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									AIP Canada (ICAO)
Aeronautical Information
Circulars




         Effective 0901Z
        27 June 2013
      to 0901Z 25 July 2013
     Published by NAV CANADA in accordance with ICAO
Annexes 4 and 15 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation

            © 2013 NAV CANADA All rights reserved

                Source of Charts and Maps:
       © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada
              Department of Natural Resources
                                                                                                    27 JUN 13



              AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR
                        SUMMARY 4/13
                                          (Supersedes all previous summaries)

The following Aeronautical Information Circulars are in effect:

          4/95        Amendment to the Waste Disposal Clause in the Airport Zoning Regulations
          9/98        Operation of Precision Approach Path Indicator (PAPI) Units
          3/01        Exemption from Paragraph 804.01(c) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations and from
                      Chapter 4 of the Manual of Surface Weather Observations
          6/01        Potential Interference from broadcasting stations on VHF Radionavigation Receivers On
                      Board IFR Aircraft Operating in France
          5/02        Exemption from Paragraph 804.01(c) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations and from
                      Chapter 7 of the Manual of Surface Weather Observations
          10/04       Change in NOTAM Procedure Regarding Logging Activities—Pacific Region
          6/05        Aeronautical Facilities Notification (AFN) Logons for Future Air Navigation System (FANS)
                      Operations
          21/05       Exemption from Paragraph 602.07(a) and (b) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations
                      (Replaces AIC 9/03)
          27/06       Exemption from Subsection 602.34(2) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations
          22/07       North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Advisory
          4/08        Implementation of a Minimum Safe Altitude Warning (MSAW) System
          15/08       IFR Approval of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) in North Atlantic Minimum
                      Navigation Performance Specifications (NAT MNPS) Airspace
          16/08       Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) Operations Using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)
          43/08       Transponder Operation in the Northern Portion of the Edmonton Flight Information
                      Region/Control Area (FIR/CTA)
          44/08       NAV CANADA Automated Weather Observation System and Digital Aviation Weather
                      Camera Projects
          45/08       Obstacle Collision Avoidance System (OCAS™) (Replaces AIC 7/08)
          4/09        Pre-Departure Clearances
          14/09       Pilot Procedures for Exposure to Laser and Other Directed Bright Light Sources
                      (Replaces AIC 24/08)
          24/09       Introduction of Multilateration Services at Fort St. John, British Columbia
          15/10       Visual Separation Update (Replaces AIC 12/08 and AIC 40/08)
          14/11       VFR Chart Hill Shade
          20/11       Emergency Security Control of Air Traffic (ESCAT) Plan (Replaces AIC 5/01)
          21/11       Labrador Coast Aerodrome Traffic Frequency Corridor
          26/11       VFR Navigation Charts—Clarification of the Maximum Elevation Figure
          31/11       Air Traffic Services Associated with Automatic Dependent Surveillance–Broadcast Out
                      Surveillance (Replaces AIC 21/09)
          36/11       Implementation of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications in the Edmonton Flight
                      Information Region/Control Area



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27 JUN 13



         37/11     Implementation of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications in the Montreal Flight
                   Information Region/Control Area
         44/11     Automatic Dependent Surveillance—Broadcast Service in the Gander Oceanic
                   Control Area
         3/12      New Area Navigation Standard Instrument Departure Procedures at Toronto, Lester B.
                   Pearson International Airport (CYYZ)
         17/12     Trial of a Five-Minute Along-Track Longitudinal Separation Minimum in the Gander
                   Oceanic Control Area (Supersedes AIC 42/11)
         18/12     Vancouver, British Columbia—CYAs and Flight Training Areas
         21/12     Altitude Assignment Polar Flights (Replaces AIC 23/11)
         28/12     Kruger Montérégie Wind Farm Project Near Saint-Rémi, Quebec—Change in Airspace and
                   Visual Flight Rules Route
         38/12     Implementation Planning of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications Services in
                   Canadian Domestic Airspace (Replaces AIC 25/12)
         39/12     Implementation of a 50 Nautical Mile Lateral Separation Minimum in the Edmonton Flight
                   Information Region/Control Area (Supersedes AIC 11/11)
         40/12     Notice of Mandate for Data Link Services in the North Atlantic Region (Supersedes
                   AIC 24/12)
         41/12     Pilot Information Kiosks
         42/12     Instrument Landing System (ILS) Replacement Program (Replaces AIC 35/11)
         7/13      Transponder Operation Procedures Mode S Multilateration—Toronto/Lester B. Pearson
                   International Airport
         8/13      Transponder Operation Procedures Mode S Multilateration—Calgary International Airport
                   (Replaces AIC 19/12)
         11/13     Inability of Air Traffic Controllers to Issue Clearances
         12/13     Termination of Recent (RE) Weather Codes in METAR / SPECI
         16/13     Naming Convention for Duplicate Approach Procedures
         17/13     Calgary, Alberta—Reduction in the Terminal Control Area
         20/13     Remote Communications Outlet Redesign Project
         21/13     Change to ICAO Compliant FIR-Based SIGMET and AIRMET Bulletins (Replaces
                   AIC 14/13)
         22/13     Smithers, British Columbia—Terrain on LPV RWY 33 Approach—EGPWS Database

The following Aeronautical Information Circulars have been cancelled:

         23/05     Redesign of the Remote Communications Outlet (RCO) System
         16/11     Introduction of Multilateration Surveillance at Montreal, Pierre Elliott Trudeau International
                   Airport
         22/12     Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario—Change in Level of Service
         36/12     Format Differences in NOTAMJ
         13/13     Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan—New Class F Airspace Advisory Areas—CYA(M) (Replaces
                   AIC 10/13)
         15/13     Parc des Laurentides, Quebec—Flight Information Services En Route
         18/13     Kitchener/Waterloo, Ontario—Change to Airport Control Zone




Page 2 of 2                                           AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR SUMMARY 4/13
                                                                                                       27 JUN 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 22/13

                               SMITHERS, BRITISH COLUMBIA
                             TERRAIN ON LPV RWY 33 APPROACH
                                    EGPWS DATABASE
During the flight validation of the new LPV 33 approach to Smithers, British Columbia, the flight test aircraft
received “CAUTION TERRAIN” and then “TERRAIN TERRAIN PULL UP” messages from the EGPWS
system.

Investigation of the issue revealed that the approach was correctly designed but the terrain database in the
Honeywell Mark V EGPWS was using terrain tiles at the Smithers airport that were 30 ARC SECONDS in
size. This resulted in terrain west of the final approach path appearing to impinge on the approach within the
EGPWS database.

Honeywell has revised their terrain database around the Smithers airport to reduce the size of the tiles to
15 ARC SECONDS, thus clearing the approach of terrain in the EGPWS database. Honeywell will be
releasing the new terrain database, version 469, for the Mark V EGPWS on 07 June 2013. This new terrain
database should be available across the Honeywell EGPWS product line. Operators of other EGPWS
equipment should check with their EGPWS manufacturer for the resolution of their terrain database at the
Smithers airport.

For further information, please contact:

              NAV CANADA
              Customer Service Centre
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:         800-876-4693
              Fax:          877-663-6656
              E-mail:       service@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




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                                                                                                    30 MAY 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/13

                         CHANGE TO ICAO COMPLIANT FIR-BASED
                            SIGMET AND AIRMET BULLETINS
                                                   (Replaces AIC 14/13)

In response to a formal request from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) on behalf of the
International Air Transport Association (IATA), Canada will be converting to an ICAO-compliant significant
meteorological information (SIGMET) and aviation weather advisory (AIRMET) bulletin format effective
14 November 2013.

The following is a brief summary of changes that will be made to Canadian SIGMET and AIRMET bulletins.

1.           Parallel Bulletins
An international version and a national version of SIGMET and AIRMET bulletins will be issued. The national
bulletin version will contain additional information considered important for domestic use.

2.           Frame of Reference Change (from GFA to FIR)
SIGMET and AIRMET bulletins will be issued in accordance with flight information region (FIR) boundaries
rather than graphic area forecast (GFA) boundaries.

3.             Bulletin Header
All SIGMET and AIRMET bulletins will have a common header (CWAO) regardless of which aviation forecast
centre (Canadian Meteorological Aviation Centre [CMAC]) actually issues the bulletin. The forecast centre
identifier will continue to be included in the body.

4.            ATS Unit Identification
The area control centre (ACC) unit serving the FIR to which the SIGMET refers will be indicated in the body of
the bulletin.

5.           Alphanumeric Bulletin Sequence
The bulletin number scheme has been significantly changed to conform to ICAO standards. Bulletin sequence
numbers will be automatically reset daily for SIGMET or AIRMET bulletins issued after 00Z.

6.          Validity Period
While the SIGMET and AIRMET validity period remains essentially the same, bulletins can be issued in
advance of a “forecast” significant weather event.

7.          FIR Identification and Name
The FIR will be clearly indicated in the body of the bulletin.

8.           Weather Event Description and Location
The order of the weather event description will be changed so that it will precede the location of the weather
event. This is opposite to what is currently done.




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9.           Latitude and Longitude Format
A minor change will be made to the geographic coordinate format within the body of the bulletin. The national
bulletin version will continue to include a description for each geographic coordinate used to describe the
position of a weather event by use of aviation reference points.

10.         Aviation Reference Points (National Bulletin Version Only)
The current meteorological reference map will be replaced with a new set of “aviation-relevant” reference
points consisting of Canadian airport identifiers extracted from the Canada Flight Supplement.

Example 1 – Current SIGMET Bulletin
WSCN33 CWUL 162225

SIGMET A4 VALID 162225/170225 CWUL-

WTN 20 NM OF LN /4929N09449W/25 SW KENORA - /5104N09348W/RED LAKE - /5209N09120W/60 NW
PICKLE LAKE.

BKN LN TS OBSD ON RDR/SAT PIX/LTNG DTCTR. MAX TOPS 340.

LN MOVG EWD 15KT.

LTL CHG EXPD

END/GFA33/CMAC-E/GR/GR

Example 2 – New National SIGMET Bulletin
WSCN23 CWAO 162225

CZWG SIGMET A4 VALID 162225/170225 CWEG-

CZWG WINNIPEG FIR SQLN TS OBS WTN 20NM OF LINE /N4929 W09449/25 SW CYQK – /N5104

W09348/CYRL – N5209 W09120/60 NW CYPL TOP FL340 MOV E 15KT NC

RMK GFACN32=

Example 3 – New International SIGMET Bulletin
WSCN03 CWAO 162225

CZWG SIGMET A4 VALID 162225/170225 CWEG-

CZWG WINNIPEG FIR SQLN TS OBS WTN 20NM OF LINE N4929 W09449 –

N5104 W09348 – N5209 W09120 TOP FL340 MOV E 15KT NC=

Publication Changes
The Transport Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (TC AIM – TP 14371E) will be amended in the
October 2013 release.




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                                                                                               30 MAY 13



Validity
The changes described in this AIC become effective 14 November 2013. For further information, please
contact:

            NAV CANADA
            Customer Service

            Tel.:       800-876-4693
            E-mail:     service@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/13                                                        Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                   30 MAY 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 20/13

           REMOTE COMMUNICATIONS OUTLET REDESIGN PROJECT
NAV CANADA, the country’s provider of civil air navigation services, is redesigning the Remote
Communications Outlet (RCO) system to improve En Route communications and information services to
pilots. Below are links to a brochure that explains why and how we are redesigning the system, a link to a
series of maps that depict the current RCO locations and frequencies by their responsible Flight Information
Centre (FIC), as well as a link to notices for RCO changes that are issued 60 days in advance.

For information on the RCO project
English

http://www.navcanada.ca/ContentDefinitionFiles/Services/ANSPrograms/RCORedesign/RCO_Brochure_en.pdf

French

http://www.navcanada.ca/ContentDefinitionFiles/Services/ANSPrograms/RCORedesign/RCO_Brochure_fr.pdf

For RCO maps
English

http://www.navcanada.ca/NavCanada.asp?Language=en&Content=ContentDefinitionFiles\Services\ANSPrograms\
RCORedesign\default.xml

French

http://www.navcanada.ca/NavCanada.asp?Language=fr&Content=ContentDefinitionFiles\Services\ANSPrograms\R
CORedesign\default.xml

RCO Change Notices
English

http://www.navcanada.ca/NavCanada.asp?Language=en&Content=ContentDefinitionFiles\Newsroom\ServiceProje
ctAnnouncements\default.xml

French

http://www.navcanada.ca/NavCanada.asp?Language=fr&Content=ContentDefinitionFiles\Newsroom\ServiceProject
Announcements\default.xml




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30 MAY 13


For further information, please contact:

              NAV CANADA
              Customer Service Centre
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:      800-876-4693
              Fax:       877-663-6656
              E-mail:    service@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




Page 2 of 2                                     AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 20/13
                                                                                                       30 MAY 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 19/13

                     CANADA AIR PILOT AND
           RESTRICTED CANADA AIR PILOT PUBLICATIONS
      MAJOR CHANGES FOR 22 AUGUST 2013 AND 17 OCTOBER 2013
On 22 August 2013 and 17 October 2013, NAV CANADA will be introducing an improved product
specification for the Canada Air Pilot (CAP) and Restricted Canada Air Pilot (RCAP) publications. In 2011,
NAV CANADA’s aeronautical information services (AIS) undertook an initiative to modernize the format of the
CAP and RCAP publications. The results of this initiative are structured products with increased consistency
and overall usability.

Change Areas
The publication improvements focus on several key areas:

         •        Restructuring the depiction of communication information;
         •        Introducing an Approach Summary section of information to Instrument Approach
                  Procedures (IAP);
         •        Depicting all charts to scale;
         •        Establishing a new chart ordering and identification standard;
         •        Introducing Flight Safety Foundation Stabilized Approach Principles into the depiction;
         •        Introducing human factors into the depiction; and
         •        Increasing overall consistency.

             Chart Type                                                        Change
      Instrument Approach              ▪    Minimum Sector Altitude (MSA) Quadrants
        Procedures (IAP)               ▪    Expanded Plan View and Scaled Information
                                       ▪    Constant Descent Angle Info
                                       ▪    Replacement of Landing Chart with Lighting Diagram
             COPTER                    ▪    Similar structure and information as IAP
                                       ▪    Accompanying Visual Approach chart
        Standard Terminal              ▪    Splitting depictions into En Route Transition and Arrival pages
          Arrival (STAR)               ▪    Depicting information to scale
                                       ▪    En Route Transition identification box
                                       ▪    Removal of route description page
       Standard Instrument             ▪    Splitting depictions into Departure and En Route Transition pages
         Departure (SID)               ▪    Depicting information to scale
                                       ▪    En Route Transition identification box
        Aerodrome Charts               ▪    Incorporation of lighting diagrams on runways




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30 MAY 13



Implementation
Due to the volume of charts and the effort required to convert the current charts to the new specification,
implementation of these changes will occur over two (2) cycles. The intent is to minimize the impact on the
user community and introduce the changes in a safe and efficient manner, while also maintaining our ability to
support the aviation community through publishing required changes in aeronautical information. However,
during this period of conversion, the volume of changes made to our publications will be reduced. Emphasis
will be placed on critical safety changes and planned infrastructure activities. Production efficiencies gained
through implementation will ensure quick publication of procedures impacted by the project.

The following table represents when each volume of the CAP and RCAP will be released under the new
specification:

                                           Implementation Cycles
                              22 August 2013                     17 October 2013
                                   CAP 1                               CAP 3
                                   CAP 2                               CAP 4
                                   CAP 7                              CAP 5/6
                                                                       RCAP

As a result of the two-cycle transition to the new specification, the following products will also be impacted:

         CAP GEN                 Two CAP GEN publications will be distributed to each subscriber, as
                                 well as made available digitally through our On Board communication
                                 site. Each version will clearly indicate which volumes of the publication it
                                 relates to.
         Canadian                The CAC is an electronic-only publication, available through the NAV
         Aerodrome Charts        CANADA portal. It will be partitioned into two publications during the
         (CAC)                   transition period, aligning with the CAP volume implementation schedule.

These impacts will expire once the conversion period is complete.




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                                                                                                  30 MAY 13



Additional Information
To assist in communicating the change, NAV CANADA has partnered with the Canadian Council for Aviation
and Aerospace (CCAA) to produce a training package that highlights the upcoming improvements in the CAP,
while also introducing the concept of Constant Descent Angle principles. This training package has been
delivered in a workshop environment throughout Canada over the past year.

In addition to the workshops, presentation material, and other project information is available on NAV
CANADA’s On Board communication site. This site will be continually updated with project information,
visual examples, an updated CAP GEN, and other material as it is produced. Please visit us at
<www.onboard-abord.ca>.

The images on the following pages are representative of the pending improvements.

For further information, please contact:

            Chris Bowden, AIS AIM Project Manager
            NAV CANADA

            E-mail:      bowdech@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 19/13                                                           Page 3 of 8
30 MAY 13




              NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




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                              NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




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              NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




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                              NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 19/13                     Page 7 of 8
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              NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




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       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 17/13

                                CALGARY, ALBERTA
                     REDUCTION IN THE TERMINAL CONTROL AREA
NAV CANADA has conducted a review of the potential impacts on airspace design, air traffic control (ATC),
and aircraft operations due to the installation of a new runway at the Calgary International Airport. From this
review, it is recommended that the diameter of the Calgary terminal control area (TCA) be reduced by
eliminating the 35 nautical miles (NM) outer Class C, 10,000 feet to 12,500 feet ring.

The following graphic depicts the reduction of the TCA.




                                          NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




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30 MAY 13


This change will take effect 27 June 2013 at 0901 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

The following publications will be amended:

        •         Canada Flight Supplement (CFS)–Calgary International and Calgary/Springbank VTPCs;
        •         En Route Low Altitude Chart–LO 2;
        •         Terminal Area Charts–T1 Calgary;
        •         Edmonton/Calgary VTA (AIR 1904) 19th Edition, June 2013; and
        •         Calgary VNC (AIR 5005) 23rd Edition, June 2013.
For further information, please contact:

              NAV CANADA
              Customer Service Centre
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:      800-876-4693
              Fax:       877-663-6656
              E-mail:    service@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




Page 2 of 2                                                   AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 17/13
                                                                                                     30 MAY 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 16/13

                            NAMING CONVENTION FOR DUPLICATE
                                 APPROACH PROCEDURES
With the increase in instances of published duplicate approach procedures (same approach type to the same
runway) changes are necessary to accommodate a duplicate approach procedure suffix on the procedure
approach chart and in the record of an avionics database. This will allow for all duplicate approach
procedures to be coded and made available onboard aircraft with suitable avionics equipment. However,
many existing avionics and global positioning system (GPS) units only allow for a four character approach
procedure identifier and cannot accept this suffix in its procedure identification record. For this reason, when
duplicate approach procedures are published for an aerodrome, only one of the approach procedures can be
coded into the databases of these particular avionics units.

To ensure the appropriate approach procedure is coded into avionics databases, NAV CANADA has
developed and will implement, commencing with the 27 June 2013 Aeronautical Information Regulation and
Control (AIRAC) cycle, a system for designating the predominant approach procedure for each runway end.
Duplicate approach procedures will be differentiated using alpha characters starting with the last letter and
continuing backward through the alphabet (Z, Y, X, etc.). The predominant approach procedure will be
identified using the “Z” suffix (i.e., RNAV (GNSS) Z RWY 25). It is intended that the approach procedure
identified with the “Z” suffix be the one procedure coded in an avionics database when only one duplicate
approach procedure can be coded in the system. NAV CANADA will assign the “Z” suffix in accordance with
the following priority:

         •        Approach procedure intended for all/most customers vs. some customers;
         •        Public approach procedure vs. restricted approach procedure; and
         •        Lower minima vs. higher minima.
In the provided example RNAV (GNSS) Z RWY 25, the other approach available to the same runway end
would be identified with a Y and could be identified by RNAV (RNP) Y RWY 25.

Many airports have both an instrument landing system (ILS) and an ILS CAT II approach to the same runway
end. In this instance, the CAT II differentiates the two ILS approaches and no Z or Y will be assigned provided
the approach, missed approach, and holds are identical.

These changes take effect 27 June 2013 at 0901 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the Canada Air
Pilot (CAP), Restricted Canada Air Pilot (RCAP), and GPH 200 will be amended accordingly.




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




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                                                                                                    2 MAY 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 12/13

                         TERMINATION OF RECENT (RE) WEATHER
                                CODES IN METAR/SPECI
The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is revising standards related to the reporting of recent
weather in the aerodrome routine meteorological report (METAR) and the aerodrome special meteorological
report (SPECI). As of 14 November 2013, the inclusion of recent weather codes will no longer be required.
Canada has opted to cease using recent weather codes, which are intended primarily for use in states where
SPECI are not provided.

This change will remove the inherent redundancy that exists between the reporting of recent weather and the
SPECI reporting criteria, given that the current SPECI program provides alerts of significant weather events
as they occur.




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




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                                                                                                             2 MAY 13



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 11/13

                         INABILITY OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS
                                 TO ISSUE CLEARANCES
Intention of Circular
This Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) informs pilots of procedures that air traffic controllers (ATC)
follow when they are unable to issue clearances.

Background
Between 2006 and 2011, Transport Canada published several Advisory Circulars on reduced and low visibility
operations (RVOP/LVOP) and runway protected areas. New direction to ATC followed on how to operate
when these conditions existed.

Since implementation, a series of occurrences prompted a review of ATC direction, and it was found that
controllers prohibited from providing clearances during RVOP/LVOP were using dissimilar or unclear
phraseologies.

         Note:         ATC clearances are based on known traffic conditions and aerodrome limitations
                       which affect the safety of aircraft operations. This encompasses aircraft in flight
                       and on the manoeuvring area, vehicles, and other potential obstructions. ATC
                       are not authorized to issue air traffic control clearances when traffic conditions
                       are unknown, when any part of the aerodrome is partially or fully closed, or when
                       the aerodrome or runway operating minima are not met.

New Procedures
ATC procedures have been streamlined to ensure consistency. There are two distinct phrases used when
unable to issue ATC clearances:

             AT YOUR DISCRETION:                   Used to approve an aircraft movement on any surface not visible
                                                   from the control tower due to a physical obstruction other than
                                                   weather phenomena, or on the apron or non-manoeuvring area..
                                                   The pilot is responsible to manoeuvre safely with respect to traffic
                                                   or hazards encountered during the operation. ATC will provide
                                                   information on known traffic or obstructions when possible.
             UNABLE TO ISSUE                       Used when a controller is not authorized to issue an ATC
             CLEARANCE:                            clearance. A pilot who continues without a clearance in these
                                                   circumstances may be subject to regulatory action by Transport
                                                   Canada. ATC will provide pertinent taxi/take-off/landing
                                                   information and then file an aviation occurrence report. The pilot
                                                   is responsible to manoeuvre safely with respect to traffic or other
                                                   hazards encountered during the operation.




