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									 Solar Water Heating
Basics for Homeowners
      March 14, 2013
Welcome

    Presenter introductions




2
Housekeeping

    Please sign in
    Cell phone
    Restrooms
    Evaluation Forms



3
Our Goal Today
     Provide information
     Share benefits
     Develop confidence
     Take the next step



4
SWH Topics
    CPAU Eligibility Requirements
    Rebate/Incentive Information
    Estimated Project Costs
    Solar Water Heating Systems (SWH)
    Choosing a contractor
    How We Can Help

5
City of Palo Alto Solar Water
Heating Program (CPAU SWHP)
                    ELIGIBLE
              Gas, Electric, or Propane
          water heating customers of CPAU
          Domestic Hot Water Applications

       Both retrofit buildings and new construction

                 Self-Installed Systems

                   NOT ELIGIBLE
        Pool & Spa Systems, Space heating/ cooling,
                   Radiant Floor Heating
6
    POP QUIZ!
7
Financial Impact of SWH
                           Save up to 75%
    Solar water heating    of hot water
        reduces the        heating costs!
      energy needed
          to heat
        your water.
                          75%

       You save $$$
8
 Environmental Impact of SWH
         A solar water heating system has the same CO2
                    emissions reductions as:




                              =

Not driving for 4.7 years           Planting 19 Trees
 9
     What is Solar Water Heating ?
        Technology that uses heat from
         the sun to create hot water
        Can be used in any climate
        The fuel is free!
         (hint: it’s sunshine!)


10
     POP QUIZ!
11
     CPAU SWH Rebate Program
      www.cityofpaloalto.org/swh




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How the rebate works
✴It’s a one time upfront payment
✴System must be OG-300 certified
✴Your contractor applies for you (unless you are
 a self-installer)
✴Apply for the rebate once the project is
 completely installed & has been inspected by
 the city

13
Incentive Based on
Expected Performance (4 Factors)

 Expected annual energy savings
  (OG-300 rating)
 Surface orientation
 Shading analysis
 Current incentive level for natural
  gas or electric

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     Incentives: Electric/Propane
                $ per kWh      Single 
        Steps
                  Saved      Family Cap
       Step 1     $0.54        $1,834




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     Example: Incentive Formula
                  (Electric/Propane)

     Average Energy Savings            2677 kWh
     x  $ / kWh                      x $0.54
     x  Surface orientation factor  x    1.0 
     x  Shade factor                 x    1.0 
     =  $ Rebate                     = $1,446

16
     Electric    (example of average savings)




                                                Possible savings:
4,000 kWh/year   X   $0.12 /kWh   = $480/year
                                                } $324
                                                   per year!

1,300 kWh/year   X   $0.12 /kWh   = $156/year



17
     Incentives: Natural Gas
               $ per Therm  Single Family 
       Steps
                  Saved          Cap
      Step 1      $18.59       $2,719 




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     Example: Incentive Formula
                    (Natural Gas)

     Average Energy Savings          121 therms
     x  $ / therm                    $18.59
     x  Surface orientation factor  x    1.0 
     x  Shade factor                 x    1.0 
     =  $ Rebate                     = $2,249

19
     Natural Gas (example of average savings)


                                                  Possible savings:
200 therms/year   X   $0.82/therm   = $164/year
                                                  }    $98
                                                      per year!

80 therms/year    X   $0.82/therm   = $66/year



20
      Average Rebate
      Summary

                 Average   Average   Out-of-Pocket
                  Cost     Rebate        Cost

     Gas         $ 8,700   $ 2,250      $ 6,450

     Electric/
     Propane
                 $8,700    $1,445       $7,255
21
     Wait…there’s more!
     30% Federal Tax Credit




22
 Average Costs



                               Cost
                                       Fed Tax
                   Initial     After
                                        Credit   Net Cost
                 Investment   CPAU
                                        (30%)
                              Rebate

     Gas          $8,700      $6,450   $1,935    $4,515
     Electric/
     Propane
                  $8,700      $7,255   $2,176    $5,079

23
New CPAU Financing Option
✴CPAU partnered with the Electric & Gas
 Industries Association (EGIA)
✴qualifying energy efficiency improvements
✴direct cash-back rebate OR
✴interest-free loan for up to six months
✴EGIA GEOSmart Authorized Contractor
         www.egia.org/PaloAlto
www.egia.org/paloalto/screened-contractors
24
     POP QUIZ!
25
     Types of Solar Water
       Heating Systems
      (Time to pull out your SWH matrix!)


