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					Identifying the
Elements of A
 Plot Diagram
       Part I
   Student Notes
    Plot Diagram
            3



                4
      2
1
                    5
       Plot     (definition)
• Plot is the organized
  pattern or sequence
  of events that make
  up a story. Every
  plot is made up of a
  series of incidents
  that are related to
  one another.
         1. Exposition
This usually occurs at the beginning of a short story.
•Here the characters and setting are introduced.
•Most importantly, we are introduced to the main
conflict (main problem).
             2. Rising Action
This part of the story begins to develop the conflict(s).
•A building of interest or suspense occurs.
•Problems arise making the conflict difficult to resolve.
              3. Climax
This is the turning point of the story (where
EVERYTHING changes).
•Usually the main character comes face to face with a
conflict.
•The main character WILL CHANGE IN SOME WAY.
   4. Falling Action
All loose ends of the
plot are tied up.
•The conflict(s) and
climax are taken
care of.
     5. Resolution
• The end of the
  story!
  Putting It All Together
1. Exposition        Beginning of
                        Story
2. Rising Action


3. Climax           Middle of Story




4. Falling Action
                        End of Story
5. Resolution
                    Conflict
• There are 4 (four) different kinds of
  conflict a person can face:

•   1. Character vs. Character
•   2. Character vs. Nature
•   3. Character vs. Society
•   4. Character vs. Themselves
     Character vs. Character
• A character in the story has a problem with
  another character in the story.
      Character vs. Character
• Physical fight
• Verbal fight
• Good vs. Evil

Example:
• Superheroes fighting off the villain.
Now you think of an example…
       Character vs. Nature
• When the character faces a problem that
  is with nature; it is beyond anyone’s
  control.
               Can you
               think of an
               example?
          Character vs. Nature
•   Blizzard      Examples: The Wizard of Oz
•   Flood                 The Perfect Storm
•   Storm                   Titanic
•   Landslide
•   Avalanche
•   Animal attack
•   Tornado
•   Hurricane
•   Ocean troubles
       Character vs. Society
• When a character has a problem with
  society as a whole.
• If society is stopping someone from
  reaching their goal.
          Character vs. Society
•   Gay marriage
•   Inter-racial marriage
•   Racism
•   Prejudice
•   Religion
•   Political reasons
•   War
•   Examples: Brokeback Mountain, Hotel Rwanda,
    the 1960s counterculture, Civil Rights, Avatar
    Character vs. Themselves
• If the character is not reaching their goal
  because of an inner conflict/struggle within
  themselves.
    Character vs. Themselves
• Some moral struggle.

• When you want to do something but you
  hold yourself back.
   External vs. Internal Conflict
• The four types of conflict can be labeled
  as either external conflict or internal
  conflict.

• External = outside of yourself (outside
  force)
• Internal = inside of yourself (inside force)
   External vs. Internal Conflict
• Guess if the conflict is external or internal:

• Character vs. Character
 à external
• Character vs. Nature
 à external
• Character vs. Society
 à external
• Character vs. Themselves
 à internal
Let’s Practice Plot and Conflict with
             Cinderella!
•   1. Exposition
•   2. Rising action (Conflict)
•   3. Climax
•   4. Falling Action
•   5. Resolution
•   Conflict
Elements of Plot:
    Part II

     Student Notes
CHARACTERIZATION
       ü Creating & developing a
         character.

       ü The author tells what the
         character looks like, does,
         says, or how others react to
         him/her.
                 THEME
• Central message of the story
               SETTING
• Time and place of the story.
          POINT-OF-VIEW
üFirst Person – a character in the story is
 telling the story. (“I” am #1!)

üThird Person – told through the eyes of
 ONE character/narrator. (Uses “he/she”)

üOmniscient – the “all-knowing” narrator.
 - Knows EVERYTHING about EVERY
    character.

				
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posted:7/18/2013
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