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The following table provides scenarios in which ATC may not be able to provide a clearance, ensuing ATC
actions, and examples of phraseology that will be used:

                                                  BELOW MINIMA
                                  Reduced/low visibility operating procedures
      Scenario              Pilot Request            Controller Action                   Examples
                                                  Include information in      ATIS
                                                  the Automatic Terminal      REDUCED/LOW VISIBILITY
                                                  Information Service         PROCEDURES IN EFFECT.
                                                  (ATIS)                      RUNWAY (number) NOT
                                                                              AUTHORIZED FOR TAKEOFF
                                                       Note: If conditions
                                                       are rapidly                Or
                                                       changing, the
                                                       information may be     REDUCED/LOW VISIBILITY
                                                       issued directly by     PROCEDURES IN EFFECT.
                                                       ATC                    RUNWAY (number) NOT
                                                                              AUTHORIZED FOR LANDING

                                                                                  Or
Reduced Visibility
Operations Plan                                                               REDUCED/LOW VISIBILITY
(RVOP)/Low                                                                    PROCEDURES IN EFFECT.
Visibility Operations                                                         RUNWAY (number) NOT
Plan (LVOP)                                                                   AVAILABLE
procedures have
                        Pilot requests taxi       ATC will inform the pilot   PHRASEOLOGY
been implemented
                        and takeoff               that taxi clearance         (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
and result in
                        clearance                 cannot be issued and        TAXI CLEARANCE ON TAXIWAY
manoeuvring area
                                                  provide the reason          (name), REDUCED/LOW
restrictions or              Note: the
closures                                                                      VISIBILITY PROCEDURES IN
                             request must                                     EFFECT
                             be made prior
(RVOP/LVOP                   to:
procedures vary
across Canada,          ▪    Commencing
depending on airport         pushback with
operating limits)            the intent of
                             taking off;
                        ▪    Commencing
                             pushback with
                             the intent to taxi
                             to the de-icing
                             bay; or
                        ▪    Commencing
                             taxiing on the
                             manoeuvring
                             area under the
                             aircraft’s own
                             power with the
                             intent of taking
                             off




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                                           BELOW MINIMA
                             Reduced/low visibility operating procedures
    Scenario          Pilot Request            Controller Action                     Examples
                   Pilot is taxiing for    ATC will:                    PHRASEOLOGY
                   takeoff when                                         (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
                   RVOP/LVOP               ▪    Inform the pilot that   CLEARANCE. REDUCED/LOW
                   procedures are               a clearance cannot      VISIBILITY PROCEDURES IN
                   implemented that             be issued on the        EFFECT. RUNWAY (number)
                   result in                    intended runway;        CLOSED
                   manoeuvring area        ▪    Provide the reason;
                   restrictions or         ▪    Determine if            Then, if appropriate:
                   closures                     another runway is
                                                available for           (Aircraft identification), RUNWAY
                                                takeoff;                (number) AVAILABLE, ADVISE
                                           ▪    Inform the pilot of     INTENTIONS
                                                the alternate
                                                runway; and                  Or
                                           ▪    Request the pilot’s
                                                intentions              (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
                                                                        CLEARANCE. REDUCED/LOW
                                                                        VISIBILITY PROCEDURES IN
                                           If no alternate runway is
                                                                        EFFECT. ALL RUNWAYS
                                           available, ATC will
                                                                        CLOSED. ADVISE INTENTIONS
                                           request the pilot’s
                                           intentions
                   Pilot requests taxi     ATC will provide taxi        PHRASEOLOGY
                   after landing           clearance                    (Aircraft identification), TAXI VIA
                                                                        (taxi route)
                   Pilot requests          ATC will:                    PHRASEOLOGY
                   landing or takeoff                                   (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
                                           ▪    Inform the pilot that   CLEARANCE. RUNWAY
                                                a clearance cannot      (number), ARRIVALS NOT
                                                be issued;              AUTHORIZED, ADVISE
                                           ▪    Provide the reason;     INTENTIONS
                                                and
                                           ▪    Request pilot
                                                intentions
                   Pilot chooses to land   When traffic permits,        PHRASEOLOGY:
                   or take off             ATC will:                    (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
                                                                        CLEARANCE RUNWAY (number),
                                           ▪    Inform the pilot that   WIND (if required), (other
                                                a clearance cannot      information if required)
                                                be issued;
                                           ▪    Provide                      Note: Information may be:
                                                landing/take-off             traffic, hazards, obstructions,
                                                information;                 runway exit, runway surface
                                           ▪    Notify the airport           conditions or other pertinent
                                                operator; and                information
                                           ▪    File a TC Aviation
                                                Occurrence Report




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 11/13                                                           Page 3 of 6
2 MAY 13



                              OBSTRUCTED RUNWAY PROTECTED AREA
  Controller unable to determine if runway or runway protected area is free/will be free of obstacles before:
               a) the arrival crosses the threshold, or b) before the departure starts take-off roll
     Scenario             Pilot Request            Controller Action                     Examples
                       Pilot requests          ATC will:                    PHRASEOLOGY:
                       landing or takeoff                                   (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
                                               ▪    Inform the pilot that   CLEARANCE. RUNWAY
                                                    a clearance cannot      (number), PROTECTED AREA
                                                    be issued;              OBSTRUCTED. ADVISE
                                               ▪    Provide the reason;     INTENTIONS
                                                    and
                                               ▪    Request pilot                Note: obstacles include
                                                    intentions                   taxiing aircraft and ground
                                                                                 traffic.
                       Pilot chooses to land   When traffic permits         PHRASEOLOGY:
ATC is unable to
                       or take off             ATC will:                    (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
issue a clearance
                                                                            CLEARANCE, WIND (if required),
                                               ▪    Inform the pilot that   (other information, if required)
                                                    a clearance cannot
                                                    be issued;                   Note: Information may be:
                                               ▪    Provide                      traffic, hazards, obstructions,
                                                    landing/take-off             runway exit, runway surface
                                                    information;                 conditions or other pertinent
                                               ▪    Notify the airport           information
                                                    operator; and
                                               ▪    File a TC Aviation
                                                    Occurrence Report




Page 4 of 6                                                    AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 11/13
                                                                                                       2 MAY 13



                                     REASONS OTHER THAN TRAFFIC
     Scenario              Pilot Request             Controller Action                    Examples
                        Pilot requests a         ATC will:                    PHRASEOLOGY:
                        landing, takeoff or                                   (Aircraft identification), NOTAM
                        other manoeuvre          ▪    Inform the pilot that   SPRINGBANK STATES RUNWAY
                                                      a clearance cannot      ZERO SEVEN IS CLOSED FOR
                                                      be issued;              MAINTENANCE UNTIL (Date,
ATC cannot issue a
                                                 ▪    Provide the reason;     Time). ADVISE INTENTIONS
clearance for a
reason other than                                ▪    Quote pertinent
traffic                                               NOTAM(s) or
                                                      airport condition
    Note: may                                         directive(s); and
    occur when:                                  ▪    Request the pilot’s
                                                      intentions
▪   The airport/part    Pilot chooses to         When traffic permits,        PHRASEOLOGY:
    of the airport is   land/take off or         ATC will:                    (Aircraft identification), UNABLE
    closed by the       manoeuvre                                             CLEARANCE, WIND (if required),
    operator; or                                 ▪    Inform the pilot that   (other information, if required)
▪   ATC is directed                                   a clearance cannot
    by NAV                                            be issued;                  Note: Information may be:
    CANADA or                                    ▪    Provide required            traffic, hazards, obstructions,
    other authority                                   landing, takeoff or         runway exit, runway surface
    to deny taxi                                      manoeuvring                 conditions or other pertinent
    clearance                                         information;                information
                                                 ▪    Notify the airport
                                                      operator; and
                                                 ▪    File a TC Aviation
                                                      Occurrence Report



                                              AT YOUR DISCRETION

         Pilot Request                          Controller Action                         Examples
Push back                             ATC will provide ground traffic, if     PHRASEOLOGY:
                                      possible                                (Aircraft identification), PUSH
                                                                              BACK AT YOUR DISCRETION,
                                                                              and if possible, TRAFFIC
                                                                              (description)
Taxi on a non-manoeuvring area        Workload permitting, ATC will           PHRASEOLOGY:
                                      provide information on traffic and      (Aircraft identification), TAXI AT
                                      obstructions                            YOUR DISCRETION, and if
                                                                              necessary, TRAFFIC (description)




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 11/13                                                                Page 5 of 6
2 MAY 13



                                            AT YOUR DISCRETION
           Pilot Request                       Controller Action                          Examples
Taxi on a manoeuvring area not         ATC will provide ground traffic, if   PHRASEOLOGY:
visible from the control tower or      possible                              (Aircraft identification), (area) NOT
non-manoeuvring area                                                         VISIBLE, TAXI AT YOUR
                                                                             DISCRETION ON TAXIWAY
                                                                             (name)

                                                                                  Note: This means that the
                                                                                  view of the manoeuvring area
                                                                                  is obstructed by a
                                                                                  structure(s); it does not
                                                                                  include restricted visibility due
                                                                                  to weather
Fixed-wing aircraft landing or
taking off from a non-manoeuvring
area that is approved for that
purpose
                                                                             PHRASEOLOGY:
     Note: may be an area at or        ATC will provide traffic and          (Aircraft identification), TRAFFIC
     adjacent to the airport, not at   obstruction information, and          (description), WIND (if required),
     the airport, but in the control   control instructions as necessary     LAND/TAKE OFF AT YOUR
     zone; a water aerodrome; a                                              DISCRETION, and if necessary
     temporary landing area in the                                           FROM (location)
     control zone; etc.
Helicopter landing or takeoff from
a non-manoeuvring area that is
approved for that purpose


Publication Changes
The Transport Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (TC AIM – TP 14371E) will be amended in the
October 2013 release.

Validity
Effective 2 May 2013. For further information, please contact:

              Alain Lemery, Manager
              ATS Standards & Procedures
              NAV CANADA

              Tel:       613-563-5659
              E-mail:    lemerya@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




Page 6 of 6                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 11/13
                                                                                                       4 APR 13



         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 8/13

                        TRANSPONDER OPERATION PROCEDURES
                              MODE S MULTILATERATION
                          CALGARY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
                                                   (Replaces AIC 19/12)

Introduction
The purpose of this Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) is to provide guidance for the use of transponders
in conjunction with multilateration (MLAT) surface surveillance at Calgary International Airport.

General
MLAT is deployed as an enhancement to the existing airport surface detection equipment (ASDE) radar
system. MLAT uses a network of ground stations to receive signals from Mode A, C, or S transponders.
Aircraft and vehicle ground position is calculated from transponder returns from multiple ground stations
within the coverage area.

Pilot Requirements
MLAT relies on transponder returns, therefore pilots of transponder-equipped aircraft and ground vehicles
should leave their transponders in the transmit mode at all times when manoeuvring on the airfield (including
moving on aprons). Pilots should ensure that the transponder code issued by air traffic control (ATC) is
selected before switching the transponder out of standby. In the event that no code has been issued by ATC,
transponder code 1000 should be selected.

Aircraft with a technical limitation that does not allow for the operation of a transponder on the ground (weight
on wheels switch deactivation) must report this to Clearance Delivery (121.3) or Tower (118.4).

Guidelines
The following is a guideline for transponder operation. The settings illustrated are provided as an example;
however, it is essential that the traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) and transponder
equipment functions as described.




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4 APR 13



                                                   Departure
At the Gate/Stand
▪    Select STBY.
▪    Enter the Mode A code received from ATC (e.g., 7312).
▪    Enter the 3-letter International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
     designator, followed by flight identification number (e.g.,
     DAT1349) through the flight management system (FMS) or
     transponder control panel (according to aircraft equipment).




On requesting Push back/Taxi (whichever is earlier)
▪   Select XPDR (and AUTO if available).
▪   Your ”call-sign” will be displayed on the ATC display.




Lining up
▪    Select TA/RA.
▪    To ensure that the performance of systems based on secondary
     surveillance radar (SSR) frequencies is not compromised, TCAS
     should not be selected before receiving the clearance to line up.




                                                     Arrival
On the runway
▪   Keep TA/RA selected.




Page 2 of 3                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 8/13
                                                                                                    4 APR 13



                                                    Arrival
After vacating the runway
▪    Select XPDR (and AUTO if available).
▪    To ensure that the performance of systems based on SSR
     frequencies is not compromised, TCAS should be deselected
     when vacating the runway.




Fully parked on stand
▪    Select STBY.
▪    When STBY is selected, the transponder is not transmitting or
     replying to interrogations.




Publication Changes
The following publications will be changed for 02 May 2013:

        •       Canada Flight Supplement (CFS) in the Calgary International PRO section; and
        •       Canada Air Pilot (CAP), in CAP 3 – Calgary Intl, Aerodrome Chart, Taxi Chart, Parking
                Areas.

Validity
Effective as of June 2012. For further information, please contact:

David Ferriss, Manager                                   Mike Krahn, Manager
Surveillance Systems Engineering                         Air Traffic Control Operational Requirements
NAV CANADA                                               NAV CANADA
    Tel.:       613-248-7554                                  Tel.:       780-890-8366
    Fax:        613-248-6802                                  Fax:        780-890-4341
    E-mail:     ferrisd@navcanada.ca                          E-mail:     krahnm@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 8/13                                                             Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                       4 APR 13



         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 7/13

               TRANSPONDER OPERATION PROCEDURES
                      MODE S MULTILATERATION
          TORONTO/LESTER B. PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
Introduction
The purpose of this Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) is to provide advance notice of the implementation
of surface surveillance services using multilateration (MLAT) at Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International
Airport.

General
MLAT is deployed as an enhancement to the existing airport surface detection equipment (ASDE) radar
system. MLAT uses a network of ground stations to receive signals from Mode A, C, or S transponders.
Aircraft and vehicle ground positions are calculated from transponder returns from multiple ground stations
within the coverage area.

Pilot Requirements
MLAT relies on transponder returns, therefore pilots of transponder-equipped aircraft and ground vehicles
should leave their transponders in the transmit mode at all times when manoeuvring on the airfield. Pilots
should ensure that the transponder code issued by air traffic control (ATC) is selected before switching the
transponder out of standby. In the event that no code has been issued by ATC, transponder code 1000
should be selected.

Aircraft with a technical limitation that does not allow for the operation of a transponder on the ground (weight
on wheels switch deactivation) should advise ATC Clearance Delivery/Ground (or Tower) before commencing
ground operations.

Guidelines
The following is a guideline for transponder operation. The settings illustrated are provided as an example;
however, it is essential that the traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS) and transponder
equipment function as described.




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4 APR 13



                                                   Departure
At the Gate/Stand
▪    Select STBY.
▪    Enter the Mode A code received from ATC (e.g., 7312).
▪    Enter the 3-letter International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
     designator, followed by the flight identification number (e.g.,
     DAT1349) through the flight management system (FMS) or
     transponder control panel (according to aircraft equipment).




On requesting Push back/Taxi (whichever is earlier)
▪   Select XPDR (and AUTO if available).
▪   Your ”call-sign” will be displayed on the ATC display.




Lining up
▪    Select TA/RA.
▪    To ensure that the performance of systems based on secondary
     surveillance radar (SSR) frequencies is not compromised, TCAS
     should not be selected before receiving the clearance to line up.




                                                     Arrival
On the runway
▪   Keep TA/RA selected.




Page 2 of 3                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 7/13
                                                                                                 4 APR 13



                                                     Arrival
After vacating the runway
▪    Select XPDR (and AUTO if available).
▪    To ensure that the performance of systems based on SSR
     frequencies is not compromised, TCAS should be deselected
     when vacating the runway.




Fully parked on stand
▪    Select STBY.
▪    When STBY is selected, the transponder is not transmitting or
     replying to interrogations.




Publication Changes
The following publications will be changed for 02 May 2013

        •       Canada Flight Supplement (CFS) in the Toronto/Lester B. Pearson Intl PRO section; and
        •       Canada Air Pilot (CAP), in CAP 4 – Toronto/Lester B. Pearson Intl, Aerodrome Chart,
                Taxi Chart, Parking Areas.

Validity
Effective 04 April 2013. For further information, please contact:

David Ferriss, Manager                                    Samy Ghobrial, Manager
Surveillance Systems Engineering                          Tower / Terminal Operations
NAV CANADA                                                Toronto IFR Operations
    Tel.:       613-248-7554                              NAV CANADA
    Fax:        613-248-6802                                  Tel.:      905-676-5672
    E-mail:     ferrisd@navcanada.ca                          Fax:       905-676-4587
                                                              E-mail:    samy.ghobrial@navcanada.ca




Chuck Montgomery
Director, AIS and Flight Inspection




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 7/13                                                          Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                   13 DEC 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 42/12

                              INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM (ILS)
                                  REPLACEMENT PROGRAM
                                                   (Replaces AIC 35/11)

In accordance with NAV CANADA’s Air Navigation System Plan (ANS Plan) and as part of life-cycle
management, NAV CANADA will be continuing in 2013 with the national instrument landing system (ILS)
replacement program.

This project involves the replacement of outdated localizers and glide path units with new state-of-the-art
equipment. For the locations and timelines for replacements, please refer to the National ILS Replacement
Program Schedule 2009-2014 on the NAV CANADA website:

              <www.navcanada.ca>
              Services
              ANS Programs
              Level of Service Reviews
              Instrument Landing System (ILS) Replacement Program
              National ILS Replacement Program Schedule 2009-2014

During the replacement period, ILS availability at the location where the replacement is taking place will be
affected for approximately one to three months, depending on weather and installation factors. As well, new
ILS systems do not generate a useable back-course signal; consequently, localizer back-course procedures
will be replaced with area navigation (RNAV) approaches, where applicable.

Actual dates of scheduled outage will be published via NOTAM. Pilots should carefully monitor NOTAMs
before and during the construction period for specific dates of the outage or other related disruptions.

If you require any additional information regarding this notice, please contact:

              NAV CANADA
              Operations Plans and Programs
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:         613-563-3356
              Fax:          613-563-5602




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                      13 DEC 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 41/12

                                     PILOT INFORMATION KIOSKS
Located at a number of airports across Canada, Pilot Information Kiosks (PIK) offer access to the NAV
CANADA aviation weather website. A handset is also available for pilots to call a flight information centre
(FIC) for a detailed interpretive weather briefing and flight planning services.

PIK were introduced in the early 2000s when the availability of the Internet, cell phone, and other mobile
technologies were limited. Due to the emergence of this technology NAV CANADA has seen dramatic
decreases in the use of PIK, to a point where further investment is no longer practical.

Additionally, PIK do not support the new Collaborative Flight Planning System (CFPS).

PIK at sites with continuously declining/low usage will no longer be supported, and all PIK sites will gradually
be decommissioned by 31 August 2013. NAV CANADA is assessing new service options on a site-by-site
basis.

Please contact the undersigned should you wish to discuss this issue.

              Marcel Pinon, Manager
              Level of Service and Aeronautical Studies
              NAV CANADA
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:         613-563-5630
              Fax:          613-563-5602
              E-mail:       pinonm@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                        13 DEC 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 40/12

                   NOTICE OF MANDATE FOR DATA LINK SERVICES
                         IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC REGION
                                                 (Supersedes AIC 24/12)

Introduction
It is widely acknowledged that data link services enhance surveillance and intervention capabilities, and its
availability constitutes a crucial component in providing safe, efficient, and sustainable operations, as well as
facilitating the future evolution of the air traffic management (ATM) system in the North Atlantic (NAT) region.

As notified in State letter EUR/NAT 12-0003.TEC (dated 04 January 2012), all aircraft intending to conduct
flights in the portions of the NAT regional airspace defined below shall be fitted with, and shall operate
controller-pilot data link communications (CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Contract (ADS-C)
equipment.

Purpose of Circular
This aeronautical information circular (AIC) outlines the defined airspace for the data link mandate, methods
of indicating equipage in flight plan, and details the timelines for implementation.

Background
The CPDLC and ADS-C implementation based on RTCA DO-258A/EUROCAE ED-100A (or ED-100) avionics
standards started in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) NAT region at the end of 1990. Data
link service enhances ATM surveillance and intervention capabilities and is seen as instrumental in reducing
the collision risk, particularly in the vertical plane, and meeting the NAT target level of safety (TLS). The use
of ADS-C vertical and horizontal deviation event contracts to conformance monitor aircraft help towards
quickly resolving this significant safety issue.

The use of ADS-C would also greatly facilitate search and rescue operations and location of an aircraft
following an accident in oceanic airspace.

In order to achieve the foregoing safety objectives, it is important to increase the level of data link equipage in
the NAT. The current level of data link usage in the NAT has reached 45-50% and continues to grow.
Introducing a mandatory data link equipment carriage requirement will increase the NAT data link equipage
level and help in meeting the NAT TLS.

Area of Applicability
The NAT data link mandate will be implemented incrementally, via two phases.

The first phase will commence 7 February 2013, with all aircraft operating on or at any point along two
specified tracks within the NAT organized track system (OTS) from flight level (FL) 360 to FL 390 inclusive
required to be fitted with and using CPDLC and ADS-C equipment. The mandate will be in effect during the
OTS validity period, and is applicable to those flights that will cross 30° W during the published track times.

The specified tracks will be those for which the predicted loading is in the higher percentage of overall
predicted NAT OTS loading on that day and shall be identified in the Remarks section of the NAT OTS
message. Non compliant aircraft will not be permitted to join or cross the specified tracks during the NAT OTS
validity period. However, continuous climb or descent through the specified levels may be available, subject to
traffic.


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13 DEC 12


The specified tracks will be published as part of the NAT OTS message in REMARKS 2.

Example:
                 REMARKS:
        1.       TMI IS 108 AND OPERATORS ARE REMINDED TO INCLUDE THE TMI NUMBER AS
                 PART OF THE OCEANIC CLEARANCE READ BACK.
        2.       ADS-C AND CPDLC MANDATED OTS ARE AS FOLLOWS
                 TRACK B 360 370 380 390
                 TRACK D 360 370 380 390
                 END OF ADS-C AND CPDLC MANDATED OTS
The second phase will commence 5 February 2015 in specified portions of NAT minimum navigation
performance specifications (MNPS) airspace. The vertical and lateral dimensions of the airspace will be
defined and advertised at a later date.

Flight Planning
Operators intending to conduct flights in the airspace defined above shall be fitted with and shall operate
CPDLC and ADS-C. The appropriate equipage to be indicated in Item 10 (equipment and capabilities) of the
ICAO flight plan is as follows:

        •        D1 ADS-C with FANS 1/A capabilities and
                 −       J2 CPDLC FANS 1/A HFDL and/or
                 −       J5 CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (INMARSAT) and/or
                 −       J7 CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM (Iridium).

Further Information
For further Information, please contact:

              Doug Dillon, Manager
              ACC Operations, Gander Area Control Centre
              NAV CANADA
              P.O. Box 328
              Gander, NL A1V 1W7

              Direct line: 709-651-5223
              E-mail:      dillond@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Page 2 of 2                                                   AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 40/12
                                                                                                      13 DEC 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 39/12

               IMPLEMENTATION OF A 50 NAUTICAL MILE LATERAL
                   SEPARATION MINIMUM IN THE EDMONTON
                 FLIGHT INFORMATION REGION/CONTROL AREA
                                                 (Supersedes AIC 11/11)

Introduction
Edmonton area control centre (ACC) has completed operational readiness to apply a 50 nautical mile (NM)
lateral separation standard between aircraft authorized as required navigation performance (RNP) 10 or
RNP 4. Use of this standard harmonizes route spacing operations between the Edmonton flight information
region/control area (FIR/CTA) and the Anchorage Arctic FIR. Route filing practices are not affected by the
introduction of this procedure and application by air traffic control (ATC) will be transparent to flights.

This circular is intended to provide operators and State authorities with the applicable operational policies
and procedures.

Description of Airspace
The 50 NM lateral separation may be applied between aircraft authorized as area navigation (RNAV) 10
(required navigation performance (RNP) 10) or RNP 4 operating within the lateral boundaries of the Canadian
minimum navigation performance specification (CMNPS) portion of the Edmonton FIR/CTA and the entire
Anchorage Arctic FIR (see Figure 1 below). Within the Edmonton FIR/CTA, the lateral separation standard
applicable to flights that have not flight planned as authorized RNP 10 or RNP 4 will be 60 NM for flights
indicating CMNPS approval by filing “X” in field 10 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
flight plan.




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13 DEC 12




                             Figure 1: Depiction of the Arctic RNP 10 Region

ICAO Flight Plan Requirement
The letter R shall be inserted in Item 10 (Equipment) of the flight plan to indicate performance-based
navigation (PBN) approved. Additionally and as appropriate, PBN/ followed by “A1” to indicate RNAV 10
(RNP 10) capability or “L1” to indicate RNP 4 capability shall be inserted in Item 18.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Page 2 of 2                                                  AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 39/12
                                                                                                 15 NOV 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12

   IMPLEMENTATION PLANNING OF CONTROLLER PILOT DATA LINK
   COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES IN CANADIAN DOMESTIC AIRSPACE
                                                   (Replaces AIC 25/12)

Introduction
On 16 December 2011, NAV CANADA commenced use of controller pilot data link communications (CPDLC)
within the Canadian Domestic Airspace (CDA), with services offered in the Montreal flight information region
(FIR). This was followed on 30 January 2012 by implementation in the northern portion of the Edmonton FIR.
It is the intent of NAV CANADA to incrementally expand CPDLC service into the Moncton, Gander, Winnipeg,
Vancouver, and Toronto FIRs during the remainder of 2012 and early 2013.

As with the services offered in the Montreal and Edmonton FIRs, implementation of CPDLC in the remaining
regions will be via a phased approach, as detailed below.

Purpose of Circular
This circular advises operators of the service area coordinates and expected implementation timelines for
each of the remaining FIRs within CDA. Specific start dates for each FIR and implementation phase will be
announced via Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). A description of the implementation phases, flight crew
procedures, and supported CPDLC messages are also detailed below.




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15 NOV 12




Page 2 of 9   AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12
                                                                                                 15 NOV 12



Moncton Area Control Center
On or after 28 June 2012, the Moncton area control centre (ACC) will begin application of CPDLC in the
Moncton FIR/control area (CTA).

