Mason Template 2 Title Slide by dffhrtcv3

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 50

									Hardware, Wake-up Process, 
 Boot-Up, Operating System 
    Control of Hardware 
       Dr. Harold D. Camp
            IT 212 002
        1 February 2007
PC Hardware
Personal Computer Hardware
A typical pc consists of a case or chassis in desktop or tower shape and the following parts:
Motherboard or system board with slots for expansion cards and holding parts ** Central processing
    unit (CPU) 
Computer fan - used to cool down the CPU 
Random Access Memory (RAM) - for program execution and short term data storage, so the 
    computer does not have to take the time to access the hard drive to find the file(s) it requires. 
    More RAM will normally contribute to a faster PC. RAM is almost always removable as it sits in 
    slots in the motherboard, attached with small clips. The RAM slots are normally located next to 
    the CPU socket. 
Basic Input-Output System (BIOS) or Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) in some newer computers 
Buses 
      • PCI 
      • PCI-E 
      • USB 
      • HyperTransport 
      • CSI (expected in 2008) 
      • AGP (being phased out) 
      • VLB (outdated) 
      • ISA (outdated) 
      • EISA (outdated) 
Personal Computer Hardware
Power supply - a case that holds a transformer, voltage control, and (usually) a cooling fan 
Storage controllers of IDE, SATA, SCSI or other type, that control hard disk, floppy disk, CD-ROM 
    and other drives; the controllers sit directly on the motherboard (on-board) or on expansion cards 
Video display controller that produces the output for the computer display. This will either be built into 
    the motherboard or attached in its own separate slot (PCI, PCI-E or AGP), requiring a Graphics
    Card. 
Computer bus controllers (parallel, serial, USB, FireWire) to connect the computer to external 
    peripheral devices such as printers or scanners 
Some type of a removable media writer: 
      • CD - the most common type of removable media, cheap but fragile. 
           – CD-ROM Drive 
           – CD Writer 
      • DVD 
           – DVD-ROM Drive 
           – DVD Writer 
           – DVD-RAM Drive 
      • Floppy disk 
      • Zip drive 
      • USB flash drive AKA a Pen Drive 
      • Tape drive - mainly for backup and long-term storage 
Personal Computer Hardware
Internal storage - keeps data inside the computer for later use. 
      • Hard disk - for medium-term storage of data. 
      • Disk array controller 
Sound card - translates signals from the system board into analog voltage 
    levels, and has terminals to plug in speakers. 
Networking - to connect the computer to the Internet and/or other computers 
      • Modem - for dial-up connections 
      • Network card - for DSL/Cable internet, and/or connecting to other 
        computers. 
Other peripherals 
In addition, hardware can include external components of a computer system. 
    The following are either standard or very common.
Wheel Mouse
Personal Computer Hardware
Input or Input devices 
      • Text input devices 
            – Keyboard 
      • Pointing devices 
            – Mouse 
            – Trackball 
      • Gaming devices 
            – Joystick 
            – Gamepad 
            – Game controller 
      • Image, Video input devices 
            – Image scanner 
            – Webcam 
      • Audio input devices 
            – Microphone 
Output or Output devices 
      • Image, Video output devices 
            – Printer Peripheral device that produces a hard copy. (Inkjet, Laser) 
            – Monitor Device that takes signals and displays them. (CRT, LCD) 
      • Audio output devices 
            – Speakers A device that converts analog audio signals into the equivalent air vibrations 
               in order to make audible sound. 
            – Headset A device similar in functionality to that of a regular telephone handset but is 
               worn on the head to keep the hands free. 
Motherboard
A typical computer is built with the microprocessor, main memory, and other 
    basic components on the motherboard. Other components of the computer 
    such as external storage, control circuits for video display and sound, and 
    peripheral devices are typically attached to the motherboard via ribbon 
    cables, other cables, and power connectors. 
A typical motherboard provides attachment points for one or more of the 
    following: CPU, graphics card, sound card, hard disk controller, memory 
    (RAM), and external peripheral devices. The connectors for external 
    peripherals are nearly always color coded according to the PC 99 
    specification. 
   Power Supply




Power supplies, often referred to as "switching power supplies", use switcher 
technology to convert the AC input to lower DC voltages. The typical voltages 
supplied are: 
    3.3 volts 
    5 volts 
    12 volts 
The 3.3- and 5-volts are typically used by digital circuits, while the 12-volt is used to 
run motors in disk drives and fans.
     Case




Cases usually come with room for a power supply unit, several expansion slots and expansion bays, wires for 
powering up a computer and some with built in I/O ports that must be connected to a motherboard.


