Docstoc

transverse lie final

Document Sample
transverse lie final Powered By Docstoc
					Transverse lie , Cord and
complex presentations
                By 
     Dr. Hazem Abdelghaffar
         Lecturer of OB/GYN
             Sohag 2013
  SHOULDER PRESENTATION
(TRANSVERSE LIE):
 Definition: The long axis of the fetus crosses 
 that of the mother with the head on one side and 
 the breech on the opposite side of the middle 
 line.

 Incidence:
 About 1/200 (0.5%).
Etiology:
Any condition which changes the shape of the uterus, 
pelvis or the fetus or prevents engagement or allows 
 free mobility of the fetus favours transverse lie as:
1-      Laxity of the abdominal and uterine muscles in 
multipara ( the commonest cause in general and the 
 commonest cause in multipara)
2-      Contracted pelvis ( accounts for most cases in 
 primigravidae)
3-      Placenta previa You should not conduct pelvic 
exam. For a case of transverse lie unless you have 
excluded placenta previa by ultrasonic exam.
4-      Polyhydramnios.
5-      Multiple pregnancy.
6-      Prematurity.
7-      Intra­uterine fetal death.
8-      Congenital malformation of the uterus as 
bicornuate, subseptate or arcuate.
9-      Tumors of the uterus as fibroid.
Positions:

The scapula is the denominator. There are 4 positions 
depending on the position of the back and direction of 
 the head:
1st: left scapulo­anterior: back anterior and head to the left. 
2nd: right scapulo­anterior. 
3rd: right scapulo­posterior. 
4th: left scapulo­posterior. 

Scapulo­anterior is more common than scapulo­posterior 
as in the former the concavity of the front of the fetus fits 
into the convexity of the maternal spine.
Mechanism of labor:

There is no mechanism and the labor is obstructed.
Rarely, one of the following may occur early in labor before 
 rupture of membranes:
­         Spontaneous rectification: into vertex.
­         Spontaneous version:  into breech.
In extremely rare conditions, if the fetus is very small, the 
pelvis is very wide and the uterine contraction is strong one of 
 the following may occur:
­         Spontaneous expulsion: the fetus is folded like the letter V 
and expelled.
­         Spontaneous evolution:  the head is retained above the 
pelvic brim, the neck greatly elongated; the breech descends 
followed by the trunk and the aftercoming head.
    Diagnosis:
 (A)     During pregnancy:
 (1)    Inspection:
The abdomen is broader from side to side.
 (2)    Palpation:
­          Fundal level: Lower than level expected from the period of 
amenorrhea.
­          Fundal grip: Neither head nor breech are felt in the fundus 
(empty).
­          Umbilical grip: The head is felt on one side and the breech on the 
other. The head is usually at a lower level that is in one iliac region.
­          Pelvic grip: Neither head nor breech is felt (empty).
 (3)    Auscultation:
FHS at the side of umbilicus towards the head.
  
 (4)    Ultrasonography :
­         Confirm the diagnosis.
­         Exclude any abnormality in the fetus or in the pelvis.
 (B)     During labor:
 Vaginal examination: revealed:
(1)      Slow dilatation of the cervix, protruding 
membranes, presenting part is high and 
premature rupture of membranes with 
 prolapsed arm or cord is common
(2)      When the cervix is sufficiently dilated 
especially after rupture of membranes feel the 
scapula, the acromin, the clavicle, the ribs and 
 the axilla (the region of the shoulder)
(3)      If prolapse of the arm occurs, the dorsum 
of the prolapsed supinated arm points to the 
back and the thumb to the head.
Management:

 (A)     During pregnancy:
 ­          Do external cephalic version and re­
examine the patient after one week to be sure 
that the malpresentation dose not recur.
­           In shoulder presentation, external version 
can be done up to the end of pregnancy and even 
early in labor provided that the membranes are 
intact.
(B)     During labor:


(1)    In contracted pelvis placenta previa, previous CS: 
do caesarean section.