The Moncton CPDLC service area is flight level (FL) 290 and above, in the portion of the Moncton FIR/CTA
bounded by:

           41° 52’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W             to        44° 30’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W
           44° 30’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W             to        44° 56’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W
           44° 56’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W             to        45° 37’ 30” N 67° 46’ 30” W
           45° 37’ 30” N 67° 46 30 W               to        45° 47’ 00” N 67° 48’ 17” W
           45° 47’ 00” N 67° 48’ 17” W             to        45° 49’ 30” N 67° 35’ 00” W
           45° 49’ 30” N 67° 35’ 00” W             to        46° 08’ 35” N 67° 13’ 00” W
           46° 08’ 35” N 67° 13’ 00” W             to        46° 12’ 00” N 67° 13’ 00” W
           46° 12’ 00” N 67° 13’ 00” W             to        46° 32’ 08” N 67° 17’ 59” W
           ARC Start                               to        35 Mile ARC Centered on
           46° 32’ 08” N 67° 17’ 59” W                       46° 57’ 00” N 67° 53’ 12” W
           Arc End                                 to        47° 23’ 35” N 69° 00’ 00” W
           47° 17’ 20” N 68° 34’ 24” W
           47° 23’ 35” N 69° 00’ 00” W             to        48° 00’ 00” N 69° 00’ 00” W
           48° 00’ 00” N 69° 00’ 00” W             to        48° 09’ 40” N 69° 19’ 45” W
           48° 09’ 40” N 69° 19’ 45” W             to        48° 53’ 20” N 69° 30’ 00” W
           48° 53’ 20” N 69° 30’ 00” W             to        49° 11’ 15” N 68° 40’ 00” W
           49° 11’ 15” N 68° 40’ 00” W             to        51° 00’ 00” N 68° 40’ 00” W
           51° 00’ 00” N 68° 40’ 00” W             to        51° 30’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W
           51° 30’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W             to        51° 53’ 00” N 65° 43’ 04” W
           51° 53’ 00” N 65° 43’ 04” W             to        51° 58’ 32” N 65° 22’ 15” W
           51° 58’ 32” N 65° 22’ 15” W             to        52° 07’ 27” N 64° 47’ 59” W
           52° 07’ 27” N 64° 47’ 59” W             to        52° 32’ 21” N 63° 07’ 24” W
           52° 32’ 21” N 63° 07’ 24” W             to        52° 49’ 10” N 61° 54’ 48” W
           52° 49’ 10” N 61° 54’ 48” W             to        51° 30’ 00” N 59° 45’ 00” W
           51° 30’ 00” N 59° 45’ 00” W             to        48° 50’ 00” N 57° 45’ 00” W
           48° 50’ 00” N 57° 45’ 00” W             to        44° 26’ 48” N 56° 03’ 06” W
           44° 26’ 48” N 56° 03’ 06” W             to        43° 35’ 00” N 55° 45’ 00” W
           43° 35’ 00” N 55° 45’ 00” W             to        42° 30’ 00” N 60° 00’ 00” W
           42° 30’ 00” N 60° 00’ 00” W             to        42° 20’ 12” N 61° 36’ 36” W
           42° 20’ 12” N 61° 36’ 36” W             to        41° 37’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W
           41° 37’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W             to        41° 52’ 00” N 67° 00’ 00” W




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12                                                          Page 3 of 9
15 NOV 12



Gander Area Control Center
On or after 28 June 2012 the Gander ACC will begin application of CPDLC in the domestic area of the
Gander FIR/CTA.

The Gander domestic CPDLC service area is FL 290 and above, in the portion of the Gander FIR/CTA
bounded by:

              43° 35’ N 055° 45’ W                      to        48° 50’ N 057° 45’ W
              51° 30’ N 059° 45’ W                      to        52° 49’ 10” N 061° 54’ 48” W
                                                        to        51° 53’ 01” N 065° 43’ W
              51° 30’ N 067° 00’ W                      to        51° 00’ N 068° 40’ W
              53° 32’ N 068° 40’ W                      to        57° 33’ N 064° 00’ W
              58° 50’ 40” N 063° 00’ W                  to        65° 19’ N 063° 00’ W
              65° 23’ N 062° 38’ W                      to        65° 30’ N 060° 00’ W
              65° 42’ 36” N 058° 23’ 56” W              to        65° 00’ N 057° 45’ W
              63° 30’ N 055° 45’ W                      to        63° 30’ N 055° 00’ W
              53° 52’ N 054° 58’ W                      to        53° 05’ N 054° 05’ W
              51° 00’ N 050° 00’ W                      to        44° 30’ N 050° 00’ W
              to the point of beginning.


Winnipeg Area Control Center
On or after 28 June 2012, the Winnipeg ACC will begin application of CPDLC in the Winnipeg FIR/CTA.

The Winnipeg CPDLC service area is FL 290 and above, in the portion of the Winnipeg FIR/CTA bounded by:

              49° 00’ N 110° 00’ W                      to        49° 50’ N 109° 00’ W
              51° 11’ N 109° W                          to        51° 20’ N 109° 30’ W
              51° 30’ N 110° W                          to        53° 25’ 15” N 110° 00’ W
              then via a 60NM arc counter-clockwise               54° 46’ N 108° 41’ 40” W
              around the Cold Lake TACAN (UOD)
              54° 46’ N 108° 25’ W                      to        55° 20’ N 107° 25’ W
              53° 00’ N 102° 00’ W                      to        52° 26’ N 101° 00’ W
              52° 46’ N 99° 08’ W                       to        52° 20’ N 95° 00’ W
              52° 08’ N 95° 53’ W                       to        51° 20’ N 89° 23’ W
              49° 54’ N 84° 12’ W                       to        47° 05’ N 87° 00’ W
              47° 54’ 30” N 88° 46’ 30” W                         Then via a 35NM arc clockwise around
                                                                  CYQT to
              48° 06’ 30” N 90° 06’ W                   to        48° 34’ 15” N 91° 50’ W
              48° 58’ 30” N 93° 24’ W                   to        49° 00’ N 97° 43’ W
              then along 49N latitude to the point of
              beginning.




Page 4 of 9                                                  AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12
                                                                                               15 NOV 12



Vancouver Area Control Center
On or after 30 September 2012, the Vancouver ACC will begin application of CPDLC in the Vancouver
FIR/CTA.

The Vancouver CPDLC service area is FL 290 and above in the portion of the Vancouver FIR/CTA
bounded by:

          49° 00’ 02” N 115° 29’ 59” W                        Then west along the Canada/US boundary to
          48° 29’ 36” N 124° 43’ 38” W              to        48° 30’ N 125° W                       to
          48° 20’ N 128° W                          to        51° N 133° 45’ W                       to
          54° N 136° W                              to        54° 13’ N 134° 57’ W                   to
          54° 39’ 44” N 132° 41’ 03” W                        Then along the Canada/Anchorage (US)
                                                              boundary to
          57° N 132° 03’ 58” W                      to        56° N 123° 15’ W                       to
          53° 24’ N 119° W                          to        50° 19’ 35” N 116° 05’ 05” W
          then west along the arc of a circle                 49° 57’ 18” N 115° 47’ 32” W           to
          25NM radius centered on Skookum, BC
          NDB to
          49° 57’ 45” N 115° 08’ 50” W              to        49° 30’ N 115° 08’ 15” W               to
          49° 00’ 02” N 115° 29’ 59” W              to        the point of beginning.


Toronto Area Control Center
On or after 15 March 2013, the Toronto ACC will begin application of CPDLC in the Toronto FIR/CTA.

The Toronto CPDLC service area is FL 290 and above in the portion of the Toronto FIR/CTA bounded by:

         44° 13’ 17” N 76° 11’ 30” W                          Then west along Canada/Us boundary to
         47° 46’ 29” N 87° W                        to        49° 32’ N 87° W                        to
         50° N 86° 16’ W                            to        52° N 83° 08’ 30” W                    to
         53° 28’ N 80° W                            to        49° N 79° W                            to
         48° 35’ 13” N 79° W                                  Then counter clockwise along the arc of a
                                                              circle of 25NM radius centered on Rouyn, QC
                                                              NDB to
         47° 50’ 24” N 78° 33’ 56” W                to        47° 33’ 15” N 78° 07’ 03” W            to
         47° 06’ 39” N 77° 32’ 45” W                to        46° 56’ 48” N 77° 15’ W                to
         46° 08” N 77° 15’ W                        to        45° 57’ 40” N 76° 55’ 40” W            to
         45° 50’ 15” N 76° 16’ W                    to        44° 13’ 17” N 76° 11’ 30” W            to
         the point of beginning.




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12                                                        Page 5 of 9
15 NOV 12



Phased Implementation
Phase 1 – Basic Request Phase
This initial phase will enable an aircraft to make various speed and altitude requests using CPDLC.

The response from the ACC ground system will be a free text acknowledgement that the request had been
received and that a response from air traffic control (ATC) will be provided by the appropriate ACC via voice.

Phase 2 – Advising Domestic Frequencies
This phase introduces the assignment of domestic contact frequencies via CPDLC. Analysis of voice traffic
indicates that such messages represent a significant proportion of existing voice traffic, and using CPDLC to
carry out this function would be a useful contribution to reducing voice congestion.

Phase 3 – Support En Route Altitude Changes and Speed Changes
This phase will enable aircraft to request En Route altitude changes, En Route speed changes and to report
Leaving/Reaching Levels via CPDLC.

Responses to these requests from the ACC will also be via CPDLC.

Phase 4 – Full Implementation
With the exception of those messages deemed unsafe by ICAO, specified downlink elements will be
supported. Domestic ACCs will develop appropriate procedures to respond to all received downlink message
elements.

ATC will not provide information regarding when or where a flight can expect to climb or descend, due to the
potential misunderstanding that such a message constitutes a clearance.

Supported Downlink Messages (Phase 1 and Phase 2)
Only the following messages will be supported for phase 1 and phase 2. Any downlink message other than
indicated below will generate “MESSAGE NOT SUPPORTED BY THIS FACILITY” response from the ground
system.

              DM0             WILCO
              DM1             UNABLE
              DM2             STANDBY
              DM3             ROGER
              DM4             AFFIRM
              DM5             NEGATIVE
              DM6             REQUEST (Alt)
              DM9             REQUEST CLIMB TO (Alt)
              DM10            REQUEST DESCENT TO (Alt)
              DM18            REQUEST (Speed)
              DM20            REQUEST VOICE CONTACT
              DM21            REQUEST VOICE CONTACT (FREQ)
              DM55            PAN PAN PAN
              DM56            MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY
              DM58            CANCEL EMERGENCY
              DM62            ERROR (ERROR INFORMATION)
              DM63            NOT CURRENT DATA AUTHORITY



Page 6 of 9                                                    AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12
                                                                                                       15 NOV 12


             DM64             (ICAO FACILITY DESIGNATION)
             DM65             DUE TO WEATHER
             DM66             DUE TO AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE
             DM67             FREE TEXT
             DM75             AT PILOTS DISCRETION


Flight Planning
Air traffic services (ATS) systems use field 10 (Equipment) of the standard ICAO flight plan to identify an
aircraft’s data link capabilities.

For non-ICAO 2012 format flight plans, operators should insert the following items into the ICAO flight plan
form for FANS 1/A-equipped aircraft 1:

        1.      Field 10a (Radio communication, navigation, and approach equipment): insert the letter “J” to
                indicate data link equipment.
        2.      Field 18 (Other Information): when the letter “J” is inserted in field 10a, insert the characters
                “DAT/,” followed by one or more letters as appropriate to indicate the type of data link
                equipment carried (see table below).

                          Letter Following DAT/        Type of Data Link Equipment
                                     S                 Satellite data link
                                     H                 HF data link
                                     V                 VHF data link
                                     M                 SSR Mode S data link

For ICAO 2012 format flight plans, which are effective as of 15 November 2012, operators should insert the
following items into the ICAO flight plan form for FANS 1/A-equipped aircraft:

        1.      Field 10a (Radio communication, navigation, and approach equipment): insert the indicator(s)
                “J1 – J7” to indicate appropriate data link equipment as per the table below.

                            Field 10a Indicator        Type of Data Link Equipment
                                         J1            CPDLC FANS 1/A ATN VDL
                                                       Mode2
                                         J2            CPDLC FANS 1/A HFDL
                                         J3            CPDLC FANS 1/A VDL Mode 4
                                         J4            CPDLC FANS 1/A VDL Mode 2
                                         J5            CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM
                                                       (INMARSAT)
                                         J6            CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM
                                                       (MTSTAT)
                                         J7            CPDLC FANS 1/A SATCOM
                                                       (IRIDIUM)




1
    Only ICAO 2012 format flight plans will be accepted commencing 15 November 2012. Non ICAO 2012
format flight plans will be rejected by the flight data processor.


AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12                                                                Page 7 of 9
15 NOV 12


ATS Facilities Notification (AFN) Logon
A CPDLC connection is initiated by the ground system in response to an AFN logon received from the aircraft.
It is important, when initializing the flight management computer (FMC), to ensure that aircraft identification
matches the identification displayed in the filed ATC flight plan message. If a flight becomes aware that
incorrect flight identification data was provided in the AFN logon, the data link must immediately be terminated
and a new AFN logon performed with the correct information. Flights entering any CDA CPDLC service areas
from airspace where FANS 1/A ATS data link services are being received do not need to perform another
AFN logon. Flights entering the CDA CPDLC service areas from airspace where no FANS 1/A ATS data link
services are being received should perform an AFN logon:

        a)       15 to 45 minutes prior to entering the airspace; or
        b)       prior to departure if departing airports are adjacent to, or underlying, the airspace.
The AFN logon address for flights entering CDA facilities are as follows:

                          Facility Name                         Facility Identifier for AFN Logon
         Montreal Area Control Centre                                          CZUL
         Edmonton Area Control Centre                                          CZEG
         Moncton Area Control Centre                                           CZQM
         Gander Area Control Centre (Domestic)                      CDQX (Domestic identifier)
         Gander Area Control Centre (Oceanic)                               CZQX
         Winnipeg Area Control Centre                                         CZWG
         Vancouver Area Control Centre                                         CZVR
         Toronto Area Control Centre                                           CZYZ

Flights exiting the CDA CPDLC service areas into adjacent airspace where data link services are offered
should not need to perform another AFN logon. Under normal circumstances, the current and next ATS units
automatically transfer CPDLC and Automated Dependent Surveillance–Contract (ADS-C) services. The
transfer is seamless to the flight crew.

Communication of CPDLC Service Capability
CPDLC will supplement existing very high frequency (VHF) voice as modes of direct controller pilot
communications (DCPC) or high frequency (HF) as a third party mode of communications, within CDA.

Aircraft that are entering a Canadian Domestic CPDLC service area and have performed an AFN logon are
not required to use the term “C-P-D-L-C” on initial check-in or in other radio-telephony communications with
ATC.

Contact with Aero Radio – Flight Crew
Where VHF communications is not available in CDA; pilots shall contact the appropriate Aero Radio station
and on initial contact shall do the following:

        1.       Do not include a position report;
        2.       Use the term “C-P-D-L-C” after the aircraft call sign;
        3.       If required request the SELCAL check.
The following is a sample exchange with Gander Aero Radio:

              GANDER RADIO, AIRLINE FIVE FIVE ONE C–P–D–L–C, FLIGHT LEVEL 350; REQUEST
              SELCAL CHECK FDAB




Page 8 of 9                                                      AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12
                                                                                              15 NOV 12



Contact
For further information on CPDLC service in the Canadian Domestic FIR/CTA and the expansion of this
service, please contact

           Operational Systems Integration and Data Link
           Head Office, Ottawa, Canada

           Tel.:       613-294-6707




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 38/12                                                        Page 9 of 9
                                                                                                       23 AUG 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 28/12

              KRUGER MONTÉRÉGIE WIND FARM PROJECT
                       NEAR SAINT-RÉMI, QUEBEC
          CHANGE IN AIRSPACE AND VISUAL FLIGHT RULES ROUTE
NAV CANADA, the country’s provider of civil air navigation services, recently conducted an aeronautical
study to assess the impact of the implementation of the Kruger Energy Montérégie L.P. wind farm project
on the air navigation system. The wind farm consists of 44 wind turbines and is located from 9.9 to
14.2 nautical miles (NM) south of the Montréal Pierre Elliott Trudeau Int’l airport. The height of the turbines
is 456 feet above ground (AGL), which makes the highest turbine in this wind farm project 653 feet above
sea level (ASL).

As a result of consultations and evaluations, transponder airspace will be implemented over the wind farm
area. The visual flight rules route from Les Cèdres Aerodrome to the St-Philippe-de-la-Prairie will be revoked.

These changes will take effect 20 September 2012 at 0901 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The
appropriate aeronautical publications will be amended.

For further information, please contact:

              Marcel Pinon
              Manager, Airspace and Service Requirements
              NAV CANADA
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:         613-563-5630
              Fax:          613-563-5602
              E-mail:       pinonm@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                           Page 1 of 1
                                                                                                         31 MAY 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/12

                          ALTITUDE ASSIGNMENT POLAR FLIGHTS
                                                   (Replaces AIC 23/11)

Introduction
The Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) require that the pilot-in-command of an aircraft operate that
aircraft at a cruising altitude or flight level appropriate to the track, as set out in paragraph 602.34, unless
assigned another altitude or flight level by an air traffic control unit.

According to existing air traffic control (ATC) procedures, altitudes inappropriate for direction of flight may only
be assigned in certain situations and when particular conditions are met, as in the following examples:

         •        When airspace is structured for one way traffic flow;
         •        When aircraft are transitioning to and from ocean entry/exit points; or
         •        When an aircraft requests the altitude due to icing, turbulence, or fuel considerations.
If a request is made by a pilot due to icing, turbulence, or fuel considerations, ATC is required to determine
when the aircraft will be able to accept an appropriate altitude.

In the case of polar flights, north and southbound routes generally vary slightly in direction from westbound to
eastbound as the aircraft proceeds from point to point. There is currently no provision for ATC to assign an
altitude inappropriate for direction of flight to polar flights.

Intention of Circular
The intention of this Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) is to introduce new procedures for assigning
altitudes inappropriate to direction of flight when aircraft are flight planned on polar routes. The procedures
are expected to

         •        allow additional flexibility for controllers when solving conflictions between north and
                  southbound flights;
         •        reduce fuel consumption; and
         •        aid in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Background
With the increase in the number of aircraft flight planning polar routes, the number of potential conflicts
between north and southbound aircraft has increased. Although, in general, southbound aircraft are at higher
altitudes than northbound aircraft and this provides some mitigation, most polar flights alternate regularly
between eastbound and westbound direction of flight as they proceed in a general north/south bound
direction. This means that aircraft flying closely spaced north and southbound routes can potentially be
eligible to fly at the same altitudes. Complicating matters is the fact that direct controller pilot communication
is not always available in the concerned airspace.




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31 MAY 12


Currently, ATC is required to continually adjust the altitudes at which aircraft are flying as their routes subtly
change direction from east to west. Often this means adjusting aircraft altitudes several times while
transitioning through Edmonton and Winnipeg’s airspace or potentially keeping aircraft at a lower level than
requested because the aircraft is not able to climb to the next higher appropriate altitude. These solutions are
not practical from a traffic management perspective. It is also recognized that on flights of long duration, these
restrictions create unnecessary fuel burn without increasing levels of safety.

ATC procedures already permit exceptions to the altitude assignment order. Currently aircraft may be
assigned an altitude inappropriate to direction of flight if requested for fuel considerations, including requests
made by polar flights. These same procedures also require that a determination be made as to when the
aircraft can accept an operational suitable altitude. As a result, new ATC procedures are being introduced to
address these issues.

Procedures
A polar flight is defined as any aircraft northbound or southbound that will pass over RUSSIAN boundary fixes
from 75N to 90N inclusive. Polar flights proceeding northbound (track of 345-015) and southbound (165-195)
over these fixes will be assigned altitudes based on their general direction of flight through the Edmonton and
Winnipeg flight information regions (FIRs).

These procedures will give the controller more flexibility for altitude assignment, thus reducing conflicts
between north and southbound flights. There will be no increase in the number of conflictions with aircraft that
are on predominantly east and westbound routes caused by these new procedures, since north and
southbound aircraft are routinely in conflict with either east or westbound aircraft regardless of whether they
are assigned appropriate or inappropriate altitudes.

Implementation Plan
These procedures are in effect since 20 May 2010 in Edmonton FIR and since 15 February 2011 in
Winnipeg FIR. In the event the procedure is formalized, the Transport Canada Aeronautical Information
Manual (TC AIM – TP 14371E) will be amended in April 2013.

Any comments or suggested amendments to this AIC may be addressed to

              NAV CANADA
              Customer Service
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:      800-876-4693
              Fax:       877-663-6656
              E-mail:    service@navcanada.ca

Hours of operation: Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. EST.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Page 2 of 2                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/12
                                                                                                     3 MAY 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 18/12

                               VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
                              CYAs AND FLIGHT TRAINING AREAS
Last year, common frequencies were established in Class F Airspace Advisory Areas (CYAs) used for flight
training around Vancouver and Victoria. After suggestions from air traffic control and flying schools, some
revisions will be made to the labelling of these areas on the back of the Vancouver VTA. In addition, to help
simplify the CYA designations and de-clutter the map, several of the CYAs will be combined as follows:

         •        CYA 176(A)(T)(H) and CYA 177(A)(T)(H) will be combined to form CYA 185(A)(T)(H). The
                  new CYA 185 will be labelled as the PITT training area using common frequency 122.72(5).
         •        CYA 178(A)(T)(H) and CYA 179(A)(T)(H) will be combined to form CYA 186(A)(T)(H). The
                  new CYA 186 will be labelled as the HARRISON training area using common frequency
                  122.77(5).
         •        CYA 182(A)(T)(H) and CYA 183(A)(T)(H) will be combined to form CYA 187(A)(T)(H). The
                  new CYA 187 will be labelled as the SUMAS training area using common frequency
                  122.77(5).
         •        CYA 180(T) and 181(A)(T) will be combined to form CYA 188(A)(T). The new CYA 188 will
                  be labelled as the GLEN VALLEY training area using common frequency 122.72(5).
These changes will be reflected on the next edition of the Vancouver VTA.

For further information, please contact:

              Marcel Pinon, Manager
              Airspace and Service Requirements
              NAV CANADA
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:         613-563-5630
              Fax:          613-563-5602
              E-mail:       pinonm@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                        Page 1 of 1
                                                                                                        3 MAY 12



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 17/12

TRIAL OF A FIVE-MINUTE ALONG-TRACK LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION
        MINIMUM IN THE GANDER OCEANIC CONTROL AREA
                                                 (Supersedes AIC 42/11)

Introduction
On 28 March 2011, as part of a program to improve service provision in North Atlantic (NAT) airspace,
Gander area control centre (ACC) commenced participation in the trial of a five-minute longitudinal separation
minimum to be applied between eligible aircraft pairs operating within the Gander and Shanwick oceanic
control areas (OCAs).

The five-minute longitudinal separation minimum is intended to aid in the provision of optimum vertical
profiles, by means of mid-ocean flight level changes, for those suitably equipped aircraft. Application of this
separation minimum is predicated on the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance—Contract (ADS-C)
periodic reports, which provide air traffic control (ATC) with increased confidence in aircraft position reports
and estimates, and direct controller pilot–communications (DCPC) provided via controller–pilot data link
communications (CPDLC).

NAT MNPS Longitudinal Separation
The current longitudinal separation minimum applied in NAT minimum navigation performance specifications
(MNPS) between turbojet aircraft pairs on the same track is 15 minutes, which may be reduced to 10 minutes
using the Mach number technique. All aircraft pairs, including those eligible for the five-minute separation, are
required to be separated by one of these minima prior to entry into NAT MNPS airspace.

The five-minute longitudinal separation minimum becomes available once eligible aircraft have entered the
Gander or Shanwick OCA, and ADS-C and CPDLC connections have been established. For this reason, it is
imperative that pilots request mid-ocean flight level changes from ATC, if it is determined that such changes
might result in a more fuel-efficient flight profile.

Operator Participation
Operators do not need to apply to be part of the trial and will be eligible for participation provided they have an
ADS-C and CPDLC log-on with Gander ACC and possess MNPS approval. Application of this specific
procedure by ATC will be transparent to flights that have received an altitude change clearance.

Flight crews must

         •        adhere to the ATC cleared Mach number; and
         •        report any failure or malfunction of their global positioning system (GPS), ADS-C, or CPDLC
                  equipment to ATC as soon as it becomes apparent.
There will be no changes to the applicable Strategic Lateral Offset Procedure (SLOP).




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3 MAY 12



Trial Period
The trial is scheduled to run until March 2014, after which time a review will be performed and a decision will
be announced regarding future plans for the five-minute longitudinal separation minimum.

Further Information
For further Information, please contact:

              Doug Dillon, Manager
              ACC Operations, Gander Area Control Centre
              NAV CANADA
              P.O. Box 328
              Gander, NL A1V 1W7

              Direct line: 709-651-5223
              E-mail:      dillond@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Page 2 of 2                                                     AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 17/12
                                                                                                       12 JAN 12



         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 3/12

               NEW AREA NAVIGATION STANDARD INSTRUMENT
                  DEPARTURE PROCEDURES AT TORONTO,
             LESTER B. PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (CYYZ)
New area navigation (RNAV) standard instrument departure (SID) procedures will be introduced at
Toronto, Lester B. Pearson International Airport (CYYZ) as of 9 February 2012. A number of these new
RNAV SID procedures will be available to be flown by either global navigation satellite system (GNSS) or
DME/DME/IRU (D/D/I).

The development of the RNAV SID procedures available to either GNSS or D/D/I equipped aircraft has
included a DME assessment to ensure suitable DME coverage exists for D/D/I navigation.

Suitable operational procedures must be in place by D/D/I operators using these SID procedures to ensure
necessary navigation system performance can be achieved. This includes:

         •        NOTAMs should be checked to verify the health of critical DMEs when using a D/D/I RNAV
                  system; and
         •        D/D/I aircraft must ensure the aircraft navigation system position is confirmed within
                  1,000 feet at the start point of the take-off roll.
NAV CANADA will be monitoring the performance of aircraft flying these SID procedures through the
provision of radar service.

An example of one of these RNAV SID procedures is provided for reference purposes.

