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The Top Ten Things You Need to Know _and Do__ for Assessment and

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The Top Ten Things You Need to Know _and Do__ for Assessment and Powered By Docstoc
					Winning Strategies for
Assessing Student Learning

    Institutional Planning, Assessment, Research,
    and Testing (IPART)
    January 23, 2008
What is Assessment?
            PLAN: Develop
             clear learning
               outcomes

 ACT: Use                     DO: Offer courses,
  results                       programs, or
              ASSESSMENT           learning
                                experiences


             CHECK: Assess
              achievement
Why Do We Assess?
 n   Outstanding communications tool
 n   Required by DoE, Middle States, and
     discipline-specific accrediting bodies.
 n   When we claim our graduates can “think
     critically” or “communicate effectively”,
     do we have evidence that they can?
 n   Did my students understand what I just
     taught them? How do I know?
Guiding Principles At AUC
n   Institutional Commitment
n   Primacy of Student Learning Outcomes
n   Community “Ownership”
n   Multiple assessment measures
n   Confidentiality
n   A Secure Environment
n   Resources to Support Assessment
n   Open Access to Information
n   Simplicity
Start With A Mission
n   Mission statement/Course
    description/Course objective
n   Should relate to the mission of the
    program.
Next: State Learning
Outcomes
 n       What will my students know? What will they
         understand?
 n       What are the [4] “walk away” things you want
         students to be able to know and do when they
         leave your course?
 n       Student focused rather than instructor focused.
 n       Students will (action verb) (knowledge, skills,
         values)
     ¡     “Students will be able to…” “Students will
           demonstrate…”



                        Huba, M.E. & Freed J. (2000). Learner Centered Assessment on College Campuses.
                        Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Learning Outcomes
 n   Reflect the university and program
     missions.
 n   Align with program goals.
 n   Focus on important, non-trivial aspects of
     learning.
 n   General enough to capture important
     learning but clear and specific enough to
     be measurable.
 n   Limited in number: 3-5 ideal.


                 Huba, M.E. & Freed J. (2000). Learner Centered Assessment on College Campuses.
                 Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Exercise: Teaching Goals
Inventory

n   Break into groups of three.
n   Each group member complete
    teaching goals inventory.
n   You have 10 mins.
University Learning Outcomes
 n   Professional Skills
 n   Advanced Communication Skills
 n   Critical Thinking
 n   Cultural Competence
 n   Effective Citizenship
Samples of Learning
Outcomes
 n   Students will demonstrate the ability to make
     appropriate inferences and deductions from
     biological information.
 n   Students will present original interpretations of
     literary works in the context of existing research
     on these works.
 n   Students will use voice, movement, and
     understanding of dramatic character and
     situation to affect an audience.
 n   Students will be able to explain the impact of
     the Korean War on US-Far East relations today.

                    Suskie, L. (2004). Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide. Bolton,
                    MA: Anker Publishing.
Samples of Learning
Outcomes
 n   Too vague: Students will demonstrate
     information literacy skills.
 n   Too specific: Students will be able to use
     institutional online services to retrieve
     information.
 n   Better: Students will locate information and
     evaluate it critically for its validity and
     appropriateness.

                  Suskie, L. (2004). Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide. Bolton,
                  MA: Anker Publishing.
    Samples of Learning
    Outcomes
n   Focus on higher order thinking skills rather than
    memorization of facts or simple conceptual
    understanding.
    ¡ Students will be able to identify grammatical forms
      (past participles, etc.)…
        n   Better: Students will be able to write and speak
            grammatically.
    ¡   Students will be able to recall important historical
        dates…
        n   Better: Students will be able to place historical events
            within a social and political context, to draw meaningful
            comparisons between events, and to analyze current
            events within a historical framework.