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Two Basic SWH Differentiations:
Passive vs Active
             PASSIVE                            ACTIVE
               No Pumps                       Pumps move water
                                              through the system



     Integral Collector Storage       Direct Forced Circulation*
     Thermosyphon System              Closed-loop – Glycol
                                       Closed-loop – Drainback

     * Not eligible in the CPAU SWH Program
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Integral Collector Storage (ICS) System

       Passive system
            (no pumps)
       Open-loop




 28
ICS System

      Pros                        Cons
         Simple design—no           Inefficient in cold
          pumps                       climates
         Low cost                   Heavy weight on roof
         Resistant to freezing       (600-800 lbs.)
          in moderate climates


 29
Integral Collector Storage (ICS) System




30
     ICS System




                    Water stored in collector

31   Source: SunEarth                    CPAU
Thermosyphon System

 Passive system
     (no pumps)
 Closed-loop




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Thermosyphon System

     Pros                   Cons
        Simple design—no      Higher roof weight
         pumps                  (1,000 – 1,300 lbs.)
        Good in colder        Glycol & heat
         climates               exchanger reduce
                                efficiency


33
Thermosyphon System




34
Thermosyphon System




      Source: SunEarth   CleanTech

 35
Direct Forced Circulation (DFC)
    Active system, open-loop
    Greater risk of freezing in colder climates
 DFC systems not eligible for rebate




36
Indirect Forced Circulation   (IFC)
Closed-Loop Glycol
 Active system
        (pump/forced)
    Glycol = Antifreeze
    Controllers & Sensors
    Expansion tank
    Storage tank


37
Indirect Forced Circulation (IFC)
Closed-Loop Glycol
     Pros                   Cons
      Frequently            Heat exchanger &
       installed by solar     antifreeze reduce
       companies              efficiency
      Good for cold         Antifreeze may
       climates               break down at high
      Better with hard       temperatures
38     water
Indirect Forced Circulation   (IFC)
Closed-Loop Glycol




39
Indirect Forced Circulation   (IFC)
Closed-Loop Drain-Back

  Active system
      (pump/forced)
  Water and air circulate
  Controllers & Sensors
  Drain-back reservoir


 40
Indirect Forced Circulation      (IFC)
Closed-Loop Drain-Back
      Pros                  Cons
       Excellent in cold    Proper slope
        climates              important
                                  (pipes & collector)
       Excellent in hot
        climates               Heat exchanger
       No glycol
                                reduces efficiency
       Can use tap water
                               Larger pump
 41                             required
Indirect Forced Circulation   (IFC)
Closed-Loop Drain-Back




42
     POP QUIZ!
43
     Collector Types in
      Active Systems




44
45
Choosing a Contractor




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Choosing a Contractor
  Select a SWH contractor
     Eligible contractors list:
     http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/SWH

  Get at least 3 bids

  Decide the contract structure
     (who gets the rebate)


47
 Contract Structure Options - $8,700

                                                 $ 8,700
                       $ 6,450
                                                - $ 2,250
                                                         rebate

                                                 $ 6,450

                      $ 2,250           $0
                         rebate

48 Rebate $ goes to contractor    Rebate $ goes to you
Basic Questions To Ask Contractors

     1.   Are you an “eligible” contractor through the CPAU SWH
          Program?
     2.   Is the SWH system OG300 certified?
     3.   What type of freeze protection does this SWH system
          have?
     4.   What type of heat protection does this SWH system have?
     5.   What type of insulation will be used on the pipes?



49
     POP QUIZ!
50
What can we do for you?

      Answer your questions
      Supply unbiased information
      Provide quality control measures
       •   Inspections
      Offer great customer service!



51
     Remember…
     Determine the best system for your needs
     Let us help you
     Contact 3 contractors for bids
     Install your system
     Complete inspections
     Get your rebates
52
       Our goal today was to…

      Provide information
      Share benefits
      Develop confidence
      Take the next step

Thank you! Please fill out the evaluation forms.
53
SWH Program Contacts
 Sarah Smith – CPAU SWH Program Manager
     sarah.smith@energycenter.org
     858.634.4739


 Skip Fralick - Energy Engineer
     skip.fralick@energycenter.org
     858.244.4868




54                       www.cityofpaloalto.org/swh

								
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