Contact
If you require additional information pertaining to the implementation of the new RNAV SIDs at CYYZ, please
contact:

              NAV CANADA
              Customer Service
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

              Tel.:         800-876-4693
              Fax:          877-663-6656
              E-mail:       service@navcanada.ca

Hours of operation: Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. EST.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                           Page 1 of 2
12 JAN 12




              Example of RNAV SID Procedure (NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION)



Page 2 of 2                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 3/12
                                                                                                   15 DEC 11



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 44/11

 AUTOMATIC DEPENDENT SURVEILLANCE—BROADCAST SERVICE IN
            THE GANDER OCEANIC CONTROL AREA
Introduction
In the first quarter of 2012, Gander area control centre (ACC) will commence Automatic Dependent
Surveillance–Broadcast (ADS-B) service to eligible aircraft operating within the southern Greenland portion of
the Gander oceanic control area (OCA; see map below). NAV CANADA will notify operators of the exact start
of ADS-B service within the indicated service volume via NOTAM. This aeronautical information circular (AIC)
supplements information contained in AIC 31/11 regarding NAV CANADA ADS-B planning and services.




                             Yellow area: existing combined radar and ADS-B coverage
                             Red area: ADS-B coverage over southern Greenland



Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                       Page 1 of 3
15 DEC 11



Operator Participation
Eligibility for ADS-B service in the Gander OCA is based upon the compliance considerations of European
Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) 20–24 or equivalent. Aircraft
avionics functionally should be compliant with Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) DO-260,
DO-260A, or DO-260B. Operators must meet the conditions of operational specification No. 609 or No. 610,
as appropriate, outlined in Transport Canada, Advisory Circular (AC) 700-009, Issue No. 2. Operators must
also complete an aircraft equipment survey and provide NAV CANADA with each aircraft’s unique 24-bit
transponder address in order to be entered onto the list of eligible aircraft.

Operational Use of ADS-B over Southern Greenland
The application of five-mile separation has been approved for use between ADS-B aircraft. However, the
provision of effective air traffic services (ATS) surveillance services requires identification of the vast majority
of aircraft operating within the airspace to ensure that the separation standard is maintained while other
services are being provided. Although the number of eligible ADS-B aircraft has been steadily increasing
since NAV CANADA initiated continental ADS-B services in 2009, the overall percentage of eligible aircraft
operating within the North Atlantic (NAT) region is not yet sufficient to allow air traffic control (ATC) to provide
a full range of surveillance services. Therefore, and until such time that the percentage of eligible aircraft
increases to the point where additional services can be feasibly offered, ADS-B service over southern
Greenland will be used primarily to aid in the provision of optimum vertical profiles to eligible aircraft.

Initially, ADS-B will be used to provide flight level changes in scenarios where the availability of ADS-B
permits identified aircraft to climb or descend though the flight level of other ADS-B equipped aircraft.
Additional applications, such as five-mile in-trail spacing, will become available and advertised to customers
at a later date.

Flight Crew and ATC Procedures
Because of the combination of eligible and non-eligible aircraft operating, all aircraft intending to transit the
southern Greenland portion of the Gander OCA are expected to continue to flight plan in accordance with
procedures outlined in NAT Doc 007, “Guidance concerning Air Navigation in and above the NAT MNPSA,”
published by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). As always, flight crews are encouraged to
request any changes, including flight level, that can optimize the flight profile.

Where it is determined, following a request from the flight crew, that a flight level change can be attained
because of the availability of ADS-B, the following steps can be expected:

        •        A very high frequency (VHF) control frequency will be assigned to the required flights by
                 ATC, either directly via controller-pilot data link communications (CPDLC) or via high
                 frequency (HF) voice through the Gander international flight service station (IFSS) (Gander
                 Radio).
        •        Once VHF contact has been established, the flights involved will be informed by ATC that
                 identification has been established.
        •        The requested climb or descent clearance will be issued by ATC either via CPDLC or through
                 the assigned VHF control frequency.
        •        When the flight level change has been completed and vertical separation re-established,
                 flight crews will normally be informed by ATC that surveillance services are terminated and
                 subsequently returned to their previously assigned frequency.
Flight crews are advised that aircraft will not normally be informed of ADS-B identification unless a specific
operational advantage, such as a flight level change, can be attained.




Page 2 of 3                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 44/11
                                                         15 DEC 11



Further Information
For further Information, please contact:

            Doug Dillon, Manager
            ACC Operations, Gander Area Control Centre
            NAV CANADA
            P.O. Box 328
            Gander, NL A1V 1W7

            Direct line: 709-651-5223
            E-mail:      dillond@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 44/11                  Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                 17 NOV 11



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 37/11

          IMPLEMENTATION OF CONTROLLER PILOT DATA LINK
        COMMUNICATIONS IN THE MONTREAL FLIGHT INFORMATION
                     REGION/CONTROL AREA
Introduction
On or soon after 15 December 2011, Montreal Area Control Centre (ACC) will begin application of controller
pilot data link communications (CPDLC) in the northern portion of the Montreal flight information region
(FIR)/control area (CTA). Implementation will be conducted by means of a phased approach, as described
below, commencing with Phase 1. NAV CANADA will announce the start dates of subsequent phases via
Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). CPDLC is a means of communication between controller and pilot, using data link
for air traffic control (ATC) communications.

Automatic dependent surveillance–contract (ADS-C) services are not provided in the Montreal FIR/CTA.

Montréal CPDLC Service Area
The Montréal CPDLC service area is flight level (FL) 290 and above in the portion of the Montreal FIR/CTA
bounded by a line beginning at:

             62 45N, 80 00W                                          to
             63 38N, 7603W                                           to
             65 00N, 68 00W                                          to
             65 23N, 62 38W                                          to
             65 19N, 63 00W                                          to
             58 50 40N, 63 00W                                       to
             57 33N, 64 00W                                          to
             55 20N, 66 44W                                          to
             54 52 41N, 67 14 50W                                    to
             53 32N, 68 40W                                          to
             49 11 15N 68 40W                                        to
             48 56 25N 70 20 10W
             Thence counter clockwise along a 45 NM arc              to
             centered on CYBG (Bagotville Aerodrome)
             48 40N, 72 00 08W                                       to
             48 40N, 72 15W                                          to
             48 25N, 73 25W                                          to
             47 45N, 76 30W                                          to
             46 50 53N, 77 59 20W                                    to
             47 22 32N, 79 50 33W                                    to
             48 47 31N, 85 20 12W                                    to
             49 55N, 84 11W                                          to
             50 14N, 85 12 29W                                       to
             53 28N, 80 00W                                          to point of beginning



Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                     Page 1 of 4
17 NOV 11




Page 2 of 4   AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 37/11
                                                                                                        17 NOV 11



Phased Implementation
Phase 1: Basic Request Phase (commencing on or soon after 15 December 2011)
This initial phase will enable an aircraft to make various speed and altitude requests using CPDLC. The
response from the Montreal ACC ground system will be a free text acknowledgement that the request had
been received and that a response from ATC will be provided by Montreal Centre via voice.

Phase 2: Advising Domestic Frequencies (date to be determined)
This phase introduces the assignment of domestic contact frequencies via CPDLC. Analysis of voice traffic
indicates that such messages represent a significant proportion of existing voice traffic and using CPDLC to
carry out this function would be a useful contribution to reducing voice congestion.

Phase 3: Support En-route Altitude Changes and Speed Changes (date to be determined)
This phase will enable aircraft to request en route altitude changes and speed changes, and to report
Leaving/Reaching Levels via CPDLC. Responses to these requests from Montreal ACC will also be via
CPDLC.

Phase 4: Full Implementation (date to be determined)
With the exception of those messages deemed unsafe by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO),
all downlink elements will be supported. Montreal ACC will develop appropriate procedures to respond to all
received downlink message elements.

Montreal ACC will not provide information regarding when or where a flight can expect to climb or descend,
due to potential misunderstanding that such a message constitutes a clearance.

Flight Planning
Air traffic service (ATS) systems use field 10 (Equipment) of the standard ICAO flight plan to identify an
aircraft’s data link capabilities. Operators should insert the following items into the ICAO flight plan form for
Future Air Navigation Systems (FANS) 1/A-equipped aircraft:

        1.       Field 10a (Radio Communication, Navigation, and Approach Equipment): insert the letter “J”
                 to indicate data link equipment.
        2.       Field 18 (Other Information): when the letter “J” is inserted in field 10a, insert the characters
                 “DAT/,” followed by one or more letters as appropriate to indicate the type of data link
                 equipment carried (see table below).

                        Letter Following DAT/           Type of Data Link Equipment
                                    S                Satellite data link
                                    H                High frequency (HF) data link
                                    V                Very high frequency (VHF) data link
                                    M                Secondary surveillance radar (SSR)
                                                     Mode S data link


Flight Crew Procedures
ATS Facilities Notification Logon
A CPDLC connection is initiated by the ground system in response to an aeronautical frequency notification
(AFN) logon received from the aircraft. The AFN logon address for flights entering the Montreal FIR/CTA is
CZUL.




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 37/11                                                                  Page 3 of 4
17 NOV 11


It is important, when initializing the flight management computer (FMC), to ensure the aircraft identification
matches the one displayed in the filed ATC flight plan message. If a flight becomes aware that incorrect flight
identification data was provided in the AFN logon, the data link must immediately be terminated and a new
AFN logon performed with the correct information. Flights entering the Montreal CPDLC service area from
airspace where FANS 1/A ATS data link services are being received do not need to perform another AFN
logon. Flights entering the Montreal CPDLC service area from airspace where no FANS 1/A ATS data link
services are being received should perform an AFN logon:

        1.       15 to 45 min prior to entering the airspace; or
        2.       Prior to departure if departing airports are adjacent to, or underlying, the airspace.
Flights exiting the Montreal CPDLC service area into adjacent airspace where data link services are offered
should not need to perform another AFN logon. Under normal circumstances, the current and next air traffic
service units (ATSUs) automatically transfer CPDLC and automatic dependent surveillance–contract (ADS-C)
services. The transfer is seamless to the flight crew.

Communication of CPDLC Service Capability
CPDLC will supplement existing VHF voice as modes of direct controller pilot communications (DCPC) within
the Montreal CPDLC service area. Aircraft that have performed a logon with Montreal ACC should identify
themselves when entering the CPDLC service area by using the term “C–P–D–L–C” after the aircraft call sign
on initial contact.

Flight crews can expect the reply from Montréal Centre to include

        1.       acknowledgement that the flight is C–P–D–L–C; and
        2.       the assigned frequency for the next station en route.
The following is a sample exchange with Montréal Centre:

              MONTREAL CENTRE, AIRLINE FIVE FIVE ONE C–P–D–L–C, FLIGHT LEVEL 350

              AIRLINE FIVE FIVE ONE C–P–D–L–C, MONTREAL CENTRE, CONTACT MONTREAL
              CENTRE AT IQALUIT ON 132.7

Contact
For further information on CPDLC service in the Montreal FIR/CTA and the expansion of this service, please
contact

              Shift Manager
              Montreal ACC
              Tel.: 514-633-3365




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Page 4 of 4                                                        AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 37/11
                                                                                                  17 NOV 11



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 36/11

          IMPLEMENTATION OF CONTROLLER PILOT DATA LINK
        COMMUNICATIONS IN THE EDMONTON FLIGHT INFORMATION
                     REGION/CONTROL AREA
Introduction
On or soon after 15 December 2011, Edmonton Area Control Centre (ACC) will begin application of controller
pilot data link communications (CPDLC) in the northern portion of the Edmonton flight information region
(FIR)/control area (CTA). Implementation will be conducted by means of a phased approach, as described
below, commencing with Phase 1. NAV CANADA will announce the start dates of subsequent phases via
Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). CPDLC is a means of communication between controller and pilot, using data link
for air traffic control (ATC) communications.

Edmonton ACC currently provides Automatic Dependent Surveillance Waypoint Position Reporting (ADS
WPR) in the northern portion of the Edmonton FIR/CTA. In addition to ADS WPR, CPDLC services will be
offered in the same airspace to comprise the Edmonton data link services area.

Edmonton Data Link Service Area
The Edmonton data link services area is flight level (FL) 290 and above in the portion of the Edmonton
FIR/CTA bounded by a line beginning at:

                           70 00N, 142 00W                       to
                           90 00N, 140 00W                       to
                           82 00N, 59 00W                        to
                           78 00N, 74 00W                        to
                           76 00N, 70 29.4W                      to
                           65 43.2N, 55 33.58W                   to
                           65 30N, 60 00W                        to
                           64 00N, 70 00W                        to
                           63 00N, 79 00W                        to
                           56 40N, 79 00W                        to
                           54 20N, 90 00W                        to
                           59 00N, 100 00W                       to
                           57 42N, 102 30W                       to
                           61 42N, 116 12W                       to
                           60 00N, 117 36W                       to
                           57 42N, 119 00W                       to
                           58 00N, 120 00W                       to
                           58 00N, 123 00W                       to
                           56 06N, 123 48W                       to
                           56 48N, 132 18W                       to
                           60 00N, 142 00W                       to point of beginning.




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                      Page 1 of 5
17 NOV 11




Page 2 of 5   AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 36/11
                                                                                                        17 NOV 11



Satellite Communications (SATCOM) Shadow
The airspace where CPDLC will be conducted is affected by an area of satellite communication (SATCOM)
unreliability referred to as the SATCOM shadow (see map above). The SATCOM shadow extends from the
North Pole to 70° north (N). Unreliability is most pronounced at 120° west (W) where the two satellites
servicing the area are furthest away. Coverage improves to the east and west of 120° W, where reliable
coverage can be expected as far north as 80° N at 80° W. The exact extent and effect of the shadow depends
on atmospheric conditions, aircraft antenna placement, and direction of flight.

Aircraft observing an indication that satellite communications have been lost should anticipate that their
CPDLC reporting may have been terminated. Flight crews can re-logon to CZEG, the aeronautical frequency
notification (AFN) for flights entering the Edmonton FIR/CTA, if it is felt that the outage has been overcome.
Otherwise, ensuing position reports must be provided via voice.

Phased Implementation
Phase 1: Basic Request Phase (commencing on or soon after 15 December 2011)
This initial phase will enable an aircraft to make various speed and altitude requests using CPDLC. The
response from the Edmonton ACC ground system will be a free text acknowledgement that the request had
been received and that a response from ATC will be provided by Edmonton Centre, Gander Radio, or Arctic
Radio via voice.

Phase 2: Advising Domestic Frequencies (date to be determined)
This phase introduces the assignment of domestic contact frequencies via CPDLC. Analysis of voice traffic
indicates that such messages represent a significant proportion of existing voice traffic and using CPDLC to
carry out this function would be a useful contribution to reducing voice congestion.

Phase 3: Support En Route Altitude Changes and Speed Changes (date to be determined)
This phase will enable aircraft to request en route altitude changes and speed changes, and to report
Leaving/Reaching Levels via CPDLC. Responses to these requests from Edmonton ACC will also be via
CPDLC.

Phase 4: Full Implementation (date to be determined)
With the exception of those messages deemed unsafe by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO),
all downlink elements will be supported. Edmonton ACC will develop appropriate procedures to respond to all
received downlink message elements.

Edmonton ACC will not provide information regarding when or where a flight can expect to climb or descend,
due to potential misunderstanding that such a message constitutes a clearance.

Flight Planning
Air traffic service (ATS) systems use field 10 (Equipment) of the standard ICAO flight plan to identify an
aircraft’s data link capabilities. Operators should insert the following items into the ICAO flight plan form for
Future Air Navigation Systems (FANS) 1/A-equipped aircraft:

        1.       Field 10a (Radio Communication, Navigation, and Approach Equipment): insert the letter “J”
                 to indicate data link equipment.
        2.       Field 18 (Other Information): when the letter “J” is inserted in field 10a, insert the characters
                 “DAT/,” followed by one or more letters as appropriate to indicate the type of data link
                 equipment carried (see table below).




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 36/11                                                                  Page 3 of 5
17 NOV 11



                       Letter Following DAT/            Type of Data Link Equipment
                                  S                Satellite data link
                                  H                High frequency (HF) data link
                                  V                Very high frequency (VHF) data link
                                  M                Secondary surveillance radar (SSR)
                                                   Mode S data link

Flight Crew Procedures
ATS Facilities Notification Logon
A CPDLC connection is initiated by the ground system in response to an AFN logon received from the aircraft.
The AFN logon address for flights entering the Edmonton FIR/CTA is CZEG.

It is important, when initializing the flight management computer (FMC), to ensure the aircraft identification
matches the one displayed in the filed ATC flight plan message. If a flight becomes aware that incorrect flight
identification data was provided in the AFN logon, the data link must immediately be terminated and a new
AFN logon performed with the correct information. Flights entering the Edmonton data link service area from
airspace where FANS 1/A ATS data link services are being received do not need to perform another AFN
logon. Flights entering the Edmonton data link service area from airspace where no FANS 1/A ATS data link
services are being received should perform an AFN logon:

        1.      15 to 45 min prior to entering the airspace; or
        2.      Prior to departure if departing airports are adjacent to, or underlying, the airspace.
Flights exiting the Edmonton data link service area into adjacent airspace where data link services are offered
should not need to perform another AFN logon. Under normal circumstances, the current and next air traffic
service units (ATSUs) automatically transfer CPDLC and automatic dependent surveillance–contract (ADS-C)
services. The transfer is seamless to the flight crew.

Communication of Data Link Service Capability
Aircraft are advised that, depending on their position when entering the Edmonton FIR/CTA, initial radio
contact will be with either Edmonton ACC (“Edmonton Centre”), Gander international flight service station
(“Gander Radio”), or North Bay flight information centre (“Arctic Radio”). Communications procedures are
outlined below.

The integrity of the ATC service remains wholly dependent on establishing and maintaining HF or VHF voice
communications with each ATSU along the route of flight. Flight crews should use the data link terms
provided below to identify the flight.

                                   Terms to Identify Data Link Capability

                                Term                   Data link status of aircraft
                              “A-D-S”          Participating in ADS only.
                            “C-P-D-L-C”        Participating in CPDLC and ADS

The initial voice contact procedures within the Edmonton data link service area are outlined below.

Flight Crew Initial Contact with Edmonton Centre
Flights that are not radar or automatic dependent surveillance–broadcast (ADS-B) identified when making
initial contact with Edmonton Centre should

        1.      use the term “C–P–D–L–C” after the aircraft call sign; and
        2.      not include a voice position report.



Page 4 of 5                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 36/11
                                                                                                       17 NOV 11


Flight crews can expect the reply from Edmonton Centre to include

        1.      acknowledgement that the flight is C–P–D–L–C;
        2.      the advisory VOICE POSITION REPORTS NOT REQUIRED; and
        3.      the assigned frequency for the next station en route.
The following is a sample exchange with Edmonton Centre:

             EDMONTON CENTRE, AIRLINE EIGHT FIVE ONE C–P–D–L–C, FLIGHT LEVEL 350

             AIRLINE EIGHT FIVE ONE C–P–D–L–C, EDMONTON CENTRE, VOICE POSITION REPORTS
             NOT REQUIRED, CONTACT EDMONTON CENTRE AT INUVIK ON 134.47

Flight Crew Initial Contact with Gander or Arctic Radio
Depending on the service area, HF services in the Edmonton FIR are provided by either Arctic Radio or
Gander Radio. Upon initial contact with Gander or Arctic Radio, flight crews should

        1.      use the term “C–P–D–L–C” after the aircraft call sign; and
        2.      not include a voice position report.
Flight crews can expect Gander or Arctic Radio to

        1.      advise the flight that (for Phase 2) “FREQUENCIES WILL BE ASSIGNED VIA CPDLC”; and
        2.      issue:
                a)       communication instructions for the next CTA/FIR; or
                b)       communication instructions and the frequency to contact the appropriate CTA/FIR
                         approaching, or over, the exit point; or
                c)       instructions for the flight to contact the a radio station serving the next CTA/FIR at a
                         time or location prior to the next CTA/FIR boundary or exit point.

Contact
For further information on data link services in the Edmonton FIR/CTA please contact

             Shift Manager
             Edmonton ACC
             Tel.:      780-890-8397




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 36/11                                                                Page 5 of 5
                                                                                                      20 OCT 11



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 31/11

        AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES ASSOCIATED WITH AUTOMATIC
     DEPENDENT SURVEILLANCE–BROADCAST OUT SURVEILLANCE
                                                   (Replaces AIC 21/09)

Introduction
This Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) supersedes the information provided in AIC 21/09 related to NAV
CANADA Air Traffic Control (ATC) services supported by Automatic Dependent Surveillance–Broadcast Out
(ADS-B Out). This AIC outlines the latest in a continuing series of improvements in air traffic service provision
that began in January 2009 with the introduction of reduced separation based on ADS-B Out as managed by
the Montreal and Edmonton area control centres (ACCs) within the ADS-B coverage volumes.

Owing to ongoing increases in the number of customers operating aircraft in conformance with Transport
Canada Operations Specifications 609 or 610, NAV CANADA has been able to provide benefits for its
customers through progressively improved service, from tactical application of reduced separation applied on
an opportunity basis, to priority handling for assignment of flight-planned route, cruise altitude, and planned
Mach number, and approval of requests for en route dynamic rerouting. There are no changes to the
continued priority handling for ADS-B Out registered aircraft within the entire ADS-B coverage volume.

The changes outlined below are part of NAV CANADA’s commitment to continuous reduction of aviation’s
greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint and improvement in customer service.

Changes in the Hudson and Minto Sectors
The following air traffic flow management (ATFM) changes take effect in the Hudson and Minto Sectors as of
17 November 2011. Aircraft that are not registered with NAV CANADA as eligible to receive ADS-B Out
surveillance services, when operating through the Hudson and Minto Sectors at a flight-planned altitude
ranging from flight level (FL) 350 to FL400 inclusive, will be required to file flight plans on published route
structures.

This change in ATFM responds to our customers’ desires to extract benefits from investments made in
qualified avionics by providing additional airspace capacity that will enable a larger percentage of ADS-B Out
customers to fly their preferred routes.

The following graphic provides the specific dimensions of the Hudson and Minto Sectors.




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                          Page 1 of 4
20 OCT 11




Introduction of ADS-B Out Separation Services in Oceanic Airspace
Prior to the end of 2011, Gander Centre will exercise the ability to apply ADS-B Out separation services to
qualified aircraft in oceanic airspace within the vicinity of southern Greenland. Services will reflect the same
type as those initiated in the Hudson Bay airspace, with tactical application of improved separation for eligible
aircraft. Initial benefits are expected to accrue for eligible customers through the availability of earlier climb
approvals on westbound flights.

Further development of traffic management applications in the Oceanic ADS-B service volume will follow the
same process as the domestic ADS-B, with advancements as a result of increasing percentages of eligible
traffic in concert with ongoing customer consultation.

The following graphic indicates the projected extent of the Oceanic service area.




Page 2 of 4                                                      AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 31/11
                                                                                                    20 OCT 11




Future Incremental Changes within Domestic ADS-B Coverage Volumes
NAV CANADA is planning to require operators of aircraft that have not been registered for ADS-B Out to be
on fixed route structures when transiting through any domestic ADS-B coverage between FL350 and FL400
beginning in November of 2012. Furthermore, discontinuing the publication of the Northern Organized Track
Structure (NOR OTS) is planned to be coincident with this extension of the lateral boundary of fixed route
filing for non ADS-B Out aircraft.

NAV CANADA plans to implement further domestic ATFM advancements on a regular basis throughout 2013
and beyond. These advancements will progressively include lower flight levels as part of the requirement to
file flight plans on published routes for aircraft not capable of ADS-B Out that are operating in ADS-B service
volumes.


AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 31/11                                                              Page 3 of 4
20 OCT 11



Aircraft Registration with NAV CANADA
At the time of publication of this AIC almost 1,000 aircraft representing over 30 air operators were eligible to
receive ADS-B-based separation services from NAV CANADA. A qualification for ADS-B separation services
from NAV CANADA is valid in any area where we provide services.

Domestic operators and those foreign operators holding a Foreign Air Carrier Operations Certificate are
required to apply to Transport Canada for Operations Specifications 609 or 610 to be eligible to have a
separation standard applied based on ADS-B Out. Transport Canada has provided guidance in Advisory
Circular AC700-009 revision 2 as to how operators can achieve this specification.

Operators who do not fall into these categories are required to provide NAV CANADA with proof from the civil
aviation authority of their aircraft’s state of registry of compliance with the European Aviation Safety Agency’s
(EASA) Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) 20-24. In addition, in all cases operators must complete an
aircraft equipment survey and provide NAV CANADA with each aircraft’s unique 24-bit transponder address
in order to be entered onto the list of eligible aircraft.

