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					Passive Solar Residential
Design and Construction
            Mark M. Feldman,
                President

               High Desert
             Construction, Inc.

          www.markmfeldman.com
 Design Determinants: The Lot
                                                   Climate
                                                   Microclimate
                                                   Vegetation
                                                   Soil Conditions
                                                   Topography/Drainage
                                                   Solar Availability
                                                   Access
 The apparent path of the Sun across the           Privacy
 sky. In summer, the Sun's path is longest,        Views - Good & Bad
and so are the days.In winter, the Sun's path      Neighbors
      is shortest, and so are the days.
                                                   Utilities
    The Rules of the Road
 Zoning
  Ordinances
 Relevant
  Codes (2006
  IRC)
 Restrictive
  Covenants
Hierarchy & Relationship of Spaces




     Bubble Diagram
     Relationship to Each Other
     Relationship to the Lot
                Style
 Photos From
  Magazines
 Personal
  Photos
 Houses and
  Details
Material Choices



     Durability (lifetime)
     Environmental Consequences
     Cost
     Suitability
     Standardization
Budget



      Current and
       lifetime costs
      Payback periods
   Start Drawing!




 Plan, elevations, sections,
 details, K.I.S.S.
Models




Think in 3-D
             Let the Sun Shine In
 Declination
    (finding true
    South)
   Glass to the
    South
   Sun Angles
   Site Specific
   Amount of Solar
   Orientation



                       National Geophysical Data
                       Center (NOAA Satellite and
                       Information Service)
                       Declination: 9° 26’ E
        Heat Capacity




 Build with materials that have a high
  thermal mass
 High heat capacity & conductivity
Work with the Environment




     Go with the flow
     Don’t fight Mother Nature
     Consider indigenous design
               Define Goals

   Day use?
   Night use?
   Energy or dollar
    conservation (for
    your home or for the
    planet)?
Principles of Heat Transfer

                    Conduction
                    Convection
                    Radiation


    Surface area of building
Insulation and Weather Stripping

 High quality
 Tight Construction
 Heat loss
 Infiltration/fan
  pressurization test
 Air to air heat
  exchangers
Heating and Cooling Degree Days




    Types of insulation
    How much insulation is enough
Recommended Levels of Insulation




           R-values
           U-values
           Effective u-values
Glazing Materials

           Double, triple glazing
           Low “e” windows
           Wood
           Fiberglass
           Aluminum
           Vinyl windows
           doors
                     Direct Gain




PROS:                         CONS:
                              • Glare
• Simple                      • Loss of privacy
• Inexpensive                 • Fading of fabrics/pictures
• Natural daylight            • Carpets not desirable
                              • Large temperature swings
• View outside                • Moveable insulation
   Direct Gain
   Examples




Clerestory
                 Window
Sunspaces/Greenhouses




PROS:                       CONS:
• Space for growing         • Heat loss at night
food/plants                 • Summertime
• Act as buffer zone        overheating
• Easily retrofitted        • Expense
• Additional living space
Sunspaces/Greenhouses Examples
     Thermal Mass Walls




PROS:                          CONS:
• Lower temperature swings     • Two south walls
• Time delay                   • Mass wall uses space
• Combined collector/storage   • No daylight or view
• Combined solar/structural    • Heat loss at night
• No glare or fading            • Cleaning/insects
Thermal Mass Example 1




             Hallways/Stairs
Thermal Mass Example 2




     Water/drum walls
   Thermal Mass Example 3




Partial unvented trombe walls
Overhangs
Control of Passive Solar Systems




 Natural Shading
 Blinds
Passive Cooling
Daylighting
Design Rules of Thumb

  Excerpted from The
  Passive Solar Energy
  Book by Ed Mazria
Passive Solar Domestic Water
 Heating Systems: Breadbox



                  Simple
                    &
                  Cheap
Passive Solar Domestic Water Heating
      Systems: Thermosiphon 1
Passive Solar Domestic Water Heating
      Systems: Thermosiphon 2
Backup Cooling Systems
          Average    Average   Yearly
          Water Use Run Time Water Use
          (gal/hr)   (hr/yr)   (gal/yr)


Without   3.5        2,100     7,350
Bleed
With Bleed 10.5      2,100     22,050




           Evaporative Cooler
  Backup Heating Systems 1
Conversion & Equivalence Chart
• Electricity: 1 KW = 3,413 Btu/hr
• Natural gas:
   1 Cubic Foot of Natural Gas = 1030 Btu's
   1 CCF = 100 Cu Ft = 1 Therm = 103,000 Btu's 
   1 MCF = 1,000 Cu Ft = 10 Therms = 1,034,000
Btu's = 1.034 MMBtu's
• Propane: 1 Gal Propane = 91,600 Btu's
      1 Cu Ft Propane = 2,500
Backup Heating Systems 2
Backup Heating Systems 3
Backup Heating Systems 4
Backup Heating Systems 5




      Heat pumps and Geothermal

				
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posted:8/20/2013
language:English
pages:40