Motherboards are screwed to the bottom or the side of the case, its I/O ports being exposed on the back of the 
case. Usually the power supply unit is at the top of the case attached with several screws. The typical case has 
four 5.25" and three 3.5" expansion bays for devices such as hard drives, floppy disk drives and CD-ROMs. A 
power button and sometimes a reset button are usually located on the front. LED status lights for power and 
hard drive activity are often located near the power button and are powered from wires that are connected with 
the motherboard. Some cases come with status monitoring equipment such as case temperature or processor 
speed monitors.
Disk Drive




# Capacity, usually quoted in gigabytes. (older 
   hard disks used to quote their smaller 
   capacities in megabytes)
# Physical size, usually quoted in inches:

    * Almost all hard disks today are of either the 
     3.5" or 2.5" varieties, used in desktops and 
     laptops, respectively.
CD ROM
     DVD ROM
DVD (commonly "Digital Versatile Disc" 
or "Digital Video Disc") is an optical disc 
storage media format that can be used 
for data storage, including movies with 
high video and sound quality. DVDs 
resemble compact discs as their 
diameter is the same (120 mm (4.72 
inches) or occasionally 80 mm (3.15 
inches) in diameter), but they are 
encoded in a different format and at a 
much higher density.
Tape Drives
Instead of allowing random-access to data as hard disk drives do, tape 
drives only allow for sequential-access of data. A hard disk drive can 
move its read/write heads to any random part of the disk platters in a 
very short amount of time, but a tape drive must spend a considerable 
amount of time winding tape between reels to read any one particular 
piece of data. As a result, tape drives have very slow average seek 
times. Despite the slow seek time, tapes drives can stream data to 
tape very quickly. For example, modern LTO drives can reach 
continuous data transfer rates of up to 80 MB/s, which is as fast as 
most 10,000 rpm hard disks.
Removable Disks
The disk format itself had no more capacity than the more 
   popular (and cheaper) 5¼-inch floppies. Each side of a 
   double-density disk held 180 KB for a total of 360 KB per 
   disk, and 720 KB for quad-density disks.[13] Unlike 5¼-
   inch or 3½-inch disks, the 3-inch disks were designed to 
   be reversible and sported two independent write-protect 
   switches. It was also more reliable thanks to its hard 
   casing.
USB Flash Drives currently are sold from 32 megabytes up 
   to 64 gigabytes 
IDE Controller
Built into the motherboard, two connections 
 provide for ribbon cables that send signals 
 controlling disk drives
     AGP Expansion Slots
     The Accelerated Graphics Port (also called Advanced Graphics
     Port) is a high-speed point-to-point channel for attaching a graphics
     card to a computer's motherboard, primarily to assist in the 
     acceleration of 3D computer graphics. Some motherboards have 
     been built with multiple independent AGP slots. AGP is currently 
     being phased out in favor of PCI Express. 

                 PCI Express
Superseded By:
                 (2004)


Width:           32 bits
Number of
                 1 device/slot
Devices:

Speed:           up to 2133 MB/s

Style:           Parallel
Hotplugging?     no
External?        no
PCI Expansion Slot
The Peripheral Component Interconnect, or PCI Standard (in 
  practice almost always shortened to PCI) specifies a computer bus 
  for attaching peripheral devices to a computer motherboard. These 
  devices can take any one of the following forms:
An integrated circuit fitted onto the motherboard itself, called a planar
  device in the PCI specification. 
An expansion card that fits in sockets. 
Video Card
A video card, (also referred to as a graphics accelerator
  card, display adapter and numerous other terms), is an 
  item of personal computer hardware whose function is 
  to generate and output images to a display. The term is 
  usually used to refer to a separate, dedicated expansion
  card that is plugged into a slot on the computer's 
  motherboard, as opposed to a graphics controller 
  integrated into the motherboard chipset. 
Sound Card
             A sound card is a computer 
               expansion card that can input and 
               output sound under control of 
               computer programs. Typical uses 
               of sound cards include providing 
               the audio component for 
               multimedia applications such as 
               music composition, editing video 
               or audio, presentation/education, 
               and entertainment (games). Many 
               computers have sound 
               capabilities built in, while others 
               require these expansion cards if 
               audio capability is desired. 
    Random Access Memory (RAM)
Random access memory (usually known by its acronym, 
    RAM) is a type of data store used in computers. It takes 
    the form of integrated circuits that allow the stored data 
    to be accessed in any order — that is, at random and 
    without the physical movement of the storage medium 
    or a physical reading head.
The word "random" refers to the fact that any piece of data 
    can be returned quickly, and in a constant time, 
    regardless of its physical location and whether or not it 
    is related to the previous piece of data. This contrasts 
    with storage mechanisms such as tapes, magnetic disks 
    and optical disks, which rely on the physical movement 
    of the recording medium or a reading head. In these 
    devices, the movement takes longer than the data 
    transfer, and the retrieval time varies depending on the 
    physical location of the next item.
Clock
In electronics and especially synchronous digital circuits, a 
   clock signal is a signal used to coordinate the actions of two 
   or more circuits. 
A clock signal oscillates between a high and a low state, 
   normally with a 50% duty cycle, and is usually a square
   wave. 
Circuits using the clock signal for synchronization may become 
   active at either the rising or falling edge, or both of the clock 
   signal. 
Most integrated circuits (ICs) of sufficient complexity utilize a 
   clock signal in order to synchronize different parts of the 
   circuit and to account for propagation delays. 
As ICs become more complex, the problem of supplying 
   accurate and synchronized clocks to all the circuits becomes 
   increasingly difficult. The preeminent example of such 
   complex chips is the microprocessor, the central component 
   of modern computers. 
Basic Input/Output System
BIOS, in computing, stands for Basic Input/Output System also 
   incorrectly known as Basic Integrated Operating System. BIOS 
   refers to the firmware code run by a computer when first powered 
   on. The primary function of the BIOS is to prepare the machine so 
   other software programs stored on various media (such as hard
   drives, floppies, and CDs) can load, execute, and assume control of 
   the computer. This process is known as booting up.
BIOS can also be said to be a coded program embedded on a chip 
   that recognises and controls various devices that make up the 
   computer. The term BIOS is specific to personal computer vendors. 
   Among other classes of computers, the generic terms boot monitor, 
   boot loader or boot ROM are commonly used.
Microprocessor
A microprocessor (sometimes abbreviated µP) 
   is a programmable digital electronic
   component that incorporates the functions of 
   a central processing unit (CPU) on a single 
   semiconducting integrated circuit (IC). The 
   microprocessor was born by reducing the 
   word size of the CPU from 32 bits to 4 bits, so 
   that the transistors of its logic circuits would fit 
   onto a single part. One or more 
   microprocessors typically serve as the CPU in 
   a computer system, embedded system, or 
   handheld device. 
Heat Sink and Fan
A heat sink is an environment 
  or object that absorbs and 
  dissipates heat from another 
  object using thermal contact 
  (in either direct or radiant 
  contact). 
Universal Serial Bus (USB)
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is a serial bus 
   standard to interface devices. It was originally 
   designed for computers, but its popularity has 
   prompted it to also become commonplace on 
   video game consoles, PDAs, portable DVD 
   and media players, cellphones; and even 
   devices such as televisions, home stereo 
   equipment (e.g., digital audio players), car
   stereos and portable memory devices.
The radio spectrum based USB implementation is 
   known as Wireless USB.
Keyboard



