Docstoc

Education 173 Cognition and Learning in Educational Settings

Document Sample
Education 173 Cognition and Learning in Educational Settings Powered By Docstoc
					          Education 173
Cognition and Learning in 
  Educational Settings

       Behaviorism


     Michael E. Martinez
 University of California, Irvine
        Fall Quarter 2007 
What is Learning?  Two Answers.
ü A Change in Behavior
  ü Or the capacity to behave
  ü That is relatively enduring
  ü And not primarily developmental.
                          —or—
ü A Change in the Mind
  ü Manifest as a new information-processing 
    capability
  ü That is presumably stored the brain
  ü And inferred from behavior.
         What is Behaviorism?

ü The theory that human or animal activity can 
  be understood through studying behavior
  alone, without reference to “mental” qualities, 
  such as knowledge, desires, or goals.
ü Two Kinds of Behaviorism
   ü Classical Conditioning
   ü Operant Conditioning
          Pavlov:
          Classical Conditioning

ü Conditioning Means Learning (in Behaviorism)
ü Classical Conditioning is Stimulus Substitution
   ü Unconditioned Stimulus (food) produces an Unconditioned 
     Response (salivation)
   ü Conditioned Stimulus (bell) produces a Conditioned 
     Response (salivation)
ü Stimulus Generalization (to other similar bells)
ü Stimulus Discrimination (but not all bells)
ü Classical Conditioning Explains Only Simple Behavior, 
  Such as Emotional Reactions
 John B. Watson
ü Pushed Behaviorism as the Only Legitimate 
  Form of Psychology
   ü circa 1920
ü Little Albert
   ü Learned to fear a white rat                           
      when paired with a loud noise
   ü His fear generalized to a
       ü rabbit, dog, and fur coat
ü Watson Believed Strongly in the Effects of 
  Experience (Nurture) on Development
   ü “Give me a dozen healthy infants”
ü Watson Inspired Skinner
    Edward L. 
    Thorndike

üAnother Behaviorist
üOne of the First Educational 
 Psychologists
üBelieved in the Advancement of 
 Education and Psychology Through 
 Scientific Research
Thorndike’s Experiment

 üTrial and Error Learning
   ü Puzzle box: Can the cat escape?
   ü Yes, but only by accident (at first)
 üThorndike’s Law of Effect
   ü A behavior is more likely to recur if 
     followed by a “satisfying state of affairs”
 üThorndike’s Cat’s Behavior was More 
  Sophisticated than Pavlov’s Dogs’
    B. F. Skinner

    ü Introduced A Different Paradigm
      ü Not classical conditioning
 
      ü But similar to Thorndike’s theory
    ü Operant Conditioning Is Intended to Explain 
      All Behavior, Including Complex Behavior
      ü All behavior is the product of 
               reinforcement histories
      ü What did you do today?
    ü Operants are emitted behaviors, some of 
      which are reinforced
More Skinner

ü Not Welcome: Mental Talk
   ü Such as think, believe, plan, goal, feeling
ü Behavior is Determined, Not Chosen
   ü Therefore, freedom is an illusion
   ü So is dignity (virtue)
   ü If behavior is programmed, then why not try to create a 
     Utopian society?
       ü Walden II
ü Skinner’s Theory had an Enduring Impact
   ü On Education
   ü On Child-Rearing
     Operant Conditioning in Schools

    üEncouraging Good Behavior
      ü Stickers
      ü Smiley Faces
      ü Praise
      ü Aren’t these reinforcements at least partly 
        manipulative? (means to an end)
    üDiscouraging Bad Behavior
      ü Extinction: “Just ignore him”
      ü Withholding reinforcement
Reinforcement and Punishment

ü Reinforcement Increases the Likelihood that 
  Behavior Will Be Repeated
  ü Reinforcement is identified only by its effects
  ü Want a hamburger?  A hug?
ü Punishment Decreases Likelihood
ü Positive and Negative Refer to Adding or 
  Subtracting a Consequence
  ü What is negative reinforcement?
    Reinforcement Schedules

    üContinuous Reinforcement is Best for 
     Starting a New Behavior
      ü Reinforce every time the behavior occurs
    üVariable Ratio Reinforcement is Best 
     for Making Behavior Robust
      ü Resistant to extinction once reinforcement 
        is withdrawn
      ü Slot machines, fishing
      ü For education: Don’t reward every time
Complex Behavior
ü Use Successive Approximations (Shaping)
  ü Gradually raise expectations
ü Widely Used in Animal Training
  ü Whales and dolphins in Sea World
ü For Humans: Behavior Modification
  ü Reinforcement, M&Ms, token economies
  ü Sometimes useful with behavior disorders
ü Can Reinforcement Backfire?
  ü Magic Markers and the Good Player Award
  ü Be careful if intrinsic motivation is already present
One Application to Education: 
Programmed Learning
üSkinner’s “Teaching Machines”
  ü Machine “tutors” helped shape the learner
  ü Used a program of small steps
  ü Now obsolete
üComputer-Assisted Instruction
  ü Many more capabilities now, of course
  ü Sometimes computers present material in 
    a Skinnerian format
  What’s Wrong With Behaviorism?
ü Noam Chomsky’s Critique of Skinner’s Book, 
  “Verbal Behavior”
  ü Language can’t be learned only through 
    reinforcement
  ü The brain must be a built-in (innate) language 
    capability
ü Donald Norman’s Critique of Skinner’s Work
  ü Was operant conditioning a half-century 
    distraction?
Why Use a Cognitive (Thinking) 
Approach?
üBehaviorism Does Not Address All the 
 Important Goals of Education
  ü It Neglects Important Learning Outcomes
     ü Understanding, Interest, Curiosity, Confidence
  ü It Neglects Certain Aspects of the Learner
     ü Beliefs, Motivation, Values, Goals
üIt’s Best to Investigate the Mind as a 
 Real Entity, Not Treat it as an Illusion
üIs There a Metaphor We Can Use?

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:7/27/2013
language:English
pages:17
Lingjuan Ma Lingjuan Ma
About