  b) negotiate in  such  a  way  as  to  avoid  taking  advantage  of 
     another
  c) do one’s best to complete the negotiations,
  d) act fairly an honestly,
  e) co-operate,
  f) inform the other party of all the needs to know,
  g) avoid lies and misleading conduct,
  h) abstain from fraud
Contractual Transparency
• recent development in consumer rights and protection 
  obliges  insurers  to  bear  their  responsibility  arising  out 
  of the duty of “disclosure” as a matter of good faith.
• The information would cover:
  ▫ the status of insurer
  ▫ the value and type of assets in the fund;
  ▫ the rates of return generated on the assets;
  ▫ the fees or commissions charged 
Contractual Transparency
• As  to  the  transparency  in  life  assurance,  according  to  the 
  Art.36  and  annex  111  of  Directive  2002/83/EC,  a  written 
  information to policyholders must be submitted relating to 
  the  definition  of  benefits,  term  of  the  contract,  means  of 
  payment of premiums, surrender value and paid-up value (if 
  any)  and  a  cancellation  period.  Art  35  states  that    the 
  policyholder  has  to  have  the  opportunity  to  cancel  the 
  contract  within  a  period  of  between  14  and  30  days  from 
  the  time  the  policy  holder  was  informed  that  the  contract 
  was  incepted  (cooling  of  period).  Since  the  life  insurance 
  contract  is  a  long-term  contract,  individual  may  be 
  persuaded  by  high  pressure  salesmanship  to  enter  into 
  contracts which may not be entirely appropriate for them.
Contractual Transparency

• What remedies are available to the victim of bad faith?

  ▫ Avoidance (rescission)
  ▫ Termination of the insurance contract
  ▫ Compensation
Tax Incentives
• In  many  countries  long-term  life  and  pension  premiums 
  contribution  payment  are  encouraged  through  tax 
  exemptions.
• One way of this tax relief is called tax deduction.
• The other way is tax credit method. It is a direct, dollar-for-
  dollar  reduction  in  tax  liability,  as  distinguished  from  a  tax 
  deduction, which reduces taxes only by the percentage of a 
  taxpayer’s  Tax  Bracket  (A  taxpayer  in  the  31%  tax  bracket 
  would get a 31 cent benefit from each $1,00 deduction, for 
  example).  In  the  case  of  a  tax  credit,  a  taxpayer  owing 
  $10.000  would  owe  $  9.000  of  the  took  advantage  of  a 
  $1,000 tax credit. 
Tax Incentives
• Also accumulated  funds  and  mathematical  reserves 
  return are encouraged by means of tax exemptions to 
  some extent. 

• Also,  the  capital  and  annuities  payment  can  be 
  exempted from taxes.

• We must confess that, in emerging markets where tax 
  payment behaviour is not very strong, 
Governmental Sponsorship
• One  of  the  method  which  is  very  efficient  is  the 
  participation  of  a  government  or  a  company  into  the 
  premiums payment of the policies.

• In  this  method,  let’s  say  a  percentage  of  25%  is  added  by 
  sponsor to the premium paid by insured. If the insured wait 
  till his contract’s maturity date, he can obtain this additional 
  fund consisting of the sponsor’s payments and its return. In 
  case of surrender his policy within 10 years only 50% of the 
  sponsored fund is paid to him. Additional fund may not be 
  paid  to  the  insured  if  the  policy  is  surrendered  within  the 
  first five years.
HOW TO SELL LONG-TERM
        LIFE INSURANCE
How to Sell Long-Term Life Insurance
• At the first stage, some distribution  channels like wise 
  internet, call center, banks even agencies have difficulty 
  even in understanding various aspects of the long term 
  life insurance policies.

• For this reason, a direct seller of an insurance produced 
  must act as a financial advisor as well. 
  ▫ a special training, 
  ▫ some conditions of academic background 
  ▫ presentability is necessary. 
How to Sell Long-Term Life Insurance
• As to the advertising, a sufficient budget should be allocated. 




 • A list of potential customer is a useful instrument to reach the client.
 • The  customer  should  be  provided  for  a  file  and  demonstration 
   explaining  the  product.  Also,  an  explanatory  note  presenting  the 
   produces must be read and signed by the customer.
         CONCLUSION :
A MODEL PROPOSAL FOR
    EMERGING MARKET
States Sponsorship

• in Turkey 65%  of  the  insured  cannot  benefit  from  tax 
  deduction.

• Thus  a  governmental  sponsorship  is  very  important  to 
  motivate people in purchasing long term life insurance 
  policies. 
Regulation for Transparency
• The customer must be aware of 
  ▫ all loadings on the policy 
  ▫ an easily  readable,  understandable  and  comprehensive 
    text should be prepared.

• The public authority must announce the principles,
  ▫ check the actuarial aspect of the product 
  ▫ control advertisement against unfair competition. 
Distribution Channels

• Long term  life  and  pension  product  are  allowed  to  be 
  sold only through approved salesmen. 
Simple&Comprehensive Products Must Be 
Launched İnto The Market
• To keep the simplicity, a kind of universal life policy with profit can be 
  proposed.

• Ex : Yearly Premium                                  100    Unit
       Company’s Loading 10%                                        10    Unit
       Risk Premium for death (Cx/Dx)                      7,5 Unit
       Acquisition Cost                                    2,5 Unit
       Saving Component                                  80    Unit 
       Technical Interest 3%                                 2,4 Unit
       Cash Value to be invested                         82,4 Unit
 
• Acquisition cost can be paid within the first two or three years of the 
  contract instead of spreading it over the year for faster selling.
Assistance Benefit

• Since long-term  life  assurance  is  a  long  term 
  commitment,  it  is  strongly  advised  to  give  a  cheap 
  fringe  benefit  to  the  policyholder  to  fortify  his 
  confidence. This assistance may be a medical call center 
  service or “concierge” only.
Dispute Settlement

• Direct  information  and  notification  with  the 
  policyholder  will  be  highly  recommended  through 
  normal  post  and  call  canter  to  decreases  cancellation 
  and lapses of contracts. 
                THANKS



Dr. Ahmet Naim OKTAY

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:9/5/2013
language:Latin
pages:73