For registration support please contact:

              Jacques Lemire, Surveillance Technology Specialist
              Operational Systems Requirements
              NAV CANADA

              Tel.:      613-248-7226
              Fax:       613-248-6802
              E-mail:    lemirej@navcanada.ca

Ongoing Customer Consultation
NAV CANADA will continue to conduct regular customer consultation through teleconference and web-based
media. If you are not part of the ongoing consultation forums and would like to participate, please contact:

              Jeff Cochrane, Manager
              CNS Service Design
              NAV CANADA

              Tel.:      613-248-4247
              Fax:       613-248-4184
              E-mail:    cochraj@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




Page 4 of 4                                                     AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 31/11
                                                                                                              22 SEP 11



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 26/11

                VFR NAVIGATION CHARTS—CLARIFICATION OF THE
                         MAXIMUM ELEVATION FIGURE
In future, the Maximum Elevation Figure (MEF) description in the legend will be replaced by the following:

                 The Maximum Elevation Figure (MEF) is depicted in THOUSANDS and HUNDREDS of feet
                 above sea level. The MEF represents the highest feature in each quadrangle. Flight at or
                 below the MEF may be at or below the highest obstruction in that quadrangle. Pilots
                 need to provide a margin for ground and obstacle clearance and for altimeter error. Please
                 see AIM 2 RAC 5.4 602.15 2b (NOTE) and AIM AIR 1.5 for detail. The MEF is calculated
                 based on terrain data and known and unknown obstacles.

Additional information
The MEF is calculated by taking the higher value of:

         •           the top elevation of the highest obstacle plus the vertical accuracy (variable) of the terrain
                     source data; or
         •           the elevation of the highest terrain plus 328 feet plus vertical accuracy of the terrain source
                     data.

Equations for clarity
Take the higher value of:




             Where        O        is the top elevation of the highest obstacle in the quadrangle in feet;
                          a        is the vertical accuracy (in feet) of the terrain elevation data for the features;
                          T        is the elevation of the highest terrain feature in the quadrangle in feet; and
                          328      is the obstacle height (in feet) at or below which the feature may not appear on
                                   the map.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations


2
    AIM is the Transport Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (TC AIM) TP 143


Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                                  Page 1 of 1
                                                                                                     2 JUN 11




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/11

                         LABRADOR COAST AERODROME TRAFFIC
                               FREQUENCY CORRIDOR
Introduction
This circular is intended to familiarize the aeronautical community operating at and between the Labrador
coastal airports, as well as the aerodrome located at Voisey’s Bay, with changes to communication
procedures to come into effect on 30 June 2011.

In order to enhance traffic awareness and aviation safety, an aerodrome traffic frequency (ATF) corridor is to
be created encompassing the aforementioned facilities and utilizing a common frequency of 122.8 MHz, from
the surface to 12,500 ft above sea level (ASL).

Aerodrome Traffic Frequency Area
Pilots should be familiar with the guidance published in the RAC sections 4.5.5, 4.5.6 and 4.5.7 of the
Transport Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (TC AIM – TP 14371E) which can be referenced at:
<www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/publications/tp14371-menu-3092.htm>.

Affected Area
At present, the Labrador coastal community airports are served by ATF 122.8 MHz and the aerodrome at
Voisey’s Bay is served by ATF 123.2 MHz, to a range of 5 nautical mile (NM) and to a specified altitude. With
the activation of the ATF corridor the enclosed airspace will become subject to ATF procedures, utilizing
122.8 MHz as the common frequency throughout the corridor. The facility at Voisey’s Bay will adopt, in all
pertinent publications, the published frequency of ATF 122.8 MHz vice 123.2 MHz.

A textual and graphic representation of the ATF corridor will be published in the Canada Flight Supplement.




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                        Page 1 of 2
2 JUN 11




                   NOT SUITABLE FOR NAVIGATION




Martin J. Eley
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 2 of 2                           AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/11
                                                                                                   5 MAY 11




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 20/11

   EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) PLAN
                                                   (Replaces AIC 5/01)

Introduction
This Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) supersedes AIC 5/01, Emergency Security Control of Air Traffic
(ESCAT), and its intent is to provide up-to-date information on the revised ESCAT plan.

Background
The ESCAT plan was amended in October 2009 in coordination with the Department of National
Defence (DND), Transport Canada (TC) and NAV CANADA.

The current ESCAT plan and zones can be found in the following publications:

         •        Canada Flight Supplement (CFS) in the Emergency section
         •        Transport Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (TC AIM) TP 14371E – RAC 12.8.2
                  <http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/publications/tp14371-menu-3092.htm>

The current ESCAT map and coordinates can be found in the following publication:

         •        Designated Airspace Handbook (DAH) TP 1820E.
                  <www.navcanada.ca>
                  Aeronautical Information Products
                  Designated Airspace Handbook




Martin J. Eley
Director General
Civil Aviation




Note: Cette information est aussi disponible dans l’autre langue officielle.                      Page 1 of 1
                                                                                                       7 APR 11



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/11

                                         VFR CHART HILL SHADE
NAV CANADA has developed a digital production process for the terrain layers of all VFR navigational charts
(VNC) and VFR terminal area (VTA) charts. There are limited choices in the technology to generate digital hill
shades. As well the combination of digital terrain and hill shading produces unacceptable chart clutter. As part
of our analysis we reviewed VFR chart best practices from around the globe.

As a result of the current technology limitations, clutter, and best practices, the shading will not be
incorporated into the VNC and VTA charts series, effective immediately. NAV CANADA will continue to
reassess shading technology as improvements occur.

For a current list of charts that have been released with updated terrain layers, but no hill shading, please see
the NAV CANADA Website:

              <www.navcanada.ca>
              Publications
              Aeronautical Information Products
              Aeronautical Charts
              VFR Navigation Charts (VNC)
              list of available charts




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                         1 JUL 10



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 15/10

                                    VISUAL SEPARATION UPDATE
                                          (Replaces AIC 12/08 and AIC 40/08)

Intention of Circular
This Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) replaces AIC 12/08, Visual Separation, and AIC 40/08, Additional
Visual Separation Information, and its intent is to provide up-to-date visual separation information and to
provide notice of a trial expansion.

Background
In 2008, NAV CANADA announced implementation plans and associated procedures for new applications of
visual separation between departing aircraft using instrument flight rules (IFR) in visual meteorological
conditions (VMC). These procedures align Canadian practices more closely with those of the United States’
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). To date, these procedures have led to a significant increase in
efficiency at our major airports during good weather conditions, as well as assisted in the reduction of
greenhouse gas emissions.

Visual separation is a means of spacing IFR aircraft using visual observation by an airport controller or by a
pilot when assigned separation responsibility. Visual separation may be applied in a control zone or terminal
control area at 12,500 ft above sea level (ASL) and below during the trial period.

Speed Control Instructions on Departure
Visual separation departure procedures requires airport controllers to consider aircraft performance, wake
turbulence, closure rate, routes of flight, and known weather conditions prior to issuing a take-off clearance. In
the application of visual separation departure procedures, airport controllers will not issue speed control
instructions co-incident with take-off clearances. In addition, there will be no increase in the incidence of
speed control instructions being issued by the departure controller.

Controller-applied Visual Separation
The airport controller sees the aircraft involved and issues instructions, as necessary, to ensure that the
aircraft avoid each other. This type of visual separation cannot be applied if departure routes or aircraft
performance preclude maintaining separation. Air traffic control (ATC) will not use visual separation between
successive departing IFR aircraft if wake turbulence separation is required. The application of controller-
applied visual separation will be virtually seamless to pilots.

Pilot-applied Visual Separation
When pilots accept responsibility to maintain visual separation, they must maintain constant visual contact
with the other aircraft involved until visual separation is discontinued. The term “constant visual contact”
means that the pilot assigned responsibility for pilot-applied visual separation must observe the other aircraft
visually throughout the application of visual separation and without aid of an airborne surveillance system.
This responsibility does not eliminate the pilot’s regulatory responsibility to see and avoid other aircraft; meet
noise abatement requirements; or meet obstacle clearance requirements and is not intended to restrict pilots
from completing other necessary tasks.




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1 JUL 10


Pilot-applied visual separation departure procedures require a pilot to see the other aircraft involved and,
upon instructions from the controller, maintain separation from it. ATC will not use pilot-applied visual
separation between successive departing IFR aircraft if wake turbulence separation is required. If the pilot for
any reason refuses pilot-applied visual separation, ATC will separate departures using another form of IFR
separation.

              Example phraseology for pilot-applied visual departure separation:

               Tower:       AIRLINE ONE TWO THREE, TRAFFIC [position, type of aircraft, intentions, etc.]
                            CONFIRM TRAFFIC IN SIGHT?
               Pilot:       AIRLINE ONE TWO THREE, TRAFFIC IN SIGHT.
               Tower:       AIRLINE ONE TWO THREE, MAINTAIN VISUAL SEPARATION CLEARED FOR
                            TAKE-OFF [other information or instructions, as required].
               Pilot:       AIRLINE ONE TWO THREE, MAINTAINING VISUAL SEPARATION [read back
                            additional instructions, as appropriate].

Visual separation is discontinued when either aircraft is observed on a diverging heading, unless otherwise
advised by ATC.

Pilots must notify ATC as soon as possible if

        •         they anticipate losing sight of the other aircraft;
        •         course deviations are required to maintain visual separation with preceding traffic; or
        •         they suspect they will be unable to maintain visual separation for any reason.
In these cases, another form of IFR separation will be applied by ATC.

Expansion of Trial
Visual separation is currently being used on a trial basis at Calgary International, Vancouver International,
and Montreal, Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airports. Expansion of the trial to include Ottawa
International, Halifax International, Victoria International, and Edmonton International Airports is expected in
2010. Commencement of the trial at each new location will be announced by NOTAM.

These procedures will be published in a future edition of the Transport Canada Aeronautical Information
Manual (TC AIM), which is available on the Transport Canada website at
<www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/publications/tp14371/menu.htm>.

Any questions, comments, or suggestions may be addressed to:

              NAV CANADA
              Customer Service
              77 Metcalfe Street
              Ottawa, ON K1 P 5L6

              Tel.:       1-800-876-4693
              Fax:        1-877-663-6656
              E-mail:     service@navcanada.ca

Hours of operation: Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. EST.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations


Page 2 of 2                                                         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 15/10
                                                                                                      22 OCT 09



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 24/09

                      INTRODUCTION OF MULTILATERATION
                  SERVICES AT FORT ST. JOHN, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Introduction
The purpose of this aeronautical circular is to provide advance notice of the implementation of surveillance
services using multilateration (MLAT) in the vicinity of Fort St. John, British Columbia.

General
MLAT is being deployed as an equivalent surveillance system to secondary surveillance radar (SSR). MLAT
uses a network of strategically-placed ground stations to receive signals from Mode A, C, or S transponders.
Precise aircraft positioning is determined by computing the time of arrival of the transponder signals at
multiple ground stations within the coverage volume. The coverage volume at Fort St. John is designed to
provide airborne and ground surveillance over an area extending from the surface of the airport out to
40 nautical miles (NMs) at 12,500 feet above sea level. Air traffic control (ATC) will provide the same services
and use the same radio phraseologies as those applied in SSR coverage.

Pilot Requirements
To enable MLAT surveillance detection, pilots of transponder equipped aircraft operating in the vicinity of Fort
St. John should leave their transponders in the transmit mode at all times while engines are running.

The Fort St. John flight service station (FSS) should be advised if the avionics in your aircraft precludes
operation of the transponder in the transmit mode while on the ground.

Validity
MLAT surveillance at Fort St. John will commence in late October 2009. The exact date will be published by
NOTAM one week prior to initiation of MLAT surveillance services.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                           2 JUL 09




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09

               PILOT PROCEDURES FOR EXPOSURE TO LASER AND
                   OTHER DIRECTED BRIGHT LIGHT SOURCES
                                                   (Replaces AIC 24/08)

Purpose
This aeronautical information circular (AIC) contains information and guidelines for flight crews encountering
“laser illuminations” or other directed bright light sources while in flight. It also contains a reporting form for
pilots to report directed bright light illumination incidents.

Background
Directed bright light sources projected near airports or into any navigable airspace can create potential flight
control disruptions and/or eye injury to pilots, crew members, and passengers. The number of laser
illuminations of aircraft has significantly increased during the past few years. In particular, the reporting of
laser incidents involving law enforcement helicopters has substantially increased.

Canada and the U.S. have both recorded numerous instances of laser exposures that have been disruptive to
flight operations. The effects of these occurrences to flight crews have ranged from startle to glare and, in
some instances, flash blindness and afterimage.

Definitions
Afterimage: The perception of light, dark, or coloured spots after exposure to bright light that may be
distracting and disruptive. Afterimages may persist for several minutes.

Directed bright light source: Devices capable of emitting a beam of high-intensity light, such as a laser,
searchlight, spotlight, or image projector.

Flash blindness: A temporary vision impairment that interferes with the ability to detect or resolve a visual
target following exposure to a bright light.

Glare: A reduction or total loss of visibility, such as that produced by an intense light source in the central field
of vision, e.g. oncoming headlights. These visual effects last only as long as the light is actually present and
affecting the individual’s field of vision. Visible laser light can produce glare and can interfere with vision even
at low energies, including levels well below that which produce eye damage.

Laser: An acronym for “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.” A device that produces an
intense, directional, coherent beam of light.

Startle: Sudden shock from surprise or alarm, which can cause an adverse psychological or physiological
effect.




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2 JUL 09



Discussion
Directed bright light sources, particularly laser beams, projected near airports or into any navigable airspace
can cause two flight safety concerns:

        1.       The primary concern is when non-injurious, bright levels of directed light unexpectedly enter
                 the cockpit. Depending on the brightness level, the light could startle the flight crew
                 member(s); could cause glare, making it difficult to see out the windscreen; or could even
                 create temporary vision impairment (flash blindness and/or afterimage). The illumination and
                 glare may be short—one or a few bright flashes—but the startle and afterimage effects could
                 persist for many seconds or even minutes.
        2.       A secondary concern is if a laser beam is so powerful that it causes temporary or permanent
                 eye injury to anyone (pilots, crew members, passengers) viewing it. Fortunately, this is only a
                 remote possibility because the laser power required to cause eye injury to a pilot in flight
                 greatly exceeds that of lasers in common use today.
Therefore, the most likely in-flight safety hazard is that of a bright non-injurious flash causing disruption in the
cockpit workflow. Such effects pose significant flight safety hazards when the cockpit workload increases,
below 10 000 ft above ground level (AGL); in critical phases of flight (approach and landing); dense traffic
areas (terminal environment and en-route areas); and in proximity to airports. This safety hazard is applicable
to both single- and dual-engine cockpit operations.

Even laser pointers can cause adverse effects that could cause pilots to be distracted from their immediate
tasks. Exposures to pilots from persons using laser pointers have been reported in increasing numbers,
particularly against law enforcement helicopters.

Procedures
The primary purpose of this section is to outline preventative measures and incident procedures pilots can
follow to either prevent potential illuminations or minimize cockpit disruption if one occurs. For simplicity, the
following procedures refer to laser illumination incidents; however, the same procedures should be applied
regardless of the source, whether it is a laser or any other directed bright light, such as a searchlight.

Preventive procedures: During aircraft operations into navigable airspace where laser illuminations are
anticipated, flight crews should:

        1.       Consult NOTAMs for temporary laser activity. The NOTAM should include the location and
                 time of the laser operations.
        2.       Avoid known permanent laser displays (e.g. Disney World). In the U.S., these sites are
                 published in the Airport/Facility Directory. Currently, there is only one permanent site within
                 Canada, which is located at the Shaw Millennium Park in Calgary, Alta. (510258N 1140530W
                 5 NM SW AIRPORT). Although this is a permanent laser display, it is only being utilized for
                 special events (e.g. Canada Day); a NOTAM is published on those specific days.
        3.       Turn on additional exterior lights to aid ground laser safety observers in locating aircraft so
                 they are able to respond by turning off the laser beam.
        4.       Turn on thunderstorm lights to minimize cockpit illumination effects.
        5.       Engage the autopilot.
        6.       Have one flight crew member stay on the instruments to minimize the effects of a possible
                 illumination while in the area of expected laser activity.
        7.       Consider using notch filter eye spectacles that protect against 514- and 532-nanometer laser
                 wavelengths, if flying a helicopter engaged in surveillance or medical evacuation.




Page 2 of 7                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09
                                                                                                            2 JUL 09


Laser incident procedures: If a laser beam illuminates a pilot in flight, the pilot should:

        1.       Immediately look away from the laser source or try to shield the eyes with a hand or a hand-
                 held object to avoid, if possible, looking directly into the laser beam.
        2.       Immediately alert the other flight crew member(s) and advise them of the illumination and its
                 effect on their vision.
        3.       If vision is impaired, immediately transfer control of the aircraft to the other flight crew
                 member. If both flight crew members have been illuminated, engage the autopilot, if
                 equipped.
        4.       Be very cautious of spatial disorientation effects (the “leans”). After regaining vision, check
                 cockpit instruments for proper flight status.
        5.       Resist the urge to rub the eyes after a laser illumination, as this action may cause further eye
                 irritation or damage.
        6.       Contact ATC and advise of a “laser illumination.” Use this terminology for all laser
                 incident/accident reports. If the situation dictates, declare an emergency.
        7.       When time permits, provide ATC with an incident report, which would include the location,
                 direction, beam colour, length of exposure (flash or intentional tracking), and effect on the
                 crew.
        NOTE:        As a follow-up, to ensure Transport Canada has sufficient information to analyze
                     and investigate occurrences, please complete and submit the attached report
                     form.

Medical follow-up procedures: After an in-flight illumination:

A crew member that has been subjected to a significant illumination causing persistent symptoms, such as
pain or visual abnormalities (e.g. flash blindness and/or afterimage), should seek immediate medical
attention. In addition, they should contact a regional aviation medical officer (RAMO) or aviation medical
officer at the earliest opportunity. The medical officer will provide assistance in locating the nearest
ophthalmologist or medical facility with experience in evaluating laser injuries. If outside Canada, contact the
Civil Aviation Medicine (CAM) Branch in Ottawa. An eye damaged by a laser beam starts to repair itself
immediately. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that an ophthalmologist, familiar with laser injury
examination requirements, evaluate the crew member within five hours of the exposure to determine the
nature of the injury and if it needs further follow-up action.

NOTE: Because diagnosis can be difficult, especially for medical personnel who rarely, if ever, see
laser eye injuries, it should not be automatically assumed that a particular symptom, abnormality or
injury was caused by a given laser exposure.

For assistance, please contact one of the following:

                                    1.1      Civil Aviation Medicine Branch Offices

                    HEADQUARTERS                                                  ATLANTIC REGION

Civil Aviation Medicine                                     New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island,
Transport Canada                                            Newfoundland and Labrador
330 Sparks St.
Place de Ville, Tower C, Room 617                           Civil Aviation Medicine
Ottawa ON K1A 0N8                                           Transport Canada
                                                            330 Sparks St.
Tel.: 613-990-1311 (General)                                Place de Ville, Tower "C", Room 617
Fax: 613-990-6623                                           Ottawa ON K1A 0N8

                                                            Tel.: 1-888-764-3333
                                                            Fax: 613-990-6623




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09                                                                   Page 3 of 7
2 JUL 09


                    QUEBEC REGION                                       ONTARIO REGION

Quebec                                              Ontario

Civil Aviation Medicine                             Civil Aviation Medicine
Transport Canada                                    Transport Canada
700 Leigh Capreol, Room 2007A                       4900 Yonge St., 4th Floor
Dorval QC H4Y 1G7                                   North York ON M2N 6A5

Tel.: 1-888- 570-5712                               Tel.: 1-877-726-8694
Tel.: 514-633-3258 (General)                        Tel.: 416-952-0562 (General)
Fax: 514-633-3247                                   Fax: 416-952-0569
              PRAIRIE AND NORTHERN REGION                               PACIFIC REGION

Alberta, Yukon, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Northwest   British Columbia
Territories and Nunavut
                                                    Civil Aviation Medicine
Civil Aviation Medicine                             Transport Canada
Transport Canada                                    600-800 Burrard St., Room 620
1140-9700 Jasper Ave.                               Vancouver BC V6Z 2J8
Edmonton AB T5J 4C3
                                                    Tel.: 1-877-822-2229
Tel.: 1-877-855-4643                                Tel.: 604-666-5601 (General)
Tel.: 780-495-3848 (General)                        Fax: 604-666-0145
Fax: 780-495-4905




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 4 of 7                                                AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09
                                                                                                    2 JUL 09


Please take a few minutes to complete this report and submit it as soon as possible after the incident.

 Person filing the report
 Name                                               Telephone Number


 Mailing Address                                    E-mail Address




 Crew members (attach extra paper if required)
 Name                                               Age         Glasses / Contact Lenses
                                                                     Yes   No
                                                                     Yes   No
                                                                     Yes   No

 Date and time of the incident
 Date                       Time                    Aircraft Type               Flight No. / Call Sign



 Location and weather conditions
 Closest Airport/City       VOR Radial/DME          Aircraft Altitude           Pitch and Bank Angle


 Phase of flight            Procedure Identifier    Weather Conditions          Relative Darkness



 Light source location and position
 Angle from aircraft
 How did it hit you? (Straight in the eyes or off axis?)
 How did it enter the cockpit? (12 o’clock/left side window?)

 Light description
        Colour, static/moving
        Relative intensity (flashbulb, headlight)
        Duration of exposure
        Beam angle from ground
        Steady or flickering
        Was light visible prior to the incident?                            Yes      No




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09                                                            Page 5 of 7
2 JUL 09



 Effect on crew member(s)
 Any after-effects?                                       Yes    No

 Post-flight medical attention sought?
 When, where?
 What cockpit tasks were you performing when the
 exposure began?
                                                          Yes    No
 Did the illumination startle you?

 How long do you estimate your attention was partly
 or fully averted as a result of the illumination?
 After the initial illumination, were you able to
 concentrate fully on flying, or were you partially
 preoccupied by what happened?
 Did the illumination cause any interruption to your
 vision?
 Could you see well enough during the illumination
 to adequately focus on instruments and outside
 references?
 Did the vision interruption cease immediately when
 you looked away from the source?
 Did “spots” persist in your vision after you exited
 the light beam? For how long?
 After leaving the light beam, was your vision
 “bleached” to the point where you could not
 adequately focus on objects inside or outside the
 cockpit? For how long?
 Were you distracted to the point where cockpit
 tasks were delayed or overlooked?
 Please elaborate.
 Were you visually or psychologically incapacitated
 to the point where you wanted to, or did, relinquish
 control of the aircraft to the other flight crew
 member?
 How long did this exist before you felt comfortable
 resuming control of the aircraft?
 Did the illumination interrupt the normal orderly flow
 of cockpit duties?
 Please elaborate.
 Did you experience eye pain?
 Describe (location, intensity and persistence).
 Did you rub or touch your eyes at the time of the
 incident?




Page 6 of 7                                               AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09
                                                      2 JUL 09



 Effect on crew member(s) (cont’d)
 Did you feel disoriented at any time? Vertigo?
 Did the aircraft enter an unusual attitude?
 If so, describe it.
 How long did any symptoms you experienced from
 the exposure persist?
 Did the light appear suddenly, and did it become
 brighter as you approached it?
 Was the light coming directly from the source, or
 did it appear to be reflected off other surfaces?
 Was there more than one source of light?
 Describe any evasive manoeuvring you attempted.
 Did the beam follow you as you moved away?

 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS




 Please forward this incident report to:
       Chief of Standards
       Aerodromes and Air Navigation
       Tower C, Place de Ville, 330 Sparks St.
       Ottawa, ON K1A 0N8

       E-mail: alain.piche@tc.gc.ca



AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 14/09              Page 7 of 7
                                                                                                        9 APR 09



         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/09

                                  PRE-DEPARTURE CLEARANCES
Introduction
Pre-departure clearance (PDC) is a system that provides instrument flight rules (IFR) departure clearances
via data link to subscribing airlines at selected airports. NAV CANADA PDC currently uses the 620/622
communications protocol, with service currently limited to ARINC data link service subscribers. On or after
20 April 2009, NAV CANADA will be introducing the PDC 623 protocol, which will be available to subscribers
of both ARINC and SITA.

Airports where PDC service is currently provided are Victoria International, Vancouver International, Calgary
International, Edmonton International, Saskatoon International, Winnipeg International, Thunder Bay
International, Toronto International, Ottawa International, Montreal Pierre Elliott Trudeau International,
Quebec International, and Halifax International. Expansion of the service to additional airports will be notified
via NOTAM.

Purpose of Circular
This Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC) specifies the requirements for operators to access PDC in both
the 620/622 and 623 protocols.

Service Registry Procedures
Current Operational PDC 620/622
Under the PDC 620/622 protocol, air traffic control (ATC) sends a clearance without an electronic
acknowledgement, thus requiring a verbal read-back of the flight plan unique identifier (FPUI). This is a four-
character (three numeric and one alphabetic) value generated by NAV CANADA and included in the PDC
message. The FPUI is the primary element in the voice readback of the PDC clearance.

PDC 620/622 has been in use at selected Canadian airports for several years. To take advantage of this
service an operator must both be an ARINC data link subscriber and be registered for it with NAV CANADA.

Registration for PDC 620/622 may now be accomplished by emailing the following information to
pdc@navcanada.ca:

         1.       Airline call sign;
         2.       Airports at which PDC service is being requested;
         3.       Aircraft types to receive the service (i.e. B763, B762, etc.);
         4.       Network Code: the address of your air operations centre (AOC) computer to which the
                  620/622 clearance message is to be sent; and
         5.       Confirmation that crews have been trained and are ready to accept PDC, or the date at which
                  your airline will be ready to accept PDC clearances.