(2)    Early in labor and membranes intact, try external 
cephalic version. If succeeded rupture the membranes 
and apply abdominal binder. If external version fails, 
wait for further dilatation of the cervix so long as the 
membranes are intact.
(3)    If the membranes are ruptured and the 
cervix is not sufficiently dilated, we do caesarean 
section which is the safest procedure for both the 
mother and the fetus. 
Internal podalic version Its place nowadays is 
restricted to a second twin and should be 
conducted under general anesthesia.
 (4)    Internal podalic version is done when the cervix is 
 fully dilated, sufficient amount of liquor is present, the 
 uterus is not tonically retracted and there is no 
 contracted pelvis. Internal podalic version is followed 
 by breech extraction.
  (5)    Caesarean section is indicated in:
         Contracted pelvis.
artially dilated cervix with rupture of membrane            
 prolapsed pulsating cord or fetal distress.
         Elderly primigravida.
n the rare cases of neglected shoulder with living            
 baby.
(6)    Management of neglected shoulder: 
It means shoulder presentation that is neglected 
during labor till the picture of imminent rupture 
uterus appears, 
(the shoulder is impacted, the labor is obstructed, 
the membranes are long ruptured, the liquor is 
drained, the uterus is tonically retracted i.e. 
patient is presented with picture of impending 
rupture of the uterus). Internal podalic 
version is contraindicated here as it may 
cause rupture uterus.
Management: Caesarean section whether the fetus 
is living or dead. Decapitation of a dead fetus is 
not used in modern obstetric.
 Maternal risks:
(1)     Prolonged labor and exhaustion, obstructed 
labor with its complications occur in neglected 
cases.
(2)     Lacerations of genital tract (spontaneous 
and operative).
(3)     Post­partum hemorrhage.
(4)     Infection.
 Fetal risks:
 Mortality is high due to:
(1)    Asphyxia.
(2)    Prolapse of the cord.
(3)    Operative trauma.
 CORD PRESENTATION AND PROLAPSE:
 Definition:
       Cord presentation is the 
condition in which coils of the 
umbilical cord can be felt 
below the presenting part 
through the intact bag of 
waters .
 Prolapse of the cord is descent
 of the cord before the presenting 
part through the cervix into 
the vagina, after rupture of the 
 membranes
Incidence:
Prolapse of the cord occurs in 1:150 of 
malpresentations. The condition is rare in 
normal vertex presentations 