A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially 
  modeled after the typewriter keyboard. 
  Keyboards are designed for the input of text and 
  characters and also to control the operation of a 
  computer 
Network Connector
An electrical connector is a device for joining electrical
  circuits together. The connection may be temporary, as 
  for portable equipment, or may require a tool for 
  assembly and removal, or may be a permanent 
  electrical joint between two wires or devices. There are 
  hundreds of types of electrical connectors. In computing, 
  an electrical connector can also be known as a physical
  interface. 
Parallel Port
A parallel port is a type of socket found on personal computers for 
   interfacing with various peripherals. It is also known as a printer
   port or Centronics] port. The IEEE 1284 standard defines the bi-
   directional version of the port.
For the most part, the USB interface has replaced the Centronics-style 
   parallel port — as of 2006, most modern printers are connected 
   through a USB connection, and often don't even have a parallel 
   port connection. On many modern computers, the parallel port is 
   omitted for cost savings, and is considered to be a legacy port. In 
   laptops, access to a parallel port is still commonly available through 
   docking stations.
Serial Port
In computing, a serial port is a serial communication physical interface through which 
    information transfers in or out one bit at a time (contrast parallel port). Throughout 
    most of the history of personal computers, data transfer through serial ports 
    connected the computer to devices such as terminals or modems. Mice, keyboards, 
    and other peripheral devices also connected in this way.
While such interfaces as Ethernet, FireWire, and USB all send data as a serial stream, 
    the term "serial port" usually identifies hardware more or less compliant to the RS-
    232 standard, intended to interface with a modem or with a similar communication 
    device.
For the most part, the USB interface has replaced the serial port — as of 2006, most 
    modern computers are connected to devices through a USB connection, and often 
    don't even have a serial port connection. The serial port is omitted for cost savings, 
    and is considered to be a legacy port.
  Modem
A modem (from modulate and demodulate) is a 
  device that modulates an analog carrier 
  signal to encode digital information, and also 
  demodulates such a carrier signal to decode 
  the transmitted information. The goal is to 
  produce a signal that can be transmitted 
  easily and decoded to reproduce the original 
  digital data. 
Faster modems are used by Internet users every 
  day, notably cable modems and ADSL
  modems. 
Operating System
An operating system (OS) is a computer program that 
  manages the hardware and software resources of a 
  computer. At the foundation of all system software, the 
  OS performs basic tasks such as controlling and 
  allocating memory, prioritizing system requests, 
  controlling input and output devices, facilitating 
  networking, and managing files. It also may provide a 
  graphical user interface for higher level functions. It 
  forms a platform for other software. 
Services
   •   Process Management
   •   Disk and File Management
   •   Internal/External Security
   •   Networking
   •   Graphical User Interfaces (GUI)
   •   Device Drivers
Microsoft Windows OS
The Microsoft Windows family of operating systems originated as a graphical layer on 
   top of the older MS-DOS environment for the IBM PC. Modern versions are based 
   on the newer Windows NT core that first took shape in OS/2 and borrowed from 
   VMS. Windows runs on 32-bit and 64-bit Intel and AMD processors, although earlier 
   versions also ran on the DEC Alpha, MIPS, Fairchild (later Intergraph) Clipper and 
   PowerPC architectures (some work was done to port it to the SPARC architecture).
As of 2006, Windows held a near-monopoly of around 94% of the worldwide desktop 
   market share, although some predict this to dwindle due to the increased interest in 
   open source operating systems.[1] It is also used on low-end and mid-range servers, 
   supporting applications such as web servers and database servers. In recent years, 
   Microsoft has spent significant marketing and R&D money to demonstrate that 
   Windows is capable of running any enterprise application which has resulted in 
   consistent price/performance records (see the TPC) and significant acceptance in 
   the enterprise market at the cost of existing Unix based system market share.
Other Operating Systems
Macintosh Operating System
   Apple deliberately downplayed the existence of the operating system in the early years of the 
   Macintosh to help make the machine appear more user-friendly and to distance it from other 
   operating systems such as MS-DOS, which were portrayed as arcane and technically 
   challenging. Apple wanted Macintosh to be portrayed as a computer "for the rest of us". The term 
   "Mac OS" did not really exist until it was officially used during the mid-1990s. The term has since 
   been applied to all versions of the Mac system software as a handy way to refer to it when 
   discussing it in context with other operating systems. 
Unix/Linix
     Unix systems run on a wide variety of machine architectures. They are used heavily as server 
     systems in business, as well as workstations in academic and engineering environments. Free