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9 APR 09


Future Implementation PDC 623
PDC 623 is a request–response protocol with automatic system acknowledgements and hand-shaking with
no verbal read-back required. The connection is established in three stages:

        1.      The pilot requests clearance electronically.
        2.      ATC sends the clearance to the pilot.
        3.      The pilot sends the clearance acknowledgement.
Unlike PDC 620, there is no registration requirement to use PDC 623: Operators must be ARINC or SITA
data link subscribers, aircraft must be equipped for PDC 623, and pilots must be trained in its use. Once
these conditions have been met, operators may begin to use the service at PDC 623 airports.

PDC 623 – Procedures and System Messages
      1.      The pilot initiates PDC 623 by sending a Departure Clearance Request (RCD). The RCD
              must be sent no more than 60 minutes prior to, and no later than 15 minutes after, the
              estimated time of departure (ETD), as filed in the flight plan.
        2.      If the above condition is met the pilot will immediately receive a Flight System Message
                (FSM) stating: RCD RECEIVED – REQUEST BEING PROCESSED – STANDBY.
        3.      Failure to comply with step one will result in one of the following FSM being received: RCD
                REJECTED – FLIGHT PLAN NOT HELD – REVERT TO VOICE PROCEDURES; or RCD
                REJECTED – ERROR IN MESSAGE – REVERT TO VOICE PROCEDURES – RCD TOO
                LATE.
        4.      Once ATC receives a valid RCD, it will respond by sending the Departure Clearance
                Message (CLD).
        5.      Once the CLD has been received, the pilot will have five minutes to respond with a
                Departure Clearance Readback (CDA).
        6.      Upon successful reception of a matching CDA, the pilot will receive a FSM that states: CDA
                RECEIVED – CLEARANCE CONFIRMED.
        7.      At any time during the clearance process, if the pilot receives a FSM stating to REVERT TO
                VOICE the data link clearance becomes void and the pilot should contact ATC.
        8.      The following are other examples of FSM error messages:
                RCD REJECTED – REQUEST ALREADY RECEIVED – STANDBY
                In this case the pilot has sent a second FSM. Only one FSM can be received and acted on
                by ATC.
                RCD REJECTED – ERROR IN MESSAGE – REVERT TO VOICE PROCEDURES
                There was an error in the RCD. Do not send again. Contact ATC via voice.
                CDA REJECTED – CLEARANCE CANCELLED – REVERT TO VOICE PROCEDURES
                The clearance acknowledgement did not match the clearance sent. Contact ATC via voice.




Page 2 of 3                                                    AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/09
                                                                                                  9 APR 09



Further Information
PDC 623 is a new technology for NAV CANADA and will be tested operationally. Information on the test site
and dates will be provided via NOTAM. Once operational testing has been satisfactorily completed, NAV
CANADA will provide further information via NOTAM as additional airports become operational.

Operators requesting further information on the PDC system or assistance in acquiring the service should
contact NAV CANADA via e-mail at pdc@navcanada.ca.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/09                                                           Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                      20 NOV 08



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 45/08

              OBSTACLE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM (OCAS™)
                                                   (Replaces AIC 7/08)

The Obstacle Collision Avoidance System (OCAS™) is an all-weather, day-and-night, low-voltage, radar-
based obstacle avoidance system. This system is independent and does not require any additional
installation, such as a transponder, in the aircraft.

OCAS™ activates strobe lights and in certain locations audio signals via the aircraft’s very high frequency
(VHF) radio to alert pilots of potential collisions with obstacles such as power lines, wind farms, bridges, and
pylons. The lights and audio warning are inactive when there is no air traffic in the area.

The system detects aircraft on any track that may conflict within five nautical miles (NM) from the surface to
200 feet above the obstacle. The system's first warning is the activation of white strobe lights, 30 seconds
prior to conflict. These strobes are medium intensity during the day and low intensity at night. The second
warning, 20 seconds prior to conflict, consists of an audio message transmitted on pre-selected VHF
frequencies stating "POWER LINE, POWER LINE" or whatever type of obstruction is applicable. The timing of
each warning can be modified as required by the approving authority.

OCAS™ has been approved for use in Canada as an alternative to conventional marking systems on a
site-specific basis and currently is being installed at cable crossings and wind farms.

Any questions or comments may be directed to the Transport Canada Pacific Region Aerodrome and Air
Navigation office at 604-666-5490. More information can be found on the OCAS website at http://www.ocas-
as.no/Home.htm.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                    20 NOV 08



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 44/08

  NAV CANADA AUTOMATED WEATHER OBSERVATION SYSTEM AND
         DIGITAL AVIATION WEATHER CAMERA PROJECTS
Introduction
The existing automated weather systems across Canada are more than 20 years old and nearing the end of
their lifecycle. Late in 2008, NAV CANADA will begin replacing these systems with new ones offering more
advanced technology and added functionality. The new systems will meet the more stringent regulatory
performance standards introduced by Transport Canada in 2005. There are two kinds of automated weather
systems operated by NAV CANADA:

         •        AWOS (automated weather observation system); and
         •        LWIS (limited weather information system)
This Aeronautical Information Circular provides information on new weather reporting functions and enhanced
data quality that will be part of the new automated systems.

Background
AWOS collects weather data using a suite of sensors, which are then coded by computer software into
aerodrome routine (METAR) or special (SPECI) meteorological reports. The automated systems create a
weather report each minute and these reports are broadcast over VHF radio at many sites for aircraft
operating in the vicinity. When a report meets METAR or SPECI criteria, it is formatted and disseminated
using various means, including satellite relay.

Implementation Plan
The first of the new systems is scheduled to be installed in the summer of 2008 and commissioned by early
2009. There are currently 64 AWOS and nine LWIS legacy units in operation across the country that will be
upgraded by 2013. As a result of level of service reviews, which included customer and stakeholder
consultation, NAV CANADA has identified additional sites where new systems will be installed. As the project
evolves, and subject to further level of service reviews, there may be opportunities to install more of the new
systems in the future.

New Functionality
The new systems will improve reporting of visibility, and cloud height and amount. They will also include new
functionality such as thunderstorm reporting, ice-resistant wind-sensor technology, and a runway visual range
(RVR) reporting capability at sites where RVR is installed. As an added feature, the new LWIS system will be
capable of issuing a SPECI when wind shift criteria are met. The new system functions are summarized
below.




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20 NOV 08


Thunderstorm reporting (AWOS) will be provided at sites within the domain of the Canadian Lightning
Detection Network (CLDN). Thunderstorm activity, based on the proximity of the lightning strikes to the site,
will be reported as:

              TS                  Thunderstorm at site, if lightning within 6 statute miles (sm)
              VCTS                Thunderstorm in vicinity, if lightning within 6–10 sm
              LTNG DIST           Lightning distant, if lightning is within 10–30 sm, with octant
              (direction)         compass cardinal direction reported in “Remarks”
              LTNG DIST ALL       Lightning distant in all quadrants will be reported in “Remarks” if
              QUADS               lightning is detected in four or more octants.

Ice-resistant anemometer (AWOS and LWIS) using new ice-resistant technology will essentially eliminate
anemometer performance degradation due to freezing precipitation, freezing fog, or snow contamination.

Density altitude reporting capability (AWOS and LWIS) will enable density altitude at the site to be
reported in the “Remarks” section of the observation.

New laser ceilometer technology (AWOS) will be capable of reporting cloud bases up to 25,000 ft.

Improved capability to report obstructions to vision (AWOS) will enable reporting of haze (HZ); mist (BR);
fog (FG); freezing fog (FZFG); and blowing snow (BLSN).

New voice generator sub-system (VGSS) will be installed at many sites to replace older text-to-voice
technology for local VHF transmission of weather report to pilots.

Runway visual range (RVR) reporting (AWOS) at sites where RVR sensors are installed.

Remote maintenance capability (AWOS and LWIS) will enable the remote monitoring, resetting, and
upgrading of systems.

Updated weather algorithms will reduce the number of “nuisance” SPECI reports (AWOS). LWIS will be
capable of issuing a SPECI when wind shift criteria are met.

Digital Weather Cameras
New digital weather cameras (WxCam) are being installed at many AWOS and LWIS sites and at a number of
standalone sites where there is currently no weather observation reporting. WxCam will provide wide-angle,
high-resolution images refreshed every 10 minutes on the Aviation Weather Web Site (AWWS), which can be
compared to reference images with height and distance markers.

Along with the installation of new weather cameras, the 22 existing sites with analog weather cameras will
also be upgraded.

Terminology
To help differentiate between the new and old automated weather observations systems, beginning on
20 November 2008, the new systems will be identified in NAV CANADA aeronautical publications simply as
AWOS or LWIS and the old systems will be identified as Legacy AWOS or Legacy LWIS throughout the
replacement project. All legacy systems are expected to be replaced by 2013.

In the Canada Flight Supplement (CFS), AWOS or LWIS units that include weather cameras will have
WxCam added to their listing.




Page 2 of 3                                                     AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 44/08
                                                      20 NOV 08


Any comments or suggestions should be addressed to:

           John Foottit
           Manager, Aviation Weather Services
           NAV CANADA
           77 Metcalfe Street
           Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

           Tel.:       613-563-5603
           Fax:        613-563-5602
           E-mail:     john.foottit@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 44/08               Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                    23 OCT 08



       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 43/08

  TRANSPONDER OPERATION IN THE NORTHERN PORTION OF THE
EDMONTON FLIGHT INFORMATION REGION/CONTROL AREA (FIR/CTA)
Introduction
The current practice of operators suggests that some uncertainty exists regarding the use of Squawk Code
2000. Presently, many aircraft are adjusting their transponders to reply on Mode A and Mode C, Code 2000,
upon exiting radar coverage in the northern portion of the Edmonton flight information region (FIR) en route to
European destinations.

Increased surveillance coverage in Canadian northern airspace has resulted in a greater number of aircraft
exiting surveillance coverage in the Edmonton FIR and subsequently re-entering in another FIR. Since
discrete transponder code information is electronically linked from one FIR to another, the continued
squawking of a previously assigned code upon re-entry into surveillance airspace facilitates aircraft
identification and correlation of associated flight data. The squawking of a discrete code upon re-entry into
surveillance airspace reduces required coordination and communication for air traffic services (ATS), thus
promoting efficiency and safety.

Intention of Circular
The intention of this circular is to clarify the ATS requirements for transponder operation in controlled and
uncontrolled high-level airspace within the northern portion of the Edmonton FIR. Aircraft instructed to squawk
a discrete code should continue to squawk this code even if exiting surveillance airspace within the northern
portion of the Edmonton FIR. The termination of radar service does not constitute direction to change to
Code 2000.

Rules of Operation within Canadian Domestic Airspace (CDA)
When pilots receive ATC instructions concerning transponder operation, they shall operate transponders as
directed until receiving further instructions or until the aircraft has landed, except in an emergency,
communication failure, or hijack.

Rules of Operation within North Atlantic Airspace
The last assigned ATC code must be retained for a period of 30 minutes after entry into North Atlantic (NAT)
airspace unless otherwise directed by ATC. After 30 minutes of flight in the NAT, aircraft shall adjust their
transponders to Mode A and Mode C, Code 2000.




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                          8 MAY 08




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 16/08

      INSTRUMENT FLIGHT RULES (IFR) OPERATIONS USING GLOBAL
               NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM (GNSS)
                                           (Supersedes AIC 12/04 and 27/05)

1.0      Introduction
This notice is a reprint of the Canada Air Pilot (CAP) Special Notice titled, “Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)
Operations Using GNSS (GPS and WAAS),” which provides the terms and conditions of the Canadian
approval for use of global positioning systems (GPS) and wide area augmentation systems (WAAS) in
Canadian IFR flight operations. If a difference exists between these two documents, the CAP Special Notice
will take precedence.

For additional reference and guidance material, refer to the Transport Canada Aeronautical Information
Manual (TC AIM) (TP 14371E), COM 3.16, “Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).”

2.0      GPS OR WAAS AVIONICS
2.1      General
         a)       The avionics shall be approved in accordance with the applicable standards specified in
                  section 3.1.
         b)       The avionics shall be installed and approved in accordance with the appropriate sections of
                  the Airworthiness Manual (TP 6197E).
         c)       Aircraft shall be equipped with an approved and operational traditional navigation system
                  appropriate to the area of operations. The avionics requirements for IFR flight are described
                  in Canadian Aviation Regulation (CAR) 605.18, “Power-driven Aircraft–IFR.”
2.2      En Route and Terminal Equipment
         a)       The avionics for GPS equipment must meet Technical Standard Orders (TSO) C129/C129a
                  (any class) issued by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); WAAS equipment must
                  meet FAA TSO-C145a/C145b /C146a/C146b (Class 1, 2 or 3) or equivalent criteria.
         b)       For flight within Canadian minimum navigation performance specifications (CMNPS) airspace
                  or required navigation performance capability (RNPC) airspace, an installation meeting the
                  requirements defined in CARs, Part VI, “General Operating and Flight Rules,” and Part VII,
                  “Commercial Air Services,” may serve as the long-range navigation system. CMNPS and
                  RNPC airspace are defined in the Designated Airspace Handbook (DAH) (TP 1820E) and
                  illustrated in the TC AIM RAC Figure 12.1, “CMNPS, RNPC and CMNPS Transitional
                  Airspace.”
2.3      En Route and Terminal Operations
         a)       GPS or WAAS may be used for all en route and terminal operations.
         b)       Course deviation indicator (CDI) sensitivity and integrity alerting shall be appropriate for the
                  phase of flight.
         c)       Sufficient navigation capability shall be available in accordance with CARs, Part VI, “General
                  Operating and Flight Rules,” to continue to the planned destination or another aerodrome in
                  the event of a loss of GPS navigation.



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8 MAY 08


3.0     Approach
3.1     RNAV (GPS) and RNAV (GNSS) Approaches
GPS and WAAS based approaches are charted as RNAV (GNSS) RWY XX, denoting that GNSS navigation
shall be used for approach guidance. These approaches may have up to three charted minima lines, as
follows:

        •        LPV (localizer performance with vertical navigation);
        •        LNAV/VNAV (lateral/vertical navigation); and
        •        LNAV (lateral navigation only).
Pilots and controllers shall use the prefix “RNAV” in radio communications (e.g. “cleared the RNAV RWY 04
approach”).

        a)       LNAV approaches, including overlays, may be flown using GPS (FAA TSO-C129/C129a,
                 Class A1, B1, B3, C1 or C3) or WAAS (TSO-C145a/C145b/C146a/C146b, any class)
                 avionics.
        b)       LNAV/VNAV approaches may be flown using WAAS (FAA TSO-C145a/C145b/C146a/C146b,
                 Class 2 or 3) avionics, or multi-sensor flight management systems (FMS) (FAA TSO-C115b)
                 with barometric vertical navigation (BARO VNAV) capability, certified in accordance with FAA
                 Advisory Circular (AC) 20-129 or equivalent.
        c)       LPV approaches may only be flown using WAAS (FAA TSO-C145a/C145b/C146a/C146b,
                 Class 3 or 4) avionics.
3.2     GNSS Overlay Approaches
Overlay approaches are traditional very high frequency omnidirectional range (VOR), or non-directional
beacon (NDB) based approaches (not localizer [LOC] based) that have been approved to be flown using the
guidance of an IFR approach-certified GPS or WAAS. These are identified in the CAP with the letters GNSS
in parentheses and in small capitals after the runway designation [e.g. NDB RWY 04 (GNSS)].

3.3     Approach Database
Approaches flown using GPS or WAAS must be retrieved from a current navigation database. The pilot-in-
command is responsible for ensuring that the navigation data matches the current CAP information as
amended by NOTAM. If the loss of GPS or WAAS navigation performance accuracy or integrity results in the
inability to support the planned flight operation, the pilot-in-command shall advise the air traffic service (ATS)
as soon as practical.

4.0     Operator Certification
Holders of air operator certificates issued under CARs, Part VII, “Commercial Air Services,” or private
operator certificates issued under CARs, Part VI, Subpart 4, “Private Operator Passenger Transportation,” are
required to be authorized by an operations specification to conduct GPS-based (including WAAS) instrument
approach operations in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). This requirement is explained in
Commercial and Business Aviation Advisory Circular (CBAAC), No. 0123R, “Use of Global Positioning
System for Instrument Approaches” (25 March 2004).

Unless required by the aircraft flight manual or flight manual supplement for the GPS or WAAS equipment,
pilots do not have to monitor the underlying traditional aids while flying these approaches, and may fly the
approach even when the underlying aid is temporarily out of service.

When communicating with ATS, pilots shall refer to GNSS overlays as follows: “GNSS overlay RWY XX.”
ATS may request that the pilot specify the underlying approach if more than one overlay is published for the
runway.




Page 2 of 3                                                      AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 16/08
                                                                                                      8 MAY 08


Pilots and controllers shall use the prefix “RNAV” in radio communications (e.g. “cleared the RNAV RWY 04
approach”).

5.0     Alternate Aerodrome Requirements
Pilots can take credit for a GNSS-based approach at an alternate aerodrome when all of the following
conditions are met:

        a)      An approach completely independent of GNSS at the planned destination is expected to be
                available at the estimated time of arrival (ETA);
        b)      The pilot-in-command verifies that LNAV approach-level receiver autonomous integrity
                monitoring (RAIM) or WAAS integrity is expected to be available at the planned alternate
                ETA, taking into account predicted satellite outages;
        c)      For GPS FAA TSO-C129/C129a avionics (and WAAS avionics, when not in the geostationary
                [GEO] footprint/WAAS coverage area), periodically during the flight, and at least once before
                the mid-point of the flight to the destination, the pilot-in-command verifies that approach-level
                RAIM is expected to be available at the planned alternate ETA; and
        d)      The published LNAV minima are the lowest landing limits for which credit may be taken when
                determining alternate aerodrome weather minima requirements. No credit may be taken for
                LNAV/VNAV or LPV minima.
For additional guidance on flight planning of GPS-based approaches at alternate aerodromes, refer to the
TC AIM, COM 3.16.12, “GPS and WAAS Approaches at Alternate Aerodromes.”

6.0     Use of GNSS in Lieu of Ground-Based Aids
GNSS may be used to identify all fixes defined by distance measuring equipment (DME), VOR, VOR/DME
and NDB, including fixes that are part of any instrument approach procedure, to navigate to and from these
fixes along specific tracks, including arcs, and to report distances along airways or tracks for separation
purposes, subject to the following conditions:

        a)      An integrity alert is not displayed;
        b)      For approaches that are not part of the GNSS overlay program described in section 3.2, the
                pilot-in-command shall monitor the underlying navigation aid (NAVAID) for approach and
                missed approach track guidance.
        c)      Fixes that are part of a terminal instrument procedure are named, charted and retrieved from
                a current navigation database.
        d)      Where ATS requests a position based on a distance from a DME facility for separation
                purposes, reported GNSS distance from the same DME facility may be used stating the
                distance in miles and the DME facility name (e.g. “30 miles from Sumspot VOR,” instead of
                “30 DME from Sumspot VOR”).




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 16/08                                                               Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                      8 MAY 08




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 15/08

    IFR APPROVAL OF GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEMS
  (GNSS) IN NORTH ATLANTIC MINIMUM NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE
              SPECIFICATIONS (NAT MNPS) AIRSPACE
                                                  (Supersedes AIC 2/00)

General
This aeronautical information circular (AIC) sets out the general provisions for the operational approval of
Canadian-registered aircraft to use GNSS in NAT MNPS airspace.

GNSS sensors (i.e. global positioning systems [GPS] and wide area augmentation systems [WAAS]) can be
approved for use in NAT MNPS airspace for supplemental-means and primary-means navigation, as
described below.

Supplemental-means Approval
The approval to use GNSS sensors as a supplemental-means navigation system in NAT MNPS airspace
requires the sensors to be installed and approved in accordance with the appropriate sections of the
Airworthiness Manual, and operated in accordance with the approved flight manual or flight manual
supplement, based on the following documents and provisions:

         a)       Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) DO-208, Minimum Operational
                  Performance Standards for Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using the Global
                  Positioning System (GPS);
         b)       Technical Standard Order (TSO) C129a (any class), Airborne Supplemental Navigation
                  Equipment Using the Global Positioning System (GPS), or equivalent;
         c)       TSO-C145b (any class), Airborne Navigation Sensors Using The Global Positioning System
                  Augmented by the Satellite Based Augmentation System; TSO-C146b (any class),
                  Stand-Alone Airborne Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System
                  Augmented by the Satellite Based Augmentation System; or equivalent criteria;
         d)       Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circular (AC) 20-138A, Airworthiness
                  Approval of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Equipment (Appendix 1 does not
                  apply);
         e)       The GNSS sensor is used in conjunction with another approved means of long-range
                  navigation that is independent of the GNSS (for example: inertial navigation system [INS] or
                  inertial reference system [IRS]); and
         f)       Should GNSS navigation capability be lost, the other long-range navigation equipment must
                  allow navigation along the planned route or suitable alternate route.

Primary-means Approval
Primary-means GPS sensors meet the receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) requirements of
TSO-C129a and meet requirements for fault detection and exclusion (FDE). The FDE feature allows the
GNSS sensor to detect a malfunctioning satellite, exclude it from the navigation solution and continue to
operate. This decreases the probability of losing guidance during a North Atlantic (NAT) crossing to the point
where the primary-means GPS sensor can be used as the only required means of long-range navigation. To
account for on-board equipment failures, the aircraft must carry two separate primary-means systems.


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8 MAY 08


The use of primary-means equipment requires that flights be planned for times when GPS signals will support
RAIM and FDE operations. This pre-flight planning is achieved through the use of a RAIM/FDE prediction
program and certain dispatch conditions apply. The failure of a primary-means navigation system may require
reversion to a non-normal means of navigation (e.g. dead reckoning).

The approval to use GPS sensors as a primary-means navigation system in NAT MNPS airspace requires the
sensors to be installed and approved in accordance with the appropriate sections of the Airworthiness
Manual, and operated in accordance with the approved flight manual or flight manual supplement, based on
the following documents:

        a)     RTCA/DO-208, Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Airborne Supplemental
               Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System (GPS);
        b)     TSO-C129a (any class), Airborne Supplemental Navigation Equipment Using the Global
               Positioning System (GPS), or equivalent criteria; and
        c)     FAA AC 20-138A, Airworthiness Approval of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)
               Equipment, including Appendix 1; or previous approvals under FAA Notice (N) 8110.60, GPS
               as a Primary Means of Navigation for Oceanic/Remote Operations.
The approval to use WAAS sensors as a primary-means navigation system in NAT MNPS airspace requires
the sensors to be installed and approved in accordance with the appropriate sections of the Airworthiness
Manual, and operated in accordance with the approved flight manual or flight manual supplement, based on
the following documents:

        a)     RTCA/DO-229D Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Global Positioning
               System/Wide Area Augmentation System Airborne Equipment;
        b)     TSO-C145b (any class), Airborne Navigation Sensors Using the Global Positioning System
               Augmented by the Satellite Based Augmentation System; TSO-C146b (any class),
               Stand-Alone Airborne Navigation Equipment Using the Global Positioning System
               Augmented by the Satellite Based Augmentation System; or equivalent criteria; and
        c)     FAA AC 20-138A, Airworthiness Approval of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)
               Equipment.
WAAS sensors feature both RAIM and FDE capabilities required for primary-means navigation; however, the
WAAS sensor cannot take advantage of the WAAS integrity message while operating outside the WAAS
geostationary (GEO) satellite footprints.

Aircraft approved for operations in NAT MNPS airspace are eligible for approval for flight in Canadian
minimum navigation performance specifications (CMNPS) airspace and required navigation performance
capability (RNPC) airspace, as described in the Transport Canada Aeronautical Information Manual (TC AIM)
(TP 14371E).

Operators seeking approval to use GNSS sensors (i.e. GPS or WAAS) as a primary-means navigation
system in NAT MNPS airspace can do so by means of an application to the appropriate Transport Canada
Civil Aviation office.




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 2 of 2                                                  AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 15/08
                                                                                                        14 FEB 08



         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/08

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF A
               MINIMUM SAFE ALTITUDE WARNING (MSAW) SYSTEM
Introduction
A minimum safe altitude warning (MSAW) is a radar display feature designed to alert controllers to the
existence of aircraft operating or predicted to operate at altitudes where separation from terrain cannot be
assured. This technological initiative was introduced to assist controllers in detecting altitude deviations that
could result in controlled flight into terrain (CFIT).

MSAW service will be provided to instrument flight rules (IFR) and controlled visual flight rules (CVFR) aircraft
operating in controlled airspace and that are receiving radar service and are in direct controller-pilot
communication (DCPC) with the IFR controller.

An operational trial for MSAW will commence on or after 1 March 2008 and will take place in that airspace
within fifty nautical miles of the Prince George Airport (CYXS) within the Vancouver flight information region
(FIR). Provision of MSAW service in additional areas, as notified by NOTAM, will be phased in following the
trial.