 Etiology:
The condition is favored by an abnormally long 
cord, and by a low implantation of the placenta. 
The primary cause is any condition which 
interferes with adaptation of the presenting part 
to the lower uterine segment or the pelvic brim.
These conditions include 
contracted pelvis especially flat pelves, 
malpresentations especially transverse, breech, 
and occipitoposterior. 
Premature rupture of the membranes, especially 
in cases of hydramnios, twins, and multipara 
with non­engagement of head. 
The cord may prolapse during intrauterine 
manipulations as artificial rupture of the 
membranes and version.
  Diagnosis:
Prolapse   of the cord   should be anticipated   in   
 every malpresentation, and, therefore, a 
 prophylactic measure not to be forgotten is to 
 perform a vaginal examination im­mediately 
 after rupture of the mem­branes. 
 The condition should also be suspected when the 
 foetal heart rate shows unusual changes after 
 uterine contractions with no explainable cause. 
 This necessitates frequent recording of the foetal 
 heart sounds to ensure early diagnosis.
The presenting loop of the cord can 
be detected during vaginal 
examination as a soft ropy 
structure which pulsates unless 
the child is dead. After rupture of 
the membranes there is no 
difficulty in recognizing a 
prolapsed loop of the cord present 
in the vagina or outside the vulva.
The condition of the fetus should be determined as 
a part of the diagnosis. 
The foetal heart sounds should be estimated for 
their strength, rate and regularity. Therefore, the 
cord should be felt between two fingers and the 
pulsations recorded between two uterine 
contractions. It should be remembered that the 
pulsations may cease entirely during a uterine 
contraction and that they may not be appreciable 
although the foetal heart may continue to beat 
for some time.
 Prognosis:
There is practically no danger for the mother except 
from operative interference carried out for the sake 
of the child. 
As long as the mem­branes are intact there is no 
special danger to the fetus. The danger arises after 
the membranes rupture when the cord becomes 
compressed between the presenting part and the 
cervical rim. 
This results in asphyxia from interference with the 
foetal circulation. The cord is more likely to be 
compressed in vertex presentation with the cord 
anterior to the head, in primipara, and when the 
cervix is not fully dilated. The foetal mortality is very 
high reaching over 50%.
 The   following factors   influence the prognosis:
1.      The presentation. In breech and transverse 
presentations the risk of compression is less than in 
cephalic presentation.
2.      Type of pelvic contraction. Prognosis is worse in cases 
of generally contracted pelvis than in a flat pelvis as in the 
latter the prolapsed loop may escape pressure by slipping 
into one of the bays to either side of the sacral promontory.
3.      Extent of the prolapsed loop. A small loop can be more 
easily replaced and kept up, while on the other hand it is 
 more rea­dily overlooked
4.      Age and parity of the patient. The condition is more 
dangerous in the primipara, especially elderly.
5.      The positions of the cord, anterior prolapse in more 
 dangerous   than posterior   or lateral prolapse
6. The earlier the diagnosis the better the prognosis. Booked 
cases have a better chance than emergency cases.
 Management:
The choice of treatment is govern­ed by the following 
 factors:
1.       Condition of the child. 
2.       Degree of cervical dilatation. 
3.       Presentation of the fetus.
4.       Age and parity of the mother. 
5.       Associated complications such as placenta previa 
or contract­ed pelvis. 
  A. Cord Presentation:
a) With the cervix only partially dilated, the membranes 
should be preserved intact as long as possible. 
Postural treatment is recommended to relieve the cord 
of compression by as­suming either the knee chest 
position, Sim's position, or the Trendelenburg position. 
In Sim's position, a pillow beneath the lower buttock 
helps the cord to gravitate towards the fundus. 
If the postural treatment succeeds in returning the 
cord above the presenting part, the attendant 
should push the presenting part well down into 
the brim and apply an abdo­minal binder. 
Postural treat­ment also serves to lessen the risk 
of premature rupture of the membranes until the 
cer­vix is well dilated.
b)      When the cervix is fully dilat­ed, immediate 
delivery is in­dicated by forceps or internal 
podalic version after rupture of the membranes.
c)      Co­existing pelvic deformity or contraction 
indicates deli­very by Caesarean section. 
 B. Prolapse of Cord:
If the child is dead as determin­ed by cessation of 
pulsation in the cord in the interval between 
con­tractions, no active treatment should be 
adopted and the case is left to terminate 
 spontaneous­ly, except if correction of a mal­
presentation is required, or if the condition of 
the mother calls for early intervention. 
If the child is alive, the main factors determining the 
choice of treatment are the degree of dilata­tion of 
the cervix and the type of presentation.
Cervix partially dilated: Caesa­rean section in such 
cases offers the best chances for the child. 
Reposition of the cord, both manually or 
instrumentally, is a waste of valuable time and only 
succeeds in a small proportion of cases. Reposition 
is indicated if section cannot be performed quickly 
as when the patient is at a distance from the hospital. 
The cord should be sterilized before reposition by 
painting with an antiseptic as mercurochrome. In 
cases of breech it is useful to bring down a leg after 
reposition.
b) Cervix fully or nearly fully dilated: In cephalic 
presentations if the head is engaged it is 
extract­ed by forceps without need for reposition. 
If the head is high or the position transverse or 
com­plex internal podalic version with breech 
extraction should be per­formed. In breech 
presentation breech extraction is carried out 
without delay.
Indications for Caesarean Section in Prolapse 
 of the Cord:
1.       Partially dilated cervix.
2.               Elderly primipara. 
3.              Co­existing abnormality of the pelvis. 
4.              Associated complications such as placenta 
previa, large fetus, and brow and mentoposterior 
positions. 
Trendelenburg position of the mother, the 
administration of oxygen, and the presence of an 
assistant holding the infant's presenting part out of 
the pelvis until the operating room can be prepared, 
are factors which are often helpful in preserving the 
fetal life until delivery.
  
COMPLEX PRESENTATION:
               Definition:
                     Prolapse of one or more of 
              the foetal limbs beside the 
              presenting head. Most 
              commonly the arm presents 
              with the head and occasionally 
              both hands or a hand and a 
              foot may present with the head.
 Incidence:
The condition occurs in about one in 800 labors.
 Etiology:
The etiological factors here are in general 
 similar to those that predispose to prolapse
 of the cord, mainly those conditions in 
 which the head does not fit the maternal
  pelvic inlet as in contracted pelvis and
 Cephalopelvic disproportion or cases where the head is 
small in relation to a large pelvis. Other predisposing 
factors are hydramnios, multiparity, twins floating 
head, sudden escape of the liquor amnii as in artificial 
rupture of the membranes before engagement of the 
head.
 Diagnosis:
The condition is only diagnosed on vaginal 
examination. It is essential to differentiate the 
condition by careful palpation from cases of 
transverse presentation with prolapse of an arm, 
and from footling presentation in cases of breech. 
Because both have the same etiological factors, a 
prolapsed cord should always be excluded in 
cases of complex presentation.
 Management:
With a small baby the head may engage and labor 
may progress normally. Usually, however, the 
prolapsed limb interferes with progress of the 
head in the second stage. In such cases the limb 
should be replaced and forceps applied to the 
head. 
Thank You

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:7/24/2013
language:
pages:34