     software Unix variants, such as Linux and BSD, are popular but have not reached significant 
     market share in the desktop market. They are used in the desktop market as well, for example 
     Ubuntu, but mostly by hobbyists. 
How a Disk Boot Wakes Up a PC
•   A personal computer can't do anything useful unless it's running an 
    operating system
     • A basic type of software, such as Microsoft Windows, that acts as a 
       supervisor for all the applications, games, or other programs you use. 
     • The operating system sets the rules for using memory, drives, and 
       other parts of the computer. 
•   Before a PC can run an operating system, it needs some way to 
    load the operating system from disk to random access memory
    (RAM). 
•   The way to do this is with the bootstrap, or simply to boot—a small 
    amount of code that's a permanent part of the PC. 
Power On Self Test
•   Turn on your PC, electricity warms up the components that send, receive, and memorize bits and bytes 
    of data rushing through the system. One stream of electricity follows the same permanently programmed 
    path it has followed each time the computer came to life.
•   The path takes current to the CPU, or microprocessor. The electrical signal clears leftover data from the 
    chip's internal memory registers and places a specific hexadecimal number, F000, into one of the CPU's 
    digital note pads, called the program counter.
•   Whatever number is in the program counter tells the CPU the memory address of the next instruction. In 
    this case, it's the first instruction, located on a flash memory chip on the computer's motherboard. This 
    chip holds a few small programsthat determine how your computer works. All together, they're called the 
    BIOS.
•   Now the BIOS awakens the computer's components, performing the power-on self-test (POST) to make 
    sure the computer is functioning properly. 
Boot
•   BIOS checks a small, 64-byte chuck of RAM that is kept alive by a battery even when the 
    computer is off that contains the official record of which components are installed in your system. 
•   The BIOS and CPU check to make sure they're working right. 
•   The BIOS loads device drivers and interrupt handlers into memory the for the basic hardware in 
    the system, such as the keyboard, mouse, hard drive, and floppy drive. 
•   To be sure all the PC's operations function in a synchronized, orderly fashion, the CPU also 
    checks the system's clock, which is responsible for pacing signals.
•   The CPU sends signals over the system bus to be sure all of the components are functioning. 
•   The POST tests the memory contained on the display adapter and the video signals that control 
    the display. At this point, you'll first see something appear on your PC's monitor.
•   The BIOS checks to see if it's engaged in a cold boot, meaning the computer had been turned 
    off, or if it's a warm boot, or reboot, by checking the value at memory address 0000:0472. 
      • For a cold boot the BIOS runs a series of tests to ensure that the RAM chips are functioning 
          properly. 
      • The tests write data to each chip, and then read it and compare what they read with the 
          data sent 
      • The POST sends signals over specific paths on the bus to the internal floppy, optical, and 
          hard disk drives, and listens for a response to determine which drives are available. 
After the POST
•   A typical Windows XP boot sequence starts 
    with the MBR loading the bootstrap loader for 
    the OS, which will tell the computer 
    everything it needs to know about its memory 
    and how to use it, how the files are stored, 
    and put up the boot menu. 
•   In many computers, the boot menu is not 
    shown unless the user asks for it. The 
    bootloader then launches a program that 
    collects more information about the hardware 
    installed in it and then loads the core 
    operating system files. 
•   Then, it reads the registry from which it 
    gathers the information necessary to 
    communicate with different components, and 
    then load the necessary programs (drivers) 
    to communicate with devices attached to the 
    computer. 
After the POST
Once this is done, the bootloader loads the program that 
   shows the welcome or logon screen. Once the user logs 
   in, the computer loads the shell (Explorer), which shows 
   the desktop to the user. At this point, the OS is loaded 
   and the computer is ready for use. 
A typical boot takes about a minute, with the BIOS boot 
   sequence taking about 10-15 seconds. 
The term booting is short for bootstrapping. The word 
   bootstrapping is derived from the phrase "pulling himself 
   up by his bootstraps", which has its origins in the tall 
   stories narrated by Baron Munchhausen, a German 
   nobleman in the eighteenth century. 
How an Operating System Controls PC 
Hardware
OPERATING systems 
  originally were developed 
  to handle one of the most 
  complex input/output 
  operations: 
  communicating with a 
  variety of disk drives. This 
  is evidenced by the names 
  given to early operating 
  systems, which often 
  contained the acronym 
  DOS, for disk operating 
  system. Eventually, the 
  operating system quickly 
  evolved into an all-
  encompassing bridge 
  between your PC and the 
  software you run on it. 
How Hardware and Software Work 
Together