Application
MSAW provides information concerning terrain elevation and immediate safe altitude as derived from the
short-term predicted aircraft trajectory, based upon the observed aircraft speed, heading, and vertical
movement rate. The trajectory predict-ahead time is approximately one minute; however, the actual warning
time will depend on local terrain characteristics and the flight path of the aircraft.

The immediate safe altitude is the altitude required to clear terrain within two minutes flying time and within
forty-five degrees of either side of the aircraft’s current track. This does not mean that the pilot has two
minutes to reach the immediate safe altitude provided; the immediate safe altitude is a prediction of terrain
anywhere within the two-minute window. It should also be noted that the terrain to clear may be to the right or
to the left of the aircraft’s current track.

It is also important to note that MSAW alarms will initially be available in reference to terrain only. Man-made
obstacle data will be implemented at a later date.

Exclusion Zones
Exclusion zones have been introduced to eliminate alarms caused in situations where predicted flight in
proximity to terrain is expected. Exclusion zones generally encompass control zones and associated
approach–departure corridors. Aircraft that operate within exclusion zones will not be provided with MSAW
service.




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14 FEB 08



Pilot–Controller Procedures
Response to Minimum Safe Altitude Warning
In the event an MSAW is generated, the controller will provide the following information:

                   1.     TERRAIN WARNING.

                   2.     ALTIMETER [VALUE].

                   3.     IMMEDIATE SAFE ALTITUDE [VALUE].

Pilot-initiated Terrain Avoidance Procedure
If the aircraft is equipped with a cockpit-based ground proximity warning system/terrain awareness and
warning system (GPWS/TAWS), the flight crew are expected to carry out the appropriate terrain avoidance
procedures in response to an on-board alarm. The pilot of a GPWS/TAWS equipped aircraft should
acknowledge receipt of the altimeter and immediate safe altitude information from the controller and advise
the controller of terrain avoidance actions taken when beginning the maneuver or as soon as workload
permits:

              ROGER, INITIATING GPWS/TAWS CLIMB;

              or

              ROGER, GPWS/TAWS EQUIPPED.

The controller at this point will provide the aircraft with additional terrain-related information, as appropriate:

              [HIGHER/LOWER] TERRAIN AHEAD, TO YOUR [LEFT/RIGHT];

              MINIMUM IFR ALTITUDE [VALUE].

Pilot Has Not Initiated Terrain Avoidance Procedure
After issuing the altimeter and immediate safe altitude information, if appropriate, the controller will provide
direction based on the MSAW information received:

              EXPEDITE CLIMB THROUGH SEVEN THOUSAND;

              or

              CLIMB TO SEVEN THOUSAND.

In the event that the aircraft is not GPWS/TAWS equipped or the pilot has not yet received a warning from his
on-board system, the pilot should request vectors for terrain avoidance assistance as required:

              REQUEST VECTORS FOR TERRAIN AVOIDANCE;

              or

              REQUEST TERRAIN AVOIDANCE INSTRUCTION.

Although the prime responsibility to initiate terrain avoidance rests with the pilot, if in the judgment of the
controller it becomes apparent that the aircraft is in danger of colliding with terrain, the controller may initiate
terrain avoidance intervention:

              TURN [LEFT/RIGHT] [NUMBER OF] DEGREES IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID TERRAIN;

              or

              CLIMB [ALTITUDE] IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID TERRAIN.




Page 2 of 3                                                         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/08
                                                                                                        14 FEB 08


Once terrain avoidance has been initiated, the pilot will be provided with all additional terrain-related
information available:

            [HIGHER/LOWER] TERRAIN AHEAD, TO YOUR [LEFT/ RIGHT];

            MINIMUM IFR ALTITUDE [VALUE].

If at any time during the procedure the pilot regains sight of the terrain, visual terrain avoidance should
resume and the controller be advised as soon as practicable.

Assistance to Aircraft in Distress
The digitized terrain contour map component of the MSAW system can be used by the controller
independently of the warning function to provide navigational assistance to radar-identified aircraft
encountering icing in mountainous terrain or to any aircraft requiring navigational assistance.

Vectors for terrain avoidance can be provided to aircraft in distress or experiencing an emergency, provided
the pilot requests it or the controller suggests it and the pilot concurs.

Contact Information
Questions or comments regarding MSAW, please contact

            NAV CANADA
            77 Metcalfe Street
            Ottawa, ON K1P 5L6

            Brian Guimond, Manager
            ATS Operational Support

            Tel.:        613-563-3731
            E-mail:      guimonb@navcanada.ca




Rudy Kellar
Vice President, Operations




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/08                                                                  Page 3 of 3
                                                                                                            27 SEP 07




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 22/07

    NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT (NAFTA) ADVISORY
This aeronautical information circular provides information on the North American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA) ratified by Canada, the United Mexican States and the United States of America,
which opened-up cross-border trade in Specialty Air Services (SAS).

Background
Ratified by Canada, the United Mexican States and the United States of America, the North American Free
Trade Agreement (NAFTA) came into force on January 1, 1994. Among other things, NAFTA opened up
cross-border trade in Specialty Air Services (SAS), defined in article 1213 of NAFTA as aerial mapping, aerial
surveying, aerial photography, forest fire management, fire fighting, aerial advertising, glider towing,
parachute jumping, aerial construction, heli-logging, aerial sightseeing, flight training, aerial inspection and
surveillance, and aerial spraying services. The effective date of NAFTA coverage for some of these services
was January 1, 1994, while coverage for other services was to be phased in for each signatory country in
accordance with Annex B to NAFTA. All services have been phased in as of January 1, 2001.

Meetings of government officials led to the issuance of a joint statement establishing Working Groups “to
discuss standards and regulations pertaining to specialty air services” and thus began a process for the
“smooth implementation” of SAS operations. Representatives from the three Civil Aviation Authorities (CAAs)
formed a Steering Committee to provide leadership during the process, and technical experts from each
country constituted Working Groups covering the areas of airworthiness, flight operations and personnel
licensing. This document identifies the process resulting from the efforts of the Steering Committee and
Working Groups.

Applicability
This advisory material applies to operators in each NAFTA signatory country who wish to conduct a cross-
border SAS, as defined in Article 1213 of NAFTA. This information is exclusive to NAFTA SAS operations and
is not to be used for any other purpose.

Glossary
The following CAAs are referenced in this document:

         •        The Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC) - Mexico;
         •        The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) - United States of America; and
         •        Transport Canada, Civil Aviation (TCCA) - Canada.
National CAA: The CAA responsible for the regulatory control of an operator when it applies for operating
authority and/or registration in another NAFTA country. The national CAA will normally be the same as the
state of registry for the aircraft and will be responsible for the regulatory oversight of aircraft on its register,
including but not limited to, maintenance and inspection requirements.

Host CAA: The CAA of a NAFTA country in which cross-border SAS are being conducted.

Operator: The organization engaged in a commercial SAS operation.




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Essential Qualified Non-Crewmembers: Personnel essential to SAS operations that support that service
and are trained by the operator prior to conducting the work under SAS. (Essential with respect to SAS
operations is defined as: required to properly conduct the SAS operation. The absence of these personnel
would make the actual operation impossible).

Flight Training is a term that applies to the following:

        •        Certified Flight Schools: Those schools that hold an operating permit or certificate issued
                 by the CAA to conduct approved training for any pilot qualification.
        •        Flight Training Operators: Those operators conducting training for an agricultural rating, a
                 seaplane rating, a multi-engine rating, a type rating, an instrument rating, an airline transport
                 pilot licence, or currency requirements.
        •        SAS Operators: Those operators conducting specific operational training for a particular
                 SAS. Type-rating training may be included if the aircraft is used in that specific operation and
                 is specified on the air operator certificate or the NAFTA operating authority.

Definitions of SAS
The following is a list of SAS identified by NAFTA and shall include any other special-purpose operations
determined by the three CAAs to have similar characteristics.

NAFTA SAS are specialized commercial aviation operations involving the performance of the following:

Aerial Mapping: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of mapping by use of a camera, or other
measuring and recording devices.

Aerial Surveying: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of surveying by use of a camera, or other
measuring and recording devices.

Aerial Photography: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of taking photographs or recording
information by use of a camera, or other measuring and recording devices.

Forest Fire Management: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of fire detection and controls, as well
as for the purpose of dispensing any substance intended for forest fire suppression and prevention. This
includes carrying fire fighters, fire bosses and/or managers from the base camp into the fire area or the actual
fire site as well as within the fire zone.

Firefighting: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of dispensing water, chemicals, and fire retardants
intended for suppressing a fire. This includes the carrying of fire fighters.

Aerial Advertising: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of skywriting, banner towing, displaying
airborne signs, dispensing leaflets, and making public address announcements.

Glider Towing: The towing of a glider by a powered aircraft equipped with a tow hitch.

Parachute Jumping: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of allowing a person to descend from that
aircraft in flight using a parachute during all or part of that descent.

Aerial Construction: The operation of a helicopter for the purpose of conducting external-load operations in
support of construction, hoisting of utilities, power line construction and erection of special purpose towers.

Heli-logging: The operation of a helicopter for the purpose of transporting timber suspended from
the fuselage.

Aerial Sightseeing: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of providing recreation to passengers that
originates and terminates at the same airport or the same aerodrome.




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Flight Training: Training provided by certified flight schools and flight training operators who follow an
approved ground and flight syllabus, which permits students to meet all certification requirements for
obtaining an airman certificate or rating, and operational training provided by SAS operators.

Aerial Surveillance and Inspection: The operation of an aircraft for the purpose of conducting aerial
observation and patrols for surface events and objects.

Aerial Spraying: The operation of an aircraft for the dispersal of products, for the benefit of agriculture,
horticulture, public health or forestry but not including the dispensing of insects.

Recommended List of Publications
           •     Annex 2 to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
                 Convention on International Civil Aviation
           •     Advisory Circular No. 707-001, TCCA
           •     Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), Canada
           •     Publicación de Información Aeronáutica (PIA), Mexico
           •     Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM)
                 Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP), United States

NAFTA Cross-Border SAS Operations
General Requirements

Validity

           •     A NAFTA authorization and/or registration, unless amended, suspended or revoked, will
                 normally be valid for a maximum of one year and can be renewed. The renewal process will
                 be the same as the original authorization process.
Authorization/Registration Process

           •     The SAS operators applying for Fire Fighting or Forest Management will be issued a letter of
                 registration for all operations conducted in the United States or all United States operators
                 applying for SAS operations in any Host country.
           •     The SAS operator must be equipped and able to operate in each of the SAS applied for,
                 apply for and obtain authorization and/or registration from the national CAA, apply for and
                 obtain authorization and/or registration from the host CAA(s), and make application in the
                 official language(s) of the host country.
Special Conditions

           •     Contracts, third party, and Qualified Non-Crewmember personnel essential to SAS:
                     The applicant shall identify the necessary personnel and their job function to the National
                     CAA along with an appropriate method of control (Training requirement or process) to
                     ensure the safe operation under the specialized SAS operation. This in no way allows for
                     or permits the SAS operator to transport these persons from other than the base camp to
                     the work zone. All personnel must provide their own means of commercial transportation
                     or other means of public or private travel to the base camp.
                     The applicant or current “Holder” of SAS Authorization and/or Registration would include
                     in their application the appropriate information to show their ability to use contract
                     personnel and the control of said personnel.




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27 SEP 07


Operational Conditions

Aircraft

           •     The current and valid certificate of airworthiness and certificate of registration are required
                 from the National CAA. The operator must provide the National CAA with proof of the validity
                 of the documents.
           •     Aircraft must have an original FAA or TCCA civil type certificate for all SAS operations. Ex-
                 military aircraft that have restricted-category certification based on military experience only
                 are not eligible, while those that are operating, as civil types may be eligible, provided that
                 they meet civil standards and are in a civil type configuration.
           •     Foreign (third party-country) type-certificated aircraft must have both an FAA and a TCCA
                 type certificate.
           •     Changes in type designs (that is, supplemental type certificates or repair design certificates)
                 issued by third party-countries on their own designs and manufactured products will be
                 acceptable, provided that there is a bilateral airworthiness agreement or the equivalent with
                 either the FAA or TCCA that specifically addresses design standards.
           •     U.S. Registered Primary-category aircraft will not be used for flight training. Standard-
                 category airworthiness certificates will normally be required, except as otherwise approved by
                 the host CAA. SAS operators may conduct operational training in aircraft that are approved
                 for the particular SAS.
           •     SAS operators may use leased aircraft of a foreign registry. The operator must have all pilots
                 or required flight crewmembers of these aircraft hold at least a commercial licence and rating
                 appropriate to the country of registry of said aircraft.
SAS Operations

           •     As required by Annex 2 to the ICAO Convention, operators must comply with the general
                 operating and flight rules of the Host Country. Operators should be aware that there are
                 significant differences in the visual flight rules for each country.
           •     NAFTA does not confer a right of entry into the host country. Prior to entry the operator is
                 advised to contact the Immigration Authority at the intended Port of Entry into the host
                 country, to verify the entry requirement.
           •     Operators must also contact government agencies including customs, trade and commerce,
                 and environment, and other applicable agencies as necessary.
           •     The SAS operator must contact the host CAA(s) (see Appendix II) prior to commencing initial
                 SAS operations in each geographic area, upon changing the type of SAS operation being
                 conducted, or upon subsequently returning to the original geographic area.
           •     Operators based in one Host Country and operating in another Host Country require
                 authorization and/or registration from each host CAA.
           •     As a minimum, a current and valid commercial pilot licence issued by the National CAA is
                 required for the specific operation. A licence validation issued by the Host CAA does not
                 meet this requirement.
           •     Flight instruction towards the issuance of National CAA licences, permits and ratings may be
                 conducted in any Host Country by a person who holds a valid commercial pilot licence or
                 flight instructor rating, as applicable for the type of instructional activity, and who satisfies the
                 requirements of the National CAA (see Appendix III).
           •     Flight instruction towards the issuance of host CAA licences, permits and ratings may be
                 conducted in any Host Country by a person who holds a valid commercial pilot licence or
                 flight instructor rating, as applicable for the type of instructional activity, and who satisfies
                 additional requirements specified by the applicable host CAA (see Appendix III).



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       •       Flight-training operating authority will be granted to certified flight schools, flight training
               operators and SAS operators according to the conditions specified by the host CAA.
       •       Agricultural aircraft may be operated at an increased maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) if an
               increased MTOW has been authorized by the National CAA and the increase does not
               exceed 1.25 times the MTOW.
       •       Maintenance shall be performed in accordance with the requirements of the National CAA
               and state of registry.
       •       Sightseeing operations shall be conducted by operators certificated by their National CAA for
               commercial passenger-carrying operations.
       •       The movement of essential qualified non-crewmember personnel from base camp to a fire
               zone is not deemed to be air transportation, nor is the movement of qualified non-
               crewmember personnel from one base camp to another to continue the same work. These
               are operational necessities included under SAS.
Specific Requirements

For Operations in Canada

       •       Operators must provide TCCA with the name of the appropriately approved maintenance
               organization that is providing the operators maintenance.
       •       Proof of insurance must be carried on board the aircraft (see Appendix V).
       •       Operators must comply with the Flight Time Limitations and Flight Duty Limitations and Rest
               Periods regulations and standards requirements applicable to the operations to be conducted
               (see CAR 700.15 and CAR Std 720.15, and CAR 700.16 and CAR Std 720.16).
       •       Operators must comply with the survival-equipment requirements applicable to the operations
               to be conducted (see Appendix IV).
       •       Mexican flight schools must designate a qualified flight instructor responsible for operational
               control. Operators must identify to TCCA the type of inspection or maintenance program
               being used for each aircraft type (i.e. progressive, annual/at 100-hour intervals, or according
               to the manufacturer’s recommended program or an approved program).
For Operations in Mexico

       •       Operators must provide the DGAC with the name of the appropriately approved maintenance
               organization that is providing the operators maintenance.
       •       The Publication de Información Aeronáutica (PIA) is no longer required to be carried on-
               board the aircraft for SAS operations by foreign operators.
       •       Proof of insurance must be provided with the application before a permit can be issued and
               must be carried on board the aircraft (see Appendix V).
       •       Operations will be conducted from approved runways or sites, unless otherwise authorized.
       •       A special permit must be obtained for handling fuel other than at approved fuelling facilities.
       •       Operators must participate in alcohol and drug-testing programs when conducting SAS
               operations.
       •       Operators must comply with the survival-equipment requirements applicable to the operations
               conducted (see Appendix IV).
       •       All night flights under visual flight rules (VFR) must have a special authorization.




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27 SEP 07


        •       Flight training schools must obtain a public education certificate or a letter of authorization
                from the Secretaría de Educación Pública to teach ground school.
        •       In addition to the DGAC authorization, operators of SAS (aerial photography, aerial
                surveying, and aerial mapping) must obtain permission from the INEGI (Instituto Nacional de
                Estadistica, Geografia e Informatica).
For Operations in the United States

        •       Operators must provide the FAA with the name of the appropriately approved maintenance
                organization that is providing the operators maintenance.
        •       Operators must participate in alcohol and drug-testing programs when conducting
                sightseeing operations from a base in the United States (see Appendix II).
        •       The maintenance and alteration of emergency parachutes must be certified by a
                person authorized by the FAA.
        •       Department of Transportation Order 97-7-03 (Specialty Air Service Operators of Canada and
                Mexico) must be carried on board the aircraft. (See
                <http://ostpxweb.dot.gov/aviation/IntAv/airnafta.pdf>)




Don Sherritt
Director, Standards
Civil Aviation




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                                              APPENDIX I
                                            Sample Documents

This appendix contains sample documents that may be used by operators when applying for SAS authority in
each NAFTA signatory country.

Operators Applying to their National CAA
              Note: Applicants can obtain forms through contact information in Appendix II.

In Canada

         •      Application for (FTA) Specialty Air Service Operations – Canadian Air Operator
                (TC Form 26-0592) <http://www.tc.gc.ca/air/menu.htm>
                Note: select “Forms catalogue” from “Resource Centre”, select “Click here to search, then
                enter 26-0592 in “Form Number:”
In Mexico

         •      Letter of Application for Operations under NAFTA
In the United States

         •      Application for SAS operations except Fire Fighting and Forest Fire Management requires a
                Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (FAA Form 7711-2) <http://www.faa.gov/>
         •      Application for Fire Fighting/Forest Fire Management requires a written request for a Letter of
                Registration.
Operators Applying to a Host CAA

In Canada

         •      Application for Specialty Air Service Operations – Free Trade Agreement (FTA)
                (TC Form 26-0509) <http://www.tc.gc.ca/air/menu.htm>
                Note: select “Forms catalogue” from “Resource Centre”, select “Click here to search, then
                enter 26-0509 in “Form Number:”
         •      Authorization from National CAA
         •      Proof of insurance
In Mexico

         •      Letter of Request for Operations Under NAFTA
         •      Authorization from National CAA
         •      Proof of insurance
In the United States

         •      Application for Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (FAA Form 7711-2)
                <http://www.faa.gov/> or attachment to Letter of Registration
         •      Authorization from National CAA
         •      Proof of insurance
Notes:

         1.     National CAA authorization is required as part of the Host Application Process.
         2.     The Host CAA will provide an information package outlining the application requirements.



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27 SEP 07



                                         APPENDIX II
                                        Contact Information

         Country             CAA Contact Office                  Phone / Fax Numbers / Web sites
Canada                 Chief, Foreign Inspection             Phone: 613-998-9074
NAFTA Authorizations   Division (AARJF)                      Fax:     613-991-5188
                       Place de Ville                        http://www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/international
                       Tower C, 4th Floor                    /foreign/menu.htm
                       330 Sparks Street
                       Ottawa, ON KIA 0N8
Canada                 Program Manager,                      Phone: 613-998-8168
NAFTA Policy and       Air Operator Certification            Fax:     613-991-5188
Procedures             Certification and Operational         http://www.tc.gc.ca/civilaviation/
                       Standards Division (AARTF)
                       Place de Ville
                       Tower C, 4th Floor
                       330 Sparks Street
                       Ottawa, ON KIA 0N8

Mexico                 Dirección de Transporte y Control     Phone: 5255-5687-7620
                       Aeronautico                           Fax:     5255-5523-3419
                       Dirección General de Aeronáutica      http://www.sct.gob.mx/
                       Civil
                       Providencia 807-4º Piso
                       Col. del Valle
                       C.P. 03100, México, D.F.

United States          Federal Aviation Administration,      Phone: 817-684-6700
NAFTA Authorizations   Southwest Region                                817-684-6776
                       Dallas / Fort Worth International     Fax:      817-954-1602
                       Field Office, 14800 Trinity Blvd.,    FAA: http://www.faa.gov/
                       Suite 300                             U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT):
                       Fort Worth, Texas 76155               http://ostpxweb.dot.gov/aviation/IntAv/airnaft
                                                             a.pdf
United States          Federal Aviation Administration       Phone: 202-267-8212
NAFTA Policy and       General Aviation and Commercial       Fax:   202-267-5094
Procedures             Division AFS-800
                       800 Independence Avenue
                       Southwest
                       Washington, DC 20591
United States          Implementation and Special            Phone: 202-267-8976
Drug & Alcohol         Projects Branch, AAM-810              Fax:   202-267-5200
Program Office         800 Independence Avenue
                       Southwest
                       Washington, DC 20591




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                                                APPENDIX III
                                             Flight Training—General

     Certified Flight Schools               Flight Training Operators                       SAS Operators
                                        Specialized training facilities          Training of pilots included,
                                        (for example, Flight Safety              regardless of whether they are
                                        International)                           employed by that operator
All training authorized under a         Agricultural licence (DGAC)              Type rating
certificate; see
Canadian Aviation Regulation
(CAR) 406.02; Federal Aviation
Regulation 141.11 (141.57); and
the Ley de Aviación Civil, art. 39,
and Reglamento de la Ley de
Aviación Civil.
Recreational*                           Seaplane rating                          Currency requirements
Private—aeroplane and                   Multi-engine rating
helicopter*
Commercial—aeroplane and                Type rating
helicopter*
Flight instructor rating—aeroplane      Instrument rating
and helicopter*
Night flying privileges—aeroplane       Airline transport pilot licence
and helicopter*
                                        Currency requirements

Notes:

         1.      The flight training listed in the first column includes specific training activities, identified by an
                 asterisk that must be conducted under the authority of a certified flight school.
         2.      The flight training listed in the second column may be conducted by certified flight schools or
                 by instructors operating under the authority of a flight training operator.
         3.      The flight training listed in the third column may be conducted by an instructor operating
                 under the authority of an SAS under NAFTA for that type of SAS operation.




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27 SEP 07


                                  Additional Pilot-Instructor Qualifications

Night Training in Mexico

        •       A Canadian instructor must hold an instrument rating.
        •       A United States instructor must hold a certified flight instructor - instrument (CFII) rating.
Seaplane Training

        •       Canada requires instructors from Mexico and the United States to have 50 hours’ flight time
                on seaplanes.
VFR Over-the-Top Training in Canada

        •       A United States instructor must hold a CFII rating.
        •       A Mexican instructor must hold an instrument rating.
Aerobatics Training in Canada

        •       Instructors certified in Mexico and the United States who wish to teach aerobatics must hold
                a Canadian authorization.
Aerobatics Training in Mexico

        •       Canadian instructors wishing to teach aerobatics must hold a special permit and/or
                authorization.
Training for a Flight Instructor Rating—Aerobatics in Canada

        •       Instructors certified in Mexico and the United States who wish to conduct training for a flight
                instructor rating-aeroplane-aerobatics must hold a Canadian authorization.
Flight Training for an Instructor Rating—Aeroplane or Helicopter

        •       In Canada, TCCA requires instructors from Mexico and the United States to have 750 hours’
                flight instruction in the category (600 hours’ dual flight instruction for a civil pilot licence) and
                have recommended 10 applicants for the private, commercial or recreational pilot permit
                (RPP) flight test (maximum 3 for the RPP). Instructors from the United States must take an
                evaluation flight.
        •       In Mexico, the DGAC requires American instructors to have 3 years’ experience as a flight
                instructor, 350 hours’ flight time in the category and class (150 hours in the aircraft), 30 hours
                as pilot-in-command in the preceding two months, a written examination and a flight test.




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                                            APPENDIX IV
                                           Survival Equipment

Operations in Canada

       •      Survival equipment must be carried to satisfy Canadian Aviation Regulations (CAR) 602.61.
              This equipment includes provisions for shelter, water, fire and signaling. This section does
              not apply where the aircraft is being operated in an area and at a time of year such that
              survivability is not jeopardized. Specific information on the geographic location requirements
              is included in A.I.M. Canada. A.I.M. information can be obtained by calling the Civil Aviation
              Communication Centre 1-800-305-2059 or visiting
              <http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/Publications/menu.htm>
Operations in Mexico

       •      Survival equipment must be carried to satisfy Normas NOM-012-SCT3-2001. This equipment
              includes provisions for a first-aid kit, shelter, flotation devices (for over-water operations), a
              fire extinguisher, an emergency locator transmitter, emergency rations and clothing, and
              signaling. Emergency rations and clothing are required for remote locations only, appropriate
              to the area being over flown. This information can be obtained by contacting the DGAC by
              phone at (5255) 5687-7941 or by fax at (5255) 5523-6275. The information will be sent by
              fax.