                              Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2003). Student Learning
                              Assessment: Options and Resources. Philadelphia: MSCHE.
Exercise:
Writing Effective Learning Outcomes
n   In your groups of three:
    ¡   Using results of teaching goals inventory, each
        group member will write a list of three learning
        outcomes for a class he/she teaches.
    ¡   Share the goals with the group.
    ¡   Review:
        n   Do they use “action” verbs?
        n   Stated in terms of outcomes – what students will
            know/do after completing the course?
        n   Avoid “fuzzy” words?
        n   Are measurable?
    ¡   Each group will present one set of course
        learning goals.
Share Learning Goals With
Students
n   Listed on course syllabus, so they
    understand:
    ¡   Why is it important to take this course?
    ¡   What are the important things they will learn
        in this class?
    ¡   What is expected of them?
    ¡   How will this course help prepare them for
        career and life?
    ¡   How does this course relate to other courses
        in program?
                     Suskie, L. (2004). Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide. Bolton,
                     MA: Anker Publishing.
How Will You Assess
Progress?
 n   Assessment Methods
     ¡   Direct Methods
         n   Pre- and post-tests
         n   Exam questions and quizzes
         n   H/W assignments
         n   Projects, term papers and reports
         n   Case study analysis
         n   Artistic performances and products
         n   Portfolios
         n   Classroom assessment techniques (CATs)
     ¡   Criteria for scoring should be explicit (rubrics)

                        Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2003). Student Learning
                        Assessment: Options and Resources. Philadelphia: MSCHE.
How Will You Assess
Progress?
  n   Assessment Methods
      ¡ Indirect Methods
        n   Mid-term and course evaluations (with
            questions about learning)
        n   Test blueprints (outlines of concepts and skills
            covered on tests)
        n   No. of student hours spent on service
            learning, activities, etc.
        n   Grades not based on scoring criteria
        n   Exit interviews/surveys

                    Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2003). Student Learning
                    Assessment: Options and Resources. Philadelphia: MSCHE.
Course-Embedded
Assessment – Best Practice

n   Authentic – address ill-defined problems or
    issues.
n   Engaging – provoke student interest and
    persistence.
n   Challenging – encourage student learning.
n   Valid – yield useful information
n   Responsive – provide feedback to students.

                   Huba, M.E. & Freed J. (2000). Learner Centered Assessment on College Campuses.
                   Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
How Will You Assess
Progress?

n   Targets/Benchmarks
    ¡ “Departmental review of portfolios
      shows that 75% of students score in
      the top two categories of the scoring
      guideline.”
    ¡ “At least 80% of final presentations
      are rated as good or better.
Assessment, Teaching, and
Learning
 n   Students learn most effectively when:
     ¡   They have opportunities to revise their work
         n   Multiple drafts and critiques, peer review
 n   They understand course and program goals
     ¡   Need framework
     ¡   They (and you) reflect on what and how they have
         learned
     ¡   Assignments and assessments relevant to course goals
         are connected to learning activities and focus on most
         important goals.



                          Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2003). Student Learning
                          Assessment: Options and Resources. Philadelphia: MSCHE.
Assessment, Teaching, and
Learning
n   Students learn most effectively when:
    ¡ They understand the characteristics of
       excellent work.
        n   Test blueprints; rubrics; instructive comments, even
            on m/c exams (guidance on which types of
            questions are causing difficulty)
    ¡   Their learning styles are
        accommodated.
        n   Diversify presentation, lectures, and types
            of learning experiences.
                        Middle States Commission on Higher Education (2003). Student Learning
                        Assessment: Options and Resources. Philadelphia: MSCHE.
First and Foremost:

n   Assessment is a tool for you to use:
    ¡   To improve communication with students
    ¡   To gain insight into what works and what
        doesn’t
    ¡   To help you understand where change is
        needed
    ¡   To ensure that your students are really
        learning what they need to learn.
Institutional Support
  n   IPART:
      http://www.aucegypt.edu/RESEARCHATAU
      C/ipart/
      ¡   Assessment at AUC
      ¡   Assessment News
      ¡   Assessment Plans and Reports
      ¡   How to Assess
      ¡   Workshops and Events
      ¡   Additional Resources
      ¡   Glossary
  n   Center for Learning and Teaching
  n   Training and Development Center
  n   Teaching Enhancement Grants
Thank You!



       Photos and clip art courtesy of Microsoft Office.

				
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