•   Choose a command, like save
•   Word processor tells OS to save
•   OS knows how to control hardware
•   OS does infrastructure work
•   Program does your work
How Hardware and Software Work 
Together
Device Drivers
• A device driver, or a software driver is a specific type of computer
  software, typically developed to allow interaction with hardware devices. 
     •   This usually constitutes an interface for communicating with the device, through 
         the specific computer bus or communications subsystem that the hardware is 
         connected to, 
     •   Driver provides commands to and receives data from the device, and on the 
         other end, the requisite interfaces to the operating system and software
         applications.
•   Often called simply a driver, it is a specialized hardware-dependent 
    computer program, which is operating system specific, that enables 
    another program, typically an operating system or applications software
    package, to interact transparently with the given device. 
•   Usually provides the requisite interrupt handling required for any necessary 
    asynchronous time-dependent hardware interfacing needs.
Types of Hardware Drivers
Because of the diversity of modern hardware and operating systems, many ways exist in 
   which drivers can be used. Drivers are used for interfacing with:
• Printers 
• Video adapters 
• Network cards 
• Sound cards 
• Local buses of various sorts - in particular, for bus mastering on modern systems 
• Low-bandwidth I/O buses of various sorts (for pointing devices such as mice, 
   keyboards, USB, etc.) 
• computer storage devices such as hard disk, CD-ROM and floppy disk buses (ATA, 
   SATA, SCSI) 
• Implementing support for different file systems 
• Implementing support for image scanners and digital cameras 
Enhanced Integrated Drive Electronics 
(EIDE)
• A disk drive device driver
• An enhanced version of the IDE drive interface 
  • Expands the maximum disk size from 504 MB to 8.4 
    GB, 
  • More than doubles the maximum data transfer rate, 
  • And supports up to four drives per PC (as opposed to 
    two in IDE systems). 
• Now that hard disks with capacities of 1 GB or 
  more are commonplace in PCs, 
  • EIDE is an extremely popular interface. 
  • EIDE's primary competitor is SCSI-2, which also 
    supports large hard disks and high transfer rates. 
Enabling Disk Access
• Disk controller translates instructions from 
  the BIOS and Disk Drivers into electrical 
  signals
  • Move drive’s read/write head to proper 
    location
  • Create or read magnetic signals that 
    represent data
     HW Interrupts
1.   Press a key, an electrical signal identifies what key you pressed, to 
     the keyboard controller.
2.   The keyboard interrupt arrives on one of 16 interrupt request (IRQ) 
     lines. Seven of the IRQs monitor specific components, such as the 
     keyboard controller.
3.   The controller relays a signal to the interrupt controller that determines 
     which of the 256 possible kinds of interrupts request the CPU's 
     attention.
4.   More than one expansion card on the PCI Peripheral Component 
     Interconnect (PCI) and PCI-Express slots can use the same IRQ 
     because the requests are managed by the Plug 'n' Play function.
5.   The interrupt controller sends a signal called the INTR, used for 
     normal interrupt signals. 
6.   The CPU puts whatever it was doing on hold.
7.   A CPU uses one of two methods from computing: polling and 
     interrupts.
8.   The CPU checks to find out what key you pressed. The CPU checks a 
     section of memory called the interrupt descriptor table (IDT). 
     Specifically, the CPU performs the instructions at one of the IDT's 
     locations associated with the key. 
9.   When the interrupt software completes its job, it sends an instruction 
     to the CPU. That tells the CPU it is free to return to whatever it was 
     doing before it was interrupted. 
How Plug and Plan Works
With Plug and Play under Microsoft Windows Server 2003, you can connect a hardware 
    device to your system and leave the job of configuring and starting the device to the 
    operating system. If the device and drivers are not designed to take advantage of 
    Plug and Play, Windows Server 2003 will not be able to automatically configure and 
    start the device. Plug and Play in Windows Server 2003 supports a wide range of 
    devices.
In Windows Server 2003, Plug and Play support is optimized for computers that include 
    an Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) BIOS. ACPI devices are 
    defined by the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) Specification, a 
    hardware and software interface specification that combines and enhances the Plug 
    and Play and Advanced Power Management (APM) standards. ACPI devices 
    include low-level system devices such as batteries and thermal zones.
Plug and Play detection runs with the logon process and relies on system firmware, 
    hardware, device drivers, and operating system features to detect and enumerate 
    new devices. ACPI firmware provides enhanced features, such as hardware 
    resource sharing. When Plug and Play components are coordinated, 
    Windows Server 2003 can detect new devices, allocate system resources, and 
    install or request drivers with minimal user intervention. 
Plug and Play Architecture
Plug and Plan Driver Installation
                  When a hardware device is connected — as when 
                    you plug a USB camera into a USB port — Plug 
                    and Play Manager goes through the following steps 
                    to install the device.
                  • After receiving an insertion interrupt, Plug and Play 
                    Manager checks what hardware resources the 
                    device needs 
                      • memory ranges, I/O ranges, and DMA 
                         channels. Plug and Play Manager then assigns 
                         those resources. 
                  • Plug and Play Manager checks the hardware 
                    identification number of the device. 
                  • Plug and Play Manager then checks the hard drive, 
                    floppy drives, CD-ROM drives, and Windows 
                    Update for drivers that match the number of the 
                    device.
                  • If multiple drivers are found, Plug and Play 
                    Manager chooses the driver that is the best match 
                    by looking for the closest hardware ID or 
                    compatible ID match, driver signatures, and other 
                    driver features. 
                  • Plug and Play Manager then installs the best-match 
                    driver and the operating system starts the device.
Homework
 Prepare a single page paper addressing each 
   of the following questions:
 • What is the registry?
 • What does it do?
                               Due Next Week
 • How does it work?
 • Why does a PC require a registry?

								
To top