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27 SEP 07




                                             APPENDIX V
                                          Insurance Requirements

Canada

         •      SAS operators must meet the insurance requirements contained in Canadian Aviation
                Regulations (CAR) 606.02 and have passenger and third-party liability coverage to the limits
                specified.
Mexico

         •      SAS operators must meet the insurance requirements contained in article 64 of the Ley de
                Aviación Civil and have passenger and third-party liability coverage to the limits specified.
United States

         •      Sightseeing operators must meet the insurance requirements contained in Part 402 of the
                Department of Transportation Regulations and have passenger and third-party liability
                coverage to the limits specified.




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       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 27/06

                        EXEMPTION FROM SUBSECTION 602.34(2)
                       OF THE CANADIAN AVIATION REGULATIONS
Pursuant to subsection 5.9(2) of the Aeronautics Act, and taking into account that the exemption is both in the
public interest and not likely to affect aviation safety, I hereby exempt persons conducting IFR flight, in
Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace while operating an RVSM certified aircraft,
from the requirement to operate at a cruising flight level appropriate to the track, as set out in the Table
referenced in subsection 602.34(2) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs), subject to the following
conditions.

Subsection 602.34(2) states: “Subject to subsection (3), the pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall ensure that
the aircraft is operated at a cruising altitude or cruising flight level appropriate to the track, as set out in the
table to this section, unless the pilot-in-command is assigned another altitude or flight level by an air traffic
control unit and the aircraft is operated in level cruising flight

         a)       at more than 3,000 feet AGL, in VFR flight; or
         b)       in IFR flight.”
         Note:         Subsection 602.34(2) Table currently requires 2000 feet vertical separation
                       between FL290 to FL410 inclusive.

Purpose
This exemption will permit persons conducting IFR flight, in Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum
(RVSM) airspace while operating an RVSM certified aircraft, to operate at altitudes appropriate to track
between FL290 to FL410 inclusive, in accordance with the 1000 feet RVSM vertical separation. RVSM
procedures will permit certified RVSM aircraft to be operated with 1000 feet vertical separation in lieu of the
current 2000 feet separation. The implementation of RVSM in a designated portion of Northern Canadian
Airspace occurred on April 18, 2002, and in Southern Domestic Airspace on January 20, 2005.

Application
The exemption applies only to persons conducting IFR flight, within Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum
(RVSM) airspace while operating a RVSM certified aircraft.

Conditions
This exemption is subject to the following conditions:

         1.       A person operating a RVSM certified aircraft in RVSM airspace shall conduct IFR flight, in
                  accordance with subsection 602.34(2) of the CARs, with reference to the following Table; and
         2.       Persons conducting IFR flight, in Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace
                  shall operate RVSM certified aircraft.




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28 SEP 06


                                                   Table
                Cruising Altitudes and Cruising Flight Levels Appropriate to Aircraft Track

                          TRACK                                                  TRACK
                         000° - 179°                                            180° - 359°
                  Column I       Column II                              Column III      Column IV
                     IFR            VFR                                     IFR             VFR
                     1,000            -                                    2,000              -
                     3,000          3,500       Cruising Altitudes         4,000            4,500
                     5,000          5,500       or Cruising Flight         6,000            6,500
                     7,000          7,500       Levels – 18,000            8,000            8,500
                     9,000          9,500        feet and below           10,000           10,500
                    11,000         11,500                                 12,000           12,500
                    13,000         13,500                                 14,000           14,500
                    15,000         15,500                                 16,000           16,500
                    17,000         17,500
                        IFR & CVFR                                             IFR & CVFR
                             190                                                     180
                             210                  Cruising Flight                    200
                             230                      Levels                         220
                             250                   180 to 590                        240
                             270                                                     260
                             290                                                     280
                             310                                                     300
                             330                                                     320
                             350                     RVSM                            340
                             370                   1,000 feet                        360
                             390                   separation                        380
                             410                  FL290-FL410                        400
                             450                                                     430
                             490                                                     470
                             530                                                     510
                             570                                                     550


Validity
This exemption is in effect until the earliest of the following:

        a)       The date on which an amendment to subsection 602.34(2) Table of the CARs comes into
                 effect;
        b)       The date on which any condition set out in this exemption is breached; or
        c)       The date on which this exemption is cancelled, in writing, by the Minister, where he is of the
                 opinion that it is no longer in the public interest, or that it is likely to affect aviation safety.

Cancellation
The exemption from subsection 602.34(2) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations issued on April 28, 2005, in
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, by the Director General Civil Aviation, on behalf of the Minister of Transport, to
persons conducting IFR flight, in Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM) airspace and
operating an RVSM certified aircraft, is hereby cancelled because it is the opinion of the Minister that it is
no longer in the public interest or is likely to affect aviation safety.



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                                                                                                   28 SEP 06


Dated at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, this 28th day of July, 2006, on behalf of the Minister of Transport,
Infrastructure and Communities.




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




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                                                                                                         07 JUL 05




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/05

                 EXEMPTION FROM PARAGRAPHS 602.07(a) AND (b)
                   OF THE CANADIAN AVIATION REGULATIONS
                                                   (Replaces AIC 9/03)

Pursuant to subsection 5.9(2) of the Aeronautics Act, and after taking into account that the exemption is in the
public interest and is not likely to affect aviation safety, I hereby exempt all persons operating an aircraft
from the requirements of paragraphs 602.07(a) and (b) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) subject
to the conditions of this exemption.

Paragraph 602.07(a) states that no person shall operate an aircraft unless it is operated in accordance with
the operating limitations set out in the aircraft flight manual, where an aircraft flight manual is required by the
applicable standards of airworthiness.

Paragraph 602.07(b) states that no person shall operate an aircraft unless it is operated in accordance with
the operating limitations set out in a document other than the aircraft flight manual, where use of that
document is authorized pursuant to Part VII.

Purpose
The purpose of this exemption is to permit all persons operating an aircraft to take credit for GPS-based
approaches when selecting an alternate aerodrome as part of a flight plan, as permitted through Aeronautical
Information Circular (AIC) 12/04 paragraph 3.3.4 (Taking credit for a GPS approach at an alternate
aerodrome), where persons operating an aircraft may have restrictions against taking credit for GPS-based
approaches at an alternate aerodrome set out in the Aircraft Flight Manual or in another applicable document.

Application
This exemption applies to all persons operating an aircraft when selecting an alternate aerodrome as part
of a flight plan in accordance with AIC 12/04 paragraph 3.3.4 (Taking credit for a GPS approach at an
alternate aerodrome).

Conditions
This exemption is subject to the following conditions:

         1.       No person operating an aircraft shall take credit for GPS stand-alone or GPS overlay
                  approaches at that aerodrome when determining weather minima requirements at an
                  alternate aerodrome, except as described in condition #2 of these conditions;
         2.       All persons operating an aircraft may take credit for a GPS approach at an alternate
                  aerodrome when all of the following conditions are met:
                  a)        a useable approach at the destination is served by a functioning useable traditional
                            aid. This approach must be completely independent of GPS. (Note that this precludes
                            GPS in lieu of ground-based aids credit);
                  b)        the pilot or operator determines that approach-level RAIM will be available at the
                            alternate aerodrome at the expected time of arrival, using methods that take account
                            of predicted satellite outages; and




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07 JUL 05


                 c)      for TSO C129/C129a avionics, periodically during the flight, and at least once before
                         the mid-point of the flight to destination, the pilot uses the avionics to perform a
                         RAIM prediction for the alternate aerodrome at the expected time of arrival. If an in-
                         flight prediction indicates that approach level RAIM will not be available at the
                         alternate, the pilot should plan accordingly. (In-flight predictions are not required
                         for TSO C145/145a/ 146/146a avionics.)

Validity
The exemption will take effect on April 1, 2005 until the earliest of the following:

        a)       EST October 31, 2010;
        b)       the date on which any condition set out in this exemption is breached; the date on which any
                 of the conditions of this exemption is breached;
        c)       the date on which an amendment to the CARs and related standards comes into effect; or
        d)       the date on which the exemption is cancelled in writing by the Minister where he is of the
                 opinion that it is no longer in the public interest or is likely to affect aviation safety.
Dated at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada this 4th day of April 2005, on behalf of the Minister of Transport.




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 2 of 2                                                       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 21/05
                                                                                                     14 APR 05



         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 6/05

      AERONAUTICAL FACILITIES NOTIFICATION (AFN) LOGONS FOR
         FUTURE AIR NAVIGATION SYSTEM (FANS) OPERATIONS
This aeronautical information circular (AIC) provides information pertinent to the North Atlantic (NAT) region
and also updates A.I.P. Canada Supplement 11/04, which is pertinent within the Edmonton flight information
region (FIR).

Canada and the NAT region are harmonizing AFN logons with other regions that support FANS operations.
AFN logons to the address “CADS” will not be supported within the NAT region after May 31, 2005. This
change also affects FANS operations planned within portions of the Edmonton FIR (see AIC 3/04 and A.I.P.
Canada Supplement 11/04).

After May 31, 2005, crews shall not logon to the “CADS” address. FANS AFN logons shall use the following
addresses, as appropriate, for air traffic services (ATS) facilities:

               Gander Oceanic Control Area                                     ▪    CZQX
               Shanwick Oceanic Control Area                                   ▪    EGGX
               Reykjavik Oceanic Control Area                                  ▪    BIRD
               Santa Maria Oceanic Control Area                                ▪    LPPO
               New York Data Link service area                                 ▪    KZWY
               Bodø Oceanic Control Area                                       ▪    ENOB
               Edmonton automatic dependent surveillance (ADS) Airspace        ▪    CZEG

Operators should note that an AFN logon to any of these addresses will also result in a controller-pilot data
link communication (CPDLC) connection, if the ATS facility offers CPDLC services. It is the operator’s
responsibility to ensure that only trained crews avail themselves of CPDLC services.

Guidance material for data link operations in the NAT region is available for download at
<www.nat-pco.org/adswpr.htm>. The onus is on each operator to be familiar with, and meet, the requirements
of the Guidance Material for ATS Data Link Services in North Atlantic Airspace (particularly “Participation
Requirements” and “Responsibilities—Aircraft Operator”).




Kathleen Fox
Vice President, Operations




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                                                                                                           30 SEP 04




       AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 10/04

  CHANGE IN NOTAM PROCEDURE REGARDING LOGGING ACTIVITIES
                      PACIFIC REGION
Transport Canada, Pacific Region has been working with the logging industry to develop an improved safe
method to provide protection for aircraft in the vicinity of blasting areas. This past summer, an agreement was
reached that will greatly reduce the number of NOTAMs issued, and more importantly, reduce the hazard to
aviation.

The new procedures have been in effect (by NOTAM) since July 2004, and rely on the cooperation of both
pilots and the logging crews.

Blasters' Responsibilities (NOTAM will not be filed):

         •        If utilizing instantaneous blasting equipment, blasters will ensure the area is clear of all
                  air traffic prior to the blast.
         •        If utilizing a standard 6 min fuse, blasters will make two transmissions on 123.2 MHz,
                  advising of the imminent blast. These transmissions will be at approximately 4 min and 1 min
                  prior to the estimated blast. These transmissions will include the geographical location,
                  referenced to a prominent landmark, and the time to the blast.
         •        Notwithstanding the above two calls, if blasters detect an aircraft in the immediate vicinity of a
                  blast, they will direct a radio transmission to that aircraft, using aircraft type and colour (i.e.
                  red and white helicopter, you are over an active blast site, clear the area immediately).
         •        Blasters may elect to utilize both methods for added safety.
Pilots’ Responsibilities:

When operating VFR over forested areas of British Columbia, pilots should:

         •        Be aware of new logging road construction, new construction areas at beach level
                  (areas used for log sorting), and rock drilling equipment; if there is no dust or activity in the
                  vicinity, then a blast could be imminent.
         •        Arrange flight to be at least 1 000 ft AGL in areas of active road construction or logging.
         •        Monitor 123.2 MHz for imminent blasting notification if operating below 1 000 ft AGL.
         •        Determine their location in reference to the blast site upon hearing a warning transmission
                  regarding an imminent blast, and if necessary either climb to at least 1 000 ft AGL, or deviate
                  from the blast area.
         •        Contact the blast site and advise them of the aircraft's location and intentions if unable
                  to comply with the above recommendations.
         •        Relay information on active blast sites to other pilots in the area.




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30 SEP 04


Notwithstanding the above recommendations, a NOTAM will be required if the blast site is within 5 NM of an
aerodrome or if the blaster elects not to utilize either of the above procedures. In any case, the NOTAM will
have a maximum duration period of 14 days.

Any questions or comments may be directed to Aerodromes and Air Navigation (Pacific Region)
at 604 666-5490.




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 2 of 2                                                    AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 10/04
                                                                                                       18 APR 02




         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 5/02

              EXEMPTION FROM PARAGRAPH 804.01(c) OF THE
         CANADIAN AVIATION REGULATIONS AND FROM CHAPTER 7
          OF THE MANUAL OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS
The purpose of this AIC is to advise persons who provide aviation weather services, who meet the criteria set
out below, that an exemption has been issued that they may be able to use.

Criteria
The exemption will permit persons who meet the application conditions and criteria set out in the exemption to
provide certain meteorological observations that do not meet the standards for observation of wind direction
and speed in Chapter 7 of the Manual of Surface Weather Observations.

Persons providing aviation weather services must have met the following criteria in order to operate under the
authority of this exemption:

         a)       the aviation weather service must be estimates of wind direction and speed provided by a
                  qualified person in accordance with annex A; or
         b)       the aviation weather service must consist only of the meteorological observations of the wind
                  direction and speed.
This exemption does not apply to:

                  (i)       pilots who meet the requirements of subpart 602 of the Canadian Aviation
                            Regulations (CARs);
                  (ii)      persons providing services in accordance with CAR 804.01(c) and Chapter 7 of the
                            Manual of Surface Weather Observations;
                  (iii)     persons providing services in accordance with the exemption to CAR 804 pertaining
                            to Meteorological Observations Measured by Automatic Instrumentation of Wind,
                            Temperature, Humidity or Atmospheric Pressure Standards.
Details on the application process and complete copies of the exemption are available from local Transport
Canada offices.




Merlin Preuss
Director General
Civil Aviation




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                                                                                                       04 OCT 01




         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 6/01

   POTENTIAL INTERFERENCE FROM FM BROADCASTING STATIONS
   ON VHF RADIONAVIGATION RECEIVERS ON BOARD IFR AIRCRAFT
                    OPERATING IN FRANCE
Introduction
The purpose of this circular is

         •        to specify the regulatory provisions applicable to aircraft operating under IFR in the airspaces
                  controlled by the French authorities that specify interference immunity against emissions of
                  FM broadcasting stations for airborne radionavigation equipment (instrument landing system
                  (ILS), localizers (LLZ) and very high frequency omnidirectional range (VOR) beacons);
         •        to provide information about the transition period before implementing these provisions; and
         •        to provide information concerning the operational provisions that will be taken when a
                  potential interference is identified.

International Background
In 1979, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) decided to extend the frequency band assigned to
broadcasting stations from 104 to 108 MHz, particularly in Europe.

In 1995, in order to remedy the interference risks to VHF radionavigation receivers caused by this extension,
the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) adopted new protection standards aimed at enhancing the
immunity of these receivers.

Initially, the equipment modifications were to have been carried out in two phases:

         •        After January 1, 1995: immunity of new installations.
         •        After January 1, 1998: immunity of all airborne receivers.
However, for more flexibility and to take into account certain other technical changes, the immunity
requirement for airborne VHF radionavigation receivers of aircraft operating under IFR began on
January 1, 2001, in most of the European states.

Regulatory and Operational Provisions in France
In the airspaces controlled by the French authorities, the requirement for installing immunized
VHF radionavigation receivers (ILS and VOR), in accordance with the standards set out in Annex 10 to the
Convention on International Civil Aviation will begin on January 1, 2002, for aircraft operating under IFR.

This provision will be specified by order of the Direction Générale de l’Aviation Civile (DGAC; France’s civil
aviation authority).

Between the January 1 and December 31, 2001, the DGAC will identify the risks of interference during each
modification of the frequency plan for FM broadcasting stations.




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04 OCT 01


The use of certain standard instrument departures (SID), standard terminal arrivals (STAR), and instrument
approaches (ILS, LLZ and VOR) will be prohibited for aircraft operating under IFR whose VHF radionavigation
equipment are not in compliance with the FM immunity standards set out in Annex 10 to the Convention on
International Civil Aviation.

Operators should note the importance of observing these restrictions for safety reasons. For
example, in the case of intermodulation interference, a procedure performed using non-standard
equipment may cause a crew to follow a totally erroneous flight path during an ILS procedure without
triggering an alarm (flag) on board the aircraft.

Operators will be informed of these restrictions through the aeronautical information service of France.




Art LaFlamme
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 2 of 2                                                     AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 6/01
                                                                                                     12 JUL 01




         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 3/01

              EXEMPTION FROM PARAGRAPH 804.01(c) OF THE
         CANADIAN AVIATION REGULATIONS AND FROM CHAPTER 4
          OF THE MANUAL OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS
The purpose of this AIC is to advise persons who provide aviation weather services who meet the criteria set
out below that an exemption has been issued that they may be able to use.

Criteria
Persons providing aviation weather services must have met the following criteria in order to operate under the
authority of this exemption:

         a)       the aviation weather service must be measurements provided from a comparison of a
                  minimum of two aircraft altimeters as defined in Technical Standard Order C-10b; and
         b)       the aviation weather service must consist only of meteorological observations of the
                  meteorological element of atmospheric pressure.
The exemption will permit persons who meet the application conditions and criteria set out in the exemption to
provide meteorological observations that do not meet the standards for observation of atmospheric pressure
in Chapter 4 of the Manual of Surface Weather Observations.

Details on the application process and complete copies of the exemption are available from local Transport
Canada offices.




Art LaFlamme
Director General
Civil Aviation




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                                                                                                         08 OCT 98




         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 9/98

                              OPERATION OF PRECISION
                         APPROACH PATH INDICATOR (PAPI) UNITS
Purpose
This aeronautical information circular is to advise pilots of Transport Canada’s investigation of Precision
Approach Path Indicator (PAPI) units producing false signals due to the buildup of frost contamination on the
front lens or cover-glass and the actions being taken to address this matter.

Testing Program
Transport Canada undertook a study of the problem. The results of the testing program indicated that:

         •        contaminants such as ice, dew or frost on the PAPI front lens surface does affect the
                  projected signal;
         •        if contaminants existed on the PAPIs and the units were operated at their maximum current
                  setting of 6.6 amperes, approximately a half hour was required to remove contaminants at
                  temperatures down to -30 degrees Celsius to the point where a true signal was produced;
                  and
         •        using continuous operation, it was found that providing a minimum current of 4.8 amperes to
                  the PAPIs was sufficient to keep the lens and/or cover-glass free of contaminant which would
                  cause a false signal.
The testing concluded that false slope indication produced as a result of contamination on the lens is a design
problem. It is the responsibility of PAPI manufacturers to come up with a satisfactory solution to this problem.

Interim Action
Based on the test results and the concerns about the safety hazard that this issue posed for aircraft
operations into airports with PAPI units, Transport Canada requires that aerodrome operators with PAPI units
take the following action:

         1.       At aerodromes having ARCAL, the PAPI shall be operated continuously at a minimum current
                  level of 4.8 amperes.
         2.       At aerodromes with 24-hour ATS service, the PAPI shall be operated at the maximum current
                  level of 6.6 amperes (maximum brightness) for at least a half hour before the arrival of the
                  first morning flight.
         3.       At aerodromes with 24-hour ATS service, if there is a duration of several hours between the
                  flights during the day and those expected at night, the PAPI shall again be operated for a
                  minimum of a half hour prior to the arrival of the first flight at the maximum current level of 6.6
                  amperes.
         4.       Where there is more than one PAPI at the aerodrome, these shall be operated
                  simultaneously in accordance with requirements 1, 2, and 3 above.
         5.       Where a PAPI is not producing a proper signal after the warm up period, a NOTAM must be
                  issued that the PAPI is out of service.




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08 OCT 98


        1.     If the PAPIs have to be used before completion of the warming period, they shall be visually
               inspected for the absence of frost.
        2.     Should the aerodrome not be able to accomplish any of the above, the PAPIs shall be taken
               out of service.
Pilots are urged to report any observed anomolies on this matter to Transport Canada by telephone at
613-991-9939 or by facsimile at 613-990-0508.




Art LaFlamme
Director General
Civil Aviation




Page 2 of 2                                                   AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 9/98
                                                                                                        27 APR 95




         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/95

              AMENDMENT TO THE WASTE DISPOSAL CLAUSE IN THE
                      AIRPORT ZONING REGULATIONS
Airport Zoning Regulations are established at a number of airports to ensure that the construction of new
obstacles will not adversely affect flight operations in the vicinity of an airport. The boundaries of the affected
lands are normally defined by the obstacle limitation surfaces established for that airport. These surfaces are:

         a)       the outer surface;
         b)       the approach surfaces; and
         c)       the transitional surfaces.
In addition to protecting an airport from obstacles, a “Waste Disposal Clause” has been used in many
regulations to prohibit the establishment of garbage dumps that would present a bird strike hazard. The intent
of this provision was to affect lands within an 8km radius of the aerodrome reference point. However, in some
cases, the waste disposal clause was made applicable to the lands affected by the height restrictions. This
allows disposal sites to be established as close as 4 km in some sectors and as far as 15 km in others.

The intent was to prevent land use that would induce bird migration onto an airport, and the application of a
waste disposal clause beyond 8km is assessed as not contributing to this objective. Future revisions to the
applicable registered airport zoning will amend this discrepancy, but, in the interim, an exemption is required.

Accordingly, pursuant to subsection 5.9(2) of the Aeronautics Act, persons wishing to establish a waste
disposal site in an area where such a use of land is prohibited by the “Waste Disposal” provision of the Airport
Zoning Regulations listed in Appendix A on the reverse side are exempted from the application of the
prohibition if the waste disposal site is more than 8km from the airport reference point. Pending revisions to
the Airport Zoning Regulations, these exemptions are conditional and may be withdrawn if a waste disposal
site is established which attracts birds to the extent that they create a hazard to aircraft. Appendix A on the
reverse side provides a list of the relevant zoning regulations and their waste disposal clause references.




Gilles Rodrigue
Director General
Air Navigation System




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27 APR 95



                                         APPENDIX A

              RELEVANT ZONING REGULATIONS AND THEIR WASTE
                     DISPOSAL CLAUSE REFERENCES

                   Airport Zoning Regulation   Registered Zoning Clause Dealing
                                                     With Waste Disposal
              ABBOTSFORD, BC                                  7
              BOUNDARY BAY, BC                                6
              BRANDON, MB                                     6
              CAMBRIDGE BAY, NT                               5
              CHARLO, NB                                      7
              CHARLOTTETOWN, PE                               6
              CHURCHILL, MB                                   6
              CRANBROOK, BC                                   6
              DAWSON CREEK, BC                                6
              DEER LAKE, NF                                   6
              DRYDEN, ON                                      6
              EARLTON, ON                                     6
              EDMONTON INT’L, AB                              7
              FORT ST.JOHN, BC                                6
              FORT NELSON, BC                                 6
              FORT SIMPSON, NT                                6
              FORT SMITH, NT                                  6
              FREDERICTON, NB                                 6
              GOOSE BAY, NF                                   7
              GRAND MANAN, NB                                 7
              HALIFAX INT’L, NS                               7
              HAMILTON, ON                                    7
              HAY RIVER, NT                                   7
              INUVIK, NT                                      6
              KAPUSKASING, ON                                 6
              KENORA, ON                                      7
              KINGSTON, ON                                    6
              LA RONGE, SK                                    6
              MONCTON, NB                                     7
              MOOSONEE, ON                                    6
              NORMAN WELLS, NT                                6
              OSHAWA, ON                                      6
              PEACE RIVER, AB                                 6
              PEMBROKE, ON                                    6
              PORT HARDY, BC                                  6



Page 2 of 3                                         AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/95
                                                                               27 APR 95



                Airport Zoning Regulation   Registered Zoning Clause Dealing
                                                  With Waste Disposal
           PRINCE ALBERT, SK                               6
           REGINA, SK                                      7
           ST.ANTHONY, NF                                  7
           ST.CATHARINES, ON                               6
           ST.JOHN’S, NF                                   7
           SAINT JOHN, NB                                  7
           SARNIA, ON                                      6
           SASKATOON, SK                                   6
           SMITHERS, BC                                    6
           STEPHENVILLE, NF                                6
           SYDNEY, NS                                      7
           THOMPSON, MB                                    6
           TIMMINS, ON                                     7
           TORONTO CITY CENTRE, ON                         7
           VANCOUVER INT’L, BC                             7
           WABUSH, NF                                      6
           WATSON LAKE, YT                                 6
           WIARTON, ON                                     6
           WINNIPEG INT’L, MB                              6
           YELLOWKNIFE, NT                                 6




AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR 4/95                                         Page 3 